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 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
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The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 8:09:16 AM

Quote:
In the last week of August 1944, the entire Canadian Corps began its attack on the Gothic Line with the objective of capturing Rimini.

Six rivers lay across the path of the advance. On August 25, the Canadians crossed the Metauro River but the next, the Foglia was more formidable. Here the Germans had concentrated their defences, and it required days of bitter fighting and softening of the line by Allied air forces to reach it.

On August 30, two Canadian brigades crossed the Foglia River and fought their way through the Gothic Line. On September 2 General Burns reported that "the Gothic Line is completely broken in the Adriatic Sector and the 1st Canadian Corps is advancing to the River Conca.
See Read More

[Read More]

Regards

Jim
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anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 9:02:55 AM
Song for Coriano Ridge

LYRICS

Coriano Ridge and the Alamo.
Battles of history oh so long ago.
Bygone warriors fighting side by side,
Settling the issue—supreme sacrifice.

Young soldiers, they
Free from apron string.
Marching in battle
Liberating enemy’s sting.

Some lie fallen.
Never see sunset.
A lesson learned
Oh Why! Oh Why! Conquest.

Concluding my story.
One sad so true.
Never again children
Be subject to.

May peace be the answer
From bygone war.
Lives lost in action,
Lives lost for evermore.

Regards

Jim
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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 9:15:05 AM
Hi Jim,

With this being a seemingly Canadian victory, perhaps George can give us a good synopsis on what happened in detail? George??

Thanks,
MD

BTW touching song,
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 10:09:52 AM
Let me give it some thought.

The Adriatic side was hard slogging but so was the American sector in the hilly sections.

It seemed that the Canadians were in contact with the German 1st Paras all the way up the coast including the infamous battle of Ortona.

Coriano Ridge was difficult because it was a ridge and it was an interesting battle.

Shortly after the 1st CID returned to the line in October of 1944, my Uncle George was killed not far from Rimini.

He was a "39er" with the 48th Highlanders of Canada.

He and another fellow named Bobby Shaw MM, were told to go back and bring up the 6 pounder.

On the way back, it seems that Shaw stepped on a land mine and both were killed. We aren't sure if a mistake was made by one of them, both of whom were experienced combat veterans. That was Oct. 14. George is buried at Cesena War Cemetery. He was 29 years old.


Cheers,

George


anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 10:19:38 AM
CESENA WAR CEMETERY--Details and Pictures below


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Regards

Jim
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anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 12:23:39 PM
George- When you referred previously to the 6Pdr-I assume you meant the 6Pdr anti tank gun-which would have to be towed by a vehicle because of it's bulk and weight-a ton plus.Thus I assume- your uncle and mate were in the vehicle and were both killed or died of wounds by the exploding landmine.It seems odd to me- that both would be killed by a mine whilst walking-of course I have to admit it was possible/

Details of gun below :=

[Read More]

Regards

Jim
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MikeMeech
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Posts: 303

Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 5:12:27 PM

Quote:
George- When you referred previously to the 6Pdr-I assume you meant the 6Pdr anti tank gun-which would have to be towed by a vehicle because of it's bulk and weight-a ton plus.Thus I assume- your uncle and mate were in the vehicle and were both killed or died of wounds by the exploding landmine.It seems odd to me- that both would be killed by a mine whilst walking-of course I have to admit it was possible/

Details of gun below :=

[Read More]

Regards

Jim
--anemone

Hi

Actually the 6-pdr. was not always pulled by vehicle, below is an extract from my father's memoirs, he was an anti-tank gunner and they had 6-pdrs., this is in India during early 1944:

