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 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1957

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/23/2017 7:44:38 PM
24 Nov 1939 Czechoslovakia

Gestapo executes 120 Czech students accused of participating in an anti-Nazi conspiracy. All Czech colleges and universities are closed, and over 1,000 students are sent to concentration camps.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/24/2017 5:54:43 PM
November 24. Day 85 (continued)
Friday.

Europe
No notable additional activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 14 U-boats at sea. Two U-boats (U-20, -22) return to Kiel after 7 and 10 days respectively. No allies ships sunk. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Home Fleet Dispositions against German Battlecruisers – On the evening of the 24th at 1600, Admiral Forbes redisposed his fleet off Utvaer, Norway, to intercept the German battlecruisers. [10]Light cruisers … and destroyer KINGSTON, which was deployed just off the Norwegian coast, were disposed in a patrol line respectively, west to east, . Meanwhile light cruiser AURORA and …[7] destroyers … were stationed as a strike force to the south of the patrol line. Destroyer MAORI was detached to Scapa Flow on the the 24th to refuel and returned to patrol that day. KINGSTON patrolling just off shore was relieved by destroyers ZULU and IMOGEN.
 
Destroyers TARTAR, KANDAHAR, KASHMIR were ordered to join the AURORA group late on the 24th, but fears of mistaken identity caused their rendezvous to be delayed until daybreak on the 25th. En route TARTAR's rudder was damaged by weather and she was sent to Scapa Flow and then on to the Clyde for repair late on the 24th.
 
Battleships NELSON, RODNEY and … [7] destroyers … remained at sea.
 
At 1201/25th, a direction finding bearing NNW of the Faroes caused heavy cruisers NORFOLK, SUFFOLK and light cruiser DELHI to be sent to investigate. However, DELHI was low on fuel and could not take part in the search.
 
The patrol line, joined by NORFOLK, SUFFOLK and light cruisers DRAGON, DIOMEDE and DUNEDIN early on the 25th, was moved north at 0700/25th, but all these efforts were unsuccessful and SCHARNHORST and GNEISENAU arrived at Wilhelmshaven on the 27th with only storm damage.
 
Refuelling of the cruisers began on the 25th. One cruiser from each of the squadrons were sent in turn to refuel - ships of the 1st, 2nd, 18th Cruiser Squadrons to Scapa Flow and those of the 7th and 11th Squadrons to Sullom Voe.
 
GNEISENAU was repaired at Kiel, completing on 4 February 1940 and SCHARNHORST with similar defects returned to service shortly thereafter. Both ships immediately went to Wilhelmshaven on completion of repairs to prepare for Operation NORDMARK.
 
Northern Patrol – Northern Patrol from 24 November to 7 December sighted 34 eastbound ships and sent 23 into Kirkwall for inspection.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers ICARUS and ILEX departed Rosyth to investigate a submarine report six miles 320° from Rattray Head, and returned to Scapa Flow the next day.
 
East Coast waters – Destroyer JUNO was damaged in a collision alongside an oiler at Immingham, repaired there and returned to service on the 30th.
 
Mining damage – Motorship SUSSEX (13,647grt) was damaged SE of Southend in North Channel on a mine laid by U.33 on the 5th.
 
Submarine activities – Depot ship CYCLOPS and submarines SHARK, SEALION, SNAPPER, SALMON departed Sheerness for Harwich where they arrived that day. 3rd Submarine Flotilla began operations next day when SNAPPER departed Harwich on a patrol off Terschelling. CYCLOPS also served as the headquarters of Captain G E Creasy (D.22) from 27 November to 1 December.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outward convoy – Convoy OA.40G of 21 ships departed Southend … . The convoy merged on the 26th with OB.40G … to form OG.8 with 44 ships. OG.8 was escorted by WALPOLE from the 24th to 26th when she detached to SL.10, and WINCHELSEA and VIVACIOUS from the 24th to 28th. ENCHANTRESS was with the convoy from the 24th to 27th. Other escorts were French destroyers TARTU and CHEVALIER PAUL from 27 November to 3 December after they had departed Brest on the 26th, and destroyer VORTIGERN from 2 to 3 December. OG.8 arrived at Gibraltar on 3 December.
 
German naval activities – German pocket battleship LÜTZOW, light cruisers KÖLN, LEIPZIG, destroyers BERND VON ARNIM, BRUNO HEINEMANN, FRIEDRICH IHN, ERICH STEINBRINCK, KARL GALSTER and torpedo boats LEOPARD, SEEADLER, ILTIS and WOLF operated in the Skagerrak during the night of the 24th/25th.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser EFFINGHAM departed Halifax and arrived at Kingston on 1 December with Australian light cruiser PERTH.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser GALATEA departed Alexandria and arrived at Malta on 3 December.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.10 departed Freetown escorted by sloop LONDONDERRY, and was joined on 10 December by destroyers WALKER, WHIRLWIND, WHITEHALL and sloop ENCHANTRESS. The convoy arrived later that day, while LONDONDERRY reached Devonport on the 12th.

Indian Ocean – Light cruiser GLOUCESTER departed Diego Suarez on patrol duties and arrived back on the 29th. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/24/2017 5:55:06 PM
dup
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/25/2017 4:46:23 PM
November 25. Day 86.
Saturday.

Europe
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
No new U-boats ordered on this date. 13 U-boats at sea. O U-boat (U-13) return to Kiel after 11 days. Two British ships sunk. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 13.19 hours … the Royston Grange … in convoy SL-8B was hit by one torpedo from U-28 and sank about 50 miles southwest of Lands End. The master and crew were picked up by the British trawler Romilly and landed at Swansea.

At 22.56 hours … U-43 opened fire with the deck gun at the unescorted Uskbridge … about 120 miles west-northwest of Cape Finisterre, after two G7a torpedoes fired at 22.38 and 22.45 hours malfunctioned. As the ship began to burn, the Germans had to cease fire due to a defect on the gun. At 23.11 hours, they fired a G7e torpedo as coup de grâce but missed and shelled her again until 00.12 hours. A total of 149 rounds had been fired as the U-boat left the completely burning and slowly sinking ship. … The master and 22 crew members were picked up by the Italian steam merchant Juventus and landed at Ramsgate on 30 November. («uboat.net»)

Royston Grange (5,144 tons) was in an Africa-U.K. inbound convoy carrying general cargo and grain from Buenos Aires via Freetown to Liverpool. Complement=unrecorded; lost=0.
Uskbridge (2,483 tons, was carrying coal from Sunderland to Monaco. Complement=25; lost=2.

At sea
Quote:
Norwegian waters – Light cruiser AURORA and destroyer INGLEFIELD were attacked by German bombers off southwest Norway, 100 miles east of Scapa Flow, but neither ship was damaged. Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE and light cruiser COLOMBO also reported they were being shadowed by German aircraft.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers INGLEFIELD, IMOGEN and IMPERIAL were ordered at 1015 to Scapa Flow to refuel.
 
Light cruiser DELHI departed Scapa Flow.
 
Light cruiser DUNEDIN departed Scapa Flow and arrived at Loch Ewe on the 28th.
 
Armed merchant cruiser LAURENTIC arrived at Liverpool.
 
Light cruiser GLASGOW arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser DIOMEDE departed Loch Ewe on Northern Patrol duties and arrived back at Loch Ewe on 2 December.
 
East Coast waters – Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Grimsby on escort duties and arrived in the Thames on the 28th.
 
Norwegian outbound convoy – Destroyers IMOGEN, INGLEFIELD, IMPERIAL arrived at Scapa Flow to refuel prior to escorting convoy ON.3 from Methil.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy BC.15 of nine steamers, including BARON CARNEGIE and NIGERIAN (Commodore) departed the Loire escorted by destroyers VANESSA and VESPER, and safely arrived in the Bristol Channel on the 26th.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.41 of 17 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers GRAFTON and GALLANT on the 25th.
 
Convoy OB.41 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers ESCAPADE and MONTROSE until the 27th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.41 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop BITTERN. Minesweeper HALCYON sailed with the convoy for the passage north and it arrived at Methil on the 27th.
 
Convoy FS.42 departed Methil, escorted by sloops PELICAN and HASTINGS, arriving at Southend on the 27th.

Anti-U-boat activities – British air reconnaissance reported sighting four outbound U-boats escorted by two destroyers and four aircraft off the Hook of Holland. Destroyers KEITH, BRILLIANT, JUPITER and the Polish BLYSKAWICA patrolled in the North Sea for these ships without success.
 
Destroyer ESCORT attacked a submarine contact SW of Land's End in 49‑17N, 07‑14W.
 
Destroyers ICARUS and ILEX hunted for a submarine after a merchant ship reported being attacked 20 miles SE of Aberdeen. Destroyer ESKIMO joined them.
 
Destroyers MONTROSE and WALKER hