MHO Home   Forum Home   Help   Register   Login
 
 
Welcome to MilitaryHistoryOnline.com.
You are not signed in.
The current time is: 12/15/2017 3:23:02 AM
 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
AuthorMessage
Page 4 of 7 (Page: 1  2  3  4 5  6  7 ) 
brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/23/2017 11:29:50 PM
Day 23. September 23 (continued)
Saturday

I have nothing to add to Bill’s comments on Poland. To all intents and purposes, the campaign is over, and the cleaning up has begun.


Quote:
BERLIN, September 23

General von Fritsch, the man who built up the modern German army and then retired just before the Anschluss because of a fight with Hitler over attacking Austria, which he opposed, has been killed in action before Warsaw. A little strange. He had no command but was with the regiment of which he is honorary colonel.(Berlin Diary, p 221)
My understanding (corrections if wrong, please) is that von Fritsch had every right to insist on being with these troops even though he was not in command, either because of his final status within the army or because of his honorary status with the regiment.

Quote:
Starting day after tomorrow, new rations cards for food. The German people will now get per week: one pound of meat, five pounds of bread, three questers of a pound of fats, three quarters of a pound of sugar, and a pound of ersatz coffee made of roasted barley seeds. Heavy labourers are to get double rations, and Dr. Goebbels – clever man ! – has decided to classify us foreign correspondents as heavy labourers. (Berlin Diary, p 221)

General comment: IIUC, the first rationed substance in Britain was petrol (car gas). But Britain, like Germany, was a net importer of foodstuffs. As the war progressed, rationing became for many on both sides of the conflict a measure of resolve, a measure of commitment and a burden suffered more by urban than country folks.

I was born in 1941, and somewhere I have the ration books for various members of my extended family. Yes, Canada rationed, but never to the extent that many other nations were forced to do.


Quote:
Mussolini restated Italy’s intention to remain neutral unless attacked, following a policy to “strengthen our army in preparation any eventualities and support every possible peace effort while working in silence.” (Goralski. p 95)



Quote:
British northern waters - battleship ROYAL SOVEREIGN departed Scapa Flow at 2330, escorted by destroyers ESK and EXPRESS, to refit at Portsmouth. At 1750/24th, the destroyers attacked a submarine contact 25 miles off the north coast of Ireland. The three ships arrived at Portsmouth at 0930/26th.
 
Western Atlantic - convoy HX.2 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by heavy cruiser YORK and Canadian destroyers ST LAURENT, FRASER, and SAGUENAY. YORK detached on the 25th, and the convoy reached Liverpool on 10 October.
 
British east coast - destroyers FORTUNE and FIREDRAKE attacked U.14, 40 miles NNE of Peterhead, but no damage was done.
 
Skagerrak - U.4 captured Finnish steamer WALMA (1361grt) off Smagen on the west coast of Sweden and scuttled her off Hallo in 58‑15N, 11‑00E. The entire crew was saved. («http://www.naval-history.net»)


Apologies: I was helping a daughter move today, and missed the chance to cover U-boat successes for the date.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/24/2017 3:54:00 AM
September 24, 1939

Poland

Ed.: The campaign in Poland has now drawn down to final resistance on the Hel Peninsula, in southeast Poland, and, the largest battle yet to be fought -- in Warsaw itself.


Quote:
Various plans to take that part of Warsaw west of the Vistula were discussed and discarded. It was finally decided by OKH that Army Group South's Eighth Army, which had finished clearing Kutno, would direct the effort to capture Warsaw. Eighth Army headquarters moved to a point southwest of the capital on 24 September, relieving Tenth Army Headquarters, which moved southward to the vicinity of Kielce again. Eighth Army quickly completed its plans and final dispositions for the attack.

The Eighth Army Commander, General Blaskowitz, was instructed that he was not to permit the civilian population to leave the city prior to the assault. The worsening food situation within Warsaw and the large numbers to be fed would aid materially in hastening the surrender of the capital.

Hela was taken under fire by the Schleswig-Holstein, which was joined by the Schlesien on 24 September.
[Read More]


Image: DKM Schlesien.


Quote:
The Luftwaffe bombed Warsaw for the first time, reducing entire streets to rubble and causing widespread fires. The British government considered the bombing a breach of the pledge Germany made at the start of the war to refrain from indiscriminate attacks. (Wikipedia)


Other


Quote:
France commences talks with Switzerland on French support in case of an attack on Switzerland by Germany. (chroniknet.de)


Cheers

BW


---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/25/2017 7:30:21 AM
September 25, 1939

Poland


Quote:
The rail line used by the Poles to move their heavy artillery out to positions on the [Hel] peninsula was cut by Stuka bombing on 25 September and the offshore bombardment intensified.

Three military government commands, responsible directly to OKH, followed the German armies into Poland. These commands had army status, and were placed in control of the three military government areas (Militaerbezirke) into which western Poland was arbitrarily divided; headquarters were at Danzig, Poznan, and Cracow. The officers in charge of these commands were known as military government commanders (Militaerbefehlshaber), and their mission during the period of operations consisted chiefly of securing the German counterpart to the United States Army's communications zone, from the border of the Reich to the rear areas of the field armies. To carry out their mission, the military government commands were assigned one or two third--or fourth wave divisions, some frontier guard units that had crossed the border with the Army, and a number of security battalions consisting of troops of the older age groups.

The command at Poznan was the first to take control of its assigned area, moving in 11 September, under General der Artillerie Alfred von Vollard-Bockelberg. The second, at Danzig and responsible for the former German province of West Prussia, moved in the following day, under General der Artillerie Walter Heitz. The third, at Cracow, was commanded by General List of the Fourteenth Army, functioning in a dual role, and assisted by a small additional staff. This last command became operational on 13 September.

By 25 September the end of the campaign was fast approaching and Hitler ordered the establishment of a military government organization for the occupied Polish territories. This organization would include four area military government commands, with headquarters at Poznan, Danzig, Cracow, and Lodz. The Fuehrer selected Rundstedt as commander in chief for the conquered eastern territories, placing him in control of tactical units and military government. Army Group North and Fourth Army headquarters soon left for the west, to be followed shortly by Tenth Army. On its transition to OB EAST, Rundstedt's headquarters found itself in control of the four military government commands and the three armies remaining in Poland.
[Read More]


Quote:
Heavy Luftwaffe attack on Warsaw. (chroniknet.de)


Other


Quote:
Germany distributes new ration cards. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
The British began laying anti-submarine mines in the Strait of Dover. (Wikipedia)



Quote:
Şükrü Saracoğlu, foreign minister of Turkey, begins an almost month-long visit to the USSR. (Soviet official history of the war)



Quote:
A tropical storm made landfall [in] California, the only tropical storm to do so in the twentieth century. (Wikipedia)


Cheers

BW

---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/25/2017 6:31:05 PM
Day 24. September 24 (continued)
Sunday

I have nothing to add to Bill’s comments on Poland. To all intents and purposes, the campaign is over, and the cleaning up has begun. But Shirer’s comments are interesting:


Quote:
BERLIN, September 24
The [German] High Command, reviewing the Polish campaign, says the fate of Poland was really decided in eight days. By that time the German army had already obtained its main strategical object, the trapping of the main part of the Polish forces within the great elbow of the Vistula River. Some other things: 450.000 Polish troops captured, 1,200 guns taken, and 800 airplanes either destroyed or captured; and at the end of eighteen days of fighting not a single Polish division, not even a brigade, was left intact. (Berlin Diary), p 221


Cheers
Brian G

Apologies for being late with this post, meagre as it is.
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/25/2017 7:17:49 PM
Day 25. September 25 (continued)
Monday

General comment in a sidebar between September 25 and 26 (Goralski, p. 96, citing Matthew Cooper’s The German Army, 1933-1945 as source:

Quote:
HORSES AT WAR
Despite the commonly held perception of World War II as a highly mechanized conflict, horses formed a key element in the field of transport. It was certainly true in Asia, bu few have understood the extensive use of true horse power in Europe. The German army – famed for its panzers and lighting attacks – is a case in point.
When the war began in 1939, only four of the Wehrmacht’s 90 infantry divisions were totally motorized. Of the rest, it can be said that without animals they could hardly have moved at all. This is dramatically illustrated by meticulously kept German statistics. The better equipped of the non motorized infantry divisions had 394 passenger cars and 615 trucks, bu each was also allotted 4,842 horses. The poorest of those divisions had 330 passenger cars and 248 trucks – and 6,030 horses.
The German ground forces possessed well over a half-million horses on Sept. 1, 1939. But the time the war ended, a total of 2,700,000 horses had served the Wehrmacht. That is nearly twice the number used by the Germans in World War I. In that “primitive” war of lesser geographical dimensions, the Germans employed but 1,400,000 horses.



Quote:
Germany’s Kriegsmarine orders 42 new U-boats (U-137 to 166, plus 14 in the U-500 series)(«boat.net»)



Quote:
At 05.55 hours on 25 Sep 1939 the Silesia was hit by one torpedo from U-36 and sank 45 miles west-northwest of Egerö Lighthouse, Norway. The ship had been stopped by the U-boat and Fröhlich came to the conclusion that she carried contraband after checking the papers of the ship. The crew was ordered to abandoned ship in two lifeboats, which were then taken in tow by the U-boat and released about 12 miles from the coast. The men in the boats were picked up after three hours by the Suecia and brought to the Egerö Lighthouse. One of the empty lifeboats would not be found until 21 December. («uboat.net»)

Silesia was a steam merchantman of under 2,000 tons. Completed for a British firm in 1923, she had Swedish registry from 1936 until her sinking. No losses from the crew of 19.


Quote:
Anti-submarine minefields, Dover Straits - the British started laying a deep minefield between Folkestone and Cap Griz Nez to close the Straits to German submarine traffic. Minelayers ADVENTURE, PLOVER and auxiliary minelayers SHEPPERTON, HAMPTON laid 3636 mines and completed the field on 23 October.
 
Only U.31 was able to pass successfully through the Dover Strait during the war, on the 11th/12th September. U.35 attempted to pass through at approximately the same time, but was forced to abandon the attempt and instead proceeded to her patrol area by the north-about route.
 
U.12 was lost in the field on 8 October, U.40 on the 13th, and U.16 badly damaged and ultimately lost on the 24th. («www.naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/26/2017 4:08:18 AM
September 26, 1939

Poland


Quote:
The [German] Eighth Army attack [on Warsaw] began on 26 September, with a heavy air and artillery bombardment followed by an assault from the south. The first and second line of bunkers were taken, and prisoners reported that communications within the city had been cut and electric power was no longer available. Third Army supported the attack by a heavy artillery barrage on Warsaw's defenses from the north. By order of Hitler, the capture of the city was to be accomplished by 3 October, before the arrival of the Russians at Praga to the east of the Vistula.

Two Polish envoys crossed the German lines north of Warsaw the evening of 26 September with a letter from [Polish] General Rommel requesting a 24-hour cessation of fire and a surrender parley. The cease-fire request was refused and the German artillery fire intensified, though the Poles were informed that a local truce could be arranged in order to allow Polish emissaries to cross the lines in the event General Rommel decided to surrender the city. The incident was reported through army and army group headquarters to OKH, which directed that the surrender would be taken by Eighth Army and that only an unconditional surrender would be accepted.
[Read More]

War at Sea


Quote:
Thirteen German aircraft attack a British naval task force in the North Sea and claim to have sunk the aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal. (chroniknet.de). . . aah, but the claim is mistaken! The German pilots did not see if the carrier had been hit, and a reconnaissance flight later located the two battleships, but not Ark Royal. Based on this information, the Germans incorrectly claimed that Ark Royal had sunk. To prove the German propaganda false before it had a negative effect on Britain's allies, Winston Churchill personally reassured United States President Franklin Delano Roosevelt that the carrier was undamaged and invited the US naval attaché to view Ark Royal in dock. The British naval attaché in Rome was instructed to assure Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini that the ship was still in service. This was an embarrassment for Goebbels and Nazi propaganda. (Wikipedia)


War in the Air


Quote:
A Luftwaffe aircraft was shot down by the British for the first time. A Dornier Do 18 flying boat was downed by a Blackburn Skua of 803 Naval Air Squadron north of the Fisher Bank. (Wikipedia)


Other


Quote:
In London, Winston Churchill announces that British merchantmen will be armed. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
In Paris, the French communist party is banned for its support of the Nazi-Soviet Nonaggression Pact. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
In Berlin, the army office for weapons development (Heereswaffenamt) organizes a team of military personnel and leading German atomic scientists to explore the potential of atomic power and weapons. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
Werner von Fritsch was given a funeral with full military honors in Berlin. (Wikipedia)



Images: Blackburn Skua and Dornier Do-18


Image: HMS Ark Royal


Images: German 75-mm infantry gun firing on Warsaw, and grave of General Fritsch in the Berlin Invalidenfriedhof.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/26/2017 7:39:09 PM
Day 26. September 26 (continued)
Tuesday


Quote:
BERLIN, September 26
They buried General von Fritsch here this morning. … Hitler did not show up, nor Ribbentrop, nor Himmler, though they all returned to Berlin from the front this afternoon. The official death notices in the papers omitted the usual “Died for Führer’ and said only: “Died for the Fatherland. …

Hitler showed a typical smallness in declining to attend the funeral. He cannot forgive a man who has crossed him, even in death. …

New restrictions today on clothing. If I order a new suit, my tailor must make it out of a piece of cloth exactly 3.1 metres by 144 centimetres [Ed.: roughly 10 feet x 5 feet]. Also the papers inform us we can no longer get our shoes half-soled. No more leather. We must wait for a new substitute material not yet out. (Berlin Diary, pp 223-224.)