"One day our gun team, with Sgt. Edden in charge, had to go to the 2nd Division Battle School, where a large number of senior officers and officers from the staff were present. We were to to take part in a demonstration to find the quickest way to take our gun over rough country; the various methods were using bullocks, mules, a jeep, our Quad and us. The ground they chose for us to go over was very rough with gullies of different depths amongst other hazards. The bullocks, with their Indian handlers, hardly got started before the animals panicked, the mules were a bit better but soon packed up, the jeep went the farthest but then got bogged down. Our Quad did not last long, the gullies were too narrow and the vehicle got jammed, all the while this was going on the staff officers were taking notes of times and distance made, what was used etc. Then it was our turn to take the gun by hand over the obstacles, pulling the gun by hand was nothing new we had been doing it in one form or another since our basic training. We took the gun over the gullies, being used to the gun we swung it round and used the trail ropes on the wheels, when we reached the other side after about 300 yards the trial was over, manpower the winner. Later Lt. Luff told us that the senior officers were pleased that they would not need anything extra and that men could do the job."

I hope that is of interest.

Mike

George
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 7:47:35 PM
Thank you Mike. My uncle and the other soldier were killed while walking. They may have taken a route that had not been swept for mines.

Many years ago I met the CSM who was the first man to reach my uncle after the explosion. George mumbled a few words but they weren't intelligible.

But the two men had not yet reached the 6 pounder when Shaw stepped on the mine. They were close enough together that both men were killed.

That may have been the error that they made.


Cheers,

George

George
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/5/2017 8:27:48 PM
If I may, I can recommend one very readable book on the piercing of the Gothic Line in the British sector.

The boo is entitled, THE GOTHIC LINE: CANADA’S MONTH OF HELL IN WORLD WAR II ITALY

by Mark Zuehlke.

Zuehlke is an excellent writer of history even though other historians will point out factual errors. Zuehlke has written many books and The Gothic Line is the last of a trilogy on the war in Italy.

I call him excellent because he weaves the stories of the soldiers and their accounts of battles into the historical narrative.

As he says, in his writing he is , “shaping a detailed narrative of the Canadian experience of battle by weaving together the accounts of veterans and the official record."

His critics say that he defers to often to the accounts of the soldiers rather than the primary sources. He uses both.

anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 4:03:00 AM
I am perfectly satisfied with Mike's statement that the 6pdr gun can be towed by "the gun team of eight"; and with George's explanation that his uncle and buddy were walking back to bring the gun forward-how this was to be done- at this point- is of no consequence

My only work is Douglas Orgill's "The Gothic Line" and being half blind in one eye= I am not likely to add to that; but I do appreciate the heads up George.

Regards

Jim
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anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 4:36:56 AM
Returning to the Coriano Battle-a Synopsis

Along the line of the Coriano Ridge to the north the attack made good progress-the shattering artillery barrage had- if nothing else-dazed the enemy. North of the 9th Lancers and the 18th Lorried Brigade attacked the village of Savino.The 43rd Gurkha Brigade went into action on the back of the Queens Bays took Passano.

At the very end of the line the 11th Canadian Infantry Brigade got locked into vicious hand to hand fighting with the 29th Panzer Division inside the village of Coriano. The day cost 11th Brigade 210 men-the Cape Breton Highlanders lost 85 but at the end of it all- Coriano was in Canadian hands but the Gothic Line has still not been breached.Edit

Source- Douglas Orgill's "The Gothic Line"

Regards

Jim
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George
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 6:02:36 AM
I'm not very comfortable with a jump to Coriano Ridge when the path to Rimini involved so much more, and more than just the Canadians.

We do say that the Canadians punched the hole in the Gothic Line.

This map shows the pathway of the Canadians closer to the coast.

To their left you can see British regiments and armour fighting in the hills to the left.

And you cannot see the Yanks who were to the left of that and making their way to Bologna.



This map shows the Americans to the left but it was too big to post as an image so I have included it as a read more.

[Read More]



anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 6:13:20 AM
So where should I have started George.I truly thought that the main thrust of the thread should be the breaking of the Rimini Line-hence the taking of Coriano; but I would want to start where you are comfortable.Please advise.

regards

Jim
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George
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 7:43:00 AM
I guess that I would start at the Metauro River on Aug. 25.

