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 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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BWilson

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Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/10/2017 11:26:56 AM
October 10, 1939

Western Front


Quote:
In a radio broadcast, French prime minister Édouard Daladier rejects the German peace offer of October 6th. (chroniknet.de)


Other


Quote:
With the signing of the basing agreement with Lithuania, the Soviet Union transfers the (from 1922) Polish city of Wilno and the region around Wilno to Lithuania. Editor's note: Vilnius (Wilno) to this day is still part of Lithuania. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
The three Baltic Republics have become part of a "Soviet security zone", and their military and diplomatic orientation are now orbiting Moscow despite having signed previous agreements with Germany. The Reich makes no public objection to this change. (derniere-guerre.com)



Quote:
In a meeting with Hitler, Admiral Raeder points out the importance of Norway and states an invasion of the country would secure naval bases for the Reich. Meanwhile, in London, Winston Churchill asks for permission from the war cabinet to mine Norwegian territorial waters in order to interdict the shipments of iron ore to Germany. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)



Quote:
Finland evacuates selected districts along the international frontier with the Soviet Union. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
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Posts: 1941

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/10/2017 7:09:42 PM
11.10.39

Leó Szilárd and Albert Einstein's letter (sent on 2 Aug 1939) reaches Franklin Roosevelt, who agrees to establish a committee for the research of nuclear energy as a weapon. This would lead to Roosevelt's decision to establish the Uranium Advisory Committee.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/10/2017 9:16:49 PM
Day 40. October 10 (continued)
Tuesday.

Western Front

Quote:
GENEVA,October 10

Coming up the Rhine from Karlsruhe to Basel this morning, we skirted the French frontier for a hundred miles. No sign of war and the train crew told me not a shot had been fired on this front since the war began. Where the train ran along the Rhine, we could see the French bunkers and at many places great mats behind which the French were building fortifications. Identical picture on the German side. The troops seemed to be observing an armistice. They went about their business in full sight and range of each other. For that matter, one blast from a French”75” could have liquidated our train. The Germans were hauling up guns and supplies on the railroad line, but the French did not disturb them.
Queer kind of a war. (Berlin Diary, p 234)


No notable activity in the air.

U-boats

MAJOR EDIT: No U-boat activity on this date.

War at sea

Quote:
Ship movements – Destroyer WALPOLE, en route to join convoy KJ.1B, blew a joint in the main pipe to her starboard high pressure receiver, but was able to continue and arrived at Liverpool on the 17th, repairing until the 21st.
 
Destroyer KANDAHAR (Lt Cdr W G A Robson) was completed and after working up at Portland, joined the 5th Destroyer Flotilla with the Home Fleet on 3 November.
 
Light cruiser DAUNTLESS departed Gibraltar and arrived at Malta on the 13th, en route to the China Station.

North Atlantic – At 0100/10th, the GNEISENAU force arrived back at Kiel after accomplishing nothing, with destroyer FRIEDRICH ECKHOLDT arriving separately at Swinemünde. Upon receiving news of the German's return at 1454, Admiral Forbes returned to port.
 
Battleships NELSON, RODNEY, battlecruiser HOOD, and destroyers FAULKNOR, BEDOUIN, PUNJABI, FURY, FORESTER and FIREDRAKE went directly to Loch Ewe, arriving on the 11th.
 
Destroyers FOXHOUND and FEARLESS departed Scapa Flow on the 10th to escort the fleet into Scapa Flow, which arrived on the 11th. The ships concerned were battlecruiser REPULSE, aircraft carrier FURIOUS, light cruisers AURORA, NEWCASTLE and destroyers ESKIMO, SOMALI, MASHONA, ASHANTI, FAME, FORESIGHT, MATABELE, STURDY, FOXHOUND and FEARLESS, plus the Humber Force, less light cruiser EDINBURGH which had been detached and went directly to Rosyth.
 
Light cruiser SHEFFIELD had detached from the main force late on the 9th to patrol in the Denmark Strait and arrived back at Loch Ewe on the 15th. Destroyer FAULKNOR was weather damaged and repaired in the Clyde until 2 November, while JANUS and JACKAL were in a minor collision at Kirkwall.
 
Light cruisers DIOMEDE and DRAGON left Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol duties.
 
Group U-boat activity – The first attempt to conduct a U-boat group operation with a tactical commander on board (KKpt Werner Hartman, Commander of Submarine Flotilla 6, on U.37) was begun. Of the nine submarines designated, only three finally took part. (1) U.25 and U.34 could not complete repairs in time, (2) U.47 was detached for the operation against British units at Scapa Flow, and (3) U.42 departed Wilhelmshaven on 30 September, U.48 on the 4th, U.37 on the 5th, U.46 on the 8th, U.45 on the 10th, and U.40 on the 11th. However, U.42, U.45 and U.40 were lost before the operation could be mounted. Only U.37, U.46 and U.48 were left to attack convoy HG.3 on the 17th.
 
South Atlantic – German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE captured steamer HUNTSMAN (8196grt) in the South Atlantic in 08‑30S, 05‑15W. HUNTSMAN and German supply ship ALTMARK met on the 16th, her cargo was transferred, and crew taken off on the 17th, after which HUNTSMAN was scuttled in 16S, 17W.
 
Dockyard requirements – Light cruiser CERES departed Gibraltar with turbine defects and arrived at Plymouth on the 13th for repairs completed on the 27th.
 
Mediterranean waters – Destroyers GRAFTON and GALLANT departed Alexandria for Gibraltar to escort battleship RAMILLIES, due to sail on the 15th for Alexandria.

Southern oceans – Australian heavy cruisers AUSTRALIA, CANBERRA and light cruiser ADELAIDE searched the Gabo Island area for German ships until the 13th.
 
Eastern Pacific –New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES arrived at Valapariso for two day self maintenance to correct engine room defects.
 
Caribbean –Forces disposed in the West Indies for patrol and escort duties were (1) Jamaica Force – British light cruiser ORION, the Australian PERTH and Canadian destroyer SAGUENAY, (2) Antilles Force - French training cruiser JEANNE D'ARC, sloop VILLE D'YS, submarine AGOSTA, (3) Oil Supply Protection Force – British sloops DUNDEE, PENZANCE and French submarine OUESSANT. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/11/2017 10:33:02 AM
October 11, 1939

Other


Quote:
A Finnish delegation arrives in Moscow to discuss Finland's frontier with the Soviet Union. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
German authorities announce the use of mustard gas by the Poles during the Polish Campaign.


Editor's note: Apparently, gas mines were employed in one action by Poles to defend a bridge; the mines that exploded gassed a few German soldiers. There is also an incident in which a German bomber was mistakenly loaded with gas bombs that were dropped on Warsaw. Both were isolated instances.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/11/2017 7:51:27 PM
Day 41. October 11 (continued)
Wednesday.

USA

Quote:
Fearing war between Russia and Finland, Roosevelt appealed to Soviet President Mikhail I. Kalinin for restraint on Moscow’s part and to “make no demands on Finland which are inconsistent with the maintenance and development of amicable and peaceful relations between the two countries, and the independence of each. (Goralski, p 98)


Europe

Quote:
Britain’s War Office moved to increase the weekly production of mustard gas from 310 to 1,200 tons. Britain now had 158,000 men in France. (Goralski, p 98)


Quote:
The French Premier, Edouard Daladier, in a broadcast to the nation, scornfully dismisses Hitler’s proposals of 6 October. (2194 Days, p 29)

No meaningful activity in the air war.

No meaningful activity by U-boats.

War at sea

Quote:
North Sea – Destroyer BEAGLE attacked a submarine contact in 51‑17N, 01‑42.7E.
 
Caribbean convoy – Destroyers WINCHELSEA and WALPOLE with convoy KJ.1B attacked a submarine contact 11 miles from Great Ormes Head, later determined to be a wreck.
 
Atlantic convoys – Convoy OA.18 of nine ships departed Southend and dispersed on the 17th, possibly escorted by destroyers MONTROSE and VIVACIOUS which departed Milford Haven on the 9th.
 
Convoy OB.18 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VERSATILE and MACKAY until the 14th.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy BC.10F of troopship ULSTER PRINCE departed the Loire escorted by destroyers EXPRESS and ENCOUNTER, and arrived safely in the Bristol Channel on the 12th.
 
Northern waters – Three cruisers were on Northern Patrol duty, while light cruiser SHEFFIELD was on a special patrol between Iceland and Greenland.
 
Mediterranean – Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE departed Alexandria for Malta, arriving on the 13th for repairs to her rudder, which were completed on the 21st. She left on the 24th and arrived back at Alexandria on the 26th.
 
Destroyers HARDY, HASTY, HOSTILE, HEREWARD and HERO departed Malta on the 2nd and Gibraltar on the 5th for duty with the South Atlantic Command at Freetown. HEREWARD and HERO, escorting liner ATHLONE CASTLE, arrived at Freetown on the 11th, while HARDY, HASTY, HOSTILE joined aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL and battlecruiser RENOWN in 11-50N, 21-00W, also on the 11th. These ships arrived at Freetown on the 12th and after replenishment put back to sea on the 14th for patrol duties.
 
DAINTY and minesweeper SUTTON left in the Malta Channel on the 16th, and DUNCAN and KERSAINT were relieved by destroyers GRAFTON and GALLANT on the 17th. The two G-class destroyers remained until the 18th when Mediterranean convoying was discontinued. The convoy arrived safely at Gibraltar on the 21st.
 
Mediterranean convoy – Convoy Blue 4 departed Port Said with 29 ships on the 11th, escorted by destroyers DAINTY and DUNCAN. Minesweeper SUTTON brought two ships from Alexandria on the 12th to join the convoy. DUNCAN departed at 0545/16th to refuel at Malta and rejoined in the Malta Channel at 1415/16th with French destroyer KERSAINT.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer DIANA arrived at Suez from Singapore to reinforce the Mediterranean Fleet.
 
Submarine SEAL, passing through the Mediterranean en route to the Home Fleet, escorted damaged destroyer GARLAND which was towed by netlayer PROTECTOR, from Alexandria to Malta where they arrived on the 11th. General submarine movements at this time follow:
 
Group 1, PORPOISE, CACHALOT, SEAL departed Malta on the 11th, escorted by PROTECTOR as far as Galita Island. PROTECTOR returned to Malta to meet Group 2, SEALION, SALMON, SHARK and SNAPPER and escorted them later the same day to Galita Island. Both groups reached Gibraltar on the 15th and left on the 16th for Portsmouth, with Group 1 arriving on the 20th and Group 2 on the 22nd.
 
SNAPPER went directly into dock with engine problems which had caused problems on passage from Gibraltar. Repairs completed on the 28th and she went to Sheerness for docking from 2 to 11 November. CACHALOT and SEAL were shortly sent to Halifax to escort convoys, while PORPOISE arrived at Chatham on the 24th for refitting.
 
SEALION, SALMON, SHARK were almost immediately deployed off the Dogger Bank on a patrol line, which ended on 4 November when they were ordered to Rosyth. SEALION, SALMON, SHARK, SNAPPER, along with SUNFISH, STERLET of the 2nd Submarine Flotilla and depot ship CYCLOPS, formed the 3rd Submarine Flotilla. The Flotilla was based at Harwich and began operations in late November.
 
Gibraltar-U.K. convoy – Convoy HGF.3 departed Gibraltar with steamer NARKUNDA (16,632grt) the only ship in the convoy.
 
Eastern seas – Heavy cruiser CORNWALL departed Colombo on patrol and arrived back on 3 November.
 
Light cruiser LIVERPOOL departed Bombay to search for German raiders in the Seychelles area, Amirante Group, and Providence, Farquhar, Aldabara anchorages. The patrol ended on 13 November when she arrived at Colombo. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/12/2017 3:17:35 AM
Quote:
The French Premier, Edouard Daladier, in a broadcast to the nation, scornfully dismisses Hitler’s proposals of 6 October. (2194 Days, p 29)


 I had that one occurring on the 10th of October per chroniknet.de . Interesting how only 70-odd years down the road, sources have already lost "precision to the day" on when some of these events occurred.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/12/2017 4:18:35 PM
Yes, Bill. This happens even within some single sites. I've noticed it a couple of times already on «Uboat.net», for instance. A ship is torpedoed in the late evening hours but does not finally sink until early the next morning. Which date is appropriate to record the encounter?

In some instances, I think the sources of information for Goralski, 2194 Days and other sites I am using may the culprit. I notice, e.g., that «naval-history.net» occasionally seems to use official Admiralty times of receipt of information for their entries, rather than the date/time of the event itself. I'm not familiar enough with the site to know if there are reasons for this.

In the particular issue you note concerning Daladier, I included it largely because of the "scornfully dismisses" comment. Snippets of emotion like that delight me in chronicles; they allow a peek at the humans behind the events! But I should note that, though I did not include it, the following item is listed under October 10 in Goralski: "Hitler repeated his willingness to make peace with Britain and France" (p 98). That might make Daladier's response on October 11, and another by Chamberlain on October 12, more understandable. Doesn't make the dates any more correct, of course.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/12/2017 5:25:52 PM
Day 42. October 12
Thursday. New moon.

[Europe]

Quote:
Britain rejected Hitler’s peace overtures. Chamberlain warned Germany to choose between permanent security arrangements in Europe or “war to the utmost of our strength.” He added that “past experience has shown that no reliance can be placed upon the promises of the present German Government.”
• Germany began deporting Austrian and Czech Jews to Poland. (Goralski, p 98)


Russia-Finland talks

Quote:
Russia presented its official demands to Finland, and exchange of territory (2,123 square miles of Russian for 1,042 Finnish) and military bases designed to secure “the safety of Leningrad” and assurances that “Finland will maintain firm, friendly relations with the Soviet Union.” Leningrad was 20 miles from the frontier. (Goralski, p 98)

NOTE: Britain’s rejection and the Soviet-Finnish talks are reiterated, but with less detail, in 2194 Days, p 29).

No notable air activity.

U-boats

Quote:
At 18.05 hours on 12 October 1939 U-37 tried to stop the unescorted and neutral Aris about 150 miles west of Achill Head, but she did not stop and used the radio because they had transported war materials to Britain according to the master. The crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats after a round hit the funnel at 18.20 hours. At 19.45 hours, the U-boat fired one G7a torpedo which passed underneath the keel. She was sunk by a second torpedo after shells fired into the waterline did not sink the ship. The U-boat then towed the lifeboats 80 miles towards the coast of Ireland before leaving the area. The survivors were picked up by the Danish motor merchant Sicilien and landed at Stornoway.

At 18.08 hours on 12 Oct 1939 the Emile Miguet, a romper of convoy KJ-2since 6 October, was shelled and stopped by U-48 190 miles southwest of Fastnet. At 18.20 hours, the U-boat fired a coup de grâce at the abandoned tanker which caught fire after being hit. The burned out wreck was scuttled by HMS Imogen (D 44) (Cdr E.B.K. Stevens, RN) the next day. The survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Black Hawk. («uboat.net»)

NOTE: Aris, a Greek steam merchantman of 4,810 tons, was in ballast, sailing from Troon to Hampton Roads. Of the complement of 29, 2 died.
Emile Miguet, a French motor tanker of 14,115 tons, was carrying 137,000 bbl of gasoline and crude oil. She was en route from Corpus Christi to Le Havre via Kingston. From an unknown complement, 2 died.

Quote:
Ship movements – Battlecruiser REPULSE, after degaussing at Kirkwall, departed Scapa Flow with destroyers FAME and FORESIGHT at 1734 for boiler cleaning at Rosyth.
 
Light cruisers GLASGOW and NEWCASTLE were detached from the Home Fleet to cover convoys in the Western Approaches. They left Scapa Flow on the 12th at 1737 and 1915 respectively.
 
Light cruiser DUNEDIN departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol at 1810.
 
Light cruiser EDINBURGH departed Rosyth.
 
Northern waters – Four light cruisers were on Northern Patrol, with light cruiser SHEFFIELD still on patrol in the Denmark Strait.
 
Home waters – Destroyers AMAZON and WAKEFUL were submarine hunting off Dover.
 
Destroyers ARROW, ACHATES, ACHERON, WREN and sloop FLEETWOOD were submarine hunting off Newhaven.
 
Western Approaches – Destroyers FURY, BEDOUIN, PUNJABI were submarine hunting off the Hebrides.
 
Destroyer WOLVERINE attacked a submarine contact 51‑31N, 5‑41W.
 
Damage – Destroyer ECHO ran aground as she entered Plymouth in a heavy fog, damaged her stern and repaired at Plymouth, completing on 17 November.
 
Minesweeper/escort ship JASON ran aground on Row Point and sustained minor damage which was soon repaired.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy BC.9S of six steamers, including CERVANTES and GUELMA (Commodore) departed the Loire, escorted by destroyers EXMOUTH and ECLIPSE, and arrived safely in the Bristol Channel on the 14th.
 
Convoy FN.20 departed Southend and arrived at Methil on the 14th. There was no convoy FN.21.

Convoy FS.20 departed Methil and arrived at Southend on the 14th.
 
U.48 sank steamer HERONSPOOL (5202grt), a straggler from convoy OB.17, 260 miles SW of Fastnet in 50‑13N, 14‑48W. American steamer PRESIDENT HARDING (13,869grt) picked up the SOS of EMILE MIGUET (above) and sailing to rescue her survivors in 50‑08N, 14‑00W, came upon HERONSPOOL's entire crew and rescued them. PRESIDENT HARDING continued her rescue mission, but by that time BLACK HAWK had picked up EMILE MIGUET's crew.
 
Caribbean convoy – Convoy SLF.4 departed Freetown unescorted and arrived at Liverpool on the 20th («naval-history.net»)

NOTE: According to «Uboat.net», Heronspool was lost on October 13.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/13/2017 1:30:41 PM
October 13, 1939


Quote:
Denmark, Sweden, and Norway simultaneously issue diplomatic notes to the Soviet Union stating they expect the current negotiations between the Soviet Union and Finland will not impact Finland's neutrality stance. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
Radio speech by Colonel Lindbergh, an admirer of Germany and a staunch supporter of neutrality, calling for the surrender of the French West Indies to the United States in payment of war debts and stigmatizing Canada's entry into the war, which, according to him, brings the American continent into the war. (derniere-guerre.com)



Quote:
At Bletchley, three people die in a train collision blamed on blackout conditions. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)



Quote:
Three bridges over the Rhine are destroyed by French forces. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/13/2017 7:03:34 PM
Day 43. October 13 (continued)
Friday.

U-boats

Quote:
At 01.16 hours on 13 Oct 1939 the unescorted Heronspool (Master Sydney Edward Batson, OBE) was hit by one torpedo from U-48 and sank 260 miles southwest of Cape Clear. The vessel had been missed by five torpedoes fired by the U-boat at 20.24, 21.15, 23.05, 23.50 and 23.52 hours on 12 October. The master and crew were rescued by the American passenger ship President Harding and landed at New York.

At 08.14 hours on 13 October 1939 the unescorted Louisiane, a straggler from convoy OA-17, was stopped with gunfire by U-48 about 230 miles west-southwest of Cape Clear. After the crew abandoned ship, the vessel was shelled from 08.35 until 08.45 hours and sank ten minutes later. One crew member was lost. The survivors were later picked up by HMS Imogen (D 44) (Cdr E.B.K. Stevens, RN).
...
About 08.30 hours on 13 Oct 1939, the Stonepool, dispersed from convoy OB-17, was damaged by gunfire from U-42 (Dau) south of Bantry Bay in position 48°40N/15°30W. The ship was en route from Barry to St. Vincent loaded with 6600 tons of coal and general cargo. After ten minutes, the U-boat was forced to dive by the accurate returned fire, leaving the deck gun crew in the water. While the Germans surfaced again to pick up their men, the steamer sent distress signals which brought HMS Ilex (D 61) (LtCdr P.L. Saumarez, RN) and HMS Imogen (D 44) (Cdr E.B.K. Stevens, RN) to the scene. At 18.55 hours, the steamer spotted the U-boat on the surface, which was shortly thereafter sunk by the destroyers. («Uboat.net»)
Heronspool, a British steam merchantman of 5,202 tons, was carrying 8,000 tons of coal from Swansea to Montreal. Of an unknown number of crew, none were lost. NOTE: six torpedoes were expended over a period of five hours to sink Heronspool, an indication of the troubles the German navy were having with their torpedoes.

Louisiane, a French steam merchantman of 6,903 tons, was carrying general cargo between neutral ports (Antwerp to the Gulf ports) via Havana. Of an unknown number of crew, one was lost.

Stonepool would be sunk 11 September 1941 while in Convoy SC-42, sailing from North America to the U.K.

At sea

Quote:
Ship movements – Aircraft carrier FURIOUS sailed at 0140 from Scapa Flow for Loch Ewe, escorted by destroyers FEARLESS and FOXHOUND, and arrived later that day.
 
Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON and destroyers MATABELE, JERVIS, JUPITER, JACKAL and JANUS departed Scapa Flow for patrol at 1016.
 
Light cruiser BELFAST arrived at Scapa Flow at 1500.
 
Light cruiser CALYPSO departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol, and arrived at Sullom Voe on the 20th.
 
Light cruisers DELHI and CALEDON arrived at Scapa Flow.

Atlantic convoys – Convoy OA.19 of 13 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers ELECTRA and ESCORT until the 17th, when they detached to convoy HG.3.
 
Convoy OB.19 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANOC and WARWICK from the 14th to 16th.
 
Action against U-boats – U.40, which departed Wilhelmshaven on the 10th for her second war patrol, was mined and sunk at 0200 in the Dover Strait in the Folkestone-Gris Nez deep minefield. Thirty eight crew including commanding officer Kptlt Wolfgang Barten were lost, with destroyers BRAZEN and BOREAS picking up three survivors and five bodies at 0945/13th, 9 miles 155° from the S Goodwin Light Vessel.
 
Destroyers ILEX and IMOGEN encountered U.48 on the surface 400 miles west of Land's End at 1016, and drove her down with gunfire, but without inflicting any damage.

Destroyer KELLY, escorting a convoy in the English Channel, attacked and claimed to have sunk a submarine. She and sister ship KINGSTON arrived at Dover on the 15th.
 
Destroyer AFRIDI, in company with GURKHA, attacked a submarine contact 3.4 miles 173° off Beachy Head. Salvage ship TEDWORTH conducted diving operations and discovered it had been a wreck.
 
Destroyer ECLIPSE, escorting convoy BC.9S from Quiberon Bay to Barry with sister ship EXMOUTH attacked a submarine contact off the Lizard, in 49-38N, 5-45W.
 
Anti-submarine trawlers BLACKBURN ROVERS (422grt) and GRIMSBY TOWN (422grt) attacked a submarine contact in 51-16N, 5-48W.
 
Patrol sloops PC.74, KINGFISHER and anti-submarine trawler LADY BERYL (417grt) were submarine hunting off Liverpool.
 
Incidental damage – Destroyer SABRE, at anchor at Rosyth, was rammed by armed merchant cruiser JERVIS BAY and sank to deck level. She was taken to Grangemouth for repairs, completing on 6 May 1940.
 
Southern convoy – Convoy HG.3 of 25 ships departed Gibraltar escorted by destroyers KEPPEL and WISHART. After attacks on the 17th while it was only under aircraft protection, destroyers ELECTRA and ESCORT joined the convoy on the 18th from OA.19, leaving on the 19th with the Channel section of HG.3 after being relieved. Destroyer KEITH joined that same day, the 19th and stayed until the 21st. Before then, French destroyers LE TRIOMPHANT and LÉOPARD had been with the convoy from the 17th, arriving back at Brest on the 20th. Destroyers ACASTA, WAKEFUL and anti-submarine trawler LORD WAKEFIELD joined on the 20th and remained until the 21st, destroyer WREN joined the same day, and the convoy arrived at Liverpool, still on the 21st.
 
Ship movement – Aircraft carrier GLORIOUS, battleship MALAYA, destroyers BULLDOG and DARING were detached from the Mediterranean Fleet for operations in the East Indies, arriving at Aden on the 13th.
 
Heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE arrived at Simonstown after sailing from the Mediterranean via the Suez Canal.
 
Light cruiser DURBAN departed Simonstown for Mauritius.
 
South America Station – New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES left Valparaiso to join Commodore Harwood on the South America Station. She refuelled from British tanker ORANGEMOOR off Coquimbo on the 15th, passed the Straits of Magellan on the 19th and arrived in the Falklands on the 21st. Leaving on the 23rd after refuelling; ACHILLES rendezvoused with heavy cruiser EXETER off Lobito Island on the 26th. They joined heavy cruiser CUMBERLAND on the 27th and all three operated together until 5 November. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/14/2017 12:22:37 PM
October 14, 1939

War at Sea

Editor's Note:
Will let Brian Grafton describe the famous event of this day; my summary would lack detail and nuance.


Quote:
Polish submarine Orzeł arrives in Great Britain after a hazardous journey that began in Poland. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)


Other


Quote:
In France, refugee Polish analysts resume their attack on, and replication of, the German Enigma cipher machine. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)



Quote:
Finland and the Soviet Union halt their negotiations over adjustments to their common frontier. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)



Quote:
In the Reich, rationing of textile items commences. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/14/2017 8:59:14 PM
Day 44. October 14 (continued)
Saturday.

Little of note in the air war.

Major event of this day is the sinking of HMS Royal Oak by U-47, commanded by Günther Prien, in the middle of Scapa Flow.

Brief background: Scapa is an anchorage rather than a harbour, with many entries/exits. It is situated in the Orkney Islands, off Scotland’s north coast. Scapa was serviced by shore facilities, and protected by defensive features (anti-submarine booms, shore batteries) and naval patrols. Many argue that some of these were ineffectual and outmoded at the outbreak of war.

Scapa had been a major naval base during WW1, since senior naval officials deemed it a decent location from which to block the German High Seas Fleet from surging into the Atlantic and beyond. It was also the site of the surprise scuttling of the German Grand Fleet on 21 June 1919. And it was determined that it would continue to be the major base of the British Home Fleet throughout most of WW2. There are too many sites online for me to recommend one in particular. Most get the basic facts straight.

I have separated this event from other naval and U-boat activities for the day. At least some of the interest rests in discrepancies between accounts, though they are often minor:

Quote:
The British battleship Royal Oak was sunk … by a German submarine, and 833 men were lost. The captain of U-47, Lieutenant Günther Prien, was acclaimed a national hero for his remarkable feat of penetrating the bay and making two approaches even with several torpedo failures. (Goralski, p 98)


Quote:
At 1:30 a.m. … U-47 …penetrates the strongly defended naval base of Scapa Flow … and sinks the British battleship Royal Oak (29,150 tons). British losses are 786 dead. The forcing of Scapa Flow … is a serious blow to the prestige of the Royal Navy. (2194 Days, p 29)


Quote:
At 01.16 hours on 14 October 1939 U-47 fired a spread of three torpedoes at HMS Royal Oak (08) (Capt W.G. Benn, RN) and the British seaplane tender HMS Pegasus lying at anchor in the harbour of Scapa Flow, then turned around and fired a stern torpedo at 01.21 hours. Prien claimed a hit on the seaplane tender, misidentified as HMS Repulse (34), but one of the torpedoes apparently hit the starboard anchor chain of the battleship and both targets were undamaged.
At 01.23 hours, the U-boat fired a second spread of three torpedoes which hit HMS Royal Oak (08) on the starboard side and caused a magazine to blow up. The battleship rolled over and sank in 19 minutes. 386 of the survivors, including the commander, were rescued by the drifter HMS Daisy II (Skipper John Gatt) which had been alongside as tender.

[Complement (loss of life):] 1260 officers and men (835 dead and 425 survivors). («uboat.net»)


Quote:
U.47 sank battleship ROYAL OAK … (Flagship Rear Admiral H E C Blagrove, Captain W G Benn) at 0058 at anchor in Scapa Flow and escaped unharmed. Rear Admiral Blagrove, Lt Cdr S D Roper, Lt J E Moore, Captain H E Balls RM, Instructor Lt H Stewart, Lt (E) R L W Clark, Lt (E) C H Cock, Lt (E) M P Roupell, Surgeon Lt (D) W A Dickie, Surgeon Lt H J Cornelius RNVR, Sub Lt J L T Graham Brown, Chaplain Reverend J D B Cree, Midshipmen P W C Graham, E J Martin, N M Patterson, PG Piddington, S R M Wilson, Paymaster Midshipman W J R Bowhay, Commissioned Gunner A Powell Rtd, Commissioned Telegrapher R Hughes Rowlands, Warrant Engineer W H G Cheesley, Warrant Ordnance Officer R D Ward, Naval Cadets V G U Jay, A D McDermott, and eight hundred and nine ratings were lost.
 
Anti-submarine operations were conducted in the harbour by destroyers SOMALI, MASHONA, ASHANTI until the 22nd, but without result as U.47 had escaped the area shortly after sinking ROYAL OAK. The first attack made was by destroyer ASHANTI at 1030/13th, long after the submarine had departed. Fortunately, most of the Fleet was at Loch Ewe. However, old seaplane tender PEGASUS was in the berth next to ROYAL OAK and, although identified by U.47 as battlecruiser REPULSE, was not damaged.
 
Ship movements as a result of the sinking –Light cruisers AURORA at 0829 and BELFAST at 0730 and most of the fleet auxiliaries in the Orkneys left for Loch Ewe, arriving on the 14th. Anti-aircraft ship CURLEW was able to proceed there on the 16th.
 
The cruisers on Northern Patrol were transferred to Sullom Voe which was only protected by an anti-submarine net. Light cruisers CALEDON,CARDIFF, DELHI and COLOMBO at 0730 and armed merchant cruisers CALIFORNIA, MONTCLARE, SCOTSTOUN, SALOPIAN and CHITRAL departed Scapa Flow on the 14th, and AMCs AURANIA, RAWALPINDI and TRANSYLVANIA on the 15th.
 
Remaining at Scapa Flow were: base ship IRON DUKE, accommodation ship VOLTAIRE, destroyers SOMALI, MASHONA, ESKIMO, ASHANTI which were standing by for convoy duty, destroyer TARTAR with serious defects and minesweepers HAZARD, HEBE, SEAGULL,SHARPSHOOTER, SPEEDY.
 
Light cruiser CALEDON arrived at Kirkwall on the 18th, and COLOMBO at Sullom Voe on the 18th. («naval-history.net»)


U-boats

From Convoy KJF-3 (Kingston-UK), two ships sunk:
Quote:
In the morning on 14 October 1939, U-45 attacked the unescorted convoy KJF-3 about 230 miles southwest of Fastnet and reported the sinking of three big steamers. In fact, two ships, Lochavon and Bretagne were sunk and the British steam merchant Karamea (10350 grt) was missed, because a torpedo detonated prematurely. The U-boat was lost later the same day.

The survivors from Bretagne were picked up by HMS Imogen (D 44) (Cdr E.B.K. Stevens, RN) and HMS Ilex (D 61) (LtCdr P.L. Saumarez, RN).

The master, 55 crew members and six passengers from Lochavon (Master Charles Edward Rathkins) were picked up by HMS Ilex (D 61) (LtCdr P.L. Saumarez, RN) after eight hours and landed at Plymouth on 15 October.

At 12.13 hours on 14 Oct 1939 the Sneaton (Master Thomas Granger) was stopped by U-48 with gunfire about 150 miles southwest of Cape Clear and was sunk by a torpedo 20 minutes later after the crew abandoned ship. One crew member was lost. The survivors were picked up by the Belgian tanker Alexandria André and landed at Weymouth. («Uboat.net»)
Bretagne, a French steam merchantman of 10,108 tons carrying general cargo from Cristobal to Le Havre, has 7 crew dead of an unknown number.

Lochavon, a British motor merchantman of 9,205 tons, was carrying general cargo, including … dried fruit from Vancouver to Southampton. No losses from a crew of 62.

Sneaton, a British steam merchant of 3,677 tones, was carrying 4,300 tons of coal from Cardif to Red de Janeiro. One crew dead of an unknown complement.

At sea

Quote:
Anti-submarine work – Submarine STURGEON fired three torpedoes at U.23, 20 miles E of the Skaw in 57-50N, 9-59E at 1452.
 …
U.K.-France convoy –Convoy FS.21 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers VIVIEN, WHITLEY, WITCH and sloop STORK, and arrived at Southend on the 16th. There was no convoy FN.21.
 
French movements and refitting – French destroyers BRESTOIS and BOULONNAIS departed Brest for Cherbourg, where BRESTOIS began refitting. The third destroyer of the 5th Division, FOUDROYANT, was on escort duty in the Atlantic and joined the other two on 2 November.

German U-boat losses –U.45 was then sunk south of Ireland in 50‑58N, 12‑56W by destroyers INGLEFIELD, IVANHOE, INTREPID and ICARUS, which departed Plymouth on the 13th for anti-submarine patrol in support of KJF.3. All 38 crew were lost.

Surface action – German pocket battleship DEUTSCHLAND sank Norwegian steamer LORENTZ W HANSEN (1918grt) east of Newfoundland in 49‑05N, 43‑44W, with the loss of three crew. The survivors were put aboard Norwegian tanker KONGSDAL (9959grt) stopped later the same day.
 
Ship movements: Mediterranean – Aircraft carrier HERMES and French battlecruiser STRASBOURG arrived at Dakar having departed Plymouth and Brest, respectively, on the 7th.
 
Light cruiser DAUNTLESS departed Malta and reached Port Said on the 16th.
 
Destroyers GRAFTON and GALLANT reached Gibraltar to escort battleship RAMILLIES, and DUCHESS to escort convoy Green 5.
 
South America Station – Destroyers HAVOCK and HOTSPUR arrived off Montevideo for refuelling and left again that evening.
 
South Atlantic – Heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE of British Force H, departed Simonstown and swept the southern half of the Capetown to Freetown route. On the 22nd, they returned to refuel - SUSSEX at Simonstown and SHROPSHIRE at Capetown.
 
Australian ship movement – Australian light cruiser HOBART departed Sydney late on the 13th, with Australian destroyers STUART, VENDETTA and WATERHEN leaving at 0900/14th (local time) and all four proceeded in company. HOBART reached Darwin on the 21st, left the same day and proceeding via Lombok Strait, arrived at Singapore on the 26th. Meanwhile, the three destroyers reached Brisbane on the 15th to refuel and shelter from heavy weather, departed on the 16th, refuelled at Townsville on the 18th, arrived Darwin on the 22nd, departed on the 23rd and reached Singapore on the 29th.
 
Australian destroyers VOYAGER and VAMPIRE also left on the 14th, from Fremantle, and proceeded to Singapore via the Sunda Strait, arriving on the 21st. All six ships were initially assigned to convoy duty from Singapore. On 13 November, the destroyers left Singapore for Colombo.
 
German shipping losses – German steamer MARION TRUBER (2334grt) was lost by grounding near Oxelosund. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/15/2017 9:25:41 AM
October 15, 1939


Quote:
Germany and Estonia sign a treaty to relocate Estonians of German ancestry back to the Reich. (derniere-guerre.com)



Quote:
Exchange of diplomats between Germany and Great Britain. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)



Quote:
Finland commences conscription. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)



Quote:
Reports of cholera and dysentery epidemics in Warsaw. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)



Image: "Buy war bonds"

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/15/2017 5:02:21 PM
Day 45. October 15 (continued)
Sunday.


Quote:
…Swiss train full of soldiers. The country has one tenth of its population under arms; more than any other country in the world. It’s not their war. But they’re ready to fight to defend their way of life. …
In the early evening, coming down the Rhine, the same unreal front. Soldiers on both sides looking but not shooting. …
[Next morning, after overnight on the train, a]t Anhalter station I both the morning papers. Big News. “GERMAN SUB SINKS BRITISH BATTLESHIP ‘ROYAL OAK’!” British Admiralty admits it. That’s a blow. Wonder how it was done. And where? (Berlin Diary, pp 235-6).


No activity in the air.

U-boats

One ship sunk:
Quote:
At 08.18 hours on 15 Oct 1939, U-37 tried to stop the unescorted Vermontby a shot across her bow, but another shot had to be fired before the ship stopped and the crew abandoned ship so hasty that one of the lifeboats capsized and several men fell into the water. At 09.37 hours, a boarding party went on the ship and placed explosive charges but when they failed to detonate a G7a torpedo had to be fired into the ship and some rounds from the deck gun were used to accelerate the sinking. («uboat.net»)
Vermont. a French steam merchant of 5,186 tons, was out of Le Havre in ballast bound for New Orleans. Complement unknown: 2 crew dead.

At sea

Quote:
Major activities in search of Deutschland – Admiral Forbes departed Loch Ewe with battleships NELSON, RODNEY, battlecruiser HOOD, aircraft carrier FURIOUS, light cruisers BELFAST,AURORA and destroyers BEDOUIN, FEARLESS, FOXHOUND and FURY.
 
After light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON and destroyer MATABELE finished escorting steamer ST CLAIR (1637grt) from Lerwick to Aberdeen, arriving at 0945/14th, MATABELE left on the 14th and called at Scapa Flow. Destroyers MASHONA, PUNJABI, FIREDRAKE left Loch Ewe, also on the 14th, arrived at Scapa Flow later the same day, and then with MATABELE, sailed from Scapa Flow on the 15th to join Forbes at sea.
 
Destroyer FORESTER departed Scapa Flow on the 16th and also joined Forbes, FAME was boiler cleaning until the 22nd, and TARTAR repairing defects until the 23rd, both at Scapa Flow.
 
The sortie took the Fleet north of Iceland, 150 miles into the Arctic Circle, to block a reported sortie into the Atlantic by pocket battleship DEUTSCHLAND and to support the Northern Patrol. The destroyers refuelled from the capital ships on the 17th.
 
Battlecruiser REPULSE with destroyers JERVIS, JERSEY, COSSACK and MAORI departed Rosyth on the 18th, with COSSACK and MAORI arriving back on the 19th and REPULSE, JERVIS and JERSEY joining Forbes at sea on the 20th. The two destroyers were detached for refuelling at Sullom Voe on the 21st and afterwards carried out an anti-submarine patrol off Muckle Flugga. [ Ed.COSSACK and MAORI] then left the patrol area to search off the Norwegian coast for American steamer CITY OF FLINT.
 
JERVIS and JERSEY arrived at Rosyth on the 25th without making contact.
 
Northern Patrol – Five cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, four AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and four AMCs in the Denmark Strait. …
 
Norwegian convoy – Convoy HN.0 of five Polish, one French and one Greek steamer had departed Bergen on the 14th, and was met in the North Sea on the 15th… . [Destroyers] JERVIS and MOHAWK … escorted the convoy into Methil arriving on the 16th… .

Light cruiser SHEFFIELD arrived at Loch Ewe.
 
Anti-submarine work – Destroyer BROKE and sloop FLEETWOOD were U-boat hunting off Blyth and on the 16th, attacked a contact.
 
Destroyers COSSACK and MAORI attacked a submarine contact 6 miles 83° from Coquet Island.
 
Destroyer MOHAWK attacked a submarine contact 4 miles 340° from Flamborough Head.
 
Sloop STORK attacked a submarine contact 6.5 miles 15° from Scarborough Rock.
 
Patrol sloops KINGFISHER and PC.74 were submarine hunting off Liverpool, and were relieved on the 16th by escort vessel/minesweeper GLEANER.
 
Gibraltar-bound convoy – Convoy OA.20G departed Southend escorted by destroyers KELLY and KINGSTON from the 15th to 17th, and by destroyers AMAZON and ANTELOPE from the 17th to 18th. Convoy OB.20G also left Liverpool escorted by destroyers WHIRLWIND and WALPOLE, the two convoys merging on the 17th as OG.3.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy AXS.1 [Ed. note: I have not seen convoy code AXS before] of one steamer departed Fowey, escorted by destroyer WAKEFUL and arrived at Brest on the 17th.
 
Mediterranean – Battleship RAMILLIES departed Gibraltar escorted by destroyers GRAFTON and GALLANT for duty with the 1st Battle Squadron at Alexandria.
 
Africa-U.K. convoy – Convoy SL.5 departed Freetown [Sierra Leone] escorted by destroyers HASTY and HOSTILE, and joined by French cruiser PRIMAGUET, destroyers MAILLÉ BRÉZÉ and VAUQUELIN, which left Dakar on the 19th and arrived at Casablanca on the 25th. Destroyers TIGRE, TARTU and CHEVALIER PAUL departed Toulon, also on the 19th, and reached Casablanca on the 22nd ready to relieve the French destroyers already with SL.5. They left on the 25th and joined that day. British destroyer GRENADE sailed from Gibraltar on the 24th, also to join the convoy. PRIMAGUET, escorted by CHEVALIER PAUL detached and reached Lorient on the 28th, while TIGRE and TARTU after being relieved by British destroyers, reached Brest on the 30th. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on 3 November.


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

Phil andrade
London, UK
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Posts: 2529

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/15/2017 6:16:09 PM
In London' Smithfield Meat Market, where I spent thirty three years of my working life , there was a notorious character who - how shall I say this ? - liked to throw his weight around.

He gave me a lot of grief.

Rumour had it that he was a bare knuckle - or " cobblestone" - fighter, and he prided himself on his prowess as a hard man. To cut to the chase, he was a bully.

In subsequent trips to the market , I was surprised to see him still working, and he must be all of eighty years old now.

He and I had been enemies ; when I encountered him recently, there was a rapport between us and he displayed genuine delight at seeing me.

Somehow we got round to talking about the war, and he told me that his father had been killed , but that he could barely remember him.

I asked him where his dad had died - On the Royal Oak , he told me.

This thread works....it brings things to mind in surprising ways.

Regards, Phil







---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
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Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/16/2017 4:22:15 AM

Quote:
Northern Patrol from October 1939 – Five cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, four AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and four AMCs in the Denmark Strait.


My father-am RNR seaman was in AMC NMS Chitral=sister ship to the Rawalpibdi On 20 Nov 1939: The German merchant Bertha Fisser (4110 BRT) is intercepted in Denmark Strait west of Iceland by the British armed merchant cruiser HMS Chitral. However before the German ship can be captured she is scuttled by her own crew. 65025'N 25040'W - Crew interned in Internment Camp in Iceland.

The Rwalpinfi was sunk by the sisdters,Scharnhorst and Gneissenau on te 23ed Movember.Thirty-seven men were rescued by the German ships, a further 11 were picked up by HMS Chitral. Captain Kennedy — the father of naval officer, broadcaster and author Ludovic Kennedy — was posthumously Mentioned in Dispatches.

Crew members on Scharnhorst and Gneisenau were eligible for the High Seas Fleet Badge for participating in the sinking of Rawalpindi.

NB.ANC =Armed Merchant Cruiser ie.converted passenger liners into so called warships,each armed with six old 6" guns two forward,two aft and one either side, they were cannon fodder for a real warship


Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

BWilson

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Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/16/2017 1:10:31 PM
October 16, 1939


Quote:
A German air attack on the RN base at Rosyth in the Firth of Forth damages three ships for a loss of two Junkers Ju-88 bombers. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
In the Saar, a push by the First German Army of General von Witzleben forces French troops back into the forest of Warndt. German territory still occupied and the enclave of Forbach (site of one of the first battles of the Franco-Prussian War) are evacuated by French forces. (derniere-guerre.com)



Image: Junkers Ju-88

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 6033
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/16/2017 1:28:14 PM
Battle of the Forth Bridge

Although a fault in the radar system at Cockburnspath meant there was no warning, anti-aircraft guns blasted at the raiders from Dalmeny Estate and two Auxiliary Spitfire Squadrons were scrambled to defend the Forth: 602 Squadron (City of Glasgow) who were based at Drem in East Lothian; and 603 Squadron (City of Edinburgh) based at Turnhouse.

Flight Lieutenant Pat Gifford, from the 603 Squadron, shot down the first bomber which crashed just off the coast at Port Seton. A second was downed at Crail by Flight Lieutenant George Pinkerton from 602 Squadron.

A third crippled bomber limped back to Holland, where it crashed killing all on board. In all, eight German airmen died - the two bodies recovered received a full military funeral in Edinburgh.

The four German airmen captured included Pohle and Storp, who were picked up by HMS Jervis and local fishing boat the Dayspring and taken as prisoners of war to Edinburgh Castle.

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/16/2017 6:18:50 PM
Day 46. October 16 (continued)
Sunday. Waxing crescent moon.

Germany

Quote:
German warships received modified instructions for attacking: “All merchant ships definitely recognized as enemy ones (British or French) can be torpedoed without warning. Passenger steamers in convoy can be torpedoed a short while after notice has been given of the intention to do so.” (Goralski, p 98)


Air war

One more version of the Forth raid, because this was an event re-written by both British and German propaganda.
Quote:
German aircraft attacked anchored ships in the Firth of Forth. Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON was hit by a 1000 pounder that passed through three decks and came out of the bottom without exploding, but injuring three crew, one rating dying of wounds. Light cruiser EDINBURGH was slightly damaged by splinters from the near miss of three 500 pound bombs with eight crew wounded and Gunner G J Mitchell and one rating dying of wounds. SOUTHAMPTON's damage required only three days to repair while EDINBURGH remained in service. Destroyer MOHAWK, just arriving in the Firth from convoy duty, was bombed one and a half miles from May Island and sustained much topside damage. Commanding officer Cdr R F Jolly was fatally wounded (and awarded the Albert Medal), the ship's first officer Lt E J O'Shea and ten ratings killed and 33 crew, including her navigator, Lt A L Harper, wounded. MOHAWK berthed at Rosyth for temporary repairs and then repaired at Newcastle from 22 October to 9 December. BattlecruiserREPULSE was still at Rosyth on the 16th boiler cleaning, but German bombing restrictions forbidding bombing that endangered civilian lives were still in effect.



U-boats

Twenty-eight U-boats ordered. One ship sunk:
Quote:
At 03.50 hours on 16 Oct 1940 the Trevisa (Master Robert C. Stonehouse), a straggler from convoy SC-7, was hit aft by one torpedo from U-124 and sank by the stern 218 miles west of Rockall. The ship had been spotted at 16.00 hours the day before and missed with a torpedo at 18.29 hours. Seven crew members were lost. The master and 13 crew members were picked up by HMS Bluebell (K 80) (LtCdr R.E. Sherwood, RNR) and landed at Gourock. («uboat.net»)
Trevisa, a Canadian steam merchantman of 1,813 tons, was carrying (according to «uboat.net») “460 standards of lumber”.

Personal comments:
• Trevisa appears to be a Laker, and her owner was Canadian Lake Carriers Ltd, Montreal. If she were a traditional Laker, she would be proportionally longer for her breadth than an ocean-going vessel, and would have a shallower draft. She may not have taken to North Atlantic conditions well, which may explain why she was a convoy straggler.
Long ago, I worked in lumber mills, preparing lumber for overseas shipment. I never saw or heard of a “standard” of lumber. We talked about “board feet”. I can only assume «uboat.net» dropped a word or two. IIRC, a typical bundle of lumber was approx. 4’W x 6’H x variable L (depending on the longest board in the bundle). In addition, the square footage of the bundle would be calculated by a trained assessor, who would determine the board footage in each bundle and certify the data. But during the war, and given the supply of good timber from Canada for industrial purposes or military purposes, there may have been a different “standard” in place used in the arcane world of calculating shipping losses.

At sea

Quote:
Northern Patrol – Four light cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, four AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and three AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
U-boat attacks – Destroyer AFRIDI attacked a submarine contact in the Firth of Forth off Inchkeith Light, and was joined by destroyers WOOLSTON, VALOROUS and sloop HASTINGS.

Destroyers INGLEFIELD and IVANHOE attacked a submarine contact in the Western Approaches in 51‑00N, 18‑00W.
 
Destroyers INTREPID and ICARUS attacked a submarine contact in 49‑42N, 9‑59E.
 
Destroyer MOHAWK and sloop STORK attacked a submarine contact ESE of Scarborough.
 
Destroyer COSSACK attacked a submarine contact north of Blyth.
 
Destroyer BEAGLE attacked a submarine contact in 51‑20N, 01‑40E.
 
Destroyer BROKE and sloop FLEETWOOD attacked a submarine contact off Blyth.
 
Minesweeper/escort ship GLEANER attacked a submarine contact 17 miles 184° from Great Ormes Head.

Gibralter outbound convoy – Convoy OG.3, totalling 33 merchant ships, was formed from OA.20G which departed Southend on the 15th escorted by destroyers KELLY and KINGSTON, relieved by destroyers AMAZON and ANTELOPE, and OB.20G which departed Liverpool on the 16th escorted by destroyers WHIRLWIND and WALPOLE.
 
AMAZON was damaged in a collision on the 18th and the other destroyers remained with the convoy until the 19th. French destroyers FOUGUEUX and L'ADROIT, which departed Brest on the 17th, joined the convoy on the 19th which arrived at Gibraltar on the 23rd.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy BC.11 of steamers ADJUTANT, BALTARA, BARON CARNEGIE, BARON KINNAIRD, BLACKHEATH, BOTHNIA, COXWOLD, HARMATTAN, JADE, KINGSBOROUGH, LOCHEE, LOTTIE R, MARSLEW, NIGERIAN (Commodore) and SODALITY departed Bristol Channel, escorted by destroyers EXMOUTH, ESK, WESSEX, and arrived safely in the Loire on the 18th.
 
Convoy SA.13 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by destroyers ACHATES and VENOMOUS, and arrived on the 17th. Ed. note: I have no record of convoy code SA.
 
Convoy FN.22 departed Southend and arrived at Methil on the 18th. There was no convoy FN.22, nor convoys FS.22 and FS.23.
 
U.23 laid mines off Cromarty near Invergordon.
 
Caribbean convoy – French destroyer CYCLONE with destroyer MISTRAL on escort duty in support of convoy KJ.2, attacked a U-boat in the Bay of Biscay, but without success
 
Ship movement –Light cruiser DAUNTLESS departed Suez for Colombo.
 
Mediterranean convoy – Convoy Green 5 departed Gibraltar escorted by destroyer DUCHESS and sloop FOWEY until the 17th, when convoying in the Mediterranean was abandoned and the escorts withdrawn. DUCHESS arrived at Malta on the 20th.
 
French naval action – French destroyers MILAN and ÉPERVIER departed Marseilles with three troopships for Beirut.
 
French light cruiser DUGUAY TROUIN encountered German steamer HALLE (5889grt) which had departed Bolama, Portuguese Guinea on the 12th and Bissao on the 14th for Las Palmas. HALLE scuttled herself to avoid capture SW of Dakar. Large destroyers LE FANTASQUE and LE TERRIBLE, operating from Dakar, had been searching for her from the 15th to 17th.
 
German naval activity –German steamer UHENFELS (7603grt) departed Lourenco Marques [ed.: SE Africa]on the 13th, shadowed from off the port by sloop EGRET which had to give up because of shortage of fuel. Light cruisers LIVERPOOL and DURBAN, also in the area were unable to find her, but because of the naval activity, UHENFELS returned to Lourenco Marques.
 
German steamer TIJUCA (5918grt) arrived off Kopervik, Norway, encountered Norwegian submarine B.3 but continued on, reaching Hamburg on the 25th.


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/17/2017 9:09:18 AM
October 17, 1939


Quote:
A decree of the Council of Ministers for the defense of the Reich determines that members of the SS and "police units on special missions", are subject to prosecution only by a special court of justice, and thus withdraws them from conviction by ordinary or military courts. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
The Reich Main Security Office plans to eliminate all Poles who have occupied a position of responsibility or authority, or who could provide resistance leadership. 60,000 people will be eliminated. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)



Quote:
Negotiations between the USSR and Turkey fail without producing an accord. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/17/2017 6:10:11 PM
Mid-October notes that fit nowhere else. The following is recorded only as Mid-October, 1939", but shows the increasing spread of the sea war and the larger measures being made to counter-act German surface raiders.

Quote:
By mid October, the British and French Admiralties had organized the following Hunter Groups which were formed on the 5th in response to sinkings by German battleships:

Force F - heavy cruisers BERWICK and YORK stationed in the West Indies and North America. YORK was detached from the America and West Indies Station, but did not serve in Force F. She was maintained for Halifax convoy cover)

Force G - heavy cruisers CUMBERLAND and EXETER stationed off South America with New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES detailed on the 5th to join them.

Force H - heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE near the Cape of Good Hope.

Force I - aircraft carrier EAGLE, heavy cruisers CORNWALL and DORSETSHIRE off Ceylon.

Force J - aircraft carrier GLORIOUS and battleship MALAYA off Aden in the approaches to the Red Sea.

Force K - aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL and battlecruiser RENOWN near Pernambuco.

Force L - French battlecruiser DUNKERQUE, aircraft carrier BÉARN, light cruisers GLOIRE, MONTCALM, GEORGES LEYGUES at Brest.

Force M - French heavy cruisers DUPLEIX and FOCH at Dakar.

Force N - French battlecruiser STRASBOURG, aircraft carrier HERMES, French heavy cruiser ALGÉRIE and light cruiser NEPTUNE to be based at Jamaica, but reassigned to Dakar.
STRASBOURG, DUPLEIX and ALGÉRIE travelled in company to Dakar.

Force N was never formed. FOCH did not arrive at Dakar until mid-November, then as Force X with DUPLEIX («naval-history.net».


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/17/2017 7:48:10 PM
Day 47. October 17 (continued)
Tuesday.

In the air

Quote:
German planes bombed the British naval base as Scapa Flow. The training ship Iron Duke was damaged 9Goralski, p 98)


Quote:
Three German aircraft bombed Scapa Flow, one of which was shot down by destroyer ESKIMO. Two near misses damaged old battleship IRON DUKEwhich took a heavy list and bomb blast damaged her electrical installations. She was towed into shallow water, settled onto the sea bed and ESKIMO provided electric power. Destroyers SOMALI and ASHANTI were also at Scapa Flow at the time of the raid, and later in the day, four more aircraft attacked, near-missing ASHANTI, but causing no damage. («uboat.net»)



U-boat action

No U-boats ordered or laid down. Three ships sunk by U-boat.

Quote:

At 16.31 hours on 17 Oct 1939 the Yorkshire (Master Victor Charles Patrick Smalley) in convoy HG-3 was hit by two stern torpedoes from U-37 and sank about 160 miles west-northwest of Cape Finisterre. The master, 24 crew members and 33 passengers were lost. 105 crew members and 118 passengers were picked up by the American steam merchant Independence Hall and landed at Bordeaux on 20 October.

At 08.00 hours on 17 October 1939, U-46 attacked the Yorkshire in the unescorted convoy HG-3 with four rounds from her 8.8cm gun, no hits were scored and as the vessel fired back the U-boat dived.
At 16.30 hours, U-46 heard a detonation, this was the hit on the Yorkshire by U-37 (Hartmann). 20 minutes later U-46 fired a G7e torpedo at the City of Mandalay, observed a hit amidships in the engine room and saw the ship listing. A second torpedo fired at 17.00 hours detonated prematurely.
The City of Mandalay (Master Alexander Graham Melville) sank a short time later 360 miles west-northwest of Cape Finisterre. Seven crew members were lost. 78 crew members and passengers were picked up by the American steam merchant Independence Hall and landed at Bordeaux.

At 20.35 hours on 17 Oct 1939 the Clan Chisholm (Master Francis T. Stenson) in convoy HG-3 was hit aft by one torpedo from U-48 and sank about 150 miles northwest of Cape Finisterre. The ship had been hit by a dud torpedo at 20.32 hours. Four crew members were lost. The master and 41 survivors were picked up by the Swedish motor merchant Bardaland and landed at Kirkwall. 17 crew members were picked up by the Norwegian whaler Skudd and 15 others by the Warwick Castle. («uboat.net»)
All 3 ships are British, and are in convoy from Gibraltar to U.K.
Yorkshire, a steam passenger ship of 10,183 tons, sailed from Rangoon for Liverpool carrying general cargo, including paraffin wax. Of a total of 281 aboard, 58 were lost.
City of Mandalay, a steam merchant of 7,028 tons, was en route from Saigon to Glasgow carrying general cargo, including tea, rubber and sago. Of a ship’s complement of 85, 7 were lost.
Clan Chisholm, a steam merchant of 7,256 tons, left Calcutta for Glasgow carrying 3,300 tons of tea, 1,900 tons of jute, 1,750 tons of pig iron and 2,600 tons of general cargo. Of a complement of 78, 4 died.

At sea

Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser SHEFFIELD departed Loch Ewe for Northern Patrol in the Denmark Strait, arriving back on the 22nd after capturing German steamer GLORIA.
 
Four light cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, four AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and three AMCs in the Denmark Strait. The armed merchant cruisers were ASTURIAS, AURANIA, CALIFORNIA, CHITRAL, RAWALPINDI, SCOTSTOUN, and TRANSYLVANIA.
 
OUtbound convoys – Convoy OA.21 of 21 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers VANSITTART and WIVERN, which remained with the convoy until it dispersed on the 22nd.
 
Convoy OB.21 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WINCHELSEA and WITHERINGTON.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy BC.10S departed the Loire, escorted by destroyers MONTROSE and VIVACIOUS, and arrived safely in the Bristol Channel on the 19th.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Grimsby and arrived back on the 18th.
 
U-boat attacks – Destroyer BEAGLE attacked a submarine contact in 51‑07.5N, 01‑23.5E.
 
French ship movement – French large destroyer LÉOPARD, which had been covering minelaying in the Pas de Calais area, returned to Brest on the 17th. Large destroyer JAGUAR sailed from Dunkirk on 1 November and with large destroyer PANTHÈRE, which had been at Cherbourg under repair, also arrived at Brest, but on the 2nd.
 
German naval activity – U.19 laid mines off Inner Dowsing near Yarmouth during the night of the 16th/17th, on which three merchant ships were sunk.

German destroyers HERMANN KÜNNE, FRIEDRICH ECKHOLDT, DIETHER VON ROEDER, KARL GALSTER and HANS LÜDEMAN, escorted by destroyer WILHELM HEIDKAMP sailed from Wilhelmshaven to lay mines in the North Sea off the Humber on the night of the 17th/18th. Seven merchant ships grossing 25,852 tons were sunk in the field, … [including]:
• Oct 22: Whitemantle, British
• Oct 23: Albania, Swedish
• Oct 29: Varangmaml, Norwegian
• Oct 30: Juno, Finnish
• Nov 3: Canada, Danish
• Nov 4: Sig, Norwegian
• Dec 31: Box Hill, British
Total recorded losses for the 7 ships: 46.
 
Destroyer JUNO fired on German aircraft shadowing her SW of Farne Island. British aircraft came to her assistance and shot down a Dornier flying boat.

In addition to the losses by mines, two steamers were lost and one badly damaged when they collided with the sunken wreck of CANADA.
 …
 German destroyers PAUL JACOBI, THEODOR RIEDEL, HERMANN SCHOEMANN and torpedo boats LEOPARD, ILTIS, WOLF conducted an anti-shipping patrol in the Skagerrak from the 17th to 19th.
 
North Atlantic convoy – Convoy HX.5 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted … [by various ships and aircraft until the] … 29th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
Mediterranean convoy curtailment – Convoying in the Mediterranean was discontinued: (1) destroyer DUCHESS and sloop FOWEY, awaiting convoy Green 5, were sent from Gibraltar to Malta, arriving on the 20th, (2) destroyer DIANA and sloop DEPTFORD, en route to Port Said from Blue 5, were sent to relieve destroyers GRENVILLE and GIPSY on contraband patrol, (3) destroyer DUNCAN from Blue 4 was sent to escort battleship RAMILLIES, relieving destroyers GRAFTON and GALLANT, (4) destroyers DAINTY and DEFENDER departed Malta on the 18th to escort RAMILLIES, which reached Alexandria on the 20th, (5) French destroyers CASSARD and KERSAINT returned to Bizerte, and (6) destroyers DECOY and DELIGHT were at Malta. After refitting, DELIGHT reached Gibraltar on the 31st for escort duty, and DECOY, her refit completed on 3 November, left Malta to escort steamer NEVASA to Marseilles.


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/18/2017 12:51:24 PM
October 18, 1939


Quote:
A circular of the Reich Main Security Office (Division V, Reichskriminalpolizeiamt) orders that all convicted persons apprehended for "loafing" in future, be transferred to concentration camps. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
By Reich police regulations, a tavern ban of up to one year can be imposed on alcoholics. (chroniknet.de)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/18/2017 3:46:54 PM
Day 48. October 18 (continued)
Wednesday.

Europe

Quote:
The president of Finland met with the kings of the Scandinavian nations to consider the threat resulting from the Soviet military demands on the Finns. Hitler had assured the Swedes that Germany would remain neutral in a Rusian-Finnish war and strongly advised the Swedes to do the same. (Goralski, p 98)


In the air – No notable air activity.

U-boats – No U-boats ordered; no allied ships sunk by U-boats.
Quote:
Steamer IMPERIAL STAR (10,733grt) was attacked by a U-boat, 60 miles west of the Scillies in 49‑54N, 7‑52W. Destroyer INTREPID was sent to assist.
 
In submarine operations against convoy HG.3 [, steamers SAGAING (7968grt), GARBRATTAN (1811grt), CITY OF GUILDFORD (5157grt) and CLAN MCBEAN (5000grt) reported they were attacked on the 18th but undamaged. Destroyer ESCORT joined SAGAING and escorted her from the area. («naval-history.net»)


At sea

Quote:
Damaged – Destroyer AMAZON, which departed Plymouth on escort duty on the 17th, was damaged in collision with steamer ARACATACA (5378grt) at 1448 in convoy OG.3 (ed.: Outbound UK-Gibraltar] in 47-38N, 08-08W. AMAZON had closed to pass information and the steamer altered course without warning. She was under repair at Portsmouth from 20 October to 28 November.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser CALEDON departed Kirkwall, and arrived at Sullom Voe on the 20th.

Light cruiser DANAE departed Lagos for St Helena, where she arrived on the 22nd.

Attacks on U-boats –Destroyer AFRIDI attacked a submarine contact 3.2 miles 61° off St Abb's Head. Destroyer WHITEHALL was ordered to stand by the location where AFRIDI had buoyed the "sunken submarine."

Mediterranean convoy –Convoy Blue 5 departed Port Said on the 18th, but was dispersed and travelled without escort.
 …
African convoy – Convoy SLF.5 departed Freetown, unescorted, and arrived at London on the 30th. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/19/2017 3:06:13 AM
October 19, 1939


Quote:
Anglo-French-Turkish Treaty of 1939

a mutual assistance pact concluded in Ankara on October 19; it elaborated the Anglo-Turkish and Franco-Turkish declarations signed on May 12 and June 23, 1939, respectively. The treaty provided for British and French assistance to Turkey in the event of aggression against the latter and also provided for Turkish aid in the event of “an act of aggression, committed by a European power and leading to war in the Mediterranean Sea involving France and the United Kingdom.” Turkey was also obligated to give assistance to Greece and Rumania in the event that Great Britain and France were drawn into war in compliance with the British and French guarantees given to these states by declarations of Apr. 13, 1939. The treaty was to be in effect for 15 years. Protocol No. 2 attached to the treaty declared that “the obligations undertaken by Turkey as a result of the aforementioned treaty cannot compel Turkey to take action the result or consequence of which would be to draw it into armed conflict with the USSR.” The treaty had no practical value. During World War II, 1939–45, the Turkish government not only failed to aid the allies, but on June 18, 1941, it signed a friendship treaty with Germany. Turkey supplied Germany with strategic raw materials until the beginning of 1944. (Great Soviet Encyclopedia)



Quote:
French troops have completely withdrawn from German territory. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
The Polish government-in-exile protests to Lithuania regarding the Lithuanian treaty with the USSR that saw Polish land taken over by Lithuania. (la-guerre-au-jour-le-jour.over-blog.com)


Cheers

BW

---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/19/2017 3:47:47 PM
Day 49. October 19 (continued)
Thursday.


Quote:
BERLIN, October 19.
Germans shut both NBC and us off the air this noon. … The Nazi censor maintained it ould rate a bad impression abroad. …I called on Dr. Boehmer and told him we would stop broadcasting altogether if today’s action meant we could only talk about matters which created a nice impression. … The High Command tonight issues a detailed report of what has been happening on that mysterious western front. Nothing much at all has happened, it says, and I’m inclined to believe it, though Paris has swamped America for weeks with wild tales of a great French offensive against the Westwall. High Command says German losses up to October 17 in the west have been 196 killed, 114 missing, 356 Wounded. …I’m almost convinced that the German army tells the truth in regard to its actions. The navy exaggerates, the air force simply lies. (Berlin Diary, pp 237-8)


In the air
Little reportable action.

U-boats
No ships sunk on this day; no U-boats lost. U-19 left Wilhelmshaven on patrol; U-18 returned to Kiel after a patrol of 18 days.

At sea
Quote:
Transfer of assets – While in dock at Devonport, destroyer KEMPENFELT was transferred to the Canadian Navy as HMCS ASSINIBOINE. She had been there since 29 September repairing collision damage from the day before. As ASSINIBOINE, she departed Plymouth for Halifax on 7 November.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruisers CARDIFF, DIOMEDE, DRAGON departed Sullom Voe for Northern Patrol.

Two cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Shetland and the Faroes, AMCs AURANIA, CALIFORNIA, CHITRAL between the Faroes and Iceland, and light cruiser SHEFFIELD and AMCs RAWALPINDI, SCOTSTOUN, TRANSYLVANIA in the Denmark Strait.
 
Ship movements – Destroyers INTREPID, ICARUS, IVANHOE arrived at Loch Ewe and sister ship IMPULSIVE at Scapa Flow on the 25th, all for duty with the Home Fleet. Destroyers ILEX, ISIS, IMPERIAL joined the 22nd Flotilla at Harwich on the 31st, were released from the Flotilla on 5 November and rejoined the 3rd Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet – IMOGEN, after completing repairs, and IMPERIAL on 8 November, ILEX and ISIS on the 14th, and INGLEFIELD, also after completing repairs, on the 16th.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer WHITEHALL and sloop WESTON attacked a submarine contact three miles ENE of St Abb's Head.
 
Atlantic convoys – Convoy OA.22 of nine ships departed Southend escorted by destroyer VESPER, which stayed until the convoy dispersed on the 21st.
 
Convoy OB.22 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers MACKAY and VIMY, the destroyers detaching on the 22nd to escort SL.4.
 
Book-keeping –Prize regulations for U-boats were lifted for shipping as far west as 20°.
 
German ship losses – German tanker BISKAYA (6386grt) had departed Hamburg on 13 August for Port Arthur, Texas, but with the start of war, found refuge at Las Palmasuntil 7 October when she attempted to return to Germany. She was captured on the 19th by armed merchant cruiser SCOTSTOUN on Northern Patrol in the Denmark Strait in 66‑30N, 23‑00W, taken to Leith by a prize crew…, and renamed EMPIRE UNITY in British service.
 
German tanker GONZENHEIM (4574grt), which had departed Buenas Aires on 14 September, was intercepted by armed merchant cruiser RAWALPINDI on Northern Patrol in the Denmark Strait in 63‑25N, 12‑00W, and scuttled.
 
French convoys – French destroyer FOUDROYANT had arrived at Casablanca on 13 September with convoy 9.B of steamers STRASBOURGEOIS, MAROC, JUMIEGES and POITIERS after leaving Brest on the 7th October, as well as SAINT NAZAIRE, escorted by sloop CHEVREUIL after leaving Quiberon, also on the 7th.
 
Quite separately, destroyer BOURRASQUE reached Casablanca on the 17th with convoy 3.K of steamers MARRAKECH and KERGUELEN. They had left Le Verdon on the 13th. Both destroyers then departed Casablanca and arrived at Gibraltar on this date.
 
Far East – Heavy cruiser DORSETSHIRE departed Hong Kong for Singapore and duty with the 4th Cruiser Squadron in the East Indies Station. She left Singapore on the 22nd for Colombo.


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/20/2017 5:07:57 PM
Day 50. October 20
Friday. First Quarter moon.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
Six U-boats ordered (U-507 to -512). U-47 enters patrol from Wilhelmshaven; U-19 returns to base at Kiel after a 2-day patrol.
Quote:
At 06.00 hours on 20 Oct 1939 the neutral Gustaf Adolf was stopped by U-34 about 50 miles northeast of Sullom Voe, Shetland Islands. The ship carried contraband and was sunk by gunfire at 07.32 hours, after the crew abandoned ship. The U-boat took the lifeboats in tow and stopped the Norwegian steam merchant Biscaya with two shots across her bow at 10.30 hours. The survivors were picked up by the ship and taken to Moss, Norway.

At 10.58 hours on 20 Oct 1939, U-34 tried to stop the unescorted Sea Venture (Master Charles Swanson Tate) with three shots across the bow about 50 miles northeast of the Shetland Islands, but the ship returned fire inaccurately and tried to escape so the U-boat shelled her until the crew abandoned ship at 11.23 hours. She was sunk by a coup de grâce at 13.40 hours. The master and 24 crew members were picked up by the Lerwick lifeboat and landed at Lerwick, Shetland Islands. («uboat.net»)

Swedish steam merchant Gustaf Adolf, 926 tons, was en route from Gothenburg to Bristol laden with wood pulp. Of an unknown number of crew, there were no losses.

British steam merchant Sea Venture, 2,327tons, was sailing from Tyne to Tromso carrying 3,000 tons of coal. Of a complement of 25, there were no losses.

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruisers COLOMBO and DELHI departed Sullom Voe for Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser DRAGON departed Sullom Voe for Northern Patrol and arrived back on the 25th.
 
Two light cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Shetlands and the Faroes, light cruiser COLOMBO and AMCs AURANIA, CALIFORNIA, CHITRAL between the Faroes and Iceland, and light cruiser SHEFFIELD and AMCs SCOTSTOUN, RAWALPINDI, TRANSYLVANIA in the Denmark Strait.
 
U.K.–France convoy – While escorting convoy BC.10S with destroyer VIVACIOUS from Quiberon Bay to Barry, destroyer MONTROSE attacked a submarine contact in 52‑16N, 4‑36W.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.24 departed Southend. Shortly after, escorting sloop PELICAN was damaged when she struck submerged wreckage. The convoy arrived at Methil on the 22nd.
 
Convoy FS.24 departed Methil, escorted by destroyer BROKE, sloops BITTERN and ENCHANTRESS, and arrived at Southend on the 22nd.

German ship losses – German auxiliary patrol boat Vp.701 (trawler ESTE, 426grt) was sunk on a mine between Moen and Falsterbo.
 
German steamer BIANCA (1375grt) had departed Rotterdam pre-war for Lisbon, called at El Ferrol and refuelled in an attempt to return to Germany before the start of the war. She reached Reykjavik on 7 September and remained there until 18 October when she made her attempt. At 1150/20th in the Denmark Strait, in 67‑29N, 22‑15W, she was captured by armed merchant cruiser TRANSYLVANIA, taken to Kirkwall by a prize crew commanded by Lt Cdr D M MacLean RNR, and renamed EMPIRE WARRIOR in British service.

Allied ship losses –Greek steamer OMONIA (3699grt) was seized in the Baltic by German warships, taken to Swinemünde and later renamed OLSA for German use.
 
Ship movements – Caribbean: Light cruiser CARADOC arrived at Bermuda, and left the same day for Kingston, Jamaica.
 
Caribbean: Light cruiser DESPATCH departed Bermuda and arrived at Kingston on the 26th.
 
Mediterranean: Light cruiser GALATEA departed Alexandria, reached Malta on the 27th, left again on the 28th and arrived back at Alexandria on the 30th.
 
Indian Ocean: Light cruiser DURBAN departed Mauritius for Colombo to examine the Cargados, Caarajos and Chagos groups for German activity.
 
Transfer of station –The Admiralty ordered destroyers HOTSPUR and HAVOCK from the South America Station to the West Indies.(«naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/21/2017 2:12:57 PM
October 21, 1939


Quote:
Count Ciano and Hans Georg von Mackensen, the German ambassador to Italy, meet in Rome to discuss the resettlement of German citizens and ethnic Germans in the south of Tirol (Südtirol). (Chroniknet.de)



Cartoon of 21 October 1939.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/21/2017 7:38:08 PM
Day 51. October 21 (continued)
Saturday.


Quote:
BERLIN, October 21
The Wilhelmstrasse furious at the Turks for signing a mutual-assistance pact with the British day before yesterday. Papen jerked back here hurriedly and was called before the master, my spies tell me, for a dressing-down. It’s the first diplomatic blow the Germans have taken in a long time. They don’t like blows. (Berlin Diary, p 238)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No U-boats ordered. U-53 begins patrol from Kiel, and U-31 from Wilhelmshaven. U-47 returns to base at Kiel after a 2-day patrol. Three ships lost to mines laid by U-boats.
Quote:
On 21 October 1939 the Orsa (Master Alexander Simpson) struck a mine laid on 5 September by U-15 and sank about 15 miles 150° from Flamborough Head.

At 02.00 hours on 21 Oct 1939 the Capitaine Edmond Laborie struck a mine laid on 16 October by U-19 two miles east of the Inner Dowsing Lightvessel and sank. The wreck was later dispersed.

On 21 Oct 1939 the neutral Deodata struck a mine laid by U-19 on 16 October 1.5 miles off the Inner Dowsing lightvessel and sank. The wreck was later dispersed. («uboat.net»)
British steam merchantman Orsa, was carrying 2,100 tons of coal from Tyne to Bordeaux. Of a ship’s complement of 20, 16 were lost.

French steam merchantman Capitaine Edmond Laborie was in ballast from Bordeaux to Tyne. No reported deaths from an unrecorded crew’s complement.

Norwegian Deodata, a motor tanker of 3,295 tons, was in ballast heading from Constanza to Grangemouth. Of the ship’s complement of 23 there were no losses.

At sea
Quote:
Intelligence – The crew of the Norwegian steamer LORENTZ W HANSEN arrived on Norwegian tanker KONGSDAL (9959grt) at Kirkwall and brought news proving that both German pocket battleships ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE and DEUTSCHLAND were at sea. It had been thought that all the sinkings to date had been due to a single battleship.
 
Probably in response, light cruisers GLASGOW and NEWCASTLE, at sea since the 12th, were sent to escort convoy KJ.3, then en route from the West Indies. They detached on the 24th and the convoy arrived at Land's End on the 25th. NEWCASTLE reached Portsmouth on the 26th and GLASGOW on the 27th.
 
Ship movements – Destroyer FORESIGHT was boiler cleaning at Scapa Flow until the 26th.
 
Anti-aircraft cruisers CAIRO and CALCUTTA departed Grimsby on escort duty and arrived back the same day.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser COVENTRY departed Immingham to support a convoy under air attack, and at sea, joined sister ships CAIRO and CALCUTTA with the convoy, which was escorted to Flamborough Head. COVENTRY experienced a steering gear defect and returned to Immingham, docking on the 26th for repairs completed on 14 November. …

Ship transfers – Four former British anti-submarine trawlers arrived at Brest for duty as the French 13th Patrol Squadron. They were CANCALAISE (ex-ST AMANDUS, LV R R L Birot), HAVRAISE (ex-ST ATTALUS, EV Harduin), LORIENTAISE (ex-ST ANDRONICUS, LV F Drogou) and NANTAISE (ex-ST ARCADIUS, LV L M A Jaume). They went into service on 17 January 1940.
 
German ship losses – German steamer GLORIA (5896grt), which had departed Buenos Aires on the 6th, was captured by light cruiser SHEFFIELD on Northern Patrol in the Denmark Strait, six to ten miles off the north coast of Iceland in 65‑30N, 22‑05W. As GLORIA was being taken to Kirkwall by a prize crew commanded by Sub Lt S Phillips, three of her crew escaped in a lifeboat, but were later picked up and landed at Methil on the 28th. GLORIA was renamed EMPIRE CONVEYOR in British service.
 
German steamer POSEIDON (5864grt) departed Rio de Janiero on 1 September to return to Germany, but was forced to put into Mar del Plata on the 5th to avoid contact with light cruiser AJAX. She was finally able to leave for Germany on 1 October, but was captured during the afternoon of the 21st by armed merchant cruiser SCOTSTOUN north of Iceland in the Denmark Strait in 67‑08N, 21‑18W. Heavy weather prevented a boarding party from being put aboard at that time, and it was not until the afternoon of the 22nd in 66‑27N, 22‑09W that Py/Lt C W Armstrong RNR and his men were able to go across. SCOTSTOUN then escorted POSEIDON for 29 hours before losing touch in thick snow. Armed merchant cruiser TRANSYLVANIA finally found the missing ship early on the 25th, but she was incapable of steaming, taken in tow and proceeded towards Reykjavik with cruiser SHEFFIELD in company. When Icelandic waters were reached, SHEFFIELD detached and returned to Sullom Voe, being relieved on Northern Patrol by light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON. However, before reaching Reykavik, TRANSYLVANIA’s tow line parted in a gale and she was forced to sink POSEIDON with gunfire on the 27th.
 
Ship movements – Light cruiser DIOMEDE departed Sullom Voe for Northern Patrol between Shetlands and Faroes, and arrived back on the 25th.
 
Destroyers KELLY and KINGSTON arrived at Loch Ewe for operations with the Home Fleet.
 
U-boat attacks – Destroyer VALOROUS attacked a submarine contact six to seven miles east of Scarborough.
 
Minesweeper/escort vessel JASON attacked a submarine contact 2 miles 105° from South Rock Light Vessel, Belfast.
 
Atlantic convoys – Convoy OA.23 of 15 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers ACASTA and ARDENT from the 21st to 23rd, and the convoy dispersed on the 26th.
 
Convoy OB.23 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VOLUNTEER and VERSATILE, which detached to KJ.3 [Ed.:incoming from Kingston] on the 24th.
 
Light cruiser DAUNTLESS departed Aden en route to Colombo, and was ordered to examine the Cargados, Carajos, Chagos groups for German activity.
 
Ship reassignments –Hunter Force M with French heavy cruisers DUPLEIX and FOCH, and Force N with French battlecruiser STRASBOURG and British aircraft carrier HERMES, were reassigned to cover the Dakar to Pernambuco route[Ed.: South Atlantic route.]
 (1) Force X, which became effective in mid-November, consisted of HERMES, DUPLEIX and FOCH, while
 (2) Force Y had STRASBOURG, with French light cruiser DUGUAY TROUIN and the British NEPTUNE. («naval-history.net»)
.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

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E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/22/2017 2:04:12 PM
October 22, 1939


Quote:
In Soviet-occupied Poland, elections for national assemblies of "Western Belarussia" and "Western Ukraine" take place. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
The Indian National Congress refuses to give its support to the British war effort and condemns British imperialism. This followed a September 3rd declaration by Lord Linlithgow, without consulting the people of India, that announced India was at war with Germany and which had appealed for sympathy and support. (seconde-guerre.com)



Quote:
Sporadic artillery duels on the Western Front between French and German forces. (seconde-guerre.com)



Image: Lord Linlithgow, Governor-General and Viceroy of India, 1936-1943.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/22/2017 3:59:09 PM
Day 52. October 22 (continued)
Sunday.

Quote:
BERLIN, October 22
Eintopf – one-pot – day – this Sunday. Which means all you can get for lunch is a cheap stew. But you pay the piece of a big meal for it, the difference going to the Winter Relief, or so they say. Actually it goes into the war chest. (Berlin Diary, p 238)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No U-boats ordered. U-21 and U-59 sailed from Kiel, and U-26 from Wilhelmshaven. No Allied ships sunk.

At sea
Quote:

Northern Patrol – Light cruisers DUNEDIN, DELHI and CALYPSO departed Sullom Voe for the Northern Patrol, CALYPSO proceeding to the Iceland-Faroes Channel. This brought the numbers of ships on patrol to two cruisers between the Shetlands and the Faroes, four cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait.
 
Ships under repair – Destroyer JAVELIN was badly damaged at 0200 in collision with steamer MOIDART (1262grt) off Whitby. Destroyer AFRIDI, escorting convoy FN.24 nearby, was sent to assist, and two tugs and two anti-submarine trawlers left the Tyne at 0400. JAVELIN was towed by destroyer JUPITER to Middlesbrough and repaired until 1 January.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.25 departed Southend and escorting destroyer GURKHA attacked a submarine at 2130 contact 13 miles 68° from Orfordness on the 22nd. The convoy arrived at Methil on the 24th.
 
Convoy FS.25 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers MAORI, WHITEHEAD and sloop WESTON and arrived at Southend on the 24th.

Norwegian convoy – Battleships NELSON, RODNEY, battlecruiser HOOD, and destroyers INTREPID, IVANHOE, ICARUS, KELLY and KINGSTON sortied from Loch Ewe at 1830/22nd to cover the movement of convoy NV.1 of twelve British iron ore ships from Narvik.[Ed.: ‘NV’ appears on my list of convoy codes as applying to the Naples-Augusta route]
 
Destroyers IMPULSIVE left Plymouth on the 23rd, reached Scapa Flow on the 25th, and left next day to join [Admiral] Forbes at sea, KINGSTON detached from the force to Scapa Flow with defects, and FIREDRAKE joined on the 29th.
 
Light cruisers EDINBURGH departed Rosyth on the 23rd and joined the escort off Muckle Flugga at noon on the 24th, and AURORA departed Loch Ewe, also on the 23rd, and joined off the Norwegian coast at 0130/26th. Destroyers SOMALI, ASHANTI, TARTAR and FAME also joined from Scapa Flow.
 
En route to the Firth of Forth, destroyer FAME and two merchant ships were detached to join an Atlantic convoy.
 
At 0630/30th, SOMALI depth charged a submarine contact near Kinnaird Head in 57‑45N, 1‑02W. TARTAR also joined in the attack before catching up with ASHANTI which by now was shepherding the convoy away from the area. FAME later rejoined, stood guard on the contact which remained stationary and dropped more depth charges at 0915/30th. NV.1 arrived safely on the 31st.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy BC.12 of [15] steamers departed the Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer EXPRESS and WESSEX, and arrived safely in the Loire on the 24th.
 
Convoy AXS.2 of one steamer departed Fowey, escorted by destroyer WAKEFUL, and reached Brest on the 24th.
 
German naval activity – German destroyers MAX SCHULTZ, FRIEDRICH IHN, ERICH STEINBRINCK, HANS LODY, BERND VON ARNIM and ERICH GIESE carried out an anti-shipping sweep in the Skagerrak from the 22nd to 24th.
 
U.16 laid mines in the Straits of Dover, on which one auxiliary minesweeper was sunk.
 
Ship movement –Destroyers GRAFTON and GALLANT departed Gibraltar for Alexandria on the 15th and after calling there, returned to Gibraltar. Sister ships GREYHOUND and GLOWWORM, also sailing from Alexandria to Gibraltar, called at Toulon on the 18th, after which all four left Gibraltar on the 19th for the UK. En route they were ordered to search for a lifeboat from CLAN CHISHOLM (7256grt), lost on the 17th, and reached Plymouth on the 22nd. Assigned to duty at Harwich, they were due to be joined by Polish destroyers GROM, BURZA and BLYSKAWICA.
 
Atlantic Coast convoy – Convoy HG.4 of 41 ships left Gibraltar, escorted by destroyers GRENVILLE, GIPSY and minesweeper LEDA, and by French destroyers BOURRASQUE and FOUDROYANT from the 22nd until their arrival at Brest on the 29th. Destroyers WISHART and VIDETTE provided local escort, detached on the 23rd and patrolled off Cadiz. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 29th, with GRENVILLE, GIPSY and LEDA arriving on the 30th.
 
French naval activity – French battlecruiser DUNKERQUE, light cruisers GEORGES LEYGUES, GLOIRE, MONTCALM and large destroyers MOGADOR, VOLTA, L'INDOMPTABLE, LE MALIN and LA TRIOMPHANT left Brest, escorted in the local approaches by destroyers CYCLONE and MISTRAL, which arrived back on the 25th. The main force then patrolled the Antilles-English Channel route, to cover the movement of convoy KJ.4 until the 30th when they arrived back at Brest.

North Atlantic patrol – Heavy cruiser YORK departed Halifax to support convoy HX.5 which had left on the 17th, and to search for German battleship DEUTSCHLAND.
 
Light cruiser ENTERPRISE departed Halifax on patrol duties and arrived back on the 29th.
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK departed Alexandria and arrived at Malta on the 23rd.
 
Australian light cruiser PERTH departed Bermuda.
 
Caribbean, South AtlanticGerman pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE sank steamer TREVANION (5299grt) in the South Atlantic in 19‑40S, 04‑02E.
 
German steamer EMMY FRIEDRICH (4372grt) departed Tampico, Mexico, during the night of the 19th/20th to act as a supply ship for German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE. Allied warships began a search for her in the Gulf of Mexico, and joined by US aircraft carrier RANGER (CV.4) as part of the Neutrality Patrol, in the Caribbean. Light cruiser ORION, which departed Kingston on the 21st and Canadian destroyer SAGUENAY sighted EMMY FRIEDRICH on the 22nd in the Yucatan Channel and she turned away, back into the Gulf of Mexico. The contact report from ORION enabled light cruiser CARADOC, which departed Bermuda on the 20th, to intercept her early on the 23rd. EMMY FRIEDRICH was scuttled and CARADOC picked up her crew of 33 and took them to Bermuda, arriving on the 27th. ORION got back to Kingston on the 26th. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/23/2017 12:18:23 PM
October 23, 1939


Quote:
The former senate president of Danzig, Arthur Greiser, is made the Gauleiter of Poznan, Poland. (chroniknet.de)


Editor's note: Arthur Karl Greiser (22 January 1897 – 21 July 1946) was a Nazi German politician, SS-Obergruppenführer and Reichsstatthalter (Reich Governor) of the German-occupied territory of Wartheland. He was one of the persons primarily responsible for organizing the Holocaust in occupied Poland and numerous other crimes against humanity. Arrested by the Americans in 1945, [the Polish communist government] decided that Greiser was guilty of all charges and sentenced him to death by hanging, civil death, and confiscation of all his property. In the early morning of 21 July 1946 he was transported from prison to the slope of Fort Winiary where he was hanged before a large crowd. It was the last public execution in Poland and Europe. (Wikipedia)


Quote:
Renewed meeting of Soviet and Finnish officials over Soviet demands regarding changes to the international frontier. (seconde-guerre.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/23/2017 2:17:26 PM
Day 53. October 23 (continued)
Monday.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No U-boats ordered. U-56 and U-58 sailed from Kiel, and U-4 from Wilhelmshaven. No Allied ships sunk; no U-boats lost.

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Aircraft carrier FURIOUS and battlecruiser REPULSE with destroyers BEDOUIN, PUNJABI, FORESTER, FIREDRAKE left Loch Ewe for the Clyde, arriving on the 25th.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW and destroyers FURY, FOXHOUND, FEARLESS and MASHONA departed Loch Ewe for Scapa Flow. The destroyers were assigned for convoy escort.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Grimsby on escort duties, and arrived back on the 25th.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser SHEFFIELD departed Loch Ewe for Northern Patrol and arrived back on the 26th.
 
Norwegian convoy – Light cruiser AURORA sailed from Loch Ewe and destroyers SOMALI, ASHANTI, TARTAR and FAME from Scapa Flow to escort an iron ore convoy from Narvik.
 
Light cruiser EDINBURGH departed Rosyth to rendezvous with Commodore D in light cruiser AURORA 20 miles north of Muckle Flugga.
 
U-boat attacks – Destroyer GALLANT attacked a submarine contact 90° off the Lizard, and was joined in the search by destroyers KANDAHAR, ACASTA, ARDENT, which made an attack 20 miles south of Portland. At 0828/23rd, ACASTA was missed by a torpedo in 49-48N, 5-22W, and on the 24th, she and ARDENT were searching for a reported submarine in 49-30N, 4-45W.
 
Gibraltar convoys – Convoy OA.24G departed Southend escorted by destroyers ESCORT and ELECTRA, while OB.24G departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANOC and WARWICK. They merged on the 26th as OG.4. [Ed.: OA=Outbound from London; OB=OUtbound from Liverpool; OG=Outbound for Gibraltar (reverse=HG=Homebound from Gibraltar)]
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy SA.14 of two steamers left Southampton, escorted by destroyers VANSITTART and VENOMOUS, and arrived at Brest on the 24th
….
South Atlantic convoy – Convoy SL.6 departed Freetown escorted by destroyers HYPERION and HUNTER, which left the convoy at 0400/26th to take twelve ships into Dakar where they arrived at 0700/27th. Before then, on the 26th, French light cruiser DUGUAY TROUIN left Dakar to join SL.6 on the 27th, not arriving back until 2 November, while destroyer GRIFFIN left Gibraltar on the 30th and joined on 8 November in Home Waters, escorting the convoy to the UK. In the Western Approaches, the convoy split into SL.6, escorted by destroyers ELECTRA and ESCORT, and SL.6B, escorted by WALPOLE and VANOC, the latter transferring to SL.6 on 8 November. Dispersed ships of the main convoy arrived at Liverpool starting on the 10th.
 
German ship movement – German steamer CURITYBA (4969grt) sighted Norwegian destroyer DRAUG off Bergen where she arrived on the 24th. Setting out again, she arrived via Drogden, at Hamburg on the 30th.
 
U.37 conducted a reconnaissance of the Straits of Gibraltar during the night of the 23rd/24th.
 
Caribbean –Heavy cruiser BERWICK departed Bermuda, and arrived back on the 26th for docking where she underwent repairs until 3 November.
 
South Africa – Heavy cruiser SHROPSHIRE departed Capetown on escort duty, and arrived back on the 24th. («uboat.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/24/2017 1:46:18 PM
October 24, 1939


Quote:
Seventy tons of gold from the Polish state reserves arrive in Paris, having been transported by ship from Romania through the Mediterranean Sea. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
In an accord with the Reich, the Soviet Union agrees to provide the Germans with a million tons of grain and forage. (seconde-guerre.com)



Quote:
The Finnish delegation returns home to discuss the Soviet Union's latest proposals regarding a revision to the frontier. (seconde-guerre.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/24/2017 5:33:24 PM
Day 54. October 24 (continued)
Tuesday. Waxing gibbous moon.

Quote:
BERLIN, October 24
The German people who have been hoping for peace until the bitter end were finally told tonight by Ribbentrop in a speech at Danzig the the war will now have to be fought to a finish. I suppose every government that has ever gone to war has tried to convince its people of three things: (1) that right is on its side; (2) that it is fighting purely in defence of the nation; (3) that it is sure to win. The Nazis are certainly trying to pound these three points into the skins of the people. Modern propaganda technique, especially the rkaidio, certainly helps them.
Three youths in Hanover who snatched a lady’s handbag in the black-out have been sentenced to death. (Berlin Diary, p 239)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
12 U-boats ordered. U-61 sailed from Kiel. 4 Allied ships sunk, 1 to mines. No U-boats were lost.
Quote:
At 09.00 hours on 24 October 1939 the Konstantinos Hadjipateras struck a mine laid on 16 October by U-19 and sank 18 miles from the Inner Dowsing Lightship [on England’s East coast]. The survivors were picked up by the Gorleston lifeboat Louise Stephens.

At 06.16 hours on 24 Oct 1939 the unescorted and unarmed Menin Ridge (Master David Emlyn Powell) was hit on the port side below the bridge by one torpedo from U-37 while steaming at 9 knots about 98 miles west of Gibraltar. …[O]nly five crewmen managed to rescue themselves by clinging to wreckage. …The U-boat remained submerged after the attack because a ship was seen to approach the sinking position.
The ship was Ledbury which picked up one of the survivors about three hours after the attack and then launched her starboard lifeboat to rescue the other four. However, before they could be taken aboard the ship was shelled and sunk by U-37. Subsequently the U-boat approached the lifeboat with the survivors of both ships to question them before leaving the area. … At about 11.30 hours, all survivors were picked up by the American motor merchant Crown City (Master W.E. Carley) and landed at Gibraltar later that day.

At 06.16 hours on 24 Oct 1939, U-37 torpedoed and sank Menin Ridge about 98 miles west of Gibraltar and shortly afterwards spotted the unescorted and unarmed Ledbury (Master Norman Rice) approaching the sinking position from the east. The ship had spotted wreckage with survivors clinging to it and changed course to rescue them. The U-boat then fired two torpedoes at her but missed because the ship was constantly changing courses during a careful approach at 7 knots. However, her lookouts failed to notice the attack, so the ship first picked up one survivor by means of a line and then launched her starboard lifeboat manned by the chief officer and four crewmen to search the wreckage. They picked up four more survivors and returned to the ship after half an hour, but before they could be taken aboard U-37 surfaced off the starboard quarter in a distance of a quarter of a mile and fired a shot across the bow of Ledbury at 09.18 hours. The master ordered the lifeboat alongside to cast off, turned the stern towards the U-boat and sent a distress signal that was received by Gibraltar and other stations. The use of the radio forced Hartmann to immediately open fire with the deck gun on the steamer. The steering gear was smashed by the first round, two others struck the bridge and set it on fire and two more hit the engine room, but the most of the 34 rounds fired during the attack were aimed at the waterline on the starboard side and caused the ship to sink after about 15 minutes.

At 09.20 hours on 24 Oct 1939 the unescorted Tafna (Master Royal Cecil Newlands) received a distress signal from Ledbury that she was gunned and spotted her stationary funnel and masts in a distance of about 10 miles, so Tafna headed five miles to the southeast before she continued on the previous westerly course. Doing so the ship directly crossed the path of U-37 which had headed southwest on the surface after the attack on Ledbury until they had to dive for aircraft arriving in the area. Hartmann decided to attack the ship without a warning after seeing two guns (the ship was armed with one 4in and one 12pdr guns), but it was not possible to get closer to the ship due to an aircraft circling over it and no spread could be fired as only one of the bow torpedo tubes was loaded, so a carefully aimed torpedo was fired from an estimated distance of 2500 meters at 11.19 hours. …The Tafna was struck on the starboard side just below the funnel while steaming at 9 knots about 100 miles west-southwest of Gibraltar. …The ship sank 18 minutes after being torpedoed.

The torpedo explosion was heard by the nearby American motor merchant Crown City, which hurriedly picked up the survivors of Menin Ridge and Ledbury… . HMS Douglas (D 90) (Cdr R.F.B. Swinley, RN), HMS Keppel (D 84) (Capt F.S.W. de Winton, RN), HMS Vidette (D 48) (Cdr D.R. Brocklebank, RN) and HMS Watchman (D 26)(Cdr V. Hammersley-Heenan, RN) were sent to the area from Gibraltar after the distress signal of Ledbury had been received. At about 13.30 hours, HMS Keppel picked up the survivors of Tafna while HMS Douglas took the London flying boat in tow for Gibraltar as it was unable to take off again. Three of the destroyers then carried out an anti-submarine sweep of the area, attacking U-37 twice with depth charges during the afternoon without damaging her and then returned to Gibraltar the next day. («boat.net»)

Konstantinos Hadjipateras, a Greek steam merchantman of 5,962 tons, was sailing from Boston to Tyne carrying 8,412 tons of scrap iron. Of the ship’s complement of 31, 4 were killed.

Menin Ridge, a British steam merchantman of 2,474 tones, was carrying 4,200 tons of iron ore from Algeria via Gibraltar to Port Talbot. Of a ship’s complement of 25, only 5 survived.

British steam merchant Ledbury, 3,528 tons, was carrying 5,800 tons of bauxite from Toulon via Gibraltar to Burntisland. No crew were lost.

Tafna, a British steam merchantman of 4,413 tons, was carrying 6,900 tons of iron ore from Algeria via Gibraltar to London. Of a complement of 34, 2 were lost.

At sea
PLEASE NOTE: The following section has been completely revised on 2017.10.25 after initial posting on 2017.10.24.
Quote:
Minelaying – Minelaying cruiser ADVENTURE departed Sheerness for the Humber to lay mines in the North Sea in Operation AD, arriving on the 25th at Grimsby. From there, she laid mines, escorted by two destroyers and minesweeper SPHINX, off Flamborough Head in operations completed on the 29th.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON departed Sullom Voe for patrol SE of Norway, arrived at Scapa Flow on 6 November, then left for Rosyth, arriving on the 7th.
 
Submarine PORPOISE arrived at Chatham for refitting completed on 18 January.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were light cruiser CALYPSO and one other cruiser between the Faroes and the Orkneys, two cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait. Light cruisers COLOMBO and DRAGON had departed Sullom Voe on the 20th, DIOMEDE on the 21st, and DUNEDIN, DELHI, CALYPSO on the 22nd. DIOMEDE, DRAGON, CALEDON, COLOMBO, CARDIFF called there to refuel and left on the 25th. The armed merchant cruisers at sea were CHITRAL, SCOTSTOUN and TRANSYLVANIA.
 
German U-boat deployments and losses – U-boats were deployed against the British Fleet west of the Orkneys from 21 October to 10 November - U.59 had left Wilhelmshaven on the 21st and returned on 9 November, U.56 and U.58 on the 22nd, returning on 10 November, and U.57 on the 24th, returning on 4 November.
 
U.16 departed Wilhelmshaven on the 17th, and after completing a minelay off Dover, was detected by the St Margaret's Bay indicator loop station. Attacked by patrol sloop PUFFIN and anti-submarine trawler CAYTON WYKE (373grt), she was damaged and as she evaded further attacks, struck a mine and was even more badly damaged forward of the conning tower, running aground on the Goodwin Sands in 51‑09N, 01‑28E. The body of an officer was picked up off Folkestone by minesweeping trawler ST MELANTE (358grt), and on the same day U.16 was discovered with only the conning tower above water and the crew all dead. The 28 bodies of the crew were removed and taken to Dover for interment.
 
Destroyer GURKHA, escorting FN.25, attacked a submarine contact 13 miles 68° from Orfordness.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.26 departed Southend, and arrived at Methil on the 26th.
 
Convoy FS.26 departed Methil,and reached Southend on the 26th.

German seizures in the Baltic – Finnish steamer RHEA (1424grt) was seized in the Baltic by German warships and taken to Kiel.
 
African Patrol – Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL and battlecruiser RENOWN arrived at Freetown for refuelling, departing again on the 28th on patrol.

U.K.-Gibraltar convoy – Destroyers GRENADE and GRIFFIN departed Gibraltar to escort convoy SL.5, but GRIFFIN was ordered back to stand by for SL.6. She arrived there on the 26th and departed with the convoy on the 30th.
 
German ship loss – German trawler SATURN (194grt) was sunk in a collision near Kiel.
 
Ship movement – Australian light cruiser PERTH departed Kingston, and in 42‑25N, 43‑08W intercepted signals from a German warship. She altered course to intercept, but no contact was made. Halifax was reached on the 28th.
 
North Atlantic convoy – Convoy HXF.6 departed Halifax at 0800, escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT, with battleship REVENGE as ocean escort. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on 2 November.


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/25/2017 3:51:22 PM
Day 55. October 25
Wednesday.

Poland
A sidebar in Goralski, p 99, titled “Life in Occupied Poland”:
Quote:
Under German occupation Poles were barred from:
• riding in taxis,
• carrying briefcases,
• wearing felt hats,
• participating in athletic events,
• walking in public parks,
• calling from phone booths,
• using rail station waiting rooms,
• having their teeth filled with gold.

SOURCE: Nicholas Bethell, The War Hitler Won.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
No U-boats ordered. U-13. U-57 sailed from Kiel; U-48 returned to Kiel after a 22-day patrol.. No Allied ships sunk, 1 to mines. U-16 lost with 28 crew. No survivors.

At sea
Quote:
Northern waters – German steamer RHEINGOLD (5055grt), which had departed Bahia on 27 September, was captured in the Iceland-Faroes Channel by light cruiser DELHI, west of the Orkneys in 64‑00N, 11‑40W. RHEINGOLD arrived at Kirkwall with the prize crew, commanded by Lt Cdr FG Emley, on the 27th and later renamed EMPIRE MARINER for British service. DELHI arrived at Sullom Voe on the 28th.
 
Light cruisers COLOMBO, CARDIFF, CALEDON departed Sullom Voe, with CARDIFF and CALEDON arriving back on the 31st.
 
Two cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, four cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait. Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON was sailing to relieve sister ship SHEFFIELD in the Denmark Strait.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Grimsby for Harwich, and arrived on the 26th.
 
Destroyer MASHONA was docked at Newcastle for repairs from 25 October to 10 November.
 
Destroyer PUNJABI brought Panamanian tanker PHOEBUS (8863grt) into the Clyde, but after examination, she was allowed to continue.
 
Destroyer FURY was damaged by heavy weather, and repaired in the Clyde, completing on 17 November.
 
North Atlantic convoys – Convoy OA.25 of 19 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers ANTELOPE and VISCOUNT from the 25th to 28th.
 
Convoy OB.25 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WHIRLWIND and WALPOLE until the 28th.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy BC.11 consisting of 20 steamers departed the Loire escorted by destroyer EXPRESS, and arrived safely in the Bristol Channel on the 28th.

Convoy from Freetown – Destroyer WIVERN had escorted convoy SL.4A into Dover with trawlers ARCTIC RANGER and KINGSTON CORNELIAN, before leaving Southend on the 27th in company with destroyer WITCH as escort to convoy OA.26. When a submarine was reported, WIVERN was detached to search for what was later determined to be TRIDENT.

Ship sweeps – French battlecruiser STRASBOURG, heavy cruisers ALGÉRIE, DUPLEIX, destroyers LE TERRIBLE and LE FANTASQUE and British aircraft carrier HERMES departed Dakar to carry out a sweep to the southwest. They arrived back on the 29th.

North Atlantic convoy – Convoy HX.6 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT. They detached on the 27th and the convoy continued with battleship RESOLUTION as ocean escort. On 6 November, destroyers WHIRLWIND and WARWICK joined HX.6 from OB.29, and destroyers GRENVILLE, GRENADE, GIPSY and GLOWWORM from Plymouth. Next day, RESOLUTION, GRENVILLE and GRENADE detached to Devonport, and the convoy reached Liverpool on the 10th.

 Indian Ocean – Heavy cruiser DORSETSHIRE departed Colombo on patrol duties, and arrived back on the 28th.
 
U-boat assignments – Three U-boats were assigned for operations in the Mediterranean between 25 October and 15 November… .
 
Caribbean – German steamer SANTA FE (4627grt), which had departed Rio de Janiero on the 13th, was captured in 5N, 34W by French large destroyers LE FANTASQUE and LE TERRIBLE, supported by Force M heavy cruiser DUPLEIX. Battlecruiser STRASBOURG, British aircraft carrier HERMES, heavy cruisers ALGÉRIE, DUPLEIX together with LE FANTASQUE and LE TERRIBLE put to sea from Dakar to search for SANTA FE from the 23rd to 29th. She was renamed SAINT ANDRE in French service, but returned to German service after the fall of France.
 
Atlantic Coast – German steamer TOGO (5042grt) departed Duala, and evading patrols by French submarines AJAX and CENTAURE in the vicinity, reached Hamburg on 23 November.
 
Far East – Destroyers THANET and THRACIAN laid mines off Hong Kong in the West Lamma and North Lantau Channels, and again on the 26th and 27th. THANET carried out a lay southwest of Papai Island on the 31st.


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/26/2017 5:22:44 PM
Day 56. October 26
Thursday.

Poland
Quote:
Hans Frank took over as governor general of Poland. (Goralski, p 99)

Quote:
German-occupied Poland, apart from the areas which are shortly to be annexed to the Reich, are put under a German Governor-
General, with his capital at Krakow. Hans Frank, a high Nazi official and former Reich Minister of Justice, is appointed to the post.
…Monsignor Jozef Tiso becomes President of Slovakia. (2194 Days, p 32)

U.S.
Quote:
On the eve of a Senate vote on amending the Neutrality Act, Roosevelt delivered a fireside chat: “In and out of Congress we have heard orators and … others beating their breasts proclaiming against sending the boys of American mothers to fight on the battlefields of Europe. That I do not hesitate to label as one of the worst fakes in current history. It is a deliberate setup of an imaginary bogy.” (The Senate voted to amend the act and the House followed suit a week later.)(Goralski, 99)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
Four U-boats (U-355 to U-358) ordered. No U-boats leaving on or returning from patrol. No Allied ships sunk. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Atlantic convoy protection – Battlecruiser REPULSE and aircraft carrier FURIOUS, escorted by destroyers FORESTER, FEARLESS, FOXHOUND, FORESIGHT, FIREDRAKE departed the Clyde at 0430 to cover the Atlantic convoy routes, including Halifax convoys already at sea. Following these convoys' safe passage, they were stationed to the south and the east of Newfoundland to continue covering the route, the destroyers arriving back in the Clyde on the 28th.
 
Northern Patrol – Two cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and AMC TRANSYLVANIA in the Denmark Strait. Meanwhile, light cruiser SHEFFIELD was returning to Sullom Voe. From the 13th to 26th, Northern Patrol sighted 56 eastbound ships, sent 53 into Kirkwall for inspection and dealt with six German merchant ships.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser BELFAST arrived at Clyde for Refitting completed on 8 November.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Harwich and arrived at Grimsby on the 27th.
 
Destroyer KASHMIR (Cdr H A King) completed, and after working up at Portland, joined the 5th Destroyer Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet on 12 November.

East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.27 departed Southend, and arrived at Methil on the 28th. There was no FN.28.
 
Convoy FS.27 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers JUNO, WALLACE, WHITLEY and sloop STORK, reaching Southend on the 28th.
 
German activity in the Baltic – Swedish steamer JUPITER (2152grt) was seized in the Baltic by German warships and taken to Kiel.

Greek steamer MARIETTA NOMIKOU (5241grt) was seized in the Baltic by German warships and taken to Pillau.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar convoys – Convoy OG.4, totalling 40 ships, was formed from OA.24G, escorted by destroyers ESCORT and ELECTRA, and OB.24G which departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WARWICK and VANOC. The convoy safely arrived at Gibraltar on 1 November, escorted by French destroyers CHACAL and MISTRAL, which departed Brest on the 26th and joined on the 27th.
 
Medierranean – Destroyer DUCHESS abandoned her Kithera patrol 24 hours early to take an injured man to Malta.
 
Convoy Blue 6 of 15 ships departed Port Said and proceeded without escort.
 
Eastern seas – MTB.11 was accidentally hit by a round from a 6-inch shore battery at Hong Kong, fired to warn her to keep clear of a newly mined area. She was towed into harbour between MTB.9 and MTB.10. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3438

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/27/2017 1:00:01 PM
October 27, 1939


Quote:
In the Neuen Reichskanzlei, Hitler awards the Knight's Cross to 14 generals and other officers. (chroniknet.de)



Quote:
A speech by the King of the Belgians, Leopold III, broadcast from the United States, declares Belgium's determination to defend her neutrality. (seconde-guerre.com)



Quote:
In Washington D.C., the Senate approves the amendments to the Neutrality Act, repealing the embargo on arms deliveries abroad. (seconde-guerre.com)


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/27/2017 5:49:33 PM
Day 57. October 27 (continued)
Friday.

Europe
Quote:
Hitler again commanded his generals to preparer the western offensive. (Goralski, p 99)

Quote:
Belgium proclaims its neutrality. (2194 Days, p 32)
2194 Days is misleading, and the reference given by B. Wilson is better. Belgian neutrality was a known value in Europe from 1839’s Treaty of London forward. Its neutral status was violated only twice, both times by Germany. This was not a proclamation of neutrality, but a restatement.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activityNo U-boats ordered. No U-boats leaving on or returning from patrol. One Allied ship sunk. 12 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 19.30 hours on 27 Oct 1939, U-34 attacked convoy OB-25 180 miles west of Lands End and torpedoed the Bronte. At 21.01 hours, the U-boat attacked a second time and claimed one steamer with 4666 tons sunk, but this is not confirmed by Allied sources.
The Bronte (Master Samuel James Connolly) was taken in tow, but had to be sunk on 30 October by gunfire from HMS Walpole (D 41) (LtCdr A.F. Burnell-Nugent, RN) and HMS Whirlwind (D 30) (LtCdr M.B. Ewart-Wentworth, RN) in position 50°07N/10°36W. The master and 41 crew members were picked up by HMS Walpole (D 41) and landed at Liverpool on 31 October.
British steam merchantman Bronte, 5,317 tons, was laden with general cargo, including chemicals, and was sailing from Liverpool to Halifax, with plans for further routing to Rosario (on the River Parana in the River Plate area). All 42 of the crew survived.. («uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Two cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, one cruiser between the Faroes and Iceland with three cruisers en route to the area, and one light cruiser and two AMCs in the Denmark Strait. Between 27 October to 9 November, 26 eastbound ships were sighted and 20 sent into Kirkwall for inspection. Light cruisers COLOMBO and DIOMEDE departed Sullom Voe for Northern Patrol duties, both arriving back on 3 November.
 
Light cruiser CERES departed Plymouth for duty with the Northern Patrol, and arrived at Kirkwall on the 31st.
 
Escort duties – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Grimsby on escort duties and arrived back later the same day.
 
Submarine TRIDENT departed Oban for patrol off the west coast, and arrived at Rosyth on 11 November.
 
North Atlantic convoys – Convoy OA.26 of nine ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers WITCH and WIVERN from 27 October to 2 November.
 
Convoy OB.26 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WINCHELSEA and WITHERINGTON until the 30 October.
 
German mining activities – U.24 laid mines in Hartlepool Bay, on which one steamer was sunk.

French escort duties – French large destroyer VAUQUELIN departed Casablanca escorting submarine CENTAURE, and arrived at Brest on the 30th.
 
South Atlantic activity – Heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE departed Simonstown and Capetown respectively, to sweep towards St Helena. They returned to Capetown on 7 November.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser CAPETOWN departed Malta on patrol, and arrived back on 3 November.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers HUNTER and HYPERION arrived at Dakar at 0700/27th, refuelled and sailed to Trinidad.(«naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1385

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 10/28/2017 4:58:24 PM
Day 58. October 28
Saturday.Full moon.

Europe
No notable activity.


Quote:
BERLIN, October 28
I hear in business circles that severe rationing of clothing will begin next month. The truth is that, having no cotton and almost no oak, the German people must get along with what clothing they have until the end of the war. (Berlin Diary. p 239)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activityNo U-boats ordered on this date. No U-boats leaving on or returning from patrol. Two British ships sunk. 15 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 03.15 hours on 28 October 1939 U-59 stopped the illuminated St. Nidan with gunfire across her bow and ordered the crew to abandon ship. At 04.25 hours, the Lynx II (Skipper Arthur E. Cressy) appeared and the U-boat tried to stop her also by gunfire, but the crew abandoned vessel only after three shots were fired into the bridge. The second trawler was sunk by scuttling charges at 06.55 hours and the first at 08.30 hours. Both crews were rescued by the British steam trawler Lady Hogarth. («uboat.net»)

St. Nidan, a British fishing trawler of 565 tons, was returning from northern fishing grounds to Hull with a cargo of fish.
Lynx II, another trawler but of only 250 tons, and just arrived from Grimsby to fish. The exact number of crew members is unknown, but none were lost.

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Two British cruisers were on Northern Patrol between the Orkneys and the Faroes, three cruisers on patrol between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and two armed merchant cruisers in the Denmark Strait.
 
British submarine patrol –A British submarine anti-invasion patrol [Ed.: of nine boats] off the Dogger Bank was in effect from 29 October to 6 November. … UNDINE, which had left Rosyth on the 22nd, was ordered to reconnoiter north from Heligoland. Her patrol ended on 4 November.

[Ed.: Four other submarines were also patrolling North Sea waters. These replaced ships that had returned to port.]
 
Ship movement – Destroyer FORESTER arrived in the Clyde for repairs which were completed on 23 November.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.28 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers MAORI, WHITEHALL and sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON, and arrived at Southend on the 30th. There was no convoy FN.28.
 
U-boat minelaying – U.31 laid mines in Loch Ewe during the night of the 27th/28th, on which two auxiliary minesweepers were sunk and battleship NELSON badly damaged.
 
Attacks on U-boats – Destroyers ZULU and GURKHA attacked a submarine contact off St Abbs Head.
 
Polish destroyer BLYSKAWICA attacked a submarine contact off the Mull of Galloway in 54-45N, 5-12W.
 
Patrol sloop SHELDRAKE and aircraft were searching for a reported submarine off Oban, which was in fact British submarine TRIDENT.
 
Destroyers EXMOUTH and GREYHOUND were attempting to intercept a reported submarine in the Western Approaches.
 
German ship activity –German destroyers MAX SCHULTZ, FRIEDRICH IHN and ERICH STEINBRINCK of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla and BERND VON ARNIM, HANS LODY and KARL GALSTER of the 4th Destroyer Flotilla attempted a shipping sweep into the Skagerrak. However, they encountered heavy weather and were forced to abandon it. SCHULTZ was badly damaged by the weather and mechanical breakdown, lost power and IHN and STEINBRINCK unsuccessfully attempted to tow her. However, SCHULTZ was finally able to regain partial power and returned to Wilhelmshaven for repairs completed in late January 1940.
… 
 South Atlantic –Light cruiser DANAE arrived at Simonstown, escorting troopship ATHLONE CASTLE (25564grt) from St Helena where they departed on the 22nd.

[Far eastern seas – Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM departed Singapore for patrol in the Sunda Strait, was relieved by light cruiser DAUNTLESS on 4 November, and arrived back at Singapore on the 7th.

 
Light cruisers DAUNTLESS and DURBAN departed Colombo and arrived at Singapore on the 31st.
 
Australian light cruiser HOBART departed Singapore on patrol, and arrived back on 4 November. («naval-history.net»)


Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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