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The current time is: 11/18/2017 10:09:25 PM
 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3443

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/29/2017 1:07:23 PM
October 29, 1939


Quote:
Duce Benito Mussolini inaugurates the village of Pomezia in the drained Pontine Marshes. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
Soviet troops begin occupying bases in Latvia per their accord with that nation. (seconde-guerre.com)



Quote:
The American military attaché in Tokyo reports about 100,000 Chinese are serving in the Huang Hsieh Chun, auxiliary troops of the Japanese Army. (seconde-guerre.com)



Image: Pomezia today.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/29/2017 5:28:25 PM
Day 59. October 29
Sunday.

Europe
No additional activity to note.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No U-boats ordered on this date. U-33 sailed from Wilhelmshaven; U-24 entered Wilhelmshaven after a 7-day patrol. One British ship sunk. 15 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 01.50 hours on 29 Oct 1939, U-34 fired two torpedoes at two steamers and one destroyer in convoy HX-5A about 180 miles west of Lands End and claimed two hits. In fact, only the ship of convoy commodore, the Malabar (Master Henry Herbert Armstrong), was hit and sunk. … The master, the commodore (Rear Admiral G.W. Taylor, RNR), two naval staff members and 66 crew members were picked up by HMS Grafton (H 89) (Cdr M.S. Thomas, RN) and landed at Plymouth. («uboat.net»)
Malabar, a steam merchantman of 7,976 tones, was carrying general cargo, including lumber and tobacco, from Philadelphia via Halifax (hence HX code) to London. She was sunk on her 12th day out of Halifax. Of a total complement of 75, five were lost.

At sea
Quote:
Destroyer sweep – Destroyers JERVIS, JANUS, JUNO, JERSEY, JUPITER, JACKAL departed the Humber on operation AG. They swept off the Dutch coast, but made no contact with enemy shipping, although JERSEY was near missed by German bombing. The ships arrived back in the Humber on the 30th.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser SHEFFIELD arrived at Rosyth for refit, and departed on 9 November.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruisers CARDIFF and CALEDON were on Northern Patrol duties between the Orkneys and the Faroes, light cruisers DRAGON, DIOMEDE,COLOMBO between the Faroes and Iceland, and light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON and armed merchant cruisers CHITRAL and AURANIA in the Denmark Strait.
 …
East Coast flotillas – The 22nd Destroyer Flotilla was formed at Harwich for East Coast Defence… .[Editor’s note: This flotilla would change in size, complexity and leadership until early December.] 
 
Also, at Harwich, the 23rd Destroyer Flotilla was formed with CODRINGTON (Captain Simson, D.19) as leader, BOADICEA, ANTHONY, VANSITTART, VENOMOUS as the 45th Division, and BASILISK, BLANCHE, BEAGLE, BRAZEN as 46th Division.
 
In addition, destroyers BOREAS, which was repairing at Portsmouth until 13 November, and BRILLIANT were assigned to the 19th Destroyer Flotilla at Harwich.
 
Anti-submarine attacks – Polish destroyer BLYSKAWICA attacked a submarine contact in 54‑45N, 5‑12W.
 
North Atlantic convoys – Convoy OA.27 of thirteen ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers WANDERER and WAKEFUL from the 29th to 31st.
 
Convoy OB.28 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VIMY and MACKAY to 1 November.
 …
Neutral shipping – American steamer CRANFORD (6096grt) and Italian steamer MANZONI (3955grt) collided off Deal with light damage to CRANFORD and extensive damages to MANZONI .
 
Mediterranean – Battleship WARSPITE departed Alexandria escorted by destroyers DAINTY and DIANA, and arrived at Malta on the 31st. After a brief docking, she left on 4 November with the same escort , which was relieved by destroyers ISIS and ILEX east of Gibraltar on the 6th and WARSPITE arrived at Gibraltarlater that day.
 
Gibraltar-U.K. convoy – Convoy HG.5 of 40 ships departed Gibraltar escorted by French destroyers FOUGUEUX and L'ADROIT, from 29 October until their arrival at Brest on 6 November, and British destroyers DOUGLAS and VORTIGERN. The convoy arrived at various English ports on the 6th.
 
Caribbean –Light cruiser DESPATCH departed Kingston. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/30/2017 5:12:33 PM
Day 60. October 30
Monday.

Europe
Quote:
The USSR formally annexes the ocupied Polish territories.

German-Latvian treaty for the evacuation of Germans from the Baltic regions. 92194 Days, p 32)

Quote:
BERLIN, October 31.
Bad news for the people today. Now that it has become cold and rainy, with snow due soon, the government has decreed that only five per sent of the population is entitled to buy new rubbers or overshoes this winter. Available stocks will be rationed first to postmen, newsboys and street-sweepers. (Berlin Diary, p 241)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
Eight new U-boats ordered on this date. U-24 sailed from Wilhelmshaven. Three ships (2 British, 1 Greek sunk. 15 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 22.50 hours on 30 Oct 1939 the Cairnmona (Master Fred Wilkinson Fairley), dispersed from convoy HX-5, was torpedoed and sunk by U-13 three miles east-northeast of Rattray Head.

At 11.30 hours on 30 Oct 1939 the neutral Thrasyvoulos was stopped by signals from U-37 and the inspection of the papers revealed that she was carrying contraband. The ship was sunk by a torpedo at 12.12 hours after the crew had abandoned ship in three lifeboats.

At 23.35 hours on 30 Oct 1939, HMS Northern Rover (4.58) (Lt M.H. Macpherson, RN) was hit by one torpedo from U-59 and sank about 100 miles west of Sumburgh Head, Shetland Islands. («uboat.net»)

Cairnmona, a British steam merchantman of 4,666 tons, was carrying general cargo (including wool, copper and grain) from Montreal via Halifax to Leith. Of a complement of 45, 3 were lost.

Thrasyvoulos, a Greek steam merchantman of 3,693 tons, was carrying 3,450 tons of french nuts and 2,158 tons of anthracite cobbles from Swansea to Halifax. Her ship’s complement is unknown, but 22 men were lost. «naval-history.net» mentions six survivors rescued by Norwegian steamer Havmoy.

HMS Northern Rover, an A/S trawler of 655 tons, was on patrol out of Kirkwall patrol. All 27 of her complement were lost.

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Two cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and three armed merchant cruisers in the Denmark Strait.
 …
Ship movement – Destroyers GRENVILLE and GIPSY of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla arrived at Plymouth after departing Alexandria on the 14th, reaching Malta on the 19th, and leaving Gibraltar on the 22nd with convoy HG.4.
 
Fleet – U-boat encounter – As Admiral Forbes was returning to Loch Ewe after escorting a group of iron ore ships from Narvik to the Firth of Forth, battleships NELSON andRODNEY, battlecruiser HOOD, and destroyers ICARUS, IMPULSIVE, IVANHOE, INTREPID and KELLY ran into a U-boat line west of the Orkneys. U.56 fired three torpedoes at NELSON and while all three struck the target, none exploded. U-boats U.57, U.58, U.59, also in the area, did not contact the Home Fleet units. Admiral Forbes arrived back at Loch Ewe on the 31st without further interference.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy BC.13S of fifteen ships, including DELIUS (Commodore), GRETA FORCE, GWENTHILLS and SANDHILL departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyers EXPRESS and VIVACIOUS, and safely arrived in Quiberon Bay on 1 November.
 
Convoy AXS 3 of one steamer departed Fowey, escorted by destroyer VESPER, and arrived at Brest on the 31st.
 
Convoy SA.15 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by destroyers SCIMITAR and SARDONYX, and arrived at Brest on the 31st.

East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.29 departed Southend, and arrived at Methil on 1 November.

Convoy FS.29 departed Methil escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloops BITTERN and FLEETWOOD, and arrived at Southend on 1 November.

South American station – Heavy cruiser EXETER arrived in the Falkland Island after leaving her patrol on the South American east coast on the 27th.
 
Caribbean – Light cruiser ORION departed Kingston, and arrived back on 8 November.
 
Indian Ocean – On the 30th, the 8th Submarine Flotilla was formed at Colombo with submarines OLYMPUS, OTUS and ODIN under the command of Commander S M Raw for operations against German raiders and supply ships thought to be operating in the Indian Ocean. The final submarine of the Flotilla, ORPHEUS, was under repair at Hong Kong, left there on 5 December and joined them at Colombo on the 14th. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3443

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/31/2017 2:18:44 PM
October 31, 1939


Quote:
Beginning of the final three discussions in Moscow regarding changes to the Soviet-Finnish border. The Soviets demanded part of the Karelia Isthmus, the naval base of Hangö and the port of Petsamo, in the Arctic, in exchange for land along the eastern border. The meeting does not lead to any agreement. (seconde-guerre.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/31/2017 5:34:52 PM
Day 61. October 31
Tuesday.

Europe
Quote:
Molotov – in a speech before the Supreme Soviet – asserted the Russians had a right and duty to adopt strong measures to insure their security and again demanded territorial concessions from Finland.
The death penalty was ordered for all Poles disobeying German authority, with the guilty to be tried in SS courts. (Goralski, p 99)
Editor’s note: I wonder whether Goralski’s statement is inadvertent. If the disobedient are already guilty and there is only one penalty, what are they being tried for in SS court?
Quote:
BERLIN, October 31.
The secret police announced that two men were shot for “resisting arrest” yesterday. One of them, it is stated, was trying to induce some German workers to lay down their tools in an important armament factory. Himmler now has power to shoot anyone he likes without trial. (Berlin Diary, p 241)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. U-24 returns to Wilhelmshaven. One French ship sunk. 14 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 05.25 hours on 31 Oct 1939, U-25 fired two G7e torpedoes at the first two ships in the French convoy 20-K about 45 miles west-northwest of La Corunna. Both torpedoes hit and sank the Baoulé. («uboat.net»)

Addendum: «naval-history.net» adds to the account:
Quote:
U.25 sustained damage to her torpedo hatch caused by the blast of her own gun, and was forced to return to Germany.

Baoulé, a steam merchantman of 5,874 tons, was carrying palm kernels, cotton, cocoa, coffee and rubber from Cameroon via Casablanca to Bordeaux. Of a complement of 46, 13 were killed.

At sea
Quote:
The Royal Navy’s hunt for the Admiral Graf Spee is prosecuted world-wide. Four battleships, 14 cruisers and 5 aircraft carriers are engaged. (2194 Days, p 32)

Quote:
Ship collision – Light cruisers CALYPSO, DELHI, DUNEDIN departed Sullom Voe. CALYPSO was in a minor collision with Admiralty drifter SEA BREEZE, but there no damage to her, and she arrived back at Sullom Voe on 6 November.
 
Northern Patrol – Three cruisers were on Northern Patrol duties between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland, and cruiser SOUTHAMPTON and armed merchant cruisers CHITRAL and AURANIA in the Denmark Strait.
 
[Ship movement – Light cruiser EDINBURGH began repairs at Rosyth, which were completed on 3 November.
 
Light cruisers GLASGOW and NEWCASTLE, escorted by destroyers ANTHONY, BASILISK, BRAZEN departed Portsmouth for Rosyth, and arrived on 1 November.

Light cruiser CERES departed Kirkwall for Scapa Flow.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW departed Scapa Flow, and arrived at Rosyth on the 31st.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Grimsby, and arrived back on 1 November.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Grimsby, and arrived back later that same day.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar convoy – Convoy OA.28G of 14 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers VENETIA and ACASTA from 31 October to 2 November. Destroyer ARDENT joined the escort on 1 November and remained until the 2nd. On the same day, OA.28G merged with OB.28G, escorted by destroyers VERSATILE and VOLUNTEER to the 3rd, to become OG.5.
 
Northern waters – Steamer STARCROSS (4662grt) in a Norwegian convoy off Rattray Head, reported she rammed what she thought was a U-boat. Destroyer BROKE was sent to investigate.
 
East Coast convoy – Coastal steamer KINDIESEL (339grt) reported she was being chased by a submarine in 53‑49N, 0‑11E, and destroyer JUPITER was detached from convoy FS.29 to assist.
 
North Atlantic convoy – Convoy HXF.7 departed Halifax at 0200 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT. Ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser ASTURIAS, which detached on 11 November. She was in collision with a merchant ship while leaving Halifax, but able to continue. The convoy was joined on 10 November by destroyers ANTELOPE and VISCOUNT from convoy OA.31 and WINCHELSEA and WITHERINGTON from OB.31. The latter remained with the convoy until it arrived at Liverpool on the 12th, the same day ASTURIAS reached the Clyde.
...
South Atlantic – Heavy cruiser SUSSEX on patrol in the South Atlantic lost her Walrus reconnaissance aircraft when it failed to return from patrol. A three and a half day search for the aircraft was set in motion, but the aircraft was never found. …
 
Mediterranean – Submarine depot ship MAIDSTONE, escorted by destroyer DEFENDER, departed Alexandria and arrived at Malta on 3 November.
 
Sierra Leone-U.K. convoy – Convoy SL.7 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser MONTCLARE. Destroyer WREN joined the convoy on 16 November and it arrived later that day with both escorts.
 
Far East waters – Heavy cruiser KENT departed Hong Kong on patrol, and arrived back on 8 November.
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser YORK and Australian light cruiser PERTH departed Halifax for Bermuda, and arrived on 5 November. YORK remained for the repair of boiler defects completed on 13 November. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3443

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/1/2017 6:07:42 AM
November 1, 1939


Quote:
Germany annexes several areas of occupied Poland, including the formerly Free City of Danzig. The USSR annexes western areas of Poland into the Soviet Union. (seconde-guerre.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/1/2017 1:47:01 PM
Day 62. November 1 (continued)
Wednesday. Waning gibbous moon.

Europe
No additional activity to note.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. U-23 sails from Kiel. No Allied ships sunk. 15 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Hunt for City of Flint – Destroyers KELLY, ESKIMO, MATABELE, BEDOUIN, FEARLESS and FOXHOUND refuelled at Sullom Voe and departed on 29 October to search for American steamer CITY OF FLINT coming down the Norwegian coast. They fuelled again at Sullom Voe on the 1st to continue the search.

Light cruisers GLASGOW and NEWCASTLE, after convoy escort in the Atlantic, departed Portsmouth on 31 October, escorted by destroyers ANTHONY, BASILISK, BRAZEN, and arrived at Rosyth on the 1st. The cruisers departed Rosyth that day to provide cover for these destroyers.
 

Convoy to Norway – Battleships NELSON …, RODNEY, battlecruiser HOOD, and destroyers ICARUS, INTREPID, IVANHOE, IMPULSIVE, FAULKNOR, FORESIGHT, FORTUNE and PUNJABI departed Loch Ewe at 0930/2nd to provide heavy cover for the GLASGOW force and for convoy ON.1 which departed Methil on the 5th. FEARLESS and FOXHOUND of the CITY OF FLINT operation joined NELSON at sea.
 
Destroyers FEARLESS, FOXHOUND, IMPERIAL and KANDAHAR, after refuelling at Scapa Flow on the 4th, departed to rejoin Forbes on the 5th. Destroyer FAME also departed Scapa Flow on the 5th to join Forbes. ICARUS and IMPULSIVE were detached for refuelling at Kirkwall on the 7th.

Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Grimsby on escort duties and arrived back the same day.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy BC.12S of fourteen ships, including BALTRADER, BARON KINNAIRD, BARON NAIRN, CITY OF KEELUNG (Commodore), CLAN MONROE and TREVERBYN departed the Loire, escorted by destroyer EXPRESS, and safely arrived in the Bristol Channel on the 3rd.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.30 departed Southend, and arrived at Methil on the 3rd. There was no convoy FN.31.
 
Convoy FS.30 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers WALLACE and WHITLEY and sloop STORK, and arrived at Southend on the 3rd.
 
Attacks on U-boats – Destroyer JUPITER and sloop FLEETWOOD dropped depth charges on a submarine contact in 52‑28N, 1‑59E.
 
Destroyers VERSATILE and VOLUNTEER were submarine hunting in 53‑00N, 5‑00W after a merchant ship in convoy reported a submarine 10 miles west of Holyhead.
 
Destroyer BROKE searched for a submarine reported by D/F, 40 miles east of Buchan Ness in 57-20N, 0-30W.
 
Sloop GRIMSBY attacked a submarine contact four miles east of Whitby.
 
After a submarine was reported by British fishermen off Londonderry, patrol sloops WIDGEON and SHELDRAKE unsuccessfully searched for it.
 
Four destroyers from Harwich were on patrol off Smith's Knoll, NE of Yarmouth, searching for vessels reportedly cooperating with U-boats.
 
Neutral shipping losses – Norwegian steamer MIM (4996grt) sent to Kirkwall by light cruiser COLOMBO under guard, ran aground on Reef Dyke Skerry, and broke up the next day. Norwegian steamer HANSI (1028grt) which was going into Kirkwall voluntarily, also ran aground at the same location… .
 
Command movements – Admiral Cunningham transferred his flag ashore at Malta from battleship WARSPITE, which was preparing to leave his command for the Home Fleet.
 
Rear Admiral N A Wodehouse was relieved by Vice Admiral Sir Dudley North on the 1st as Vice Admiral North Atlantic Station, based at Gibraltar. North departed England on liner NARKUNDA (16,632grt) on the 10th and arrived at Gibraltar on the 17th.
 
Mediterranean – Destroyer DELIGHT departed Gibraltar for Marseilles escorting liner LANCASHIRE which had arrived at Gibraltar in convoy OG.4. The two ships later departed Marseilles on the 6th and arrived at Malta on the 8th.
 
French Atlantic convoys – French convoys 11.B of steamers ANDRE MOYRAND, SENNEVILLE, ONTARIOLITE, DJURJURA, DOUAISIEN, ANGE SCHAIFFINO and CAMBRADSIEN, which departed Brest on 26 October, and convoy 6.X of steamers PRESCAGEL, PIERRE CLAUDE, PALLAS, OPHELIE and ENSEIGNE MAURICE PRECHAC, escorted by sloop GAZELLE, from Le Verdon also on 26 October, merged on the 27th. They were joined by steamer AIN EL TURK, escorted by sloop COMMANDANT BORY. On 1 November, six steamers from 11.B were taken into Gibraltar by the two sloops, which returned to the convoy as it continued on to Casablanca. AIN EL TURK and 6.X arrived at Casablanca on the 2nd.
 
Caribbean – Light cruiser DESPATCH departed Panama on patrol.
 
Destroyers HYPERION, HUNTER, HOTSPUR and HAVOCK departed Pernambuco for Trinidad. HAVOCK stripped a turbine and was diverted at sea to Freetown, arriving on the 9th. Destroyer HEREWARD from Freetown was designated to replace her in the 4th Destroyer Division on the South America Station.

Ship movement – HAVOCK departed Freetown on the 16th with convoy SL.9 and arrived at Gibraltar on the 27th. She then departed Gibraltar on 12 December, arrived at Sheerness on the 16th, and was under repair at Chatham until mid-March, arriving in the Clyde for duty on 26 March.
 
French-British naval conflict – French submarine REDOUTABLE fired four warning shots at [British] steamer EGBA (4989grt) at 0736 in 32-40N, 13-23W thinking she was a German blockade runner. EGBA replied with gunfire forcing the submarine to submerge. The attack was broken off when REDOUTABLE received the steamer's distress signal revealing her identity.
 
Far Eastern waters – Destroyer SCOUT departed Singapore for duty at Hong Kong. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3443

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/2/2017 1:05:25 PM
November 2, 1939


Quote:
Soviet annexations of Poland are completed with the incorporation of NE Poland into the Belorussian SSR. (seconde-guerre.com)



Quote:
King George VI decorates five RAF pilots for their actions during an air raid on the Kiel Canal. (seconde-guerre.com)



Quote:
Achtung! The Reich gets tougher on deserters. Those absent from duty without permission for more than three days face imprisonment of ten years; deserters are to be punished with life imprisonment or the death penalty. (chroniknet.de)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/2/2017 4:16:59 PM
Day 63. November 2 (continued)
Thursday.

Europe
No additional activity to report.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. No U-boats entering or leaving patrol. No Allied ships sunk. 15 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Norwegian waters – Light cruiser GLASGOW located American steamer CITY OF FLINT at 2356/2nd and her escort, Norwegian minelayer OLAV TRYGGVASON, NW of Stavanger inside Norwegian waters. The minelayer illuminated GLASGOW with searchlights and ordered her out of the territorial waters. CITY OF FLINT put into Haugesand almost immediately.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – A submarine was sighted east of Margate Buoy and destroyers KEITH, BLANCHE and GURKHA spent some time searching. After the search was abandoned, KEITH and BLANCHE patrolled between North Goodwins and Edinburgh Channel.
 
Destroyers GREYHOUND and GRENVILLE were searching for a U-boat 17 miles 213° from Start Point.
 
Belgian steamer BRUGES (4984grt) reported at 1500 that she was stopped in 45-06N, 8-04W by a U-boat with a skull and crossbones painted on the conning tower. At 0230/3rd, Greek steamer KORTHION (2116grt) was stopped in 44-32N, 8-12W and reported she had been stopped by the same submarine.
 
East Coast waters – For East Coast Defence, available ships of the 4th Destroyer Flotilla were ordered to Rosyth for escort duties. MAORI proceeded direct and ZULU and GURKHA departed Grimsby escorting convoy FN.30 en route. Destroyers JERVIS, JERSEY, JAGUAR, JACKAL and JUPITER were in the Humber. Of the 19th, 22nd and 23rd Destroyer Flotillas, eight British and one Polish destroyer were at Harwich, two were on patrol off Lowestoft, two on East Coast convoy duty, and BASILISK, BEAGLE, BLANCHE, BOADICEA, BRAZEN and VANSITTART were proceeding from Harwich to Dover to cover minelaying mission HW which took place at 1400/2nd.
 
Operation HW was carried out by auxiliary minelayers HAMPTON, SHEPPERTON and PLOVER laying 502 mines between Tail of the Falls and Sandettie Bank. The 5th Minesweeping Squadron swept ahead, screened by the D.19 destroyers.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruisers CALEDON and CERES departed Sullom Voe on Northern Patrol duties, and arrived back on the 9th.
 
On Northern Patrol, light cruisers DELHI, DUNEDIN and CALYPSO were between the Orkneys and the Faroes, light cruisers COLOMBO, DRAGON,DIOMEDE and AMC SCOTSTOUN between the Faroes and Iceland, and light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON and AMCs CHITRAL, AURANIA andRAWALPINDI in the Denmark Strait.
 
East Coast escort duty – Anti-aircraft cruisers CALCUTTA and CAIRO departed Grimsby on escort duties and arrived back later the same day.
 
Redeployment of ships – Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW departed Rosyth after covering the Narvik iron ore convoy passage and arrived at Scapa Flow later the same day. She took over the duties of radar direction finding while the Netherbutton radar station was out of service for 24 hours for repair. The radar station resumed operation at 1505/8th.
 
North Atlantic convoys – Convoy OA.29 of 12 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers WOLVERINE and VERITY from the 2nd to the 7th. Destroyer ARDENT was with the convoy on the 2nd only.
 
Convoy OB.29 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WREN and ESK on the 2nd, and destroyers WARWICK and WHIRLWIND to the 5th, when they detached to convoy HX.6.
 
Convoy HX.7 departed Halifax at 0700 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT, which detached on the 3rd. Ocean escort was cruiser ENTERPRISE which departed Halifax with the convoy. The convoy was joined on the 14th by destroyer GRAFTON and sloop ENCHANTRESS which remained until its arrival on the 17th. ENTERPRISE arrived at Portsmouth on the 15th and the convoy at Liverpool on the 16th.
 
Far East waters – Light cruiser DAUNTLESS, now attached to the 5th Cruiser Squadron, departed Singapore on patrol duties.
 
Light cruiser DURBAN departed Singapore for Hong Kong, arriving on the 6th for refit and docking, which was completed on the 24th.
 
Indian Ocean – Light cruiser DANAE departed Simonstown for Mauritius.
 
Gibraltar-U.K. convoys –Destroyers GRENADE and GRIFFIN departed Gibraltar on 25 October to escort convoy SL.5 to England. However, GRIFFIN returned to Gibraltar on the 26th to await convoy SL.6. GRENADE arrived at Plymouth on the 2nd for duties with the 1st Destroyer Flotilla at Harwich. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1941

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/3/2017 4:48:46 PM
Day 64. 3 Nov.

Germany General Franz Halder sends a message to General Ludwig Beck telling him to be ready to move against Adolf Hitler on or shortly after 5 Nov 1939, which is the date the plans for the invasion of France, are supposed to be made known to top German military leaders.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/3/2017 5:03:44 PM
Day 64. November 3 (continued)
Friday.

Europe
Quote:
Russia incorporated eastern Poland into the Soviet Union following rigged plebiscites in which the majority of the 12 million Poles living in the conquered territory reputedly favoured annexation by Moscow.
Finland again offered counterproposals to Russia, taking it recognized Soviet security needs but hand gone as far as its “independence, security, and neutrality permit.” Helsinki was adamantly opposed to granting the Soviets a military base on Finnish territory. ( Goralski, p 99)

U.S.A.
Quote:
The United States of America amends its law on neutrality. Despite a still strongly isolationist current of public opinion, the US government hesitantly begins to hold out a hand to the Western Allies. (2194 Days, p 32)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. U-13 entering Kiel after 10-day patrol patrol. No Allied ships sunk. 14 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost; U-431 severely damaged by aircraft attack off the coast of Algiers. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Norwegian blockade – American steamer CITY OF FLINT (4963grt) departed Murmansk during the night of 26/27 October, called at Tromso on the 30th and was ordered to leave, escorted by Norwegian destroyer SLEIPNER. On the 3rd, she was interned at Haugesand by Norwegian minelayer OLAV TRYGGVASON after entering the port without permission, arrived at Bergen on the 4th and was later set free after the German prize crew was removed. CITY OF FLINT departed Bergen on the 27th and arrived at Haugesand later that day to discharge her cargo, departed there on 20 December and Bergen on the 22nd, arriving at Narvik on the 28th.

German steamer NEW YORK (22,337grt) successfully ran the blockade while the Home Fleet was involved with CITY OF FLINT. She departed Murmansk on 31 October and successfully used the Indreled, arriving at Hamburg on the 12th escorted by three minesweepers and aircraft.
 
German steamer SCHWABEN (7773grt) had departed Santos on 26 September and passed through the Denmark Strait on 21 October. She entered Haugesand shortly after the CITY OF FLINT and was allowed to continue, arriving safely in the Weser on the 8th.
 
Light cruiser GLASGOW and destroyers KELLY, BEDOUIN, ESKIMO and MATABELE had been involved in trying to intercept CITY OF FLINT and NEW YORK as they came down the Norwegian coast. All four destroyers arrived back at Scapa Flow on the 5th after sustaining severe weather damage. GLASGOW arrived at Rosyth that day with her forecastle dropped by two inches from the effect of the weather.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE arrived at Sullom Voe on the 3rd for refuelling, then went off on Northern Patrol.
 
On Northern Patrol were light cruisers CALEDON and CERES between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and three AMCs in the Denmark Strait. Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON was returning to Scapa Flow from Denmark Strait patrol.
 
Ship movement – KELLY, after emergency repairs at Kirkwall departed with destroyer ICARUS for temporary repairs from depot ship GREENWICH at Scapa Flow, before going on to Hebburn for permanent repairs. She was back in service on 14 December. ESKIMO departed Scapa Flow on the 6th and arrived at Newcastle on the 7th, repairing until the 24th. MATABELE and BEDOUIN departed Scapa Flow on the 7th, MATABELE arriving at Rosyth on the 8th and reaching Newcastle on the 10th, where she repaired until the 25th, while BEDOUIN arrived at Rosyth on the 8th for boiler cleaning and repairs.
 
Light cruisers DRAGON, COLOMBO, DIOMEDE arrived at Sullom Voe.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar convoy –Convoy OA.28G departed Southend on 31 October escorted by destroyers ACASTA and ARDENT, while OB.28G departed Liverpool on the 1 November escorted by destroyers VERSATILE and VOLUNTEER. On the 3rd, the convoys with 33 ships merged as OG.5, and were joined in the Western Approaches by French large destroyers VAUQUELIN and TARTU the same day. The British escorts were relieved and returned to England. The convoy and the French escorts arrived at Gibraltar on the 9th.
 
East Coast escort duty, convoy – Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Grimsby on escort duties and arrived back later the same day.
 
Convoy FS.31 departed Methil escorted by destroyers VALOROUS, WOOLSTON and sloop HASTINGS, and arrived at Southend on the 5th. There was no convoy FN.31.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – French torpedo boat BRANLEBAS reported the track of a torpedo in 49-38N, 2-50W.

[Ship movement – Heavy cruisers DEVONSHIRE and SUFFOLK departed Alexandria and NORFOLK Malta on the 5th. All three cruisers called at Gibraltar on the 7th and 8th, and left on the 8th, escorted by destroyers DOUGLAS and KEPPEL. The destroyers were relieved in 44N by destroyers ISIS and ILEX which had escorted battleship WARSPITE from Gibraltar on the 6th. DEVONSHIRE and NORFOLK arrived at Plymouth on the 11th and SUFFOLK at Portsmouth on the 12th. NORFOLK reached the Clyde on the 18th and departed the same day on Northern Patrol duties. SUFFOLK arrived in the Clyde on the 19th and also departed later the same day for Northern Patrol. DEVONSHIRE repaired at Devonport until the 21st, and then arrived at the Clyde on the 22nd for duty with the Home Fleet.
 