Jim it wasn't a criticism of the choice of topic but there were important events that preceded the attack on Coriano Ridge.

The fighting on the Adriatic was fearsome and the Canadians were front and centre in British 8th Army initiatives.

The Gothic Line was set up as a coast to coast defence by the Germans. Really it was not a solid line of defensive positions but the Germans chose positions along that line in which they could defend very well. And they did.

Initially, the allies intended to breach the line through Florence.

But that was horrible territory in which to fight. The Germans could defend the mountainous territory for a long time.

So British commander Leese decided to attack on the Adriatic side.

The Germans set up formidable defensive structures in that area. The fighting was horrific and the Canadians called the period, "the month of hell".


The Gothic line was a defence in depth.

The Germans had set up a series of smaller defensive positions before the Gothic Line. All civilians on the Adriatic side were removed.

Each of the positions was just behind a river. That was Italy, one river after another.

In the 10 km before the Gothic Line proper, the Germans demolished buildings, creating rubble. Mines were everywhere.

This was the kill zone in front of the line.

The line proper was defended by Panzerturms, tank turrets embedded in concrete and supported by MG positions and bunkers.

Luckily the Germans didn't finish the three lines of Panzerturms. The conditions of battle were fearsome as it was.

So yes, I want to talk about the Canadians. At great cost, they punched a hole in the Gothic Line.

But the Brits at Gemmano and Croce and the Americans at the Futa Pass cannot be ignored, to mention two difficult situations in the same time period.


So this map shows the length of the Gothic LIne (the line in red). It also shows that a lot of work just to get to the line had to be done.

[Read More]








anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 8:08:23 AM

Quote:
On August 25, 1944, it fell to I Canadian Corps to spearhead the famed Eighth Army’s major offensive, intended to rip through it.

The 1st Infantry and 5th Armored Divisions advanced into a killing ground covered by thousands of machine-gun, antitank gun positions, and pillboxes expertly sited behind minefields and dense thickets of barbed wire. Never had the Germans in Italy brought so much artillery to bear or deployed such a great number of tanks.

For 28 days, the battle raged as the Allied troops slugged an ever deeper hole into the German defences. The Metauro River, the Foglia River, Point 204, Tomba Di Pesaro, Coriano Ridge, San Martino, and San Fortunato became place names seared into the memories of those who fought there.

They fought in a dust-choked land under a searing sun which by battle's end was reduced to a guagmire by rain. But they prevailed and on September 22 won the ground overlooking the Po River Valley, opening the way for the next phase of the Allied advance.


Source-"Canadians Month in Hell"

Regards

Jim
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George
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 8:24:50 AM
Jim please, your own thoughts. These copy and pastes are thread killers, for me anyway.

Cheers,

George

anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 8:40:44 AM
I confess George that I was not aware of this period until you mentioned it and I could bot pinpoint it in Orgill. After reading through the detail-the troops obviously had a torrid time of it, but they did win through; but I have no figures for the full cost of this nightmare.They were deluged by intense artillery fire and casualties mounted.On 17th September the Seaforth lost 90 men,the RCR 74 and 48th High's 86

Regards

Jim
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Phil andrade
London, UK
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 10:50:44 AM
Just joining the party....we're actually in Italy now, albeit in Puglia, the South Eastern " heel of the boot ". Pleased to say that I can gain web access .

It's especially poignant that two of us have a direct familial connection with the Battle of Rimini : Dad served there as an infantryman, in a mortar section.

He had been a gunner at El Alamein, but shortage of infantrymen led to him being redeployed in Italy.

In the 1960s, we took family holidays in Italy, but Dad absolutely refused to go anywhere near the Adriatic, because he never forgot how badly it stank there with so many dead people and horses littering the places. He was shocked at the number of horses that the Germans had used, and their corpses were everywhere . He was also distressed by the sufferings of the civilian population : North Africa, he said, had been a " good place for a war" , because relatively very few civilians had been caught up in it. Italy was horribly different .