At sea

Quote:
British northern waters - German submarines were deployed off the Orkneys to intercept British naval units - U.10 from 26 September to 15 October, U.22 from 28 September to 16 October, U.23 from 2nd to 16th October, U.20 from the 1st to 17th, and U.18 from the 3rd to 16th. On 29 September, U.22 fired at a submarine east of Dogger Head, but the attack failed due to torpedo defect. …

British east coast - convoy FS.11 departed Methil, and arrived at Southend on the 28th.
 
Convoy FN.11 departed Southend, and arrived at Methil on the 28th.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Dover and arrived at Grimsby later the same day.
                                                                             
Kattegat/Skagerrak/Baltic – German destroyers HANS LODY, FRIEDRICH IHN, ERICH STEINBRINCK and four torpedo boats of the 6th Torpedo Boat Flotilla inspected 45 merchant ships in the Kattegat from the 26th to 28th.
 
Destroyers WILHELM HEIDKAMP, BERND VON ARNIM, ERICH GIESE, DIETHER VON ROEDER, HANS LÜDEMANN, HERMANN KÜNNE, KARL GALSTER stopped 58 merchant ships in the Skagerrak from the 28th to 30th. Nine were sent to Kiel as prizes and ARNIM captured two Danish steamers with cargo bound for England. On the 30th, ROEDER, LÜDEMANN, KÜNNE, GALSTER proceeded to Swinemünde and HEIDKAMP, ARNIM, GIESE to Kiel. …

UK-France convoys - BC.4 departed Quiberon Bay and arrived in Bristol Channel on the 28th. …

Gibraltar-UK (HG) convoys - The first of the series, HG.1, departed Gibraltar with 27 ships and local escort provided by destroyers GRENVILLE, GIPSY, GRIFFIN, GRENADE. Polish destroyer BLYSKAWICA joined the escort from the 26th to 28th and light cruiser COLOMBO from the 26th to 5 October. …
 
Convoy HGF.1 departed Gibraltar with steamers SCYTHIA (19,761grt), ORFORD (20,043grt), MEMNON (7506grt), and ORCADES (23,456grt) and no escort. They arrived at Liverpool on 1 October. …
 
Caribbean/ Atlantic - convoy KJ.2 departed Kingston escorted by light cruiser ORION from the 26th to 29th and French submarine SURCOUF from the 26th to 17 October. Destroyers MALCOLM, VANOC, WARWICK, VANESSA joined the escort on the 15th. VANOC, WARWICK, VANESSA detached on the 17th, and MALCOLM on the 18th, when the convoy arrived.(«http://www.naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2964

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/26/2017 9:42:00 PM
BW, & Brian G.,

Great work on this interesting informative thread, for all you do this Bud's for You!

Cheers,
MD

---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/27/2017 10:31:15 AM
September 27, 1939

Poland


Quote:
[Polish] General Kutrzeba appeared the following morning to accept the German terms in the name of General Rommel. The Polish envoy was immediately conducted to Eighth Army to conclude the negotiations for the surrender [of Warsaw]. Hostilities ceased at 1400 on 27 September, and 140,000 Polish troops lay down their arms, including the garrison in the eastern suburb of Praga. All Polish military personnel were ordered to be ready for evacuation by 29 September. Warsaw was in a serious situation, with over 16,000 of the garrison wounded and heavy casualties among the civilian population. The supply of drinking water had been cut off for five days, making it necessary for the garrison and population to use the water of the Vistula; an epidemic of typhoid appeared imminent. All public utilities had been heavily damaged and would require extensive repairs. The city was also on the verge of starvation.

On 27 September air support [for German operations on the Hel Peninsula] was withdrawn as the Luftwaffe was deployed to the west.
[Read More]


Quote:
Colonel-General von Rundstedt is named as the chief of military administration in occupied Poland. (chroniknet.de)


Other


Quote:
The Reich Main Security Office was created under the command of Heinrich Himmler. (Wikipedia)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/27/2017 5:36:33 PM
Day 27. September 27 (continued)
Wednesday

I have nothing to add to Bill’s comments on Poland.

Germany

Quote:
Hitler told his military commanders that he had decided “to attack in the West as soon as possible since the Franco-British Army is not yet prepared.” He set Nov. 12 as the tentative attack date. (Goralski, p 96)

A different reading on the above reference is:
Quote:
Hitler tells his principal commanders that he intends to attack France (but some of the German generals refuse to take seriously a programme apparently so far beyond the reach of German military power). (2194 Days, p 28)

At Sea

Quote:
At 06.10 hours on 27 Sep 1939 the neutral Algeria was stopped by U-36 20 miles west of Skudesnaes and was sent to Kiel as prize, arriving on 4 October. Three days later, ship and cargo were released by the Germans.
A small steam merchantman of Swedish registration, Algeria was sailing from Gothenburg to Genoa with a cargo of pig iron and paper pulp.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1957

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/27/2017 6:46:44 PM
Day 28. September 28

At Goethestrasse 24, Berlin-Lichterfelde, the house of retired General Ludwig Beck, a secret meeting took place. Present are Generals Franz Halder, Walther Von Brauchitsch, Hans Oster and retired General Hans von Haeften.





Here the decision was made to reactivate the "Oster" conspirators and to assassinate Hitler and Himmler.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/28/2017 1:32:08 PM
September 28, 1939

Poland


Quote:
[Fortress] Modlin continued to resist despite the surrender of the capital and a series of heavy attacks by the Third Army, supported by Eighth Army south of the city. The cessation of hostilities at Warsaw made large masses of artillery and increased air support available to Third Army. The bombardment of the fortress city was intensified and German infantry managed to infiltrate the first line of fortifications. An armistice was arranged at 0730 on 28 September and the formal surrender to Third Army's II Corps took place the following day. Twenty-four thousand Polish troops at Modlin laid down their arms in unconditional surrender, and German troops entered the fortress at noon. General Thommee, commander of the Modlin force, attributed his surrender to the cutting off of the water supply; the loss of food stores in the bombardment; the complete exhaustion of the defending troops, who had suffered 4,000 casualties in wounded alone; and the infantry attack.


Editor: Hela Peninsula is still resisting.

Other


Quote:
* Germany and the Soviet Union signed the German-Soviet Frontier Treaty, amending a secret clause in the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact.

* The Soviet–Estonian Mutual Assistance Treaty was signed in Moscow. (Wikipedia)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/28/2017 7:34:16 PM
Day 28. September 28 (continued)
Thursday. Full Moon.


Quote:
BERLIN, September 28
At midnight tonight I did a microphone interview with Germany’s ace submarine skipper, Captain Herbert Schultze. …
The captain told a story of how he had torpedoed the British ship Royal Sceptre, but, at the risk of his own skin, had arranged rescue of those aboard by another British vessel, the Browning. … Now, a few days before, I remembered, London had reported that the Royal Sceptre had been torpedoed without warning and that the crew and passengers, numbering 60, had presumably perished. I wondered who was right.(Berlin Diary, pp 225-6)

NOTE: Schultze was.
Quote:
At 12.00 hours on 5 Sep 1939, U-48 opened fire with the deck gun for 25 minutes at the unescorted Royal Sceptre (Master James William Gair) about 300 miles northwest of Cape Finisterre. The ship had sent distress signals when the U-boat was sighted and tried to escape. She was sunk by a coup de grâce at 13.38 hours after the crew had abandoned ship in the lifeboats. The master was killed and nine crew members were wounded by gunfire. The Petrofina and the Danish motor ship Erria heard the distress signals and searched for survivors, but they had been picked up by the Browning and landed at Bahia, Brazil on 26 September. The ship had been stopped by the U-boat at 15.05 hours the same day. The crew first abandoned ship in panic, but they were ordered to reboard their vessel and to pick up the survivors of Royal Sceptre. («boat.net»)
Schultz survived the war, making his home in England. He died, I believe, in 1980.

At sea

Quote:
At 00.30 hours on 28 September 1939 the unescorted and neutral Nylandwas stopped by U-16 about 25 miles west-southwest of Stavanger, Norway. The master of the vessel boarded the U-boat and reported that he does not have the papers, because they fell overboard. At 04.30 hours, a boarding party under command of the LI went over to the ship and found a telegram that the ship should go to Ramsgate instead of Antwerp. At 07.20 hours, the boarding party came back and the Swedish crew was ordered to abandon ship in the lifeboats. They brought the master to the boats and gave them supplies before sinking the ship by a torpedo at 08.25 hours. The crew was picked up by the Norwegian minelayer Olav Tryggvason.

On 28 September 1939 the unescorted and neutral Jern (Master G. Gabrielsen) was stopped by U-32 about 70 miles southwest of Skudenes and the crew was given 15 minutes to get into the lifeboats. A boarding party from the U-boat scuttled the ship by three scuttling charges at 15.37 hours about 85 miles west of Jæren´s Rev. Five of the Norwegians had to help the boarding party to bring the explosives to the ship. The survivors were taken towards the shore on the U-boat before being transferred to the Swedish steam merchant Caledonia. The next day they were transferred to the Norwegian torpedoboat Lyn and taken to Kristiansand.(«boat.net»)


Cheers,
Brian G

Additional information concerning the war at sea.


Quote:
Northern Patrol - light cruisers CARDIFF and DRAGON departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol duties, and arrived back 5 October.
 
British northern waters - U.18 and U.22 were ordered into the approaches to Scapa Flow.
 
British east coast - Convoy FS.12 departed Methil and arrived at Southend on the 30th. There was no FS.13.
 
Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON and destroyers JERVIS and JUPITER attacked a submarine contact outside May Island.
                                                                          
Norwegian waters - U.7 sank Norwegian steamer SOLAAS (1368grt) 25 miles SW of Lister Light. (DB - The German "Seekrieg" states that SOLASS was sunk next day on the 29th by Luftwaffe I/ZG26 in the North Sea. Editor: According to "Axis Submaríne Successes" by Rohwer, U.36 stopped SOLASS on the 28th, released her, but she sank next day, possibly mined)
 
English Channel - destroyer KEMPENFELT, escorting convoy OA.11, collided with steamer HESTER (1199grt) off Newhaven. She was taken to Devonport for repairs which completed 7 November.
 
Destroyer IMPULSIVE on patrol in the English Channel was damaged by heavy seas, and taken to Devonport for repairs completed 23 October.
 
Central and South Atlantic - French submarine PONCELET sighted German merchant ship CHEMNITZ (5522grt) at 0830, shortly after she departed Las Palmas, Canary Islands to return to Germany. She was stopped in 38-05N, 30-40W at 1305 and escorted to Casablanca, arriving 3 October. CHEMNITZ was renamed SAINT BERTRAND in French service and served in the French Merchant Marine until the fall of France when she returned to German hands. Between the 25th and 1 October, light cruiser DUGUAY TROUIN had been searching for CHEMNITZ as well as steamer AMASIS, both of which had been reported departing Las Palmas early on the 24th
 
Convoy SL.3 departed Freetown on the 28th September, escorted by light cruiser DAUNTLESS, both arriving at Gibraltar on 9 October. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the15th.
                                                                          
Destroyers of the 4th Destroyer Division were ordered home from the South Atlantic. However, the order was cancelled on 1 October because of German raider activity in the South Atlantic.
 
Light cruiser DANAE departed Simonstown on escort duties and arrived back on 2 October.
 
Indian Ocean - light cruiser BIRMINGHAM arrived at Singapore.
 
Pacific - New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES arrived at Buenaventura, Colombia and departed on the 30th, escorting steamer ORDUNA (15,507grt) to Callao, where they both arrived safely on 4 October.(«naval-history.net»)


B
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/28/2017 9:42:55 PM
General comments after four weeks of war. Perhaps I should have held off on my comments until month-end, but I'm making them now for what I think are sound reasons

At the end of the 4th week:
• Poland no longer exists as a nation state, and words to be uttered (I believe tomorrow, 29 Sept 1939) are chilling, in hindsight. See my entry for that day.
• In the West, the Phony War – the Sitzkrieg – is becoming the norm for ground action. Most European action will become diplomatic, but based on official intransigence on the part of Britain and France and false statesmanship on the part of Germany. This is still a confined war, with only five nations involved and two true belligerents. Publicly, Germany is calling for an end to the war before it begins, since the casus belli no longer exists, but noone trusts Hitler, and Britain and France argue that destruction of Poland does not negate the reasons for the state of war that exists. At the same time, while both Spain and Italy have declared their neutrality, both are seen as political allies of Germany who could enter the war on Germany's side. This would leave France with enemies on three sides, which must be a potential nightmare for the French.
• In the air, as on the ground, there is a lack of major activity, or will be after a raid by the RAF on 29 Sept 1939. See my entry for that date.
• At sea, the focus to date has been largely in European ocean waters, around the Western Approaches, along the Norwegian coast, and through the Kattagat/Skaggerak/Baltic. But that is changing, which is one reason my offering for 28 Sept 1939 is so naval-heavy. Ships are being sunk or taken in the Southern Approaches (off, e.g., Cape Finisterre). Convoys are finally approaching the war one from Britain's dominions and colonies in the East, which expands RN zones of protection. Destroyer divisions are being kept at sea in the South Atlantic as reports of German raiders increase. HMS Achilles – she will become HMNZS Achilles later in the war, but is recognized as a New Zealand ship – is doing escort duty on the west coast of South America. It is a war Germany cannot win, but the U-boat factor will make things very hard on merchant seamen over the next six years. It may be quiet on the ground, but it is expanding nonetheiess. The war at sea, at least, is becoming global.

As a contributor to this thread, there will increasingly be times when I have more information than I can realistically include in a post. Today is certainly one: I have left out East Coast convoys, England-France convoys, and heaps of other convoy information and ship movements, and collisions at sea. So don't think I'm giving you all the goods: I'm often giving you highly edited copy, and I'm often excising stuff I don't think is important. I'm not consciously skewing the information I include, though that might of course happen since my choices will inevitably reflect my own interests.

If you're following this forum, please note the references I am using, and go and explore the overwhelming detail they offer. I have to assume they too have made decisions about what to include, but they offer massively more information than I can.

It's good to see other MHO members offering entries. And I think I have to state that this isn't an exclusive thread in which Jim and Brian play historian. Because we're attempting to make this a chronicle, a post would work best on the date it occurred. And it would be wonderful if any contributor would take the time to follow the format that seems to be developing.

Nuff said.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/29/2017 2:46:04 AM
September 29, 1939

Poland


Quote:
With the support of the two old battleships, another [German] ground attack was launched down the narrow [Hel] peninsula on 29 September.
[Read More]

Editor's note: Fortress Modlin capitulated on this day.


Quote:
The Battles of Parczew, Jabłoń and Milanów between the Polish Army and the Red Army began. (Wikipedia)



Quote:
In Poznan, Hans Frank establishes a German civil administration. (chroniknet.de)

Editor's note: A notoriously brutal governor-general of occupied Poland, Frank was hanged for war crimes on 16 October 1946.

Other


Quote:
Estonia signed an agreement with the Soviet Union allowing the Soviets to establish naval and air bases within Estonia's borders. (Wikipedia)



Quote:
Fritz Kuhn, leader of the German-American "Bund", is arrested in New York City. (derniere-guerre.com)

Editor's note: Kuhn was charged with, and convicted of, embezzlement. After his term in prison, his citizenship was revoked, and he was held in a camp for enemy aliens. In September 1945, he was deported to Germany and died in Munich on December 14, 1951.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/29/2017 7:40:33 PM
Day 29. September 29 (continued)
Friday
Poland

Quote:
Germany and the /Soviet Union signed a boundary and friendship create. It formally divided Poland, giving the Germans control over the area generally west of the Bug River. The occupying governments said the partition was necessary “after the disintegration of the former Polish state: and Moscow and Berlin ‘consider it their task to restore in this region law and order [ed’s emphasis: and to insure nationals living there an existence corresponding to their national character.” … Russia achieved its gains through an invasion against an overwhelmed Poland and lost only 737 men in the brief conflict. (Goralski, p 96)


The air war

Quote:
NORTH SEA – HELIGOLAND

After a 25-day interval since the last bombing raid on German warships, 11 Hampdens in 2 formations were dispatched to search the Heligoland area. 6 aircraft bombed two destroyers but without scoring any hits. The second formation of 5 aircraft of 144 Squadron, did not return; a German radio broadcast stated that it had met ‘a hornet’s nest’ of fighters and all the Hampdens had been shot down. Post-war records show that 18 of the 24 aircrew were killed… .( Bomber Command War Diaries, p 24)
NOTE: the loss rate (5 of 11 a/c) is 45.5 per cent, a totally unsustainable rate and one that suggests once more than Bomber Command hasn’t yet made any correct assessment of Bomber Command’s weaknesses. I would have thought that is what the 25-day interval was for!

The Handley Page Hampden was somewhat unique in design, which may reflect its 1936 Specification. It may have been meant as a “schnellbomber”, though (at 255 mph) its maximum speed was never high. Coming into service in 1938 as a “medium” bomber, the Hampden could carry 4,000 lbs internally. For a bomber, she was easy to fly and agile in flight. But her narrow body made her tiring to fly and vulnerable to injuries to the pilot. Typically in 1939, she carried a crew of 4, though this entry from BC War Diary suggests most of the lost a/c were carrying 5 crew (24 air crew to 5 a/c).

U-boats at sea

Quote:
At 07.45 hours on 29 Sep 1939 the neutral Takstaas (Master Kristian M. Eltvedt) was stopped by warning shots from the 20mm gun by U-7 about 10 miles off Marsteinen Lighthouse, outside Bergen, Norway. After examining the papers, Heidel gave the crew 20 minutes to abandon ship in the two lifeboats because the ship was en route to England. At 08.55 hours, the U-boat fired a torpedo that hit on the starboard side amidships and caused a list to starboard but she remained afloat on her load of lumber. The Germans circled the ship and fired with the 20mm gun at the water line until a Norwegian aircraft appeared and forced them to dive. The lifeboats were later taken in tow to Sund in Korsfjord by the Norwegian torpedoboat Storm and continued to Bergen on their own. The ship was after a few hours taken in tow by a Norwegian tug, but broke in two and while the foreship sank, the afterpart was towed in and most of her cargo was salvaged.(«uboat.net»)
NOTE: Another officially neutral ship (Norwegian) but carrying cargo for Britain. Note too that many of the ships being sunk are older (pre-WW1) and less well-equipped (poor radio equipment), as well as being relatively small (under 2,000 tons).

Cheers,
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/30/2017 2:38:11 AM
September 30, 1939

Poland


Quote:
A further attack [on the Hel Peninsula] on 30 September gained the tiny village of Ceynowa for the Germans, and a final assault was planned for 2 October.

By 30 September [German] Eighth Army was engaged in evacuating the Polish garrison of Warsaw and with the numerous tasks involved in establishing control over the Polish capital. Tenth Army was still in contact with Polish remnants east of the Vistula, and Fourteenth Army had completed its evacuation to the San River.

Several incidents occurred during this period in the Fourteenth Army area when German and Russian troops exchanged fire. The incidents were settled by the local commanders concerned and no further action was taken by either side.

The German Army suffered a total of 8,082 officers and men killed, 27,278 wounded, and 5,029 missing in its 36 days of operations in Poland. Luftwaffe and Navy losses were much lighter. The figure on missing Army personnel can be considered as high, in view of the fact that the German Army destroyed the Polish Army and recovered most prisoners taken by organized military units.

Two hundred and seventeen tanks were destroyed during the period 1-30 September, including 89 Mark I vehicles, 83 Mark II's, 26 Mark III's, and 19 Mark IV's. Neutral sources also reported over 400 German aircraft of all types destroyed. Sustained operations over poor roads and rough terrain far ahead of maintenance facilities was extremely wearing on armored vehicles as well as trucks, requiring extensive repair work at the end of the campaign. German aircraft that participated in the campaign were in little better condition by the end of operations, having had to fly repeated sorties as the weather permitted, often from bases with only the most primitive landing and few if any maintenance facilities. The situation in the XIX Corps perhaps best exemplified the matériel situation by the end of operations when the entire corps was temporarily immobilized in East Prussia while its tanks, armored cars, and trucks were overhauled and repaired.

The Polish losses were staggering. The Germans claimed 694,000 prisoners of war, out of some 800,000 who had served in Poland's defense; the remainder were killed, captured by the Russians, had fled into Romania or Hungary, or had hidden in isolated areas of their own country. The Germans, by their own count, captured a total of 3,214 field pieces, 16,500 machine guns, 1,700 mortars, and enormous quantities of small arms and ammunition. The captured ordnance and other matériel was not considered suitable for issue by Wehrmacht standards, but could be put to use by Germany's various satellites.

The civilian population which came under German control as a result of the campaign comprised approximately 221/2 million persons. Some three-quarters of a million were ethnic Germans and available for military service. Some of the other minorities, as the Ukrainians, were not opposed to cooperation and service with the Germans. However, the bulk of the Polish population under German control were considered as the people of an occupied country. As a result, sizeable military forces had to be maintained in Poland until the time that the Wehrmacht began to concentrate its forces in the east for the campaign against the Soviet Union more than a year later. The units assigned to this occupation duty were usually of far lower combat potential than those assigned to front-line service, but the necessity of keeping a military force in Poland at all tied down personnel and equipment that might have been put to use elsewhere in the major war effort in which the Reich now found itself engaged.
[Read More]


Quote:
A Polish government in exile is established in Paris, with Władysław Sikorski as Prime Minister. (derniere-guerre.com)



Quote:
The Battles of Parczew, Jabłoń and Milanów ended. (Wikipedia)


Western Front


Quote:
Beyond the Rhine, German propaganda units of the Wehrmacht began broadcasting messages to French garrisons using loudspeakers. Between two popular songs, the Germans seek to undermine the morale of the soldiers and the French populations by broadcasting real and false news, rumors, as well as pacifist messages calling on them to lower their arms, or to beware of the British. Leaflets and postcards with messages for peace, or poems, are printed and dropped over eastern France. Radio transmitters are also being employed to broadcast messages by French speakers working for the Nazis. Among others is Jacques de Lesdain who works for "Radio-Stuttgart". This psychological war will soon be christened "Phoney War" (or, "War of the Loudspeakers") by the British. It will quickly become the "Drôle de guerre" for the French (an expression invented by Roland Dorgelès in his columns in the journal Gringoire) and the "Sitzkrieg" or "sitting war" for the Germans. So many words to highlight the absence of offensive movement on the front for eight months. (derniere-guerre.com)

Editor's note: Lesdain would be condemned to death in absentia by a French court in 1950. He took refuge in Rome and found employment writing for L'Osservatore Romano, the journal of the Vatican. Jacques de Lesdain, attaché to the French ambassador in Peking, world traveler, author, editor, enthusiastic supporter of the Vichy Regime, Nazi collaborator, and fugitive from French justice; died in 1975 or 1976, some 94-95 years old. His precise date of death and the location of his grave are unknown.


Images: Władysław Sikorski and Jacques de Lesdain.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 9/30/2017 6:06:02 PM
Day 30. September 30 (continued)
Saturday

Quote:
• Germany notified Britain its armed merchantmen would be sunk without warning. The action was claimed to the result of British merchant ships attacking German submarines.
• The British cabinet authorized poison gas shipments to France for use if the Germans began using chemical warfare weapons. (Goralski, p 96)


Quote:
• the German pocket-battleship Admiral Graf Spee sinks the British steamship Clement. The Allied forces have now lost 185,000 tons of merchant shipping. This marks the beginning of the search for the German pocket-battleship by the Royal Navy. (2194 Days of War, p 28)


Quote:
BERLIN, September 30
The talk of peace dominates all else here today. The Germans are sure of it, and one of the secretaries of the Soviet Embassy told me today Moscow was too. He said London and Paris would jump at the chance for peace now. The Völkische Beobachter observes today: “All Europe awaits the word of peace from London. Woe to them who refuse it. They will some day be stoned by their own people.”

Ciano to see Hitler here tomorrow. Talk of the German using him to pressure London and Paris to make peace. (Berlin Diary, 228)


U-boats

Quote:
At 10.17 hours on 30 Sep 1939, U-3 surfaced beneath the unescorted and neutral Vendia (Master P. Lund) and ordered her to stop by signal flags about 35 miles northwest of Hanstholm. Her lookouts had difficulties to see the U-boat at first as it was approaching from astern on a parallel course in a patch of sunlight and could not see what the flags meant, but then stopped the engines when the U-boat fired a few warning shots with a machine gun at 10.40 hours. However, what happened next is disputed. According to Schepke, the ship stopped slowly and nothing more occurred until it suddenly began to move again and turned hard towards U-3 in an attempt to ram at 11.24 hours. Schepke quickly fired a badly aimed torpedo that hit the Vendiaaft and broke off the stern which sank immediately. The wreck sank after an explosion at 12.05 hours. Six survivors, among them the master, were picked up by the Germans after about 45 minutes and shortly thereafter transferred to the Danish steam merchant Svava for repatriation.

At 21.08 hours on 30 Sep 1939 the neutral Gun (Master J.M. Persson) was stopped by U-3 about 30 miles northwest of Hanstholm. The master came aboard with the papers of the ship, which showed that she was carrying contraband. While the Germans interviewed the master, the vessel suddenly began moving and turned towards the U-boat. Warned by a similar behavior of Vendia earlier that day, U-3 evaded quickly and sent a boarding party of four men, led by WO Lt. Fraatz, aboard at 22.00 hours. Shortly thereafter the U-boat had to dive when a vessel was sighted heading for the stopped ship, this proved to be HMS Thistle (N 24) (LtCdr R.W. Stirling-Hamilton, RN) which was attacked with one G7a torpedo at 22.56 hours. The torpedo missed and the submarine dived shortly afterwards, although they were not aware of the attack. The submerged HMS Thistle passed under the stern of the steamer, not knowing that Germans were aboard and prepared the ship for scuttling. The submarine surfaced after one hour and left the area, encountering the lifeboat with the Swedish crew. They told them to return to their ship as she was still afloat, but in the meantime the seacocks had been opened and scuttling charges were placed. The boarding party left the Gun in one of her lifeboats and were picked up by the Danish steam merchant Dagmar along with the Swedish survivors. At 05.30 hours, U-3 stopped this steamer to take off the boarding party and then went to the drifting Gun to sink her by a torpedo at 09.10 hours.(«uboat.net»)
A long account, given in full because it demonstrates the possible complexities of any U-boat attack under rules covering ship sinkings in the early months of the war. The sinking of Gun, a Swedish neutral of only 1198 tons, involves five ships, a possible ramming, and 12 hours of danger.

At sea

Quote:
Western Atlantic - convoy HX.3 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT, and was joined at sea by four unescorted steamers which had departed Halifax as HX.3S on the 29th. Heavy cruiser BERWICK patrolled five miles ahead of the convoy. The destroyers were detached on 1 October and BERWICK on the 2nd. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 14th October.
 
German waters - destroyers PAUL JACOBI and BRUNO HEINEMANN, which had recently completed refitting and repairs at Wilhelmshaven, were attacked by British bombers in the German Bight, but neither was damaged. Destroyers of the 1st Flotilla in the Jade prepared to sail in support, but the attack ended before they sailed.
                                                                             
English Channel - light cruiser CERES departed Plymouth on escort duties and arrived back later the same day.
 
Destroyer MONTROSE attacked a submarine contact 31 miles south of Plymouth, and was joined in the seach by destroyers ACHATES, ACHERON, ARROW, INTREPID, KINGSTON.
                                                                             
UK-France convoys - BC.7S of 17 steamers, including BARON MACLAY and NEW TEXAS (Cdre) departed Bristol Channel, escorted by destroyers VIVACIOUS, VISCOUNT, ESCORT, ELECTRA and arrived in the Loire on 2 October.
                                                                             
Caribbean - convoy KJ.(B)1 departed Kingston, unescorted most of the way, but was joined by destroyer WINCHELSEA from 12 to 14 October, when the convoy arrived in England.
 
Australian light cruiser PERTH departed Kingston on patrol duties.
                                                                             
Mediterranean - Convoy Blue 3 departed Port Said with 24 ships. Destroyers DUCHESS, DEFENDER and sloops GRIMSBY and FOWEY provided escort from the 30th to 5 October, when off Malta DUCHESS and DEFENDER were relieved by destroyers GRENADE and GRIFFIN. GRENADE and GRIFFIN detached off Algiers on the 8th to return to Malta and the convoy continued without escort from Algiers to Gibraltar.
 
Destroyers DUNCAN, DAINTY, DARING, after calling at Colombo on the 17th‑19th and Aden on the 26th‑27th September, reached Suez to join the Mediterranean Fleet.
 
South Atlantic - German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE sank steamer CLEMENT (5051grt) off Pernambuco IN 09‑05S, 34‑05W. The crew was put into boats until GRAF SPEE stopped Greek steamer PAPALEMOS (3748grt) and put on board CLEMENT’s Master and Chief Engineer. They were put ashore at Cape Verde Island on 9 October. One boat with 13 crew was picked up by Brazilian steamer ITATINGA (2114grt) on 1 October and taken to Bahia, arriving on the 3rd. The other three boats with the rest of the crew reached Maceio on the 4th.(Excerpted from «naval-history.net»)
NOTE: under German waters the incident described echoes an event recorded for 29 September in Bomber Command War Diaries, p 24.

Chers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/1/2017 1:38:39 PM
October 1, 1939

Poland


Quote:
On 1 October [Polish] Rear Admiral J. Unrug, commander at Hela, requested a surrender parley. The Polish emissary accepted the German terms of unconditional surrender at 1700 the same day and all resistance ceased. A total of 5,000 prisoners was taken at Hela to bring the number captured by
Corps Kaupisch during the course of operations to 18,000. Hela also yielded 41 artillery pieces of various calibers and two small naval vessels.

On 1 October Tenth Army was alerted for movement back to Germany. At the same time, OKH informed Army Group South that the demarcation line had been changed again and would follow the Pisia and Narew Rivers to Ostroleka, thence past Ostrow Mazowiecka to the Bug, south along the latter to a point east of Tomaszow, west to the San, and south to the Slovak frontier. This would extend the German zone to the east, in places over 100 miles. The change had been made at the request of the Soviet Government, which desired to add Lithuania to its own sphere of influence. In exchange for Lithuania the Russians were willing to give the Germans that area of Poland between Warsaw and the Bug River.
[Read More]


Image: Partitioned Poland, 1939 - 1941. (Wikimedia)

Other


Quote:
Following the lightning-fast German successes in Poland, an instruction from the French General Staff, transmitted to all units, instructs "the preponderant role of armored units is to act in close liaison with air power". (derniere-guerre.com)



Quote:
London decrees the conscription of young men aged 20 to 22 years. (derniere-guerre.com)



Quote:
In Germany, the unit price of margarine increases from 0.63 to 0.98 Reichsmarks. In Protestant churches in Germany, thanks is given from the pulpits for a "rich harvest" on the "Polish battlefields". (chroniknet.de)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1957

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/1/2017 4:32:48 PM
Day 31 1st October

Hitler orders what will become known as “Aktion T4” – a secret euthanasia programme. It is backdated to 1st September so as to appear as a war measure.

[Read More]





T4 Begutachter



“Wo bringen sie uns hin ?” – ( Where are you bringing us ? – The Memorial










This is just a few bustops from me.

Trevor


---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/1/2017 7:02:10 PM
Trevor, just a note about "T-4". It was antedated by some years by other Nazi programs enacted as early as July, 1933.[Read More]
I'm certain you are aware of this, but some MHO members may not be.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/1/2017 7:45:33 PM
Day 31. October 1 (continued)
Sunday

Non-date related sidebar included with Oct. 1 items from Goralski, p 97:
Quote:
ENEMY ALIENS IN BRITAIN
At the outbreak of the war 75,000 Germans and Austrians lived in Great Britain. Within days about 350 were arrested as dangerous. The more obviously pro-Nazis had already left the country. An estimated 50,000 were refugees and presumed relatively “safe.” All Germans and Austrians not arrested, however, were restricted. None could travel more than five miles from home without having official permission or own a plane, boat, car, camera, nautical chart, or large-scale map unless authorized. Tribunals were established to pass on the loyalty of the questionable enemy aliens. Within two months 19,300 cases were reviewed. Of these, 15,140 were released with no further restrictions, 3,920 remained under restrictive security, and 230 were interned.
NOTE: The Tribunals were established by 28 September, meaning that on average they were making decisions on the lives of 315 persons per day.

Poland

Quote:
The poles have left 694,,000 prisoners in German hands and 217,000 more in the hands of the Russians. The number of Polish dead, wounded and missing is not known. The Germans have come out of the operations cheaply, with 10,572 dead, 30,322 wounded and 3,409 missing. (2194 Days.p 29)


Far East

Quote:
Japanese XI Corps forces began withdrawing from northern Hunan Province in China, ending an abortive attempt which began in early August to capture Changsha and the Tungting Lake area. Known as the first battle of Changsha, the action was a major victory for Chiang Kai-shek’s forces which had previously failed to distinguish themselves in battle. (Goralski, pp 96-7)


U-boats

Quote:
At 18.45 hours on 1 Oct 1939, U-35 attempted to stop the neutral and unarmed Suzon (Master R. Lejeune) by light signals, but she tried to escape and only stopped when a warn shot from the deck gun actually hit #2 hold. The 20 crew members then hastily abandoned ship in two lifeboats and were questioned by the Germans, who gave them the course to the nearest land. The U-boat then fired a torpedo that hit the ship on port side abreast the funnel, causing her to break in two and to sink almost immediately 42 miles 330° from Ushant. At 00.05 hours on 2 October, the survivors were picked up by HMS Acheron (H 45) (LtCdr R.W.F. Northcott, RN), escorting convoy MB-10 and landed at Brest on 4 October. («uboat.net»)
Suzon was a Belgian merchantman of 2,239 tons. All 20 of her crew survived.

At sea

Quote:
RN ship movements – Battleships RESOLUTION and REVENGE of the Channel Force at Portland were ordered to join the South Atlantic Command at Freetown. The orders were cancelled on the 5th before sailing. On the 7th, both battleships sailed for Halifax and duty in the North Atlantic Escort Force.

Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK departed Portsmouth on 29 September escorted by destroyer EXPRESS. The cruiser arrived at Scapa Flow on the 1st to relieve light cruiser EDINBURGH in Cruiser Squadron 18. EDINBURGH was then attached to Cruiser Squadron 2 of the Humber Force. Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived at Rosyth on the 3rd. After completing the replacement of a gun at Rosyth, both heavy cruisers proceeded to the Mediterranean. NORFOLK departed Rosyth on the 7th and SUFFOLK departed Scapa Flow on the 8th. En route in heavy weather on the 11th, NORFOLK's Walrus was washed off the catapult and lost and her catapult trolley badly damaged. Both cruisers arrived at Gibraltar on the 12th and departed on the 14th. They arrived at Alexandria on the 18th.

Battleships NELSON, RODNEY, battlecruisers HOOD, REPULSE, aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL, light cruiser NEWCASTLE (above, postwar - Navy Photos) and destroyers ASHANTI, MASHONA, MATABELE, SOMALI, FAME, FORESIGHT, FORTUNE and FIREDRAKE departed Scapa Flow for Loch Ewe where they arrived at 0700/2nd.

Light cruisers DIOMEDE and DUNEDIN, which departed Scapa Flow on 30 September, were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes. Light cruisers CARDIFF and DRAGON, which departed Scapa Flow on 28 September, were also on Northern Patrol.

UK-France convoys – Convoy OA.13 departed Southend escorted by destroyers JACKAL and JANUS, and dispersed in 48-50N, 13-40W on the 4th.

Convoy OB.13 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VERSATILE and WARWICK to 4 October.

Convoy DB.10 departed Southampton with two personnel ships, escorted by destroyers ARROW and INTREPID, and arrived at Brest on the 2nd.
 
Convoy MB.10 departed Southampton with six cargo ships, escorted by destroyers ACHERON and ACHATES, and also arrived at Brest on the 2nd.
 
Convoy BC.6F of steamers FENELLA, ST JULIEN, TYNWALD and ULSTER PRINCE departed the Loire without escort, and safely arrived in the Bristol Channel. («http://www.naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/1/2017 7:49:58 PM
Night 31. October 1/2
Sunday/Monday

Quote:
The first British Aircraft of the war to fly over Berlin – from 10 Squadron [ed.: of 4 Group] – did so on 1/2 October; this was a round trip of at least 1,000 miles. Airfields in France, particularly Villeneuve near Paris, were often used as advanced refuelling bases for distant targets or as relief landing grounds on return from long flights. (BC War Diaries, p 23)
NOTE: Middlebrook's comment is a reminder that RAF a/c could not fly over either Belgium or Holland, since both states were still neutral. Their aggressive neutrality hindered RAF Bomber Command until the German invasion of the west in May 1940.

Quote:
RAF planes flew over Berlin for the first time in the war, dropping leaflets. (Goralski, p 97)


Quote:
BERLIN, [I]October[/I] 2
Just heard the BBC announce that English planes had flown over Berlin last night. A surprise to us here. No air-raid alarm. No sound of planes. But they’re all lying these days. The Germans say they’ve sunk the Ark Royal, for instance. 9Berlin Diary, p 228)

NOTE: this raid – wherever it may have ended up dropping those leaflets – came two days after a full moon. Full moon provides much better ground illumination, and therefore in theory better navigational assistance, to night bomber crews throughout the war. Thus the full moon was called a “bomber’s moon”. IIRC, RAF bomber crews increasingly called it a “night-fighter’s moon” – just a touch of what the Germans called Galgenhumor.

Like all terms, it can be demonstrated and/or disproved. The first RAF Millenial raid on Cologne was under a full moon; the five-day Battle of Hamburg was over by the full moon.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/2/2017 2:23:21 AM
October 2, 1939

Poland

Editor's note:
Despite the fall of Warsaw and the defeat of the Polish Army, Polish resistance continues. The first resistance organizations have already formed, and units of the regular army remain in the field. There is one battle yet to be fought on Polish soil. A government in exile has formed in Paris, and Polish soldiers are making their way to France in sufficient strength to organize two infantry divisions by the time of the campaign in the West in the spring of 1940. Germany and the Soviet Union do not yet understand that, though they have occupied Poland and formally removed it from the map of Europe, they have not defeated Poland. Polish troops, despite everything, would go on to fight on every front in the European war, and Poland, as a (vastly and violently altered) nation-state would reemerge after the war. And even after 45 years of domination by Soviet communism and its Polish helpers, a thread of memory endured among the Poles: memories that honored the Poland of prewar times, the sacrifice of the Polish Army in 1939, and the officially forgotten Polish formations that fought in western Europe throughout the entire war.

This all occurred despite a massive national bloodbath. Estimates vary a bit, but most center around the figure of six million civilian casualties ... six million from a prewar population of 27 million. The civilian losses were almost evenly divided between ethnic Poles and Jews. Beyond these losses, Polish sources estimate a loss of some 155,000 soldiers killed or missing during the course of the entire war.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/2/2017 5:33:14 PM
Day 32. October 2 (continued)
Monday

Western Atlantic

Quote:
A “zone of safety” around the Western Hemisphere was proclaimed by the Congess of American Republics in Panama. South of Canada, the zone varied in width from 300 to 1,000 miles, and belligerents were warned to stay clear. The action was objected to by the British and Germans, London on the grounds it would work to the disadvantage of the Royal Navy, and Berlin because it restricted U-boat operations.
• Germany advised the U.S. all merchant ships in international waters were subject to German navy boardings for search. (Goralski, p 97)

Germany
Quote:
BERLIN, October 2
The family of Eleanor K., a naturalized American girl of German parentage who has been very helpful to me for years, has been after me since yesterday to do something about locating her. She left Amsterdam for Berlin a few days ago, but failed to arrive. I went of the the consulate today and G. to put through a blitz call to the German secret police at the Dutch border. Answer: Eleanor is under arrest there. How shall I explain that to her family? (Berlin Diary, pp 228-9)

U-boats

Quote:
At 18.25 hours on 2 Oct 1940 the unescorted Kayeson (Master William Ayres) was hit in the fore ship by the last torpedo from U-32 west of Ireland. The submerged U-boat came too close to the target and slightly collided with its rudder, bending the bow to port. They surfaced and tried to finish her off with the last two rounds from the deck gun, but missed due to high swells. Shortly thereafter the ship sank steeply by the bow. The Germans had observed how the crew abandoned ship in the lifeboats, but the master and 37 crew members were lost. («boat.net»)
NOTE: Kayeson was a British steam merchantman carrying 2802 tons of general cargo and 3901 tons of coal.

At sea

Quote:
Hunt for Graf Spee – The Admiralty received their first notice that a German raider was operating off Pernambuco when news of the sinking of the CLEMENT by pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE reached England. They responded with the immediate dispatch of aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL and battlecruiser RENOWN to Freetown. ARK ROYAL and destroyers ASHANTI and FORESIGHT departed Loch Ewe on the evening of the 2nd, while RENOWN and destroyers TARTAR and BEDOUIN left Scapa Flow the same day, and joined at sea. Following their escort duties, the destroyers returned to Scapa Flow on the 4th. To relieve ARK ROYAL, FURIOUS, which was being used as a training aircraft carrier at Rosyth, was ordered to join the Home Fleet for operations at Loch Ewe. FURIOUS departed Rosyth on the 1st escorted by destroyers JERVIS, JUPITER, JAGUAR and STURDY. On the 2nd, JERVIS and JAGUAR attacked a submarine contact off Bell Rock, River Tay.
 
Special duties – Light cruisers EFFINGHAM, EMERALD, ENTERPRISE departed Scapa Flow for Plymouth, where they arrived late on the 3rd. At Plymouth, EMERALD and ENTERPRISE embarked gold for transfer to Canada, while EFFINGHAM underwent repairs completed on the 9th.
 
Gibraltar convoys – The first of the UK to Gibraltar convoys, OG.1, of 37 ships was formed from two convoys. Light cruiser CERES departed Plymouth on the 1st to escort OG.1 to Gibraltar and act as convoy commodore. (1) OA.12G was escorted by CERES and destroyers IMPERIAL and ISIS, (2) OB.12G was escorted by destroyers ILEX and IMOGEN. The four destroyers were detached on the 3rd and joined convoy HG.1. On the 8th, the convoy was joined by destroyer VELOX from Gibraltar, when, still escorted by CERES, it arrived at Gibraltar.

[Ed. summary:] Considerable activity surrounding ship movements, from Scapa to the Yangtse, largely to strengthen RN resources in Home waters. («www.naval-history.net»)


Quote:
Lloyd George stood in the House of Commons. It was October 3, 1939.
“It is quite clear from what has appeared int eh press,: the former prime minister said, “that there has been discussion between the parties concerned, Russia, Germany and Italy, of more detailed terms of peace.” He wondered whether Parliament might not go into secret session to talk over any proposals; it was, he said, very important not to make any hurried rejection. (Human Smoke, p 148)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/3/2017 5:26:42 AM
October 3, 1939

Poland


Quote:
Army Group South's commander was redesignated OB EAST (Oberbefehlshaber Ost) as of 3 October, with responsibility for all of occupied Poland. Under this reorganization, Rundstedt became the Commander in Chief East.
[Read More]

Western Front


Quote:
1 Corps of the British Expeditionary Force takes up positions on the French-Belgian frontier. (chroniknet.de)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/3/2017 4:58:32 PM
Day 33. October 3 (continued)
Tuesday

Very little activity on land or in the air. No snippets from Berlin Diary.

U-Boats

One sinking:
Quote:
About 15.40 hours on 3 October 1939 the unescorted and neutral Diamantis(Master Panagos Pateras) was hit by one torpedo from U-35 and sank about 40 miles south-southwest of the Scilly Islands. She had been stopped in bad weather by the U-boat at 13.15 hours and the crew was ordered to abandon ship. After the first two G7a torpedoes fired exploded prematurely, a G7e torpedo was fired and worked correctly. Because the lifeboats were not suited for use in the bad weather, Lott decided to take all crew members aboard and landed them the next day in Dingle Bay, Ireland. «uboat.net»
Diamantis was a Greek merchantman carrying 7,700 tons of manganese ore to Barrow-in-Furness. Ship’s complement of 28 all survived. Werner Lott, Kapitänleutnant of U-35, survived the war, dying in 1997 aged 89.

At sea

Quote:
Home waters – Anti-aircraft cruisers CALCUTTA departed Grimsby on patrol and arrived back on the 4th, while CAIRO departed and arrived back later the same day.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy OA.14 of seven ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers KELLY, KINGSTON, MONTROSE from the 3rd to 6th.
 
Convoy OB.14 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANOC and WHIRLWIND until the 5th.
 
Convoy BC.8S departed Bristol Channel, escorted by destroyers EXMOUTH (S.O.) and EXPRESS. The convoy was also escorted by French large destroyers L'INDOMPTABLE, TRIOMPHANT and MILAN on the 4th and 5th, and arrived in the Loire on the 5th.
 
Convoy SA.10 of one cargo ship departed Southampton, escorted by destroyer ANTHONY, and reached Brest on the 4th.
 
Convoy FS.16 departed Methil, arriving at Southend on the 5th. There was no FN.16 convoy.
 
Kattegat/Skagerrak – German destroyers HERMANN SCHOEMANN, FRIEDRICH IHN, ERICH STEINBRINCK and torpedo boats GREIF, FALKE and ALBATROS conducted anti-shipping patrols in the Kattegat and Skagerrak from the 3rd to 5th.
… 
Shim movement – Heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE, which departed Alexandria on the 2nd, left Suez on the 3rd for the Red Sea. They reached Aden on the 6th and departed the same day for duty in the Indian Ocean, arriving at Simonstown on the 13th.
 
Heavy cruiser CUMBERLAND and light cruiser DESPATCH departed Freetown for South America, with DESPATCH arriving at Bermuda on the 15th for docking.
 
Heavy cruiser BERWICK arrived at Halifax.
 
Mediterranean convoys – Destroyers GRENVILLE, GIPSY, GRENADE, GRIFFIN from Convoy Green 3 and DELIGHT and DECOY from other escort duties arrived at Malta. DELIGHT and DECOY departed the next day, while GRENADE and GRIFFIN left on the 5th to relieve destroyers DUCHESS and DEFENDER escorting convoy Blue 3. DUCHESS and DEFENDER reached Malta on the 5th.
 
Convoy SO.19 of armed merchant cruiser ALCANTARA (22,209grt) and steamers ATHLONE CASTLE (25,564grt), EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA (21,833grt) and FRANCONIA (20,175grt) arrived at Gibraltar. Destroyers INGLEFIELD and IVANHOE arrived separately that day after being separated in heavy weather. From there, the convoy proceeded as Convoy Red 2 escorted by destroyers GREYHOUND and GLOWWORM, later joined by sister ships GRENVILLE and GIPSY.
 
Far East – Norwegian steamer HOEGH TRANSPORTER (4914grt) was sunk on a British defensive minefield off St John Island at the entrance to Singapore with the loss of one member of crew. The wreck and cargo were salved. («naval-history.net»


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/4/2017 1:00:33 AM
October 4, 1939

Poland


Quote:
The last organized stand by the Polish Army was made at Kock, where heavy fighting raged from 4 to 6 October. Panzer and motorized infantry units of Tenth Army ended this last Polish resistance, and the Kock force surrendered on 6 October, adding 17,000 more to the total of prisoners taken by the Germans. The Polish Campaign was over, though sporadic fighting was to continue in some of the more remote areas for a considerable period.
[Read More]

Editor's note: The fighting at Kock was the last large organized stand by the prewar Polish Army. The next phase of conventional warfare on the territory that had been part of the Polish Republic of 1939 would take place on June 22, 1941.


Image: Battle of Kock, situation as of 5 October 1939

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/4/2017 3:03:15 PM
Day 34. October 4 (continued)
Wednesday


Quote:
BERLIN, October 4
Two choice press bits today: The 12-Uhr Blatt headline in red ink all over page 1: “ENGLAND’S RESPONSIBILITY – FOR THE OUTRAGEOUS PROVOKING OF WARSAW TO DEFEND ITSELF.” The Nachtausgabe’seditorial, arguing that America is not nearly so anxious to join the war ‘as are Herr Roosevelt and his Jewish camarilla.” (Berlin Diary, p230)


U-boats

Quote:
At 06.00 hours on 4 Oct 1939 the unescorted Glen Farg (Master Robert Galloway Hall) was hit by a G7a torpedo from U-23 about 60 miles south-southwest of Sumburgh Head. The ship had been spotted at 04.45 hours and was stopped with machine gun fire. The Germans re-opened fire when the radio was used and waited for the crew to abandon ship before sinking her with the torpedo. The survivors were picked up by HMS Firedrake (H 79)(LtCdr S.H. Norris, RN) and landed at Kirkwall the next day. («boat.net»)
Glen Farg, a steam merchant of under 1,000 tons, was sailing from Folden Fjord near Trondheim to Grangemouth carrying general cargo, including pulp, carbide, paper and ferro-chrome. Ships complement lost 1 of 17.

Glen Farg was sunk by Otto Kretschmer, one of the most successful U-boat captains. He was depth-charged and, after surfacing and saving most of his crew, his U-99 sank from under him. He spent the rest of the war in a POW camp in Canada, but ultimately returned to duty with the post-war German navy. He died in 1998 at age 86.

At sea

Quote:
Home waters – Destroyers FEARLESS and FOXHOUND arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Submarine SWORDFISH began a refit at Dundee completed on 12 February 1940, and arrived at Blyth on the 13th. The same day, she proceeded to Scapa Flow, via Rosyth, to work up.
 
Atlantic coast – French heavy cruisers ALGÉRIE, DUPLEIX and destroyers MAILLÉ BRÉZÉ and VAUQUELIN departed Oran for Dakar, arriving on the 14th.
 
French submarine BÉVÉZIERS departed Cherbourg for Brest, escorted by large destroyer JAGUAR.
 …
 
Skagerrak and Kattegat – German destroyers HERMANN SCHOEMANN, FRIEDRICH IHN, ERICH STEINBRINCK and torpedo boats GREIF, FALKE, ALBATROS operated in the Skagerrak and Kattegat on contraband control duties. Swedish steamers BRITT (1544grt) and MERCIA (1184grt) were taken in prize by German warships 12 miles south of Hano in the Baltic and taken to Rendsburg. They were renamed LEBA and TRAUTE FAULBAUM, respectively, for German service.
 
Major convoy – Convoy KJ.3 departed Kingston escorted by light cruiser ORION, which was relieved by heavy cruiser BERWICK on the 8th, and later Australian light cruiser PERTH, both of which were relieved on the 15th in 39‑58N, 43W by cruiser EFFINGHAM. … [Ed. truncation: RN and French assets at various times during this convoy’s crossing totalled some 30 ships.] KJ.3 arrived off southern Ireland on the 25th, with EFFINGHAM reaching Devonport on the 26th for boiler cleaning, and the convoy arriving on the 28th with WOLVERINE, VERITY, VOLUNTEER and VERSATILE.
 
Ship movements – Destroyers INGLEFIELD and IVANHOE departed Gibraltar to return to Plymouth after escort duty with convoy SO.19.
 
Submarine SEAL arrived at Alexandria from the Red Sea.
 
Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM departed Singapore on patrol and arrived back on the 22nd.
 
Light cruiser DURBAN departed Capetown for Simonstown, arriving on the 6th.
 
New Zealand light cruiser LEANDER departed Wellington for Auckland. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/5/2017 6:48:27 AM
October 5, 1939

Poland: Fighting continues around Kock.

Other:


Quote:
In Moscow, the USSR and Latvia sign a support pact that gives the Soviets military bases in Latvia. (chroniknet.de)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/5/2017 1:51:17 PM
Day 35. October 5 (continued)
Thursday

Quote:
Hitler flew to Warsaw to inspect the damage inflicted by his forces.
• Latvia and Russia signed a 10-year mutual assistance treaty. The Soviets were given naval and air bases on the Baltic Sea.
• Russia, saying that “now that the international situation has altered on account of the war,” invited Finland to begin discussions on territorial adjustments.
• The last of the Polish troops surrendered, in the Radzyn-Kock area. In all, about 694.000 Poles out of an 800,000-man force were captured by the Germans. The remainder were killed, captured, or fled to Rumania and Hungary. Germany army losses in the campaign were 13,111 killed and missing and 27, 278 wounded. ( Goralski, p 97)
Compare this with a second statement:

Quote:
Mutual assistance treaty, signed between the USSR and Latvia, granting Russian sea and air bases. 92194 Days, p29)
Ed’s note: Neither 2194 Days nor data provided by Bill Wilson mentions the last resistance as ending on Oct. 5.

One more comparison, though probably of apples and oranges. A relatively lengthy assessment by Shirer is worth offering in full. It demonstrates the value of a thinking mind in assessing incoming data:

Quote:
BERLIN, October 5
Reichtag tomorrow. Hitler expected to offer peace terms. No one expects them to be very generous. He himself flew to Warsaw today to hold a triumphant review of his troops. He mad a speech to his soldiers, the speech of a conquering Caesar.
The people here certainly want peace. The government may want it for the moment. Will Britain and France make it now, and then maybe next year have to mobilize again? Hitler has won the war in Poland and lost the peace there – to Russia. The Soviets, without a fight, get nearly half of Poland and a stranglehold on the Baltic states and now block Germany from its two main goals in the east, Ukrainian wheat and Rumanian oil. Hitler is hastily withdrawing all Germans from the Baltic states, where most of them have been settled for centuries. Estonia has capitulated to Moscow and agreed to the Soviets’ building an air and naval base on its soil. The foreign ministers of Latvia and Lithuania are shuttling back and forth between their capitals and Moscow trying to save the pieces. And once the Soviets get a wedge in these Baltic states, how soon will they go Bolshevik? Soon. Soon. (Berlin Diary, pp 230-2310)


U-boats

No ships sunk. Marwarri, an 8,000 ton merchantman, was damaged by a mine laid by U-32 in Bristol Channel. She was carrying “government stores”. Of her 31 crew, 2 died.

At sea

Quote:
Concentraton at Scapa – Battleships NELSON, RODNEY, battlecruisers HOOD, REPULSE, and aircraft carrier FURIOUS and escorting destroyers departed Loch Ewe and arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Light cruiser SHEFFIELD departed Scapa Flow for Invergordon, arriving on the 6th. She was back at Scapa the same day.
 
Home waters – Light cruisers CALYPSO and CALEDON departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol. CALYPSO arrived back on the 11th and CALEDON on the 13th.

Steamer MARWARRI (8063grt) was damaged in the Bristol Channel, 3½ miles 190° from Scarweather Light Vessel, on a mine laid by U.32 on 17 September. She was run aground in Mumbles Bay to prevent her sinking and salved the following month.


Submarine SEAWOLF fired two torpedoes at German torpedo boat FALKE in 57-39N, 9-28E, but missed. The target was reported as a light cruiser of the NÜRNBERG class.
 
Convoys – Convoy OA.15 of six ships departed Southend escorted by destroyer ANTELOPE from the 5th to 8th, when the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.15 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WALPOLE and WINCHELSEA until the 8th.
 
Convoy BC.7S of 17 steamers including NEW TEXAS (Commodore), departed Quiberon Bay escorted by destroyers EXPRESS, ESK, ESCAPADE and ECLIPSE, and arrived safely in Barry Roads on the 8th.
 
After survey ship FRANKLIN sighted a submarine 9 miles 310° from Calais High Light, destroyer BRAZEN carried out an unsuccessful search.
 
U.K.-Gibralter convoys –French destroyers CASSARD and KERSAINT arrived at Gibraltar to exchange convoy escort duty with British destroyers GREYHOUND and GLOWWORM.

Mediterranean convoys –Steamers ALCANTARA (22,209grt) and FRANCONIA (20,75grt) of convoy Red 2 collided between Gibraltar and Malta. The convoy proceeded to Malta where FRANCONIA was repaired completing on 14 November, while ALCANTARA after temporary repairs and escorted by destroyer GRIFFIN, was able to proceed on the 13th for Alexandria, arriving on the 16th. Destroyer GRENVILLE continued with steamer EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA, and destroyer GIPSY, no longer needed to escort ALCANTARA, headed for Alexandria.
 
Convoy HGF.2 departed Gibraltar with liners CIRCASSIA (11,136grt) and DERBYSHIRE (11,660grt), and arrived at Liverpool on the 9th. Both liners were taken in hand for conversion to armed merchant cruisers.
 
Convoy HG.2 of 13 ships departed Gibraltar escorted by destroyers DOUGLAS and VELOX. Ocean escort was provided by armed merchant cruiser ALAUNIA which sailed with the convoy from the 5th to 13th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
Surface raiders – German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE captured steamer NEWTON BEECH (4651grt) in the South Atlantic in 09‑35S, 06‑30W. After her cargo and crew were transferred, she was scuttled late on the 8th.
 
German pocket battleship DEUTSCHLAND sank steamer STONEGATE (5044grt) east of Bermuda in 31‑10N, 54‑00W after the crew had been taken off. Later, when American steamer CITY OF FLINT was captured, STONEGATE’s crew was transferred to her.
 
Response to surface raiders – As a result of the sinkings by German pocket battleships, the British Admiralty ordered the organization of further Hunter Groups along the lines of the ARK ROYAL-RENOWN force.
 
Battleship RAMILLIES in the Mediterranean was ordered to join the North Atlantic Escort Force, departed Gibraltar at 1215, escorted by destroyers WISHART and VORTIGERN, but was recalled at 2233/6th to replace battleship MALAYA, due to leave the Mediterranean. RAMILLIES, WISHART and VORTIGERN arrived back at Gibraltar on the 8th. RAMILLES stayed in the Mediterranean until November when she was transferred to the East Indies, serving with the 3rd Battle Squadron at Aden from November until May 1940.
 
Heavy cruisers NORFOLK, SUFFOLK and light cruiser EFFINGHAM were detached from the Home Fleet to operate in the Denmark Strait against any raider threat to the convoy routes in the South Atlantic (at that time only GRAF SPEE had been identified. They were there to keep other raiders from going into the South Atlantic or returning to Germany). EFFINGHAM proceeded to Plymouth to repair defects, and left again on the 9th.
 
Light cruisers COLOMBO and CERES of the 11th Cruiser Squadron, previously attached to the Northern Atlantic Command at Gibraltar and the Channel Force based at Portland respectively, replaced EFFINGHAM in the Northern Patrol. The 12th Cruiser Squadron, Northern Patrol was redesignated the 11th Cruiser Squadron, and COLOMBO became Flagship of Captain R J R Scott AM, Commodore, 2nd Class at Plymouth on the 9th. She arrived on station on the 13th and CERES on the 31st after refitting at Plymouth.
 
[Ship movement – NORFOLK and SUFFOLK proceeded to the Mediterranean, where they served in the 1st Cruiser Squadron until arriving back in England on 11 November. They left Portsmouth on 16 and 18 November respectively, called at the Clyde, and were both on Northern Patrol on the 22nd. («naval-history.net»)
Editorial comment: the sea war can often be shortened, but on this date it is possible to get some idea of both the complexity of a war at sea and a hint of the concept that the RN was receiving intelligence concerning potential German naval actions. I’ll try to keep future naval data under control, but there will be certain times – Graf Spee, Bismarck, the Channel Dash and others – where greater detail may be deemed appropriate.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/6/2017 2:28:13 AM
Ed’s note: Neither 2194 Days nor data provided by Bill Wilson mentions the last resistance as ending on Oct. 5.

 Apparently, the last regular Polish units surrendered on October 6th. Wikipedia has this to say:


Quote:
The Polesie Independent Group [a battlegroup of a couple of divisions] surrendered on 6 October at 10:00. In his last order General Kleeberg wrote that the reason for his decision to capitulate was that they were surrounded and ammunition and food were depleted.


while a Polish site states:


Quote:
On October 5, General Kleeberg decided to surrender. SGO "Polesie" units laid down arms on 6 October in the area of Czarna.


... reading between the lines, it sounds like the battle was largely over by the close of October 5th but the formal surrender did not occur until the following day.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/6/2017 5:50:45 PM
Day 36. October 6
Friday. Third-quarter moon.

Germany

Quote:
Hitler delivered a Reichstag speech in which he indicated Germany was now content with its contests and would agree to peace with the Allies: “Germany has no further claims against France. …nowhere have i ever acted contrary to British interest.” (Goralski, p 97)

Quote:
In a speech in the Reichstag, Hitler appears for peace, proposing that the Western powers should recognize the new status quo in eastern Europe. (2194 Days, p29)

Excerpts from a lengthy diary entry by Shirer:
Quote:
BERLIN, October 6
Hitler delivered his much advertised “peace proposals’ in he Reichstag at noon today.

Hitler offered peace in the west if Britain and France stay out of Germany’s Lebensraum in eastern Europe. The future of Poland he left in doubt, though he said Poland would never agains endanger (!) German interest. In other words, a slave Poland, similar to the present slave Bohemia.

Hitler was calmer today than usual. … Most of the deputies I talked to afterwards took for granted that peace was assured. (Berlin Diary, pp31-2.)

In the air
No noted activity.

U-boats

Quote:
At 16.20 hours on 6 Oct 1939 the Lochgoil struck a mine laid on 17 September by U-32 about five miles off Scarweather Light Vessel in the Bristol Channel. She was run aground in Mumbles Bay, salvaged on 28 November and repaired at Swansea. («uboat.net)
Lochgoil, a British merchantman of some 9,400 tons, was carrying general cargo, including AA guns, from Newport to Vancouver. No crew were lost.

At sea

Quote:
Northern patrol – Light cruisers CARDIFF and DELHI departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol, arriving back on the 13th. At this time, six cruisers were at sea on Northern Patrol.
 
U.K. - France convoys – Convoy BC.9S of nine steamers, including BARON GRAHAM (Commodore), CERVANTES and TASSO, departed the Bristol Channel escorted by destroyers WESSEX, VANESSA (SO), VENETIA and VISCOUNT, and safely arrived in the Loire on the 8th.
 
Convoy SA.11 of one steamer departed Southampton, escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS, arriving at Brest on the 7th.
 
Convoy FN.17 departed Southend and reached Methil on the 8th, while FS.17 departed Methil and arrived at Southend on the 8th.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer ICARUS departed Malta after completing her collision repairs, left Gibraltar on the 8th and arrived at Plymouth on the 11th.
 
Light cruiser CAPETOWN, due to be assigned to the Northern Patrol, left Gibraltar for Malta at 1730/6th, and arriving on the 8th, commenced repairs which completed on the 21st.
 
Caribbean – American destroyer BORIE (DD 215, LCDR R M Morris) off the north coast of St Thomas, Virgin Islands, reported a submarine on the surface, which submerged on her approach. It turned out to be one of the French submarines in the Caribbean.(«naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/7/2017 10:37:30 AM
October 7, 1939

Germany


Quote:
A regulation of the Reichsverkehrsministeriums obligates all inland and seagoing vessels to comply with anti-aircraft defense requirements. (chroniknet.de)


Poland


Quote:
Heinrich Himmler is tasked with organizing the forced resettlement of Poles into the Generalgouvernement. (chroniknet.de)


Editor's note: Prewar Poland no longer exists. The bulk of the country has been annexed by Germany and the Soviet Union. Wikipedia: Hitler decreed the direct annexation to the German Reich of large parts of the occupied Polish territory in the western half of the German zone, in order to increase the Reich's Lebensraum. Germany organized most of these areas as two new Reichsgaue: Danzig-West Prussia and Wartheland. The remaining three regions, the so-called areas of Zichenau, Eastern Upper Silesia and the Suwałki triangle, became attached to adjacent Gaue of Germany. Draconian measures were introduced by both RKF and HTO to facilitate the immediate Germanization of the annexed territory, typically resulting in mass expulsions, especially in the Warthegau. The remaining parts of the former Poland were to become a German Nebenland (March, borderland) as a frontier post of German rule in the east. A Führer-decree of October 12, 1939 established the General Government; the decree came into force on October 26, 1939.


Images: Postage stamp and map of the Generalgouvernement, as it existed before the German invasion of Russia.

Western Front


Quote:
The British Expeditionary Force completed its crossing to France. (Wikipedia)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/7/2017 3:07:39 PM
Day 37. October 7 (continued)
Saturday.

No additional information re Poland to that provided by B Wilson.

No entry from my copy of Berlin Diary.

U-boats

Quote:
On 7 Oct 1939 the Binnendijk struck a mine laid on 10 September by U-26, 2.5 miles southeast of the Shambles Lightvessel and sank about 1 mile north of the Lightvessel at 14.00 hours the next day. The wreck was dispersed by explosives on 10 October.
Note: Bennedijk, a Dutch steam merchant of 6873 tons, sank with no loss of life to her crew of 42. She was carrying 1,000 tons of general cargo and oil on a Boston-New York-Rotterdam route.

At sea

Quote:
Ship movements – Battleship ROYAL SOVEREIGN departed Portsmouth at 0042, escorted by destroyers SALADIN and SCIMITAR and arrived at Devonport at 1240 to complete her refitting.
 
Destroyer ECHO departed Dover and arrived at Devonport on the 12th.
 
Destroyer ESKIMO arrived at Scapa Flow after repairs in the Tyne.
 
Atlantic convoys – Battleships REVENGE, RESOLUTION and aircraft carrier HERMES, escorted by destroyers WOLVERINE, WITHERINGTON, VOLUNTEER and VERITY departed Portland at 0930, and light cruisers EMERALD, ENTERPRISE, CARADOC, escorted by destroyers INGLEFIELD and IVANHOE, departed Plymouth, all on 7th. At 1910/7th both forces rendezvoused for passage to Halifax for escort duty. CARADOC had been at Plymouth since 25 September repairing defects prior to leaving station. Her refit completed on the 6th.
 
CARADOC rejoined the force at 0735/10th, and all ships arrived safely at Halifax on the 16th escorted into port by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT which joined on the 15th. In addition to their convoy escort duties, REVENGE and RESOLUTION were carrying a large amount of British silver for safekeeping in Canada. The Halifax Escort Force was commanded by Rear Admiral L E Holland who was relieved by Rear Admiral Stuart S Bonham-Carter on 1 January 1940. From Halifax, the Force could offer convoy protection in the Western Atlantic.
 
U.K.-France convoy – HERMES and CARADOC proceeded to Brest and en route, HERMES was met by French destroyers BOURRASQUE, ORAGE, and MISTRAL, which had also departed Brest on the 7th. The French ships arrived back on the 8th.
 
French naval operations – French battleship STRASBOURG and destroyers LE FANTASQUE, LE TERRIBLE and L'AUDACIEUX left Brest, still on the 7th, to join HERMES for operations as Hunter Group N and set out that evening for Dakar. Heavy cruisers ALGÉRIE and DUPLEIX joined en route and Group N arrived at Dakar on the 14th, where after refuelling, the Force was due to proceed to the West Indies.
 
French submarines FRESNEL, LE GLORIEUX and REDOUTABLE departed Toulon and arrived at Gibraltar on the 10th escorted by destroyer LA RAILLEUSE. They departed that day, escorted by destroyer LYNX and arrived at Casablanca on the 13th. LA RAILLEUSE left Gibraltar on the 11th to return to Toulon.

South Atlantic convoy – Convoy OA.16G of 27 ships departed Southend, escorted by destroyer ECHO from the 7th to 9th, and merged with OB.16G escorted by destroyer VIMY and patrol ship/minesweeper GLEANER to the 10th, on the 11th to form OG.2. This convoy reached Gibraltar on the 17th.

On the 7th, the Admiralty ordered the 4th Destroyer Flotilla, anti-aircraft cruiser COVENTRY, and sloops FLEETWOOD and GRIMSBY, now serving in the Mediterranean to sail for Portland with moderate dispatch.
 
Ship redeployment – [Destroyer] MOHAWK departed Malta on the 7th and Gibraltar on the 9th to return to England, reached Portland on the 11th, refuelled at Harwich and arrived at Humber on the 12th to join Rosyth Command.
 
GALATEA departed Malta on the 7th for Alexandria, arriving on the 10th. AFRIDI and GURKHA reached Malta on the 7th, left next day en route to England, departed Gibraltar on the 10th and arrived at Portland on the 13th for duty with the Home Fleet.
 
COSSACK, MAORI, ZULU, NUBIAN arrived at Alexandria on the 2nd from escorting convoy Green 2, and after refuelling left Alexandria on the 7th for Malta. COVENTRY left Alexandria on the 7th and arrived at Malta on the 9th. All five ships then sailed from Malta on the 9th, arrived at Gibraltar on the 11th and left the same day, arriving at Portland on the 14th without NUBIAN which reached Portsmouth the same day.
 
COVENTRY departed Portland on the 14th, and arrived at Portsmouth that night, left on the 19th for the Humber and reached Immingham on the 20th. COSSACK, MAORI, ZULU departed Portland immediately after refuelling and proceeded to the North Sea for escort duties.
 
FLEETWOOD departed Gibraltar on the 7th and arrived at Portland on the 11th. GRIMSBY was with convoy Blue 3, arrived at Gibraltar on the 11th and departed that day for Portland. In 36-02N, 6-50W, she attacked a submarine contact.
 
South Atlantic – German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE sank steamer ASHLEA (4222grt) in the South Atlantic in 09S, 03W after the crew was put aboard captured steamer NEWTON BEECH.
 
Caribbean – Heavy cruiser BERWICK called at Bermuda, departed again the same day, and arrived back on the 18th.

Eastern waters – Light cruiser LIVERPOOL departed Colombo and arrived at Bombay on the 9th.

Light cruiser DANAE departed Capetown on escort duties. … («naval.history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1957

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/7/2017 5:22:33 PM
Day 37. October 7

Germany

Adolf Hitler appoints Heinrich Himmler as “Reich Commissar for the protection of the German Race” and issues a decree empowering Himmler to deport all Jews from Greater Germany to the east, where they would be resettled together with almost 2 million Polish Jews now under German rule.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/8/2017 4:43:13 PM
Day 38. October 8 (continued)
Sunday.

No additional information concerning Poland or army activities.

Quote:
BERLIN, October 8.
…I leave tomorrow for Geneva to recover my senses and fetch some winter clothing, as the weather has turned cold. I did not bring any winter things when I left Geneva exactly two months ago. I did not know. Two months! What an age it seems. How dim in memory the time when there was peace. That world ended, and for me, on the whole, despite its faults, it injustices, its inequalities, it was a good one. I came of age in that one, and the life it gave was free, civilized, deepening, full of minor tragedy and joy and work and leisure, new lands, new faces – and rarely commonplace and never without hope.
And now darkness. A new world. Black-out, bombs, slaughter, Nazism. Now the night and the shrieks and barbarism. (Berlin Diary, p 233)

In the air

Quote:
NORTH SEA SWEEPS, 8 October to 2 December 1939

Flights by formations of bombers searching for German ships to attack were made on 9 days between 8 October and 2 December. The bombers did not approach the German mainland and the normal ‘beat’ was the 125-mile stretch of sea between Borkum and Salt which marked the outer limits of Germany’s small North Sea coast.
A total of 61 sorties were flown – 55 by Wellingtons and 6 by Hampdens. No German ships were seen; no bombs were dropped; no aircraft casualties were suffered. (Bomber Command War Diaries, p 24)

U-boats
Quote:
At 14.04 hours on 8 October 1939 the unescorted and neutral Vistula was stopped by U-37 with a shot across her bow about 35 miles northeast of Muckle Flugga, Shetland Islands. It was found that the ship was carrying contraband and she was sunk with 14 rounds from the deck gun at 15.00 hours. The crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats, was provided by the Germans with food and then set sails for the nearby Shetland Islands. («boat.net»)
Vistula, a Swedish merchantman of 1018 tons, was sailing from Gothenburg to Hull laden with general cargo, including steel and paper. Nine of her 18 complement died.

War at sea

Quote:
North Sea. German activity. - Sortie by German battlecruiser GNEISENAU, light cruiser KÖLN, and destroyers PAUL JACOBI, MAX SCHULTZ, BERND VON ARNIM, WILHELM HEIDKAMP, FRIEDRICH IHN, DIETHER VON ROEDER, ERICH STEINBRINCK, FRIEDRICH ECKHOLDT and KARL GALSTER from Kiel to operate off the south coast of Norway. They were to sink Allied shipping and entice the British Home Fleet into the range of Luftwaffe bombers. Destroyers HANS LODY and ERICH GIESE were to have sailed but suffered equipment defects. In addition, U.10, U.18, U.20, U.23 were deployed in a patrol line to attack the Home Fleet.
 
North Sea. U.K. response – Admiral Forbes, informed of these movements by a RAF Coastal Command Hudson sighting, went to sea from Scapa Flow with the Home Fleet. Battleships NELSON, RODNEY, battlecruisers HOOD, REPULSE, aircraft carrier FURIOUS, light cruisers AURORA, SHEFFIELD, NEWCASTLEand destroyers SOMALI, MASHONA, ASHANTI, ESKIMO, BEDOUIN, PUNJABI, FAULKNOR, FURY, FORESTER, FAME, FORESIGHT, FORTUNE and FIREDRAKE. Heavy weather damaged FORTUNE at the start and she detached to the Clyde arriving on the 9th, and repairing until 2 November.
 
HOOD, REPULSE, AURORA and SHEFFIELD with SOMALI, MASHONA, ESKIMO, ASHANTI sailed for a position 50 miles NW of Stadlandet in 63‑00N, 04‑00E. At the same time, NELSON, RODNEY, FURIOUS and NEWCASTLE with FAULKNOR, FURY, FORESTER, FAME, FORESIGHT, FIREDRAKE, PUNJABI and BEDOUIN sailed for a position north of Muckle Flugga in 61‑00N, 00‑00E,. Both forces were to reach their positions by dawn on the 9th, then steam towards each other in a pincer movement.
 
Skaggerrak – Light cruisers SOUTHAMPTON, EDINBURGH, GLASGOW with destroyers JERVIS, JUPITER, JAGUAR departed Rosyth, while destroyers JACKAL and JANUS departed Grimsby and joined at sea to operate off the mouth of the Skagerrak in 57‑45N, 05‑00E, before sweeping north. At 0605/9th, JAGUAR was detached to Rosyth for refuelling and en route, was attacked by German bombers, but not damaged. JERVIS and JUPITER were ordered to search for Danish steamer TEDDY (557grt) which had picked up the crew of a German Dornier flying boat shot down on the 8th. They too were attacked by German bombers at 1518, but again without damage. However, JUPITER broke down at sea at 1650 and was taken in tow by JERVIS.
 
JAGUAR, refuelling completed and JERSEY, which just finished repairs after her 22 September collision, were ordered to join the Humber Force off the Pentland Skerries to screen the withdrawal of JERVIS and JUPITER. Departing Rosyth, JAGUAR struck a small islet above the Forth bridge and damaged her starboard propeller shaft, arriving at Leith on the 11th for repairs. Just as unfortunate was JERSEY. Leaving at the same time she struck the Rosyth boom, and her repairs at Leith were not completed until the 16th.
 
SOUTHAMPTON, GLASGOW, EDINBURGH and JACKAL and JANUS of the Humber Force were heavily bombed by the Luftwaffe between 1120 and 1645/9th off the mouth of the Skagerrak. SOUTHAMPTON and GLASGOW were near missed, but neither was damaged. Shortly before arriving at Scapa Flow on the 10th, JUPITER was able to proceed on her own, screened by SOUTHAMPTON, GLASGOW, JACKAL and JANUS.
 
Battleship ROYAL OAK with destroyers MATABELE and STURDY sortied from Scapa Flow on the 9th to patrol to the west of the Shetlands in Fair Island Channel, but in heavy seas, ROYAL OAK's destroyers lost touch and she returned to Scapa Flow, arriving on the 10th.
 
Home Fleet destroyers FOXHOUND and FEARLESS undergoin minor repairs at Scapa Flow were absent from this operation. Destroyer TARTAR with major machinery defects was repairing at Scapa Flow until the 23rd.

U.K.-France convoys – Convoy BC.8S of steamers BARON MACLAY, CLAN MONROE and TRELAWNY departed the Loire escorted by destroyers WESSEX, VISCOUNT and VENETIA, and arrived safely in the Bristol Channel on the 10th.
 
Convoy FN.18 departed Southend and arrived at Methil on the 10th. There was no convoy FN.19.
 
Convoy FS.18 departed Methil and arrived at Southend on the 10th. There was no convoy FS.19.
 
Other German naval activity – U.15 completed a survey of the English east coast and Straits of Dover lightships and buoys.
 
Finnish steamer INDRA (2026grt) was badly damaged by a mine near Terschelling; six crew were injured and they, together with 14 other crew were taken to Ymuiden, where INDRA was towed for repairs.
 ...
U.12 was mined and sunk off Dover with the loss of her 27 crew. The body of commanding officer, Kptlt von der Ropp was found near Bleriot Plage near Calais on the 29th.
 
Gibraltar convoys – Convoy OG.2 was formed from the merging of OA.16G and OB.16G. The 30 ships proceeded to Gibraltar without an ocean escort, but were met by destroyers WATCHMAN and VELOX and escorted into Gibraltar on the 17th.
 
North Atlantic convoys – Convoy HX.4 departed Halifax at 0900, escorted by heavy cruiser YORK and Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT, the latter detaching on the 8th. YORK and FRASER detached on the 10th with YORK arriving back on the 13th. The bulk of the dispersed ships of the convoy reached Liverpool on the 22nd and one ship on the 24th.
 
Caribbean convoys –Convoy KJ.4, the last of the KJ series which only began on 15 September, departed Kingston. Because of German raiders in the Atlantic, ships from the Caribbean now went north along the American coast and joined the HX convoys from Halifax before beginning the Atlantic crossing.
 
Mediterranean convoy – Convoy Green 4 departed Gibraltar with 39 ships, including 14 from OG.1, escorted by French destroyers CASSARD, KERSAINT and British sloop ABERDEEN. The French ships were relieved on the 13th by British destroyer GRENADE, and the convoy reached Port Said on the 17th escorted by GRENADE and ABERDEEN. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3532

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/9/2017 7:48:47 AM
October 9, 1939

War at Sea


Quote:
In the Atlantic, [German] pocket battleship Deutschland intercepts the City of Flint, an American freighter, which took part in the rescue of the Athenia passengers (September 3) and transported 4,000 tons of petroleum products destined for Great Britain. Accused of smuggling, the American ship was seized by a German capture crew and sailed to Tromsø, Norway. It is the first time since the beginning of the war that an American ship is captured by the Germans. (derniere-guerre.com)


Western Front


Quote:
Directive Nr. 6 is issued by Hitler, ordering preparations to commence for an invasion of France through Belgium and The Netherlands. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
35 of 46 communist deputies in the French government are arrested for antiwar activity. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)


Other


Quote:
Finland mobilizes army reservists in response to Soviet pressure to alter the international border. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)


Cheers

BW

---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1957

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/9/2017 12:26:28 PM
Day 39 October 9

Poland


The first Jewish ghetto is established in Piotrkow, Poland.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1457

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/9/2017 2:53:01 PM
Day 39. October 9 (continued)
Monday. Waning crescent moon.

No notable activity in the air.

U-boats

Construction of 34 U-boats ordered this day. No ships lost to U-boats.

At sea

Quote:
Northern patrol – Six British cruisers were on their Northern Patrol stations.
 
Light cruiser BELFAST had departed Scapa Flow on the 1st for Northern Patrol. On the 8th, she stopped Swedish steamer LILJEVALCH (5492grt) but allowed her to continue after inspection, and next day, stopped Norwegian steamer TAI YIN (7077grt), sending her into Kirkwall to check for contraband.
 
Shortly after sending off TAI YIN, BELFAST sighted another steamer which proved to be German liner CAP NORTE (13,615grt) carrying German reservists from South America. She was captured 50 miles NW of the Faroes in 63N, 10W and light cruiser CALYPSO, also on Northern Patrol in the area, arrived to assist. CAP NORTE was sent off towards Kirkwall under a prize crew…, and at 0730/10th, was turned over to light cruiser DELHI. They … reached Kirkwall on the 12th. CAP NORTE was renamed EMPIRE TROOPER for British use as a troopship. After dealing with her, BELFAST, her prize crews depleted, returned to Scapa Flow, arriving at 1500/13th.
 
From 29 September to 12 October, 64 ships were sighted by the Northern Patrol. Of these 26 were eastbound and 20 of them were sent to Kirkwall for inspection. CAP NORTE was the only German ship intercepted in this period.
 
Local waters – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Grimsby on escort duties and arrived back on the 11th.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Grimsby on escort duties and arrived back on the 10th.
 
Destroyers VIVACIOUS and ESCAPADE were involved in a minor collision leaving Milford Haven. ESCAPADE was docked at Newport completing repairs on the 20th, while VIVACIOUS was only very slightly damaged and did not require repair.
 
French naval activity – French large destroyer PANTHÈRE collided with Belgian trawler VAN EYCK near Boulogne, and was repaired at Cherbourg, completing at the end of October.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy OA.17 of eleven ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers ACASTA and ARDENT from the 9th to 11th.
 
Convoy OB.17 escorted by destroyers IMOGEN and ILEX departed Liverpool, the destroyers remaining with the convoy until the 12th.
 
Convoy BC.10F of troopship ULSTER PRINCE departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyers EXPRESS and ENCOUNTER, and arrived safely in the Loire on the 11th.
 
Convoy BC.10S of steamers BEAVERDALE, BELLEROPHON (Commodore), BRIARWOOD, CITY OF DERBY, DORSET COAST, EILDON, ERATO, FLORISTAN, LYCAON, MERKLAND, PEMBROKE COAST, RAMON DE LARRINGA and VOLO departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyers EXMOUTH, ECLIPSE, MONTROSE and VIVACIOUS. The convoy safely arrived in the Loire on the 11th.
 
Convoy SA.12 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by destroyers VENOMOUS and ANTHONY, and reached Brest on the 10th.
 
Caribbean convoys – Destroyers WALPOLE, AMAZON and WINCHELSEA departed Milford Haven to escort convoy KJ.1B.

North Atlantic – German pocket battleship DEUTSCHLAND stopped American steamer CITY OF FLINT (4963grt) in the North Atlantic off the Newfoundland Banks. Captured British crew from steamer SOUTHGATE were put aboard, and disguised as Danish steamer ALF, she sailed towards Murmansk, arriving at Tromso on the 20th and the British crew put ashore. She continued on to Kola Bay where she arrived on the 22nd.
 
Ship encounters – Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL and battlecruiser RENOWN, sailing as Force K and en route to Freetown, encountered a merchant ship which identified herself as the American DELMAR. Lacking destroyers, the merchant ship could not be boarded and she was allowed to go on her way. Later intelligence revealed that the genuine DELMAR was in New Orleans and this had been German supply ship ALTMARK.
 
Mediterranean – The 1st Battle Squadron - aircraft carrier GLORIOUS, light cruiser PENELOPE, and destroyers DUNCAN, DARING, DAINTY, GRAFTON, GIPSY, GALLANT and BULLDOG exercised off Alexandria. Battleship MALAYA with GLORIOUS, BULLDOG and DARING were then detached to Socotra to arrive on the 16th.
 
Destroyer DEFENDER arrived at Malta on the 5th and was out of service for 7 days with perforated boiler tubes.
 
Southen waters – Light cruiser DANAE departed Capetown on escort duties. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
Page 4 of 7 (Page: 1  2  3  4 5  6  7 ) 
 Forum Ads from Google