Mediterranean – Destroyer DECOY departed Malta after refitting, and escorted steamer NEVASA to Marseilles. The destroyer returned, escorting ocean boarding vessel VAN DYCK and reached Malta on the 7th.
 
Destroyers ISIS and ILEX, which had departed Plymouth, arrived at Gibraltar for escort duties with battleship WARSPITE and later, with cruisers of the 1st Cruiser Squadron.
 
Submarine OSIRIS was damaged by a motor room fire at Alexandria. She departed Alexandria on the 8th escorted by anti-submarine trawler CORAL and arrived at Malta on the 13th, where she was under repair and refit until 30 December.
 
Search for Graf Spee – Light cruiser CARADOC departed Kingston for duty in the Pacific Ocean. (naval-history.net)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3443

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/4/2017 7:32:39 AM
November 4, 1939


Quote:
Admiral Hugh Sinclair, chief of British Secret Intelligence Service, passes away. He is replaced by Colonel Stewart Menzies.



Image: Sir Stewart Menzies.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/4/2017 4:53:05 PM
Day 65. November 4 (continued)
Saturday. Last Quarter.

Europe
Editor's comment: the following passage from Berlin Diary (p 242) has been added to the daily entry:
Quote:
The radio people here in great secrecy had kindly offered to take me up to a Baltic port and let me broadcast the arrival of the City of Flint, which was scheduled for tomorrow. But the Norwegians sered it day before yesterday and saved me the assignment. The Wilhelmstrasse furious and threatening the Norwegians with dire consequences if they don't turn the American ship over to Germany.


Western Front
No notable activity.

USA
Quote:
Congress repealed the U.S. neutrality law. American policy no permitted “cash and carry” purchases, a one clearly favourable to the British and French. Roosevelt issued new proclamations of neutrality and defined the zones of combat, including the Bay of Biscay, waters adjacent to Britain and Ireland, the English Channel, the North Sea, and the Baltic. All U.S. ships were barred from these waters. The main point was that U.W. manufacturers could now sell arms to belligerents if the belligerents if the material was shipped under the flag of a foreign nation. (Goralski, p 99)


In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
12 new U-boats ordered on this date. 15 U-boats at sea. U-60 sailed from Kiel. No Allied ships sunk; no U-boats lost. Two U-boats laid mines off Britain’s East Coast. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Norwegian waters – Destroyers BEDOUIN, ESKIMO, MATABELE were to ordered to rendezvous with light cruiser GLASGOW off Stadtlandet in the search for German liner NEW YORK.
 
On Northern Patrol, two light cruisers were on patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three light cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and three AMCs in the Denmark Strait. When a London flying boat from depot ship MANELA was reported missing, the five Northern Patrol cruisers carried out a search.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Grimsby and arrived at Rosyth on the 6th.
 
Norwegian convoys – The first of the Methil-Bergen ON convoy series departed Methil with five British merchant ships at 1710. Convoy ON.1 put to sea escorted by destroyers FAME, TARTAR, ASHANTI and SOMALI. At sea, FAME was relieved by destroyer PUNJABI, which had been refuelling at Scapa Flow. The convoy was given anti-aircraft support by anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW, which departed Scapa Flow on the 5th, and close cover by light cruiser EDINBURGH, which departed Rosyth, later refuelled at Scapa Flow, departed on the 6th, joined the Home Fleet at sea. and arrived back at Rosyth on the 9th. En route to Bergen, ASHANTI was detached from the convoy for refuelling and to repair defects at Sullom Voe and did not rejoin until the start of the return convoy. ON.1 arrived at Bergen on the 7th without incident.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.30 of 12 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers GREYHOUND and GALLANT from the 4th to 6th, and dispersed on the 7th.
 
Convoy OB.30 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANOC and WHIRLWIND to the 7th.

Anti-U-boat attacks – Canadian destroyer ASSINIBOINE, working up prior to departing for Canada, attacked a submarine contact northwest of Guernsey at 0200.

Steamer BRANDON (6668grt) was attacked by a U-boat 120 miles W of the Hebrides. Submarines TRIUMPH and TRIDENT were sent to investigate and carry out a search.
 
Ship damages – Minesweepers HUSSAR and SPEEDWELL were involved in a minor collision. SPEEDWELL repaired in the Tyne, completing on 10 December.
… 
Friendly losses – Greek steamer NICOLAOS M EMBIRICOS (5295grt) was sunk on a British defensive minefield off the Goodwins, 15 miles east of Dover near the Sandettie Light Vessel. One crewman was lost and the survivors picked up by the North Goodwin Light Vessel and a Dutch boat. They were transferred to British lifeboats.
 
German naval activity – Finnish steamer OTAVA (1290grt) was seized in the Gulf of Bothnia by German warships and taken to Swinemünde.
 
Far Eastern waters – Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM was relieved by light cruiser DAUNTLESS in the Sunda Strait on the 4th and arrived at Singapore on the 6th. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/5/2017 4:22:19 PM
November 5. Day 66.
Sunday.

Europe
Quote:
Hitler set Nov. 12 as the date for the attack on France and the Low Countries. (Goralski, p 99)


Western Front
No notable activity.

Britain
Quote:
Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain wrote …[a] letter to his sister. Hitler simply had to go before there could be any possibility of peace. “He must either die or go to St Helena or become a real public works architect, preferably in a ‘home’”, Chamberlain wrote. “His entourage must also go, with the possible exception of Goering, who might have some ornamental position in a transitional government.” It was November 5, 1939. (Human Smoke, p 158)


In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
12 new U-boats ordered on this date. 14 U-boats at sea. U-57 entered Kiel (after a 12-day patrol). One Allied ship sunk (see below); no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»). In addition (from «naval-history.net»), “U.33 laid mines off North Foreland, on which two ships were sunk and one damaged”.
Quote:
At 02.55 hours on 5 Nov 1940 the Scottish Maiden (Master John William Albert Gibson) in convoy HX-83 was torpedoed and sunk by U-99 about 225 miles west by south of Bloody Foreland. The U-boat fired its last torpedo at three overlapping ships from a distance of 3600 metres and observed a hit in the stern of a tanker. …[Survivors were] landed at Liverpool. («uboat.net»)

Scottish Maiden, a British motor tanker of 6,993 tons, was sailing from Curacao via Halifax to Avonmount with 3,000tons of diesel and 6,500 tons of marine fuel oil. Crew complement = 44; number dead = 16.

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, two cruisers were between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and an AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait. Armed merchant cruisers TRANSYLVANIA departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol duties and AURANIA departed her patrol station for the Clyde to overhaul her guns. Armed boarding vessels NORTHERN ISLE, NORTHERN PRINCESS and NORTHERN FOAM relieved armed boarding vessels NORTHERN CHIEF and KINGSTON BERYL on patrol in the vicinity of Muckle Flugga.
 
East Convoys – Convoy FN.32 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WHITLEY, WALLACE and sloop STORK. Destroyers WOOLSTON, VALOROUS and sloop HASTINGS departed Harwich and relieved the original escort which proceeded to Rosyth. The convoy arrived on the 7th.
 
Convoy FS.32 departed Methil, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloops BITTERN and FLEETWOOD. Six merchant ships left at 1200, despite fog, and the rest departed later. Destroyers JUNO and JUPITER were at sea to act as a fighting force from daylight on the 6th. Destroyer JAGUAR remained at Methil Roads until ordered to proceed at 1540 and overtook the convoy. JUNO and JUPITER were detached at dark on the 6th to proceed to Rosyth. There they joined minelaying cruiser ADVENTURE and escorted her to the Humber. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 7th. There was no convoy FS.33.
 
Anti-U-boat activitiy – Danish steamer TEKLA (1469grt) reported sighting a U-boat four miles SE of Flamborough Head. Destroyer JUNO was sent to search.
 
After a D/F bearing on a suspected submarine 150 miles SW of Ushant, destroyers ACASTA, ESCAPADE, VERSATILE and GRENVILLE conducted searches in the area.
 
East Coast escort duty – Destroyer ANTHONY, which had departed the Clyde on the 4th, was escorting base ship MANCHESTER CITY to Rosyth, where they arrived early on the 6th. Later that day, ANTHONY left for Plymouth.
 
Destroyer VANSITTART was sent to the Tongue Light Vessel [Editor: Thames Estuary] to investigate a report of a fast motor boat, but the order was later cancelled and she returned to normal patrol.
 
Submarine L.26, on Dogger Bank patrol, reported sighting a suspicious merchant ship in 54-32N, 3-26E. The submarine was ordered by Rear Admiral Submarines to follow the ship.

African Coast – Force K, consisting of aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL, battlecruiser RENOWN, light cruiser NEPTUNE, and destroyers HARDY, HASTY, HEREWARD, HERO and HOSTILE departed Freetown on 28 October. HERO was detached on escort duties shortly after the first of the month. In 6N, 17 W, 300 miles WSW of Freetown on the 5th, ARK ROYAL aircraft sighted German steamer UHENFELS (7603grt) which had departed Lourenco Marques, Portuguese Mozambique, on her third attempt to escape back to Germany and after evading sloop EGRET patrolling off the port. HEREWARD was detached from the screen to investigate and UHENFELS attempted to scuttle herself. However, she was captured, Force K and prize arrived at Freetown on the 6th, and UHENFELS was taken for British service and renamed EMPIRE ABILITY. She arrived in the Thames for duty on 5 April 1940.
 
[Caribbean – Australian light cruiser PERTH departed Bermuda and arrived at Kingston on the 9th.


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1941

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/5/2017 5:18:26 PM
5 Nov 1939 Germany

A plot to arrest Hitler, hatched by of his most senior military staff, collapses. Led by General Franz Halder, the architect of the invasion of Poland, many Generals are appalled by Hitler's plans to continue the conflict by invading Belgium and the Netherlands and fear that the adventure would founder in another Great War quagmire. General Walther von Brauchitsch, who meets with Hitler and is supposed to be the one to issue the order for his arrest, hesitates and misses the opportunity to prevent Hitler from plunging Europe into another World War. However one of the conspirators, Colonel Hans Oster of German Military Intelligence, tips off the Dutch and Belgians about Hitler's invasion intentions.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/5/2017 11:29:37 PM
Trevor, thanks for that post. Of interest, can you offer a link to verify your last sentence re Belgium and Holland? It's not that I don't trust you, but [Edit note from "tomorrow" to "Nov 7] I'll be noting that the Belgian and Dutch governments are offering to mediate between Germany, Britain and France in an attempt to end the war. This suggests a lot more leakage and sharing than might have been thought at diplomatic levels.

Lots of truly weird shit coming up over the next few days. Any stuff you have on the Nov 8 attempt on Hitler in Munich will be appreciated. I have at least one source suggesting it was a Nazi plot to boost Hitler's status, so there's room for lots of nuances.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/6/2017 2:42:43 PM
November 6. Day 67.
Monday.

Europe
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 15 U-boats at sea. U-15, -19 and -20 sailed from Kiel; U-43 sailed from Wilhelmshaven. No Allied ships sunk; no U-boats lost. U-21 attacked by RN submarine Sealion with six torpedoes, with no hits. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Ship movements – Destroyer KHARTOUM (Cdr D T Dowler) was completed. Following working up at Portland, she joined the 5th Destroyer Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet on 1 December.
 
Destroyer AFRIDI, whose defects were repaired in the Tyne, departed the Tyne and arrived at Rosyth on the 7th for operations.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, there were three cruisers on patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
Light cruisers CARDIFF, COLOMBO and DRAGON departed Sullom Voe on Northern Patrol duties, and arrived back on the 12th.
 
Light cruisers DUNEDIN, DELHI, CALYPSO arrived at Sullom Voe from Northern Patrol.

Armed boarding vessel NORTHERN DUKE received instructions to take over a merchant ship from light cruiser CERES and escort her into Kirkwall.
 
East Coast waters – Anti-aircraft cruisers CAIRO and CALCUTTA arrived at Rosyth to strengthen the air defences at Rosyth while the Home Fleet was refuelling there.
 
Sloop FLAMINGO, en route from the Clyde to Rosyth, was ordered to attempt to locate an aircraft down in the sea 20 miles northeast of Fraserburgh. She was unable to locate it and arrived at Rosyth on the 8th.
 
Polish submarine ORZEL, escorted by destroyer WHITEHALL, departed Rosyth for Dundee for docking. After the escort duty, WHITEHALL arrived back the same day.
 
Ship reassignments – Destroyers INTREPID and IVANHOE arrived at Scapa Flow, and after refuelling, departed for Plymouth, arriving on the 11th. They departed later that day and anchored in the Medway on the 12th, before reaching Chatham on the 13th for conversion to minelaying destroyers. On 4 December, the conversions were completed and both destroyers departed Chatham for Sheerness. At this time, INTREPID and IVANHOE were detached from the 3rd Destroyer Flotilla and attached to the 20th Flotilla.

Outward convoys – Convoy OA.31 of 16 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers ANTELOPE and VISCOUNT from the 6th to 10th. When the convoy was dispersed, the destroyers joined inbound HXF.7.
 
Convoy OB.31 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WINCHELSEA and WITHERINGTON to the 9th.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy AXS.4 of one steamer departed Fowey, escorted by destroyer WAKEFUL, and arrived at Brest on the 7th. Of the next three convoys, AXS.5 through 7, no information or dates are available. Convoy AXS.8 arrived at Brest on 11 December.
 
Convoy SA.16 departed Southampton with one steamer, escorted by destroyers SALADIN and SARDONYX, and arrived at Brest on the 7th.
 
Ship movement – Battleship WARSPITE escorted by destroyers DAINTY and DIANA arrived at Gibraltar from Malta. WARSPITE departed Gibraltar the same day escorted by destroyers ISIS, ILEX, DAINTY and DIANA and crossed the Atlantic arriving at Halifax on the 14th. She remained there until the 18th when she left as heavy escort for convoy HX.9.
 
[B]North Atlantic convoy[/B] – Convoy HX.6 of 52 ships, escorted by battleship RESOLUTION was met in the Western Approaches by eight destroyers, including WARWICK and WHIRLWIND. The convoy split on the 7th. RESOLUTION with two destroyers proceeded directly to Plymouth, leaving the two convoy sections each escorted by three destroyers.
 
[B]Gibraltar-U.K. convoy[/B] – Convoy HG.6 departed Gibraltar with 34 ships, escorted by destroyers WATCHMAN, VORTIGERN and the French CHACAL and MISTRAL. The French ships were escorts from the 6th and patrolled in 43-30N, 12-30W on the 10th. On the 13th, they arrived at Brest. Destroyer ISIS, after joining with captured German steamer LEANDER, was with the convoy from the 12th to 14th. Submarine depot ship CYCLOPS travelled in convoy returning to England for duty in Home Waters. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 14th.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser GALATEA departed Port Said, arrived at Haifa on the 7th, and Alexandria on the 8th.
 