Of course, this was only twenty years after the war....it seemed an awful long time to me then, because I was a kid .

The Germans in Italy were subjected to a terrific preponderance of allied firepower : we tend to remember the campaign in terms of forlorn allied attacks against German bastions - especially Monte Casino - but judging by statistics I've seen - and a huge German military cemetery I visited near Lake Garda - the " D-Day Dodgers " were mightily effective in putting huge numbers of the enemy out of action.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

George
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 11:46:53 AM
Many thanks for that Phil.

I mentioned that my uncle was killed just after Rimini but my Dad was also nearby with the 5th Canadian Armoured Division.

He never wanted to talk about the war very much, choosing to describe Oct. 15, the day after his brother's death. Dad had heard that the 48th Highlanders were close and asked to borrow a truck to go see his brother.

When he arrived, the guys from the 48th turned away from him. Dad knew those guys. Toronto was a small city and he knew his brother's friends.

He yelled after them and one turned and said, "Look Hughie, Porky got it last night". George was called Porky and I don't know why. He was muscular and hard.

One of my most treasured photos is a grainy one of my Dad standing at attention over George's temporary grave. He asked someone to take it so that he could send it home to my grandmother.

The whole affair knocked the stuffing out of him. He had applied to transfer to the 48th and his brother was going to sponsor him. I don't really know how that worked.

But the guys from the 48th told him to stay where he was, with the 5th Armoured and in the RCASC. They said, "all the 39ers are being killed off. There aren't many left. "

Pretty sad but of course, our family's story or stories like it, was likely repeated hundreds or thousands of times.

Someday I shall have to get to Italy, to the cemetery at Cesena, to see my uncle's grave.


Cheers,

George

Phil andrade
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/6/2017 4:37:52 PM
George,

It comes as a bit of a surprise to me to find out from CWGC records that more Commonwelath soldiers died in Italy than in France in WW2.

More than 5,700 Canadian soldiers are buried or commemorated in Italy from July 1943 to May 1945, along with more than 5,300 Indians and 2,000 Kiwis.

More than forty thousand Commonwealth troops in all, with another 2,500 + airmen and naval personnel .

Soft Underbelly.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Phil andrade
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/7/2017 2:14:09 AM
The war cemeteries in Italy testify to the very cosmopolitan nature of the campaign.

Apart from the Commonwealth nations that I've alluded to,there are surely tens of thousands of US dead from this fighting : I would like to find out about where they rest. Presumably, many were shipped home. Then there are thousands of French and Poles, hundreds of Greeks, a contingent of Jews and even some Brazilians in their respective cemeteries, large and small : a real diaspora of peoples coming to carry the torch.

Well over one hundred thousand Germans are interred, the vast majority in several enormous cemeteries.

We must reflect on the bizarre fate of the Italian soldiers themselves, some of whom died fighting against each other, I daresay. How, I wonder, are their war dead represented ?

What a mess this war was for them !

Yesterday I visited a local Pugliese town called Loco Rotondo, and inspected their war memorial.

In four imposing columns, well over two hundred names from 1915-1918 are inscribed, too many from the same families.

Down below, in a sad and almost discreet profile, are fifty two names from 1940-45.

This is a very fought over region of the world, conquered and colonised by Lombards, Normans, Turks and Saracens. Like all melting pots, it has a lot to offer in terms of culture and cuisine, and a rather challenging past to come to terms with.

Regards, Phil

---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/7/2017 4:11:10 AM
On the 16th September the Canadian infantry at San Marino,lost their hold on the ridge in full view of the German guns at San Fortunato. This position was quickly occupied by the enemy; and they in turn made an attempt to occupy the coast road; but were baulked by intense Canadian artillery fire but only matched by the German guns-thus stalemate.

The battle was no less intense on the 17th-three strong attacks on San Marino failed to make any impression- at some cost to them -previously mentioned.Also on the 17th the DAF flew 486 sorties against San Fortunato making a particularly heavy bombing attack; and on the following day after considerable fighting the Canadians finally bypassed San Marino and compelled the Germans to abandon it.

Source -The Italian Campaign by Eric Linklater

Regards

Jim
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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/7/2017 11:20:09 AM
Surprisingly when we see landscape in the approaches to the Gothic Line, tanks were employed heavily, in the fighting.

The Germans were greatly outnumbered but when it became apparent the the main allied thrust was to be on the Adriatic, they transferred troops from the central Apennines to the Adriatic coast.

These were tough fighters and the land favoured the defenders.

The Canadians crossed the Metauro River and the "Green Line" quite quickly and it was anticipated that the Germans would turn and make for the Po Valley and Rimini would fall.

This was Aug. 31 and that is when Kesselring, informed that all resources of the German 10th Army were deployed and would be incapable of stalling the Canadian advance, sent the 29th Panzer Grenadiers to help plug the hole.

So the Germans did not head for the Po Valley, and the longer that they could resist, the more likely that the autumn rains would arrive and turn the Po, excellent tank country that it was, into very difficult and muddy terrain. In fact this is what happened.

As the Germans retreated they determined to hold the high ground above the comparatively flat areas to the Adriatic ocean side.

That included the village of Coriano.


The Canadian Corps executed some well planned attacks to take villages along the high ground. They were "stonked" all the way as the Germans set up their mortars on the high ground to the left.

Now the British 5th Corps to the left of the Canadian Corps had all sorts of difficulty because of the terrain and the fact that the 29th Panzer Grenadiers arrived.

There was some national pride on the line as the British 5th Corps determined to exploit the breakthrough by the Canadian Corps.

The 5th Corps Commander, Lt-Gen. Keightly had said,


Quote:
“The enemy has been badly mauled by 1st Canadian Corps and there is a possibility of a breakthrough on that front during 2 September.”


So the Canadians were squeezed over to the coast to take the town of Cattolica.

Perhaps the Brits didn't scout ahead well because the topography and the lousy roads or tracks did not help their tank attack.

The roads were winding and difficult. So one division was supposed to advance to the next river, the Conca and 1st Br. Armoured Div was to seize Coriano and then pursue all the way to Rimini and the Po Valley. Very ambitious indeed.

The initial part of the battle went well and the Brits made the Conca River by Sept. 3. They made contact with the Canadians here and seized two bridges, both intact.

So Lt. Gen Keitley seized the initiative and ordered infantry to seize Coriano on the ridge.

As more an more Brits and Canadians gathered at the Conca, the inevitable congestion happened.

They were anticipating a fluid, speedy battle and sent in tanks toward Coriano Ridge without much infantry support.

It was broad daylight and the German artillery on the ridges had a field day. By nightfall, the BR. tank brigade was down 50% of their tanks.

On Sept. 4, Corps HQ insisted that they press on to Coriano.

The 56th Br. div tried. Over the next week, the Germans on the approaches to the Coriano Ridge proper beat back 11 determined British attacks.

It didn't help that it started to pour on Sept. 6.

Stymied Gen. Leese decided to let 8th Army regroup.

I have decided to unleash the 5th Army

So said General Leese on Sept. 8 and so the Americans launched attacks in some of the most hellish mountain territory in Italy.

The battle group included the US 5th with additional forces from British 13 Corps and the 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade.

They moved quickly at first and then got bogged down in the mountains and the fighting was violent.

So Bologna was safe.



"Pursuit Corps"

Leese decided that the British 5th would be his pursuit corps to Rimini and the Po. When they were stopped he turned again to the Canadians.

And so the Canadians augmented by 4th Br div and the 2nd New Zealand div and the 2nd Greek Mountain Brigade, would take the point.

It seems ironic that mountain fighting specialists, the Greeks were out to the right on the flat coastal areas. I guess that it just works out that way.


George





George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/7/2017 1:24:20 PM
Battle of Gemmano and Croce

It is in these two hill top towns plus the ridge at Coriano that the British 5th Corps was delayed.

This was the period just after the Canadians had breached the Green Line and Oliver Leese had anticipated a run to Rimini.

Gemmano on Croce are just to the south of the Foglia River, where the main German defences of the Gothic Line were.


And it should not have happened that the 8th army was held up for the better part of 3 weeks.

Those Germans on the high ridges that looked down on the Adriatic plain were sent there by a German officer acting on his own.

On Sept. 3, the Germans were planning to withdraw about 15 miles but acting on his own initiative, General Wenzell ordered one regiment of alpine troops into Gemmano and another regiment of panzer grenadiers into Coriano.

This deployment was responsible for the loss of many British tanks and many British, Canadian, Ghurkas as they attempted to dislodge the Germans.

For the British, this was one of the most difficult battles that 5th Corps faced in Italy.

This is Gemmano today where so many British tanks and soldiers were lost. You can see that the Germans could fire on the British and Canadians on the plains below.



anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/7/2017 1:56:57 PM
The Army's attack against Coriano had been postponed for two days.in the hope that the Gemmano assault was favourable,but very little had been achieved by the 12th when the Coriano attack could not be held up any longer; and before midnight British 1st and Canadian 5th Armoured Divisions went into action against the enemy held ridge,.There followed a week of bloody fighting in which 8th Army lost every day some 150 KIA and 600 wounded; and so weakened itself it did not recover to normal strength for several months.

Source--Linklater

Regards

Jim
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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

anemone
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Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/10/2017 4:17:51 AM
George-your photograph of Gemmano spoke volumes -it was a hill fortress 1500 ft high -its defenders- all 3000 of them- were well armed hardened campaigners- who knew the business of war.

They had built concrete bunkers,cleared their fields of fire- so that their weapons could be brought to bear on an advancing enemy.IMHO this was no place for an attack to be opened by ground troops.

Further Eighth Army intelligence had failed to grasp the importance the Germans had put on holding this strong point which was at first considered as bypassable-but it was not.

What I cannot understand is why Lees did not call up the DAF to saturate the hilltop defences with a significant weight of bombs before unleashing the ground forces.

Lees left 8th Army to go to the Far East to take over from Slim-fortunately that did not happen-Lees was a Churchill favourite; and not the brightest knife in the drawer.

regards

Jim
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George
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Posts: 5313

Re: The Road to Rimini--Aug/Sept 1944
Posted on: 6/10/2017 6:05:58 AM
In the end Jim, the artillery made the difference at Coriano Ridge.

I do not understand how 5th Corps determined that the tanks with very few infantry in support or supporting one another were going to flush the German panzer grenadiers out of Gemmano and Croce, on the approaches to Coriano Ridge.

So I wonder what the status of the British infantry battalions were with respect to numbers, at the time. Were they short bodies?

The Italian campaign seemed like attritional warfare.

Cheers,

George

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DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
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Posted on: 6/10/2017 7:21:03 AM
According to what I have read the two attacking battalions-te 2/5th and 2/6th of the Queen's Brigade were sound to start with; but once on the slopes- the machine gun fire was murderous- coming from just about every tree and bush above them-killing or wounding men and officers alike but they struggled on; but by nightfall were reduced to just to just two companies.

Valiant efforts by the remaining infantry were repulsed by deluges of relentless Spandau fire; and again by another nightfall -two platoons which remained withdrew-Shades of the Great War!!!The Reserve Btn 2/7th Queens was committed; but the story was the same=useless slaughter.

So another effort was made on the 10th -in this second phase 4th British Inf Div.would pass through Canadian Armour,accompanied by 1st British Armoured Division after 46th inf Div.and 4th Indian Div. continued the attack on the Gemmano fortress

The third phase was for the Canadian Corps to capture Fortunato; and with V Corps advance to the R.Marrachia, which flows into the sea at Rimini. However before this grand plan was to be executed-there was the Coriano Ridge.



Regards

Jim
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