French large cruiser MILAN passed Gibraltar east to west.
 
Atlantic special shipment – Armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA carrying £2,000,000 in gold bullion arrived at Halifax, escorted into port by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT.
 
German naval activity – Finnish steamer JESSIE (1405grt) was seized in the Baltic by a German warship, and taken to Kiel. («naval.hostory.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1941

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/6/2017 5:41:14 PM

Quote:
Trevor, thanks for that post. Of interest, can you offer a link to verify your last sentence re Belgium and Holland? It's not that I don't trust you, but [Edit note from "tomorrow" to "Nov 7] I'll be noting that the Belgian and Dutch governments are offering to mediate between Germany, Britain and France in an attempt to end the war. This suggests a lot more leakage and sharing than might have been thought at diplomatic levels.

Lots of truly weird shit coming up over the next few days. Any stuff you have on the Nov 8 attempt on Hitler in Munich will be appreciated. I have at least one source suggesting it was a Nazi plot to boost Hitler's status, so there's room for lots of nuances.

Cheers
Brian G
--brian grafton


I don´t know about a link. I read it in-

Joachim Fest Plotting Hitler's Death: The German Resistance To Hitler, 1933–1945 (1994).

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre, PA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant
Posts: 525

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/6/2017 7:34:00 PM
Trevor,

I know this isn't the exact title but try The German Resistance. Searching for Allies Abroad 1933-1945. I believe it was published in the early 90's and there was another from the late 60's I believe that was something like The German Generals Speak Out: The Military resistance to Hitler.
---------------
A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country.
"to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"


brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/7/2017 4:02:42 PM
November 7. Day 68 (continued)
Tuesday.

Europe
Quote:
Hitler delayed the start of the western offensive, the first of many such postponements.

Poland’s governor general, Hans Frank, established his headquarters in Krakow, which replaced Warsaw as the capital. (His diary entry read, “The Poles will be the slaves of the German Reich.”) (Goralski, p 99)

Quote:
Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands and Leopold III of the Belgians issue an appeal for peace, offering themselves as editors between the two sides in conflict. (2194 Days, p 32)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 15 U-boats at sea. U-41 sailed from Wilhelmshaven; U-46 returned to Kiel after 46 days, and U-15, -19, and-20 returned to Wilhelmshaven, each after 2 days at sea. No Allied ships sunk; no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Damage to ships – (inbound Norwegian convoy) Destroyers COSSACK, MAORI and ZULU departed Rosyth for Scapa Flow at 1745 to escort the west coast section of convoy HN.1. COSSACK was damaged in collision with steamer BORTHWICK (1097grt) off May Island in the Firth of Forth at 2015, and five ratings killed. …She was towed stern first by two tugs to Leith where she repaired until 15 January. MAORI and ZULU left to escort the convoy, joined later by sloop FLAMINGO.
 (Southwest coast) Destroyers GRENVILLE and GRENADE collided at Devonport during the night of the 7th/8th. GRENVILLE's starboard side was damaged below the water line and number three boiler room flooded; she repaired at Devonport completing on 1 December. The stem of GRENADE was twisted and the fore peak flooded; her repairs at Falmouth were completed on 9 December.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser EFFINGHAM departed Devonport after boiler cleaning, and arrived at Halifax on the 15th.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, three cruisers were on patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and light cruiser NEWCASTLE and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON arrived at Rosyth after Northern Patrol duties.

East Coast waters – Minelaying cruiser ADVENTURE departed Rosyth, was met by destroyers JUNO and JUPITER off Inchkeith, and safely escorted to Grimsby.
 
Destroyer STURDY departed Rosyth, via the Humber for Portsmouth to escort aircraft carrier ARGUS to Toulon.
 
Inbound Norwegian convoy – Convoy HN.1 of six British and one Polish steamer departed Bergen and was joined just outside Norwegian territorial waters by destroyers TARTAR, SOMALI and PUNJABI. …Four steamers were detached to their destinations on the west coast and the convoy arrived safely at Methil on the 10th.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.33 departed Southend escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloops BITTERN and FLEETWOOD. …[Seven other ships joined to] reinforce the convoy, which was being shadowed by German aircraft, and to counter an anticipated German surface attack. The convoy arrived at Methil on the 9th without incident. Convoy FS.33 was cancelled due to too few ships being ready.
 
Anti-U-boat attacks – Destroyers GRENADE, EXMOUTH and WREN were submarine hunting in 49‑37N, 5‑20W. GRENADE attacked a contact at this location.

U.K.-France Atlantic convoy – Convoy BC.14 of …[11 steamers] departed the Bristol Channel escorted by [3] destroyers… . The convoy safely arrived in the Loire on the 10th.
 
Inbound Gibraltar convoy – In bad weather, convoy HG.5A had difficulty making the Downs, and steamer CITY OF MELBOURNE (6630grt) ran aground on the South Goodwins.
 
Inbound North Atlantic fast convoy – Convoy HXF.7 was delayed due to bad weather, and during the afternoon of the 7th, only four ships out of the 13 in convoy were in company. Escorting armed merchant cruiser ASTURIAS sustained minor weather damage which required dockyard repair.
 
Air torpedo attack – On the 7th, Polish destroyers BLYSKAWICA and GROM on patrol 70 miles east of Lowestoft were attacked by German torpedo planes. No damage resulted in this first recorded aircraft torpedo attack of the war. Returning to Harwich, they fouled the buoy, GROM's port propeller was damaged, and she required docking. BLYSKAWICA was docked for examination after GROM completed her repairs.
 
Submarine issues – Submarine SEAL, returning from Dogger Bank patrol, was bombed by a German seaplane while waiting for submarines CACHALOT and L.26 off Orfordness.
 
Submarine H.28 reported defects, and was repairing until 11 November.
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser BERWICK departed Bermuda and arrived at Portsmouth for docking on the 14th, where she was under repair until 9 December. She departed Portsmouth the same day to join the 1st Cruiser Squadron.
 
Mediterranean; African coast – Depot ship MAIDSTONE departed Malta escorted by sloops ABERDEEN and DEPTFORD, and arrived at Gibraltar on the 10th. On the 12th, they departed Gibraltar, accompanied by light cruiser CAPETOWN. West of Gibraltar, the sloops were detached and proceeded to England for duty in Home Waters. CAPETOWN escorted MAIDSTONE halfway to Freetown where she was relieved by light cruiser NEPTUNE.
 
CAPETOWN returned to Gibraltar while MAIDSTONE and NEPTUNE proceeded to Freetown, arriving on the 16th.
 
Sloop FOWEY arrived at Malta en route to England from Alexandria. She was delayed by boiler defects and did not leave for Gibraltar until the 12th, arriving on the 15th. She departed on the 16th, escorting ammunition stores issuing ship (ASIS) PACHECO to Freetown.

 Light cruiser CAPETOWN departed Malta for Gibraltar where she arrived on the 9th.

 Far East waters – Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM departed Singapore for Hong Kong and en route, investigated a Japanese whaling convoy. She arrived at Hong Kong on the 10th._____
 
French heavy cruiser SUFFREN arrived at Singapore after departing Saigon on the 5th.
 
French naval movements – French heavy cruiser FOCH, light cruiser LA GALISSONNIÈRE and destroyer LION, passed Gibraltar. The heavy cruiser and destroyer had departed Oran on the 7th and the light cruiser, Toulon on the 6th. FOCH was en route to Dakar, and LA GALISSONNÈRE to Brest for repairs. All three arrived at Casablanca on the 8th. The light cruiser arrived at Brest on the 12th for repairs, completed 3 March, and arrived back at Oran on 7 March.
 
French submarine SIDI FERRUCH arrived at Trinidad, and departed on patrol on the 8th. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/9/2017 6:05:43 PM
November 9. Day 70 (continued)
Thursday.

Europe
More on the attempt on Hitler’s life:
Quote:
BERLIN, November 9
Twelve minutes after Hitler and all the big party leaders left the Bürger Brau Keller in Munich last night, at nine minutes after nine o’clock, a bomb explosion wrecked the hall, killed seven, wounded sixty-three. …
No one yet knows who did it. The Nazi press screams that it was the English, the British secret service!It even blames Chamberlain for the deed. Most of us think it smells of another Reichstag fire. In other years Hitler and all the other bigwigs have remained after the speech to talk over old times with the comrades of the Putsch and guzzle beer. … Curious that the official Nazi paper, the Völkische Beobacher, was the only morning paper to carry the story. A friend called me with the news just as I had finished broadcasting at midnight last night, but all the German radio officials and the censors denied it. They said it was a silly rumour.(Berlin Diary, pp 246-7)

Other European news:
Quote:
Finland again stated it “cannot grant to a foreign power military bases on her territory and within the confines of her frontiers.”
Chamberlain hailed repeal of the US embargo law as a “momentous event,” which, he said, “reopens for the Allies the doors of the greatest storehouse of supplies in the world.” (Goralski, p 99)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 13 U-boats at sea. U-49 sailed from Kiel; U-23 and U-59 returned to Kiel after 9 and 19 days respectively. One Allied ship lost to mines, one captured; no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 07.20 hours on 9 Nov 1939 the Carmarthen Coast (Master J.O. Rowlands) struck a mine, laid on 26 October by U-24 and sank by the stern after about ten minutes about 3 miles east of Seaham harbor. …

At 19.00 hours on 9 November 1939 the unescorted and neutral Snar was stopped by U-34 about 80 miles west of Stavanger, Norway, but high seas prevented an inspection and she was ordered to stand by until the weather improved. …
At 14.00 hours on 10 November, the Snar was searched and taken as prize because she was bound for France. … Apparently she was released shortly afterwards because the ship operated under Allied control for the rest of the war. («uboat.net»)

British steam merchant Carmarthen Coast, 961 tons, was en route to London from Kirkaldy with 1,000 tons of general cargo. Ship’s complement=17; dead=2.

Snar, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 3,176 tons, was carrying pulpwood from Norway to Rouen. Ship’s complement unrecorded, but no crew were lost.

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Battleships NELSON, RODNEY, anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO, and destroyers FAULKNOR, FAME, FORTUNE, FOXHOUND, FORESIGHT, FEARLESS, KINGSTON and IMPERIAL arrived at Rosyth at 0700 for refuelling. KINGSTON had developed a leak in her reserve fuel tank and required repair.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were two cruisers between the Orkneys and the Faroes, four cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
Light cruiser SHEFFIELD departed Rosyth on patrol, and arrived at Loch Ewe on the 21st.
_____
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.34 departed Southend, escorted by sloops GRIMSBY, WESTON, FLAMINGO, which had arrived from Rosyth for this duty. Kites were flown from the sloops at 1000 feet to hinder air attack. The convoy arrived at Rosyth on the 11th.
 
Convoy FS.34 departed Rosyth, escorted by destroyers VALOROUS, WOOLSTON and sloop HASTINGS, and arrived at Southend on the 11th.
 
anti-U-boat activities – Steamer ASHANTIAN (4917grt) reported sighting a submarine in 48‑27N, 15‑40W, and destroyer ECLIPSE was detailed to search.
 
Destroyer KANDAHAR departed Scapa Flow to join destroyer KELLY submarine hunting in Yell Sound. They were later joined by destroyer ICARUS and also searched in Colla Firth.
 
A U-boat was reported 250 miles SW of Fastnet, and destroyers BROKE and ECLIPSE were sent to search.
 
Test patrol – Submarine H.43 and trawler COMET (formerly TAMURA, 301grt) departed Devonport and exercised off the west coast of Ireland to see if submarines and trawlers could effectively work together. The patrol ended on the 21st.
 
German naval activities – U.33 laid mines off North Foreland in Bristol Channel, but no shipping was sunk or damaged.

Norwegian steamers GEISHA (5113grt) and SUSANNA (810grt) were seized by German warships in the Baltic for contraband violations.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser GALATEA departed Alexandria on patrol and arrived back on the 19th.
 
Ship transfers after Africa-U.K. convoying – Destroyer GRIFFIN of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla had departed Malta on 20 October and arrived at Gibraltar on the 22nd. She left on the 25th with sister ship GRENADE to escort convoy SL.5, but returned to Gibraltar. She left again with convoy SL.6 on the 30th and arrived at Plymouth on the 9th November. This completed the transfer of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla, now based at Harwich with the three Polish destroyers. Convoy SL.6A was escorted by destroyers ELECTRA and ESCORT into the Downs.
 
Gibraltar-U.K. inbound convoy – French destroyers TARTU and VAUQUELIN arrived at Gibraltar to escort convoy HG.7.
 
Other German shipping – German steamer LEANDER (989grt) departed Vigo to return to Germany. At 0400, 100 miles west of Vigo in 42‑32N, 12‑46W, she was captured by destroyer ISIS, joined convoy HG.6 which ISIS was escorting, arrived at Falmouth on the 13th, and was renamed EMPIRE CRUSADER for British service.
 
German steamers LAHN (8498grt) and TACOMA (8268grt) departed Talcuhuana, Chile, and arrived at Montevideo on the 23rd. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/10/2017 12:48:42 PM
November 10. Day 71
Friday.

Europe
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 12 U-boats at sea. U-49 sailed from Kiel; U-5 returned to Kiel after 19 days. No Allied ships sunk; no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers GIPSY and GLOWWORM were searching 60 miles south of Milford Haven for a reported submarine.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were two cruisers between the Orkneys and Faroes, three cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and one AMC in the Denmark Strait.
… 
Armed merchant cruisers RAWALPINDI arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol duty, and CALFORNIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.

Armed merchant cruiser SCOTSTOUN was damaged by an ice flow which buckled her frame and started plates, but she was able to continue patrol in the Iceland-Faroes Channel.
 
The Northern Patrol, from the 10th to 23rd, sighted 57 eastbound ships and sent 50 into Kirkwall for inspection. Nine German ships were sighted and dealt with.
 
Ship reassignment – Light cruisers GLASGOW, SOUTHAMPTON, AURORA and BELFAST and ten destroyers were formed as a Striking Force under the command of Captain E de F Renouf CVO as a Commodore at Rosyth.
 
Following a refit, light cruiser BELFAST departed the Clyde on the 8th and on the 10th transferred from the 18th Cruiser Squadron to the Humber Force.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer IMPULSIVE departed Scapa Flow for Aberdeen to escort steamer MARYLYN (4555grt), but when it was found the steamer would not be ready to sail until the 13th, she returned to Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyers JUNO, JANUS, JAGUAR and JERSEY departed Immingham.
 
North Atlantic outbound convoys – Convoy OA.33 of 12 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers WREN and WITCH on the 11th and 12th. Submarines CACHALOT and SEAL departed Gosport and escorted the convoy from the 10th to 15th. The convoy was dispersed on the 15th and the submarines proceeded independently to Halifax where they arrived on the 25th for escort duty.
 
Convoy OB.33 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VERSATILE, VOLUNTEER and MONTROSE until the 13th.
 
French naval movement – French submarines ORPHÉE and ANTIOPE departed Brest escorted by auxiliary patrol vessel HEREUX.

French light cruiser LA GALISSONIÈRE departed Casablanca, escorted by large destroyer CHEVALIER PAUL and later arrived at Brest; her escort being detached at sea.

Caribbean – Heavy cruiser YORK, repairing boiler defects at Bermuda, began repairs to A-turret that were to be completed by the end of the month.
 
France-U.K. convoy – Convoy BC.13S of … 13 steamers … departed the Loire escorted by destroyers VIVACIOUS and VESPER. The convoy safely arrived in the Bristol Channel on the 12th.
… 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.8 departed Halifax at 1200 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT, which detached on the 11th. Ocean escort for the convoy was battleship REVENGE, and the convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 25th.
 
Ship and senior officer transfers – Light cruiser MANCHESTER departed Bombay en route to the Home Fleet, calling at Aden on the 13th‑14th and arriving at Port Said on the 17th. Vice Admiral Geoffrey Layton, commanding the 1st Battle Squadron, Mediterranean Fleet, was ordered to the Home Fleet to command the 18th Cruiser Squadron and embarked on MANCHESTER which called at Malta on the 18th‑20th. She departed Gibraltar on the 22nd, with destroyer KEPPEL as local escort, and arrived at Portsmouth on the 25th to begin a refit lasting until 21 December. She departed Portsmouth on 22 December, arrived at Scapa Flow on the 24th, and left on the 26th on patrol.
 
South Atlantic StationHeavy cruiser CUMBERLAND departed Buenos Aires patrolling en route to Capetown, but was diverted on the 18th to Rio de Janeiro, leaving there on the 22nd for the Rio de la Plata area.
 
Heavy cruiser EXETER departed Mar del Plata to repair at Capetown, but was recalled for patrol in the Rio area.
 
New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES arrived at Rio de Janiero, then left on the 12th for local patrol. She was ordered on the 17th to patrol in the Rio de la Plata area.
 
Indian Ocean – Light cruiser DANAE departed Mauritius for Colombo, where she arrived on the 18th.
 
Heavy cruisers DORSETSHIRE and CORNWALL departed Colombo to join aircraft carrier EAGLE and Australian destroyers VENDETTA and WATERHEN on patrol at sea. The Force arrived back at Colombo on the 18th.
 
African Coast – Netlayer PROTECTOR arrived at Freetown on the 10th to lay indicator nets. The lay was completed in mid-February 1940 and she departed Freetown on the 17th to return to England. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3443

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/10/2017 2:12:20 PM
 Interesting that even without the Japanese at war with the Allies, the war is already global in nature if one considers naval operations.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/10/2017 10:17:47 PM
Bill, the same thing happened during WW1, though not exactly on such a scale. My little corner of Empiah – Victoria, BC – is flanked to the west by Naval Base Esquimalt. In WW1, despite the fact that it was in rather an out-of-the-way place, it was perhaps the premier northern Pacific base for RN vessels. A good supply of high grade coal, a sound anchorage and a rather safe roads made all the difference.

Just blue-skying it a bit, but I believe the whole tradition of "Hearts of Oak", though based on British pre-eminence at sea for decades, also reflected a deep fear, and hinted at the underlying weakness of the British Empire despite the growing strength of her Commonwealth. We're talking WW2, of course, but the same applied in WW1. Great Britain was never a strong land force. Well, except during the European wars of the Plantagenets.

We're approaching the confrontation with Graf Spee, of course, one well-designed ship at large in a radar-free, largely recon-free oceanic world. But she was not the only ship of such power at sea, and either one had the power (literally, in terms of weaponry) to disrupt all pre-war shipping plans of the British. Once Germany was successful in Western Europe, the relative impact of surface raiders would decline as the U-boats could use the expanded coastline to stretch RN capabilities beyond their fail-safe. The numbers: on a typical day in 1939 there are 13-17 U-boats on patrol. And there were Graf Spee and Deutschland at sea. The Admiralty was, IMHO, dead frightened that, face-to-face, RN ships might not fare well: there were questions concerning the armour on HM's ships that were discovered at Jutland in 1916, and were to an astonishing degree unresolved by 1939. And not to far in the future from 1939, I think that issue will come to the fore again, but will be covered over by the most lop-sided victory against a single ship that occurred during WW2, when the Bismarck was eventually sunk. IMHO, Bismarck and her escort, Prinz Eugen, became the RN's worst nightmare. In tactics. In gunnery. In survivability.

Maybe that's why the Admiralty (and let's remember who was First Lord of the Admiralty in 1939) had its ships spreading across the seven seas.

Gotta go. Guest arriving soon.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/11/2017 4:15:28 PM
November 11. Day 72
Saturday. New Moon.

Britain
Armistice Day in Britain and most of her commonwealth and colonies. Since 1920, ceremonies of rembrance have centred on the Cenotaph in Whitehall, while scaled-down services are held at various memorials across the participating nations.

There was to be no public service in 1939; public gatherings of such a nature were forbidden in wartime. Yet some things cannot be stopped:
Quote:
Officially, there was no two minutes’ silence on Armistice Day 1939 but on the first stroke of 11 am, traffic came to a voluntary standstill and passers-by stood bareheaded until two minutes had elapsed. At the Cenotaph, wreaths were laid on behalf of the King and Queen, followed by the chiefs of staff … on behalf of he fighting forces. (The Day We Went to War, p 355)

Quote:
BERLIN, November 11
Armistice Day. An irony! Listened to the broadcast from Munich of the state funeral for the beer-house victims. Hitler present, did not speak. Hess spoke. (Berlin Diary, p 247)

Editor’s note: Armistice Day was not celebrated in Germany, Shirer’s reference is to the British celebration.

Europe
Quote:
BERLIN, November 11
Something’s in the wind. Learned today that Hitler’s headquarters train has steam up. Party gossip about a mass air attack on England. A drive through Holland and Belgium. Or one through Switzerland. (Berlin Diary, p 248)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 12 U-boats at sea. No sailings or returns to port. No Allied ships sunk; no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).]

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were two cruisers were between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait. …
 
Armed merchant cruisers AURANIA and CHITRAL arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol duties.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer MAORI departed Scapa Flow to rendezvous with submarines TRIUMPH and TRIDENT 10 miles due north of the Butt of Lewis for escort. They arrived at Rosyth on the 12th.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer ZULU searched for a submarine reported NW of Holbourn Head in 58-37N, 3-32W.

Trawler SOUTHWARD HO (204grt) reported a submarine five miles SE of the Tyne. Anti-submarine trawlers OLVINA (425grt) and CAPE COMORIN (504grt) carried out a search and during the night of the 11th/12th, CAPE COMORIN ran aground near the Tyne. She was refloated and repaired.

Destroyers IMOGEN, ICARUS and IMPULSIVE departed Scapa Flow on anti-submarine patrol and returned the next day.
 
East Coast waters – Convoy FN.35 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloops PELICAN and HASTINGS. Destroyers JUNO and JUPITER were at sea as a fighting force for this convoy and for FS.35. Seven steamers became detached from FN.35 and Polish destroyers GROM and BURZA escorted them into the Humber. GROM afterwards returned to Harwich. The convoy arrived at Methil on the 13th, WOOLSTON and PELICAN at Rosyth mid-day, and HASTINGS which had lost touch, two hours later.
 
Convoy FS.35 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers WALLACE, WHITLEY and sloops STORK and STORK which attacked a submarine contact 9.9 miles off St Abbs Head. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 13th.

 
Destroyers KEITH and BOADICEA were on East Coast patrol. BOADICEA was detached to Harwich to refuel and KEITH was relieved by Polish destroyers BURZA and GROM on the 11th.

The Humber Force, consisting of 2nd Cruiser Squadron, the 7th Destroyer Flotilla, and destroyers MASHONA, BEDOUIN, TARTAR, GURKHA of the 4th Flotilla, were placed under direct Admiralty control to counter a possible sea invasion of Holland thought to be due. Light cruisers GLASGOW,SOUTHAMPTON, AURORA, BELFAST, with MASHONA, TARTAR and GURKHA departed Rosyth on the 11th to join the Humber Force at Immingham. BEDOUIN was delayed three hours and arrived later. On the 12th, MASHONA, BEDOUIN and TARTAR were relieved by destroyers AFRIDI, MAORI and ZULU, with MASHONA departing Rosyth on the 14th, escorting submarine H.34 and tanker WAR PINDARI to Scapa Flow and Loch Ewe, respectively. BEDOUIN proceeded to Scapa Flow, while TARTAR escorted steamer MARYLYN (4555grt), departing Aberdeen on the 14th for Scapa Flow. …
 
North Atlantic special shipment – Light cruiser EMERALD departed Portsmouth with another shipment of gold for Canada, called at Plymouth on the 12th, and arrived at Halifax on the 21st.

Miscellaneous ship movement – Aircraft carrier ARGUS and destroyer STURDY departed Devonport for Toulon where the carrier could conduct training exercises for new pilots. Destroyer GALLANT departed Portsmouth on the 13th and joined the ships. STURDY was to carry on and join the local defence destroyer flotilla on the China Station, but was retained in the Mediterranean as attendant destroyer for ARGUS. The three ships arrived at Gibraltar on the 17th with GALLANT leaving on the 17th and reaching Plymouth on the 21st.
 
Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoys OA.32G, which had departed the Thames on the 8th, and OB.32G, which had departed Liverpool, merged on the 11th as OG.6 with 43 ships. They were escorted by destroyers MACKAY, VIMY, WHIRLWIND, WREN and WAKEFUL from the 8th to 11th, and French destroyers TIGRE and PANTHÈRE from the 11th to 16th, when the convoy arrived at Gibraltar. Anti-submarine trawlers SPANIARD (455grt), TURCOMAN (455grt) and KELT (455grt) were with the convoy from the 11th to 16th.
 
Southeast Atlantic – Heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE departed Simonstown and Capetown respectively, to sweep towards St Helena. … The cruisers arrived back on the 23rd.
 
Indian Ocean – Battleship RAMILLIES and destroyer DELIGHT departed Port Said to relieve battleship MALAYA and destroyer DARING off Aden.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser PENELOPE departed Alexandria on patrol, and arrived at Malta on the 25th.
 
Mediterranean-U.K. transfer – The 1st Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla left Malta on the 11th with base ship VULCAN (trawler, 623grt) for Bizerte and Ajaccio, en route to Portsmouth. The Flotilla consisted of the same units it had at the beginning of the war. Destroyer DAINTY followed the flotilla to escort.
 
MTB.3 and MTB.4 broke down and returned to Malta, were freighted in depot ship WOOLWICH, which departed Malta on the 21st, and later arrived at Portsmouth. DAINTY and seven MTBs reached Bizerte on the 15th and MTB.14, MTB.15, MTB.16, MTB.18 were sent on to Ajaccio.
 
On the 16th in heavy weather off Sardinia, MTB.6 broke down and was taken in tow by DAINTY. However, she was lost when the ring of the towing spar fractured and DAINTY rammed her. MTB.1 and MTB.19 remained with DAINTY and arrived at Ajaccio before noon on the 19th, after which DAINTY returned to Malta.
 
Ship movement – Liner FRANCONIA, carrying MTB.2, MTB.5, MTB.17, departed Malta on the 16th escorted by destroyer DUCHESS. The liner was damaged by heavy seas and forced to heave to, but was able to reach Marseilles on the 19th. On the 24th, the flotilla departed Marseilles, travelled up the Rhone River, and was then towed through the canals to the Seine. In the Seine, once again under their own power, they sailed through Paris and out to sea finally arriving at Portsmouth on 6 December. After refitting, the Flotilla was based at Felixstowe and became operational in January 1940.
 
Southeast Atlantic – Light cruiser NEPTUNE departed Freetown on patrol, met depot ship MAIDSTONE, and returned on the 16th to join aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL.
 
French naval activity – French submarine SIDI FERRUCH arrived at Port of Spain after patrol in the Caribbean.
 
German blockade runners – A group of 8 German steamers escaped from Vigo to attempt to return to Germany. …[Seven of the 8 evaded British blockade. Only] the last ship of the group, KONSUL HENDRICK FISSER (4458grt) was captured attempting to pass the Iceland-Faroes Passage on the 23rd. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/11/2017 4:15:49 PM
November 11. Day 72
Saturday. New Moon.

Britain
Armistice Day in Britain and most of her commonwealth and colonies. Since 1920, ceremonies of rembrance have centred on the Cenotaph in Whitehall, while scaled-down services are held at various memorials across the participating nations.

There was to be no public service in 1939; public gatherings of such a nature were forbidden in wartime. Yet some things cannot be stopped:
Quote:
Officially, there was no two minutes’ silence on Armistice Day 1939 but on the first stroke of 11 am, traffic came to a voluntary standstill and passers-by stood bareheaded until two minutes had elapsed. At the Cenotaph, wreaths were laid on behalf of the King and Queen, followed by the chiefs of staff … on behalf of he fighting forces. (The Day We Went to War, p 355)

Quote:
BERLIN, November 11
Armistice Day. An irony! Listened to the broadcast from Munich of the state funeral for the beer-house victims. Hitler present, did not speak. Hess spoke. (Berlin Diary, p 247)

Editor’s note: Armistice Day was not celebrated in Germany, Shirer’s reference is to the British celebration.

Europe
Quote:
BERLIN, November 11
Something’s in the wind. Learned today that Hitler’s headquarters train has steam up. Party gossip about a mass air attack on England. A drive through Holland and Belgium. Or one through Switzerland. (Berlin Diary, p 248)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 12 U-boats at sea. No sailings or returns to port. No Allied ships sunk; no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were two cruisers were between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait. …
 
Armed merchant cruisers AURANIA and CHITRAL arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol duties.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer MAORI departed Scapa Flow to rendezvous with submarines TRIUMPH and TRIDENT 10 miles due north of the Butt of Lewis for escort. They arrived at Rosyth on the 12th.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer ZULU searched for a submarine reported NW of Holbourn Head in 58-37N, 3-32W.

Trawler SOUTHWARD HO (204grt) reported a submarine five miles SE of the Tyne. Anti-submarine trawlers OLVINA (425grt) and CAPE COMORIN (504grt) carried out a search and during the night of the 11th/12th, CAPE COMORIN ran aground near the Tyne. She was refloated and repaired.

Destroyers IMOGEN, ICARUS and IMPULSIVE departed Scapa Flow on anti-submarine patrol and returned the next day.
 
East Coast waters – Convoy FN.35 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloops PELICAN and HASTINGS. Destroyers JUNO and JUPITER were at sea as a fighting force for this convoy and for FS.35. Seven steamers became detached from FN.35 and Polish destroyers GROM and BURZA escorted them into the Humber. GROM afterwards returned to Harwich. The convoy arrived at Methil on the 13th, WOOLSTON and PELICAN at Rosyth mid-day, and HASTINGS which had lost touch, two hours later.
 
Convoy FS.35 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers WALLACE, WHITLEY and sloops STORK and STORK which attacked a submarine contact 9.9 miles off St Abbs Head. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 13th.

 
Destroyers KEITH and BOADICEA were on East Coast patrol. BOADICEA was detached to Harwich to refuel and KEITH was relieved by Polish destroyers BURZA and GROM on the 11th.

The Humber Force, consisting of 2nd Cruiser Squadron, the 7th Destroyer Flotilla, and destroyers MASHONA, BEDOUIN, TARTAR, GURKHA of the 4th Flotilla, were placed under direct Admiralty control to counter a possible sea invasion of Holland thought to be due. Light cruisers GLASGOW,SOUTHAMPTON, AURORA, BELFAST, with MASHONA, TARTAR and GURKHA departed Rosyth on the 11th to join the Humber Force at Immingham. BEDOUIN was delayed three hours and arrived later. On the 12th, MASHONA, BEDOUIN and TARTAR were relieved by destroyers AFRIDI, MAORI and ZULU, with MASHONA departing Rosyth on the 14th, escorting submarine H.34 and tanker WAR PINDARI to Scapa Flow and Loch Ewe, respectively. BEDOUIN proceeded to Scapa Flow, while TARTAR escorted steamer MARYLYN (4555grt), departing Aberdeen on the 14th for Scapa Flow. …
 
North Atlantic special shipment – Light cruiser EMERALD departed Portsmouth with another shipment of gold for Canada, called at Plymouth on the 12th, and arrived at Halifax on the 21st.

Miscellaneous ship movement – Aircraft carrier ARGUS and destroyer STURDY departed Devonport for Toulon where the carrier could conduct training exercises for new pilots. Destroyer GALLANT departed Portsmouth on the 13th and joined the ships. STURDY was to carry on and join the local defence destroyer flotilla on the China Station, but was retained in the Mediterranean as attendant destroyer for ARGUS. The three ships arrived at Gibraltar on the 17th with GALLANT leaving on the 17th and reaching Plymouth on the 21st.
 
Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoys OA.32G, which had departed the Thames on the 8th, and OB.32G, which had departed Liverpool, merged on the 11th as OG.6 with 43 ships. They were escorted by destroyers MACKAY, VIMY, WHIRLWIND, WREN and WAKEFUL from the 8th to 11th, and French destroyers TIGRE and PANTHÈRE from the 11th to 16th, when the convoy arrived at Gibraltar. Anti-submarine trawlers SPANIARD (455grt), TURCOMAN (455grt) and KELT (455grt) were with the convoy from the 11th to 16th.
 
Southeast Atlantic – Heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE departed Simonstown and Capetown respectively, to sweep towards St Helena. … The cruisers arrived back on the 23rd.
 
Indian Ocean – Battleship RAMILLIES and destroyer DELIGHT departed Port Said to relieve battleship MALAYA and destroyer DARING off Aden.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser PENELOPE departed Alexandria on patrol, and arrived at Malta on the 25th.
 
Mediterranean-U.K. transfer – The 1st Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla left Malta on the 11th with base ship VULCAN (trawler, 623grt) for Bizerte and Ajaccio, en route to Portsmouth. The Flotilla consisted of the same units it had at the beginning of the war. Destroyer DAINTY followed the flotilla to escort.
 
MTB.3 and MTB.4 broke down and returned to Malta, were freighted in depot ship WOOLWICH, which departed Malta on the 21st, and later arrived at Portsmouth. DAINTY and seven MTBs reached Bizerte on the 15th and MTB.14, MTB.15, MTB.16, MTB.18 were sent on to Ajaccio.
 
On the 16th in heavy weather off Sardinia, MTB.6 broke down and was taken in tow by DAINTY. However, she was lost when the ring of the towing spar fractured and DAINTY rammed her. MTB.1 and MTB.19 remained with DAINTY and arrived at Ajaccio before noon on the 19th, after which DAINTY returned to Malta.
 
Ship movement – Liner FRANCONIA, carrying MTB.2, MTB.5, MTB.17, departed Malta on the 16th escorted by destroyer DUCHESS. The liner was damaged by heavy seas and forced to heave to, but was able to reach Marseilles on the 19th. On the 24th, the flotilla departed Marseilles, travelled up the Rhone River, and was then towed through the canals to the Seine. In the Seine, once again under their own power, they sailed through Paris and out to sea finally arriving at Portsmouth on 6 December. After refitting, the Flotilla was based at Felixstowe and became operational in January 1940.
 
Southeast Atlantic – Light cruiser NEPTUNE departed Freetown on patrol, met depot ship MAIDSTONE, and returned on the 16th to join aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL.
 
French naval activity – French submarine SIDI FERRUCH arrived at Port of Spain after patrol in the Caribbean.
 
German blockade runners – A group of 8 German steamers escaped from Vigo to attempt to return to Germany. …[Seven of the 8 evaded British blockade. Only] the last ship of the group, KONSUL HENDRICK FISSER (4458grt) was captured attempting to pass the Iceland-Faroes Passage on the 23rd. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/12/2017 5:14:03 PM
November 12. Day 73
Sunday.

Britain
Quote:
Churchill, First Lord of the Admiralty, says in a broadcast the if the British get through the winder without any serious setback the first campaign of the war will have been won. (2194 Days, p 32)
Editorial comment: is it possible for Churchill to have forgotten about Poland? I don't think so either!

Europe
Quote:
Chamberlain and Daladier refuse the offer of mediation by the Netherlands and Belgium. (2194 Days, p 32)
Editor: see Nov 7 above.
Quote:
BERLIN, November 12
The Germans announce they’ve shot “by sentence of court martial” the Polish mayor of Bromberg. They say an investigation showed he was “implicated in the murder of Germans and the theft of city funds.” That, I suppose, is a German peace. … (Berlin Diary, p 248)
This may refer to an incident raised by John R. Price for Sept 3 above.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 12 U-boats at sea. U-57 sailed from Kiel; U-34 returned to Wilhelmsaven after 27 days. Two Allied ships sunk; no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 07.00 hours on 12 November 1939 the unescorted and unarmed Cresswell was stopped by gunfire from U-41 while fishing 18 miles northwest by west of Flannan Isles, Outer Hebrides. The Germans ordered the crew to abandon ship and they then shelled and sunk the trawler. … Eight survivors were picked up by the U-boat, but one died of wounds and was buried at sea. Mugler planned to put them on another ship later on.
At 09.55 hours, they witnessed the sinking of the Arne Kjøde and were transferred to the British trawler Phyllisia at 16.42 hours. The survivors were landed at Fleetwood on 14 November.

At 09.55 hours on 12 November 1939 the unescorted and neutral Arne Kjøde (Master Bernt Ingebrektsen) was hit amidships by one G7a torpedo from U-41 and broke in two northwest of Butt of Lewis. The crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats which lost contact to each other in bad weather. …
The master and three crew members drowned when [their] boat capsized in heavy seas in the morning of 14 November, but twelve survivors were rescued from the overturned boat by HMS Isis (D 87) (Cdr J.C. Clouston, RN) the same day. … («uboat.net»)

Cresswell, a British trawler of 275 tons, was laden with fish when sunk. Complement=13; dead=6.

Arne Kjøde, a Norwegian tanker of 11,019 tons, was carrying gas oil from Aruba via Kirkwall to Nyborg, Denmark. Complement=39; dead=5.

At sea
Quote:
Norwegian convoys – Battleships NELSON, RODNEY, and [5] destroyers … departed Rosyth to carry out full calibre firings before proceeding on patrol between the Faroes and Norway to cover convoys ON.2/HN.2. The force was joined by destroyer FURY at sea. ON.2, consisting of just one British ship, departed Methil escorted by [3] destroyers… . Light cruiser AURORA left Immingham to provide near cover and anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW was ordered to guard ON.2, but the order was changed and CAIRO was assigned. … ON.2 arrived without incident at Bergen on the 15th. The big ships arrived at Loch Ewe on the 17th, departed on the 20th after refuelling and reached the Clyde on the 21st.
 
East Coast waters – Light cruiser EDINBURGH and destroyers AFRIDI and MAORI departed Rosyth for the Humber, arriving that afternoon.
 
Destroyer KINGSTON departed Rosyth for repairs at Leith, completed on the 19th.
 
Destroyer IMPERIAL departed Rosyth for boiler cleaning.

 Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Rosyth and arrived in the Humber on the 13th.
 …
North Sea – Submarine SEAHORSE departed Blyth for a patrol off Terschelling, arriving back on the 28th.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were two cruisers between the Orkneys and Faroes, three cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and light cruiser NEWCASTLE and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
Light cruisers CALYPSO, CALEDON and CERES departed Sullom Voe on Northern Patrol duty. CALEDON suffered damage to her upper deck in heavy weather on the 15th.
 
East Coast Patrol – On East Coast patrol, destroyer KEITH was off Orfordness and the Polish BURZA off the Sunk.
 
Destroyers GRIFFIN (D.1), GIPSY, GREYHOUND and GLOWWORM arrived at Harwich from Plymouth, when Captain Creasy's designation changed from D.1 to D.22. GIPSY and GREYHOUND were in a collision which caused minor damage to both ships. GIPSY repaired at Harwich and GREYHOUND at Sheerness. GLOWWORM escorted convoy HXF.7A to the Sunk.
 
Ship damage and grounding – Destroyer VIMY on patrol reported a split in her hull which contaminated her fuel, and was forced to return to port.
 
[Five] steamers … and [1] tanker … of convoy FN.35 all ran aground off Lowestoft, each following the next one on to the shore. Steamer FLIMSTONE (4674grt), managed to avoid this fate but only after colliding with SAINT MARGARET.
 
German blockade running – German steamer MECKLENBURG … was intercepted on the 12th in 62‑37N, 10‑36W by light cruiser DELHI and scuttled to avoid capture NW of the Faroes in 63‑09N, 11‑38W. DELHI arrived at Sullom Voe with her 56 man crew on the 15th.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW departed Rosyth and arrived at Grimsby on the 13th.
 
Destroyers ESK, EXPRESS, BLANCHE and BASILISK departing Rosyth for the Humber, were held up by fog near Outer Dowsing.
 
German air attack – In a German air attack on Sullom Voe and Lerwick, two Sunderland flying boats at Lerwick were destroyed.
 
Ship movement – Sloop FLAMINGO departed Rosyth with submarines SEALION, SHARK, SNAPPER and SUNFISH for passage to Harwich, arriving on the 14th.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.34 of 14 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers ELECTRA and ESCORT from the 12th to 14th.
 
Convoy OB.34 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANESSA until the 13th, and destroyers WARWICK and WHIRLWIND until the 15th.

German minelaying in Thames Estuary – German destroyers KARL GALSTER, HERMANN KÜNNE and HANS LÜDEMAN, escorted by destroyer WILHELM HEIDKAMP laid 288 magnetic mines in the Thames Estuary during the night of the 12th/13th. …Destroyer BLANCHE and thirteen merchant ships for 48,725grt were sunk in this field from 10 November to 15 December, with a loss of 87 crew.
 
On the 12th, cruiser minelayer ADVENTURE (Captain A R Halfhide) escorted by destroyers BLANCHE (Lt Cdr R M Aubrey) and BASILISK (Cdr M Richmond) departed Grimsby en route to Portsmouth. At 0518/13th, three miles 120° from the Tongue Light Vessel, ADVENTURE struck a mine laid by the German destroyers that morning and was badly damaged; Nine ratings were killed, fifteen missing and 67 wounded. She was able to proceed under her own power at five knots to Chatham assisted by tugs DORIA and SALVA from Ramsgate and LADY BRASSEY from Dover. Sixty two wounded were transferred to BASILISK, which led ADVENTURE in to Sheerness. She was taken to Chatham for temporary repairs, departed on 19 December for Plymouth and arrived there on the 21st for permanent repairs lasting until 18 September 1940.
 
At 0825, near the same spot at one mile 80° from North East Spit Buoy, BLANCHE towing one of the rescue tugs, struck another mine. … BLANCHE sank two hours after striking the mine.
 
Destroyer GLOWWORM was stationed east of the Tongue Light Vessel to redirect Thames-bound shipping, and trawler MYRTLE redirected shipping coming out of the river, but the following vessels – PONZANO, MATRA, WOODTOWN,  GRAZIA,  HOOKWOOD, SPAARNDAM, RUBISLAW, SHEAF CREST, DALRYAN, SAN CALISTO, PARALOS, MEREL, and URSUS were mined and sunk in the field.
 
German naval activities – [Four] German destroyers conducted an anti-shipping sweep in the Skagerrak from the 13th to 15th.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser CAPETOWN departed Gibraltar on escort duty and arrived back later the same day.
 
South American Station – Heavy cruiser EXETER was bumped and damaged while alongside a tanker near Montevideo.
 
Far East – Heavy cruiser KENT departed Hong Kong and arrived at Singapore on the 15th.

Light cruiser DAUNTLESS arrived at Singapore after patrol in the Sunda Strait. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/13/2017 5:45:03 PM
November 13. Day 74
Monday.

Europe
Quote:
Negotiations between Finland and Russia were terminated. Stalin ordered plans for an immediate war against Finland. (Goralski, pp 99-100)

Quote:
King Carol of Rumania offers himself as a secret mediator between the two sides.
The Finns break off their talks with the Russians and mobilize their forces – not exactly large, about 200,000 men – having no illusions about the outcome of the dispute. (2194 Days, p 32)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 11 U-boats at sea. U-56 returned to Kiel after 22 days. One Allied ship sunk; no U-boats lost; U-49 attacked by air, with minor damage. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 03.40 hours on 13 Nov 1939 the unescorted Loire (Master René Decrop) was hit by one stern torpedo from U-26 and sank within 30 seconds about 40 miles south-southeast of Almeira, Spain. The U-boat had hit the ship with a dud at 03.34 hours. …

…U-26 was the first German U-boat that operated in the Mediterranean in World War 2, she left the Mediterranean again after a few days through the Strait of Gibraltar.(«uboat.net»)

Loire, a French steam merchantman of 4,285 tons, Loire was carrying 5,588 tons of pyrite, 416 tons of wine and general cargo from Oran to Dunkirk. Of her complement of 34 crew and 5 gunners, none survived.

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Rosyth.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were three cruisers between Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland, and two cruisers and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
German air and sea activity – Two German air raids on Sullom Voe and the Northern Patrol cruisers there did not cause any damage. The air raids and the U-boats reported off Sullom Voe resulted in the 7th and 11th Cruiser Squadron of the Northern Patrol being ordered to Loch Ewe.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy SA.17 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by destroyers SKATE and SCIMITAR, and arrived at Brest on the 14th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.36 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WHITLEY, WALLACE and sloop STORK which had arrived from Harwich. The convoy reached Methil on the 15th.
 
Convoy FS.36 departed Methil, escorted by sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON. Sloop FLAMINGO, which had been on other escort duty, joined off the Tyne, and the convoy arrived at Southend on the 15th.
… 
German shipping losses – German steamer PARANA (6038grt), which had departed Buenos Aires on 7 October, was intercepted on the 12th by light cruiser NEWCASTLE west of Iceland in 65‑48N, 25‑19W, and scuttled herself in 65‑14N, 25‑22W. The wreck was sunk by gunfire from NEWCASTLE and she left her Denmark Strait patrol station at 2000/13th with the German survivors.
 
German steamer HUGO OSTENDORFF (3986grt), which had departed San Juan del Puerto on 25 October, was not far astern of PARANA. Hearing her interception, she arrived at Hafnarfjoedr (Hvammasfjord) on the south coast of Iceland, set off again on the 24th and arrived at Stettin on 5 December.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Sloop ENCHANTRESS attacked a submarine contact in 49-40N, 12-04W.
 
German naval activity – U.28 laid mines in Bristol Channel, on which one merchant ship was lost.
 
German minesweeper M.132 was badly damaged by depth charges from minesweeper M.61 in an anti-submarine hunt near List in the North Sea, and was beached, a total loss.
 
Indian Ocean – Australian destroyers STUART, VAMPIRE, VOYAGER, VENDETTA and WATERHEN departed Singapore for Colombo. On the 17th, VAMPIRE and VOYAGER detached to Trincomalee to join Force J (heavy cruiser KENT and the French SUFFREN) in the Nicobar Island area. STUART and WATERHEN arrived at Colombo on the 18th and VENDETTA on the 19th. WATERHEN was attached to Force I, while VENDETTA was employed in anti-submarine patrols off Colombo. On the 25th, STUART departed Colombo for Madagascar to join light cruiser GLOUCESTER and French sloop RIGAULT DE GENOUILLY.
 
French naval activity – French tanker SAN JOSE (6013grt) was chased by an unidentified submarine in 27‑34N, 57‑58W, seven miles from Willemstad. The submarine was later identified as one of the French submarines based at Martinique.

French naval acctivity – French sloop D'ENTRECASTEAUX reported sighting a submarine in 12-56N, 22-24W.
 
French large destroyer LION arrived at Gibraltar at 0800 and departed at 1025 eastward.
 
French submarine L'ESPOIR departed Colombo for Djibouti and Toulon.
 
French submarine SIDI FERRUCH departed Port of Spain on patrol.

Caribbean – Light cruiser ORION departed Kingston on patrol and arrived back at Kingston on the 25th.

Singapore – [British India passenger steamer] SIRDHANA (7745grt) was sunk on a British defensive minefield in Singapore Roads, 3½ miles 148° from Fort Canning Light; twenty crew were killed.
… 
Far East waters –Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM departed Hong Kong on patrol in Chinese waters. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/14/2017 4:29:59 PM
November 14. Day 75
Tuesday.

Europe
Quote:
Hitler rejects mediation offered by Queen Wilhelmina and King Leopols. (2194 Days, p 32)
See Nov 6 for offer; Nov 12 for Daladier and Chamberlain’s rejection.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 14 U-boats at sea. Four boats (U-15, -19, -29, -38) sailed from Wilhelmshaven; one boat (U-61) returned to Kiel after 22 days. No Allied ship sunk; no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
French gold shipment – Carrying the first shipment of French gold to the United States, French Force Z of battleship LORRAINE, and light cruisers MARSEILLAISE and JEAN DE VIENNE departed Toulon escorted by destroyers AIGLE, FORTUNE and LA RAILLEUSE in Operation MACARONI. The escort was reinforced by destroyers LION, which departed Gibraltar on the 13th and SIMOUN from Oran. The French ships, less FORTUNE, LA RAILLEUSE and SIMOUN which were detached en route for Casablanca, arrived at Mers el Kebir on the evening of the 15th when U-boats were reported in the area. The Force, escorted by LION and AIGLE, departed on the 17th and on the 19th was joined by the three destroyers which had been detached to Casablanca. Later on the 19th these three destroyers returned to Casablanca, followed by LION and AIGLE on the 20th. Force Z reached Bermuda at 0900/27th, remained until 1230/29th and arrived at Halifax at 1400 on 1 December.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were three cruisers between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and three AMCs in the Denmark Strait. 

Light cruisers DRAGON and COLOMBO departed Sullom Voe on Northern Patrol duties, and arrived at Loch Ewe on the 20th.
 
East Coast convoy – Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW departed Grimsby on FN.36 escort duties with destroyers JERVIS and JUPITER, and arrived back later the same day.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA with destroyers JERSEY and JAGUAR departed the Humber on FS.36 escort duties and arrived at Grimsby later the same day.
 
Shetlands – Anti-aircraft cruiser COVENTRY departed Grimsby on the 14th, and in heavy weather, in the Pentland Firth, her power steering failed and she arrived at Sullom Voe under hand control. From 16 November to 14 January 1940, COVENTRY was anti-aircraft guard ship for Sullom Voe and depot ship MANELA which maintained the flying boats operating over the Arctic Ocean. Light cruiser CARDIFF was held at Sullom Voe until COVENTRY's arrival to provide anti-aircraft protection for MANELA.
 
East Coast waters – Destroyer KEITH and the Polish BURZA replaced destroyer GLOWWORM and Polish GROM on East Coast patrol.

 
Destroyer TARTAR investigated a contact 59° off Rattray Head, later determined to be the wreck of CAIRNMONA, sunk by U-boat on 30 October.

Home waters – Destroyer GLOWWORM dropped depth charges on a submarine contact off North Foreland.
 
Anti-submarine trawler IMPERIALIST (520grt) attacked a submarine contact off Kentish Knock in 51-42N, 1-48E.
 
Orkneys – Anti-submarine trawler LOCH TULLA (423grt) attacked a submarine contact in Hoy Sound.

North Atlantic outgoing convoys – Convoy OA.35 of six ships departed Southend escorted by destroyer KEITH on the 14th and destroyers ESCAPADE and ENCOUNTER on the 14th and 15th. Submarine NARWHAL departed Gosport and escorted from the 14th to 19th, and destroyers ACASTA and ARDENT from the 15th to 19th, when the convoy dispersed and NARWHAL proceeded independently to Halifax for escort duties.
 
Convoy OB.35 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WINCHELSEA and WALPOLE until the 17th.
 
Ship damage – British steamer DOTTEREL (1385grt) and French steamer ALASKA (5399grt) collided seven miles east of St Catherine. DOTTEREL was able to proceed to Southampton, but ALASKA sank early on the 15th.
 
Belgian fishing vessel MAURICE MARGUERITE (28grt) was sunk on a mine off Dyck Light Vessel, outside Gravelines, with the loss of three crew.
_____
 
German naval activity – Finnish steamer VERNA H (983grt) was seized in the Baltic by German warships and taken to Swinemünde.
 
Gibraltar-U.K. convoy – Convoy HG.7 departed Port Said on the 3rd, Malta on the 5th, and left Gibraltar on the 14th with 31 ships, escorted by destroyers VELOX, VIDETTE and also French destroyers TARTU and VAUQUELIN from the 14th to 21st when they arrived at Brest. Destroyer WOLVERINE escorted convoy HG.7A – the east coast portion - from the 21st to 23rd, and on the 21st, 28 miles 200° off Start Point, steamers DUNBAR CASTLE (10002grt) and CLAN MACFARLANE (6193grt) were in collision. DUNBAR CASTLE proceeded to Southampton for repairs. HG.7 arrived at Liverpool on the 22nd, while HG.7A arrived in the Downs on the 23rd with WOLVERINE.

 French naval activity – Off the Azores, French armed merchant cruiser KOUTOUBIA captured German steamer TRIFELS (6198grt) which had departed Ponta Delgada on the 12th carrying 21,000 cases of gasoline. TRIFELS was taken to Casablanca and renamed SAINT LOUISE for French service, but later returned to German service after the fall of France.
 
French submarines CASABIANCA, SFAX, PASTEUR and ACHILLE of the 2nd Submarine Division departed Brest escorting French armed merchant cruiser QUERCY, and arrived at Halifax for escort duty on the 25th.
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1941

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/14/2017 4:40:52 PM
14 Nov 1939 Germany

Theodor Eicke is named the commander of all SS Death's Head units; Richard Glucks takes over Eicke's former position as the inspector of concentration camps.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre, PA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant
Posts: 525

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/14/2017 5:59:07 PM
Trevor,

3rd SS Division "Totenkopf," German translation death head, then just forming in Germany which was armed with Czech weapons for the battle of France. About a third of the division came directly from the camp guard details.
---------------
A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country.
"to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"


brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/15/2017 1:29:37 PM
November 15. Day 76
Wednesday.

Europe
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 17 U-boats at sea. Three boats (U-13, -18, -22) sailed from Kiel. No Allied ship sunk; no U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Norwegian inbound convoy – Convoy HN.2 of eight British and one Finnish steamer departed Bergen and was joined by destroyers ICARUS, IMOGEN and IMPULSIVE. The convoy was covered by battleships NELSON and RODNEY and accompanying forces which departed Rosyth on the 12th. ICARUS was relieved by destroyer IMPERIAL and then proceeded to Rosyth for boiler cleaning.

…[Editor: 10 destroyers joined in the escort at various times during the convoy.]
 
A submarine contact on the 17th did not hamper the convoy's progress and HN.2 arrived safely on the 18th with IMOGEN, IMPERIAL and IMPULSIVE. The battle force arrived at Loch Ewe on the 17th, departed on the 19th and arrived in the Clyde on the 21st.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, three cruisers were between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and one AMC between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and three AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
West Coast waters – The deep minefield in the Clyde was begun and completed on the 18th in Operation CP.

East Coast waters – Sloop PELICAN and submarine TRIAD departed Rosyth to exercise outside May Island with RAF personnel. Both ships arrived back at Rosyth later that day.
 
English Channel – Polish destroyer GROM rendezvoused off North Goodwin Light with destroyers EXPRESS and ESK, which had sailed from Harwich.
 
St. George’s Channel – Destroyers BROKE and ECLIPSE were submarine hunting in 53‑50N, 5‑25W.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.37 departed Southend for Methil, escorted by sloops GRIMSBY, FLAMINGO, WESTON. Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA, destroyers JUNO and JUPITER departed Grimsby in support.
 
Convoy FS.37 departed Methil escorted by escort ships VIVIEN, VALOROUS and sloop BITTERN. Minesweeper TEDWORTH sailed with the convoy for the passage south. VALOROUS developed condenser problems, was replaced by destroyer JAGUAR, and began repairs in the Tyne, which were completed on the 16th.
 
U.K.-
France convoy
– Convoy BC.15 of ten steamers, including BARON CARNEGIE, BLACKHEATH, DEVON COAST and NIGERIAN (Commodore) departed Bristol Channel, escorted by destroyers VIVACIOUS, VESPER and VANESSA, and safely arrived in the Loire on the 17th.
 
Ant-U-boat activity – U.20 was attacked nine miles 90° from Tongue Light Vessel by British aircraft which called up destroyers KEITH and GRIFFIN. Destroyer GREYHOUND later joined in the search, but U.20 escaped serious damage and was able to lay mines off Newarp Light Vessel on the 22nd.
 
French destroyer SIROCCO attacked a contact in 25‑50N, 7‑20W after a submarine was reported by an aircraft. Destroyers VELOX and VIDETTE, after leaving convoy HG.7, also searched the area.

 
Indian Ocean – Australian light cruiser HOBART departed Colombo and arrived at Bombay on the 18th.
 
Heavy cruiser SUSSEX arrived at Durban.
 
Major German naval activity – German pocket battleship DEUTSCHLAND arrived in German waters and was renamed LÜTZOW to prevent the possibility of a ship bearing the name of the Fatherland being sunk. She anchored at Gdynia on the 17th.
 
German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE sank steamer AFRICA SHELL … 10½ miles SW by S of Cape Zavora Light in Mozambique Channel in 24-40-42S, 35-12E. Submarine OLYMPUS on patrol in the Indian Ocean set off in pursuit, but failed to make contact.
 
RN response to Graf Spee – Admiral Wells of Force K transferred his flag to battlecruiser RENOWN, and aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL departed Freetown for England to refit and receive new aircraft. When news of the sinking of AFRICA SHELL reached the Admiralty on the 17th, ARK ROYAL was ordered back to Freetown.
 
Far Eastern waters – Light cruiser LIVERPOOL departed Colombo on the 15th and arrived at Singapore on the 19th for patrol duties on the China Station. She proceeded to Saigon and arrived at Hong Kong on 10 December.
 
Canadian naval activities – Canadian destroyers OTTAWA and RESTIGOUCHE departed Esquimalt, Canada, for Halifax on the east coast after being relieved in the Pacific by British light cruiser CARADOC. They refuelled on the 25th off the Isla del Coco off the Costa Rican coast from Australian light cruiser PERTH, which had entered the Pacific through the Panama Canal, refuelled again at Kingston and reached Halifax on 7 December.
 
These movements were to allow Canadian destroyers FRASER and OTTAWA to join the America and West Indies Station, and Canadian destroyer SAGUENAY which had been operating in the Caribbean since late September to return to Canada. However, heavy demands for convoy escorts caused OTTAWA to be retained at Halifax and FRASER did not arrive in the Caribbean at Kingston until 31 March 1940.
 
Canadian destroyer ASSINIBOINE arrived at Halifax on the 17th from Plymouth, and departed Halifax on 5 December for Jamaica, arriving at Kingston on the 8th to relieve SAGUENAY.
 
SAGUENAY arrived back at Halifax in mid-December and resumed convoy duties from that port.
 
ASSINIBOINE remained in the Caribbean until 31 March 1940 when she arrived back at Halifax after being relieved by FRASER.
 
German losses – German trawler ELSE … was lost near Skargaard.
 
Other shipping losses – Lithuanian steamers PANEVEZYS … and NIDA … were sunk on mines near Tallinn. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/16/2017 5:11:39 PM
November 16. Day 77
Thursday.

Europe
Quote:
An uprising in Prague was quelled. Martial law was imposed and many of the dissidents – including large numbers of students – were killed. (Goralski, p 100)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 18 U-boats at sea. One boat (U-47) sailed from Kiel. One Allied ship sunk; no U-boats lost.

Arlington Court, a British steam merchant of 4,915 tons and a straggler from convoy SL-7A, was carrying 7,340 tons of maize from Rosario via Freetown to Hull. She was hit by two torpedo. Complement = 35; Dead = 7.(Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were three cruisers between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and two AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and three AMCs in the Denmark Strait.

Ship repair – Light cruiser CARDIFF departed Sullom Voe and arrived at Loch Ewe on the 20th to repair weather damage.

Destroyer KASHMIR at Scapa Flow was ordered to join [Adm] Forbes at sea, but had mechanical defects and was unable to sail.
Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW departed Grimsby on patrol duties and arrived back later the same day.
 
Southeast coast – Destroyers KEITH and GIPSY were ordered to rendezvous with destroyer GRIFFIN off Kentish Knock Light Vessel.
 
Minelaying operation FE was completed on the 15th/16th and 16th/17th between the English end of the Folkestone-Cape Griz Nez field and the shore off Dover by auxiliary minelayer HAMPTON escorted by two destroyers. Survey ship FRANKLIN laid the navigational buoys.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outgoing convoysConvoy OA.36G of 19 ships departed Southend on the 16th escorted by destroyers WAKEFUL and WHITEHALL on the 16th and 17th, and destroyers WOLVERINE and VERITY on the 18th and 19th.
 
Convoy OB.36G departed Liverpool on the 17th, escorted by destroyers WALKER and VANOC, which remained with the convoy until the 19th. Anti-submarine trawler NORTHERN SPRAY (655grt) was with the convoy on the 17th only. The Bristol section of OB.36G was escorted by destroyer MONTROSE which remained until the 20th.
 
Accompanying OA.36G were anti-submarine trawlers ARCTIC RANGER (493grt), KINGSTON CORNELIAN (449grt), LORD HOTHAM (464grt) and LEYLAND (452grt) on passage to Gibraltar for local anti-submarine duties, which were with the convoy from the 17th to 24th. OA.36G rendezvoused with OB.36G on the 19th and became convoy OG.7 with 43 ships. It was then escorted by French destroyers CHACAL and MISTRAL from the 19th and destroyer KEPPEL from the 20th. The convoy reached Gibraltar on the 24th.

U.28 sank Dutch tanker SLIEDRECHT (5133grt) 200 miles south of Rockall Bank; twenty six crewmen were missing but trawler MERISIA (291grt) rescued five survivors during the night of the 23rd/24th.[Editor’s comment: this sinking is listed in «uboat.net» as occurring on November 17.]
 
Sailing mishaps – Italian steamer VELOCE (5464grt) ran aground near Dungeness Light.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – When steamer HOPESTAR (5257grt) was attacked by a submarine in 48‑47N, 8‑28W, destroyers BROKE and ECLIPSE searched in the area.
 
Ship boarding – Destroyer WATCHMAN boarded Italian liner VULCANIA (24,469grt) outside Portuguese territorial waters. [No exact location indicated.]
 
Gibraltar – French destroyers TIGRE and PANTHÈRE arrived at Gibraltar for convoy escort duty.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.9 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser SALOPIAN. Disabled destroyer HAVOCK travelled with them and detached to Gibraltar on the 25th, arriving on the 27th. At 0800/2 December, destroyers MACKAY, VIMY, ACASTA, and ARDENT met the convoy in Home Waters, which arrived later that day.
 
Caribbean – French submarine SIDI FERRUCH arrived at Port of Spain after patrol. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/17/2017 5:18:38 PM
November 17. Day 78.
Friday.

Europe
Quote:
The Supreme Allied Council meets in Paris. In case of a German attack through Belgium it is decided to defend a line from the Meuse to Antwerp. In past years Marshal Pétain had opposed extension of the Maginot Line up to the Meuse on the grounds that the terrain in the Ardennes “would make any attempted invasion in that sector impossible”. (2194 Days, p 33)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 18 U-boats at sea. No boats sailed from or returned to port. Two neutral ships sunk (6,699 tons total); no U-boats lost.

Sliederecht, a Dutch motor tanker, was carrying 6,741 tons of various fuels from Abadan to Trondheim and Svolvær, but was being redirected to Kirkwall by RN order. She was hit by 1 torpedo from U-28. Complement = 31; Dead = 26.

Kaunas, a Lithuanian steam merchantman in ballast from Ghent to Hartlepool, was sunk by 1 torpedo from U-57 off the Netherlands coast. She was not displaying national markings so was sunk without warning. Complement = 16; Dead = 1. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
North Atlantic damage – Battlecruiser REPULSE sustained damage to her breakwater and aircraft carrier FURIOUS had engine trouble which limited her speed to 23 knots while at sea from Halifax.

Northern waters – Light cruisers EDINBURGH, BELFAST, GLASGOW, SOUTHAMPTON and AURORA arrived at Rosyth.
 
Light cruiser NEWCASTLE departed Scapa Flow for Loch Ewe, leaving there on the 21st for Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser CARDIFF departed Loch Ewe after refuelling and repairing damage sustained in heavy weather, and arrived back on the 20th.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruisers DIOMEDE and DUNEDIN departed Loch Ewe on Northern Patrol duties, with DIOMEDE arriving back on the 21st.
 
Armed merchant cruiser AURANIA departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol duties.
 
On Northern Patrol were two cruisers between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and two AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and three AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
East Coast – Polish destroyers BLYSKAWICA, BURZA, GROM arrived at Rosyth for a visit by the Polish Prime Minister, and left on the 18th to return to Harwich.
 
RN minelaying – Destroyers ESK and EXPRESS arrived at Harwich for minelaying in the Thames approaches in operation RG. They departed Harwich at 0815, accompanied by minesweepers SKIPJACK and LEDA.
 
ESK and EXPRESS laid more mines in this field on the 29th assisted by minesweepers HARRIER and HUSSAR, followed on 1 December by auxiliary minelayer HAMPTON and four destroyers which laid another line of mines, assisted by minesweepers SKIPJACK and LEDA.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer FURY departed the Clyde with base ship MASHOBRA on the 16th. FURY was relieved by destroyer INGLEFIELD at 1735/17th which took MASHOBRA on to Rosyth, arriving on the 19th. FURY proceeded to Loch Ewe, and after refuelling, joined the Main Fleet at sea.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.38 departed Southend, escorted by [3] escort vessels/destroyers… . Destroyer JERVIS, which had been searching the Outer Dowsing area joined the convoy on the 18th from dawn to dark, and the convoy arrived at Methil on the 19th.
 
Convoy FS.38 departed Methil, escorted by [2] destroyers … and [1] sloop… . Seaplane carrier PEGASUS travelled in company. [2] destroyers … operated in the area of FS.38 from dawn to dark on the 18th, and the convoy arrived at Southend on the 19th.
 
RN prize ship – German steamer HENNING OLDENDORFF (3986grt), which had departed Huelva, Spain, on the 2nd disguised as a Russian ship, was captured by light cruiser COLOMBO near Iceland in 62‑59N, 10‑44W. The German ship, the Royal Navy's 19th prize of the war, was taken in to Kirkwall … [and] was later renamed EMPIRE INDUSTRY for British service.
 
German minelaying German destroyers HERMANN KÜNNE and WILHELM HEIDKAMP of the 5th Destroyer Division, escorted by destroyer BERND VON ARNIM, laid 180 magnetic mines in the Thames Estuary during the night of the 17th/18th. Returning to Wilhelmshaven, they were met off Terschelling by … [5 escort vessels]. Seven merchant ships grossing 27,565 tons were sunk and one more damaged in the field… . [108 lives lost.]
 
U.19 laid mines off Orfordness during the night of the 17th/18th. Destroyer GIPSY and one merchant ship was lost in the field. The merchantman was Yugoslav steamer CARICA MILICA (6371grt), sunk on the 18th, 3½ miles 005° from Shipwash; the entire crew was rescued.

U.15 laid mines off Lowestoft during the night of the 16th/17th, on which one merchant ship was sunk.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Anti-submarine trawler DRANGEY (434grt) was damaged in a collision at Rosyth.

Destroyers BROKE and ECLIPSE were submarine hunting in 48‑05N, 6‑32W, and joined by destroyers VANESSA, VESPER and VIVACIOUS, released from the escort of convoy BC.15.
 
Minesweeping trawler CORENA (352grt) reported sighting a U-boat in 50N, 4-35W, and destroyers WOLVERINE and VERITY sailed to investigate.
 
Destroyer WALLACE attacked a submarine contact 10 miles NE of Blyth.
 
Anti-submarine trawler CAPE ARGONA (494grt) attacked a submarine contact 1½ miles 010° from Outer Dowsing.
 
Steamer COREA (751grt) sighted a submarine in 57‑44N, 5‑52W, and destroyers WOLVERINE and VERITY were ordered to carry out a search.

North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.9 departed Halifax at 1200 escorted by Canadian destroyer ST LAURENT until detached on the 18th. Ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser ALAUNIA, and the convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 29th.
 
Ship movement – Aircraft carrier ARGUS, and destroyers STURDY and GALLANT arrived at Gibraltar. GALLANT left to return to Plymouth and was ordered en route to search for German merchant ships reported leaving Vigo.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.9 departed Freetown escorted by sloop AUCKLAND, and was joined on the 29th by destroyers ESCAPADE, GALLANT and GRAFTON. The convoy arrived later that day and AUCKLAND reached Portsmouth on the 30th.
 
Pacific waters – Light cruiser CARADOC arrived at San Diego, California, for refuelling, the first foreign warship to visit a US port since the start of the war.
 
Light cruiser DESPATCH (Captain Allen Poland DSC), which entered the Pacific through the Panama Canal on the 1st, arrived at Callao, Peru with steamer LOBOS (6479grt).

Indian Ocean – Light cruiser GLOUCESTER, attached to Force I from the 16th, departed Rangoon, and on the 18th sailed from Colombo to patrol north of Madagascar.
 
German naval activity – Swedish steamer VALAPARISO (3759grt) was seized by German warships for contraband violations in the Baltic.
 
French naval movements – French submarine SIDI FERRUCH departed Port of Spain for Martinique. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1387

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/18/2017 4:43:46 PM
November 18. Day 79.
Saturday.

Europe
Quote:
BERLIN, November 18
Yesterday nine young Czech students at the University of Prague were lined up before a German firing squad and executed. A the press conference this noon we asked the authorities why and they replied the the students had staged anti-German demonstrations in Prague on October 23 and November. … Later in the day the Germans admitted that three more Czechs, two of them policemen, were shot for “attacking a German.” (Berlin Diary, p 249)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 19 U-boats at sea. Two boats (U-20, -35) sailed from Wilhelmshaven; one boat (U-15) returned to Wilhelmshaven after 5 days.. Two British ships (845 tons total) sunk; one neutral (Yugoslavian) vessel (6371 tons) sunk by mines. No U-boats lost.

Parkhill, a British steam merchantman of 500 tons, was carrying 449 tons of coal from Blyth to Kirkwall. Hit by one torpedo from U-18, she sank immediately. Crew complement=9; dead=9.

Wigmore, a fishing trawler of 345 tons out of Grimsby, sank three minutes after being hit by U-22. Complement=16; dead=16.

Carica Milica, a Yugoslavian steam merchantman of 6,371 tons carrying coal from Newcastle to Dubrovnik, was sunk by a mine laid this day by U-19. Complement=undetermined; deaths=none reported. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were two cruisers between the Orkneys and the Faroes three cruisers and three AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
Light cruisers CALEDON, CERES, CALYPSO arrived at Loch Ewe from Northern Patrol.
 
Armed boarding vessels NORTHERN PRINCESS, NORTHERN FOAM, NORTHERN ISLE departed the Fair Isle Patrol [between Orkneys and Faroes].
 
East coast – Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW departed Grimsby on escort duties.
 
British blockade – German merchant ship BORKUM (3670grt), which had departed Montevideo on 9 October, was captured by armed merchant cruiser CALIFORNIA on 18 November in the Denmark Strait. … [H]eaded for Greenock via Kirkwall, but on the 23rd was attacked by U.33 and damaged by torpedo and gunfire near the Orkneys in 59‑33N, 03‑57W. Four German crew members were killed… .
 
German merchant ship EILBEK (2185grt), which had departed Ponta Delgada in the Azores on the 10th, was captured by armed merchant cruiser SCOTSTOUN in the Iceland Faroes-Channel in 58‑45N, 14‑10W. …
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Following a D/F report, destroyers ACASTA, ARDENT, WINCHELSEA and WALPOLE, on their way to meet a homecoming Halifax convoy, conducted a search 150 miles SW of Berehaven.
 
Destroyers ECHO and WANDERER were searching for a submarine in 49‑40N, 12‑00W.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers ILEX and ICARUS began boiler cleaning at Rosyth.
 
Destroyer ISIS departed Rosyth to collect tanker ATHELKING (9557grt) at Invergordon and escort her to Methil to join convoy FS.40. ISIS arrived on the morning of the 19th and departed that afternoon with the tanker and destroyer KELLY, en route to the Tyne for refit. Destroyer INGLEFIELD, after delivering MASHOBRA to Rosyth, relieved KELLY.
 
ISIS and the tanker arrived at Methil on the 20th, while KELLY reached the Tyne on the 21st.
 
Outbound convoy formation – Convoy OA.37 of 24 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyer GRAFTON and ENCHANTRESS from the 18th to 20th. The convoy was dispersed on the 21st.
 
Convoy OB.38 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers MACKAY and VIMY to the 21st.
 
German surface minelaying – German destroyers ERICH STEINBRINCK and FRIEDRICH ECKHOLDT of the 4th Destroyer Flotilla, escorted by destroyer HANDS LODY, laid mixed contact and more magnetic mines off the Humber during the night of the 18th/19th. Returning, they were met by light cruiser LEIPZIG and torpedo boats ILTIS, SEEADLER, LEOPARD and WOLF. The British were still not aware that the Germans were using magnetic mines, against which they had no defence or sweeping capability, and it was not until the 23rd that a magnetic mine was recovered at Shoeburyness. Seven merchant ships grossing 38,710 tons were sunk and one more damaged in the field. 38 lives were lost.

African convoy route – Force K of aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL, battlecruiser RENOWN, light cruiser NEPTUNE, and destroyers HARDY, HERO, HOSTILE and HASTY departed Freetown to operate south of Freetown along the convoy route.
 
Indian Ocean – Battleship RAMILLIES and destroyer DELIGHT joined Force J in the Indian Ocean. RAMILLIES was to relieve battleship MALAYA which was due to go to Malta for rearming. However, these plans were suspended after the sinking of steamer AFRICA SHELL in the Indian Ocean. DELIGHT was also to relieve destroyer DARING which was to return to the Mediterranean for refit, but her return too was suspended.
 
Mediterranean – Aircraft carrier ARGUS, and destroyers STURDY and DOUGLAS departed Gibraltar for Toulon. DOUGLAS arrived back on the 23rd.
 
Light cruiser CAPETOWN departed Gibraltar and arrived at Malta on the 20th.
 
French destroyer BORDELAIS and submarines CAIMAN, MORSE and SOUFFLEUR passed Gibraltar westbound.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.9 departed Halifax at 1000 escorted by Canadian destroyers ASSINIBOINE and ST LAURENT until they detached on the 20th. Ocean escort was battleship WARSPITE, which detached on the 24th. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on 2 December.
 
French naval activity – French large destroyer CHEVALIER PAUL and torpedo boats FLORE and BOUCLIER were on patrol in the area of 43N, 13.5W. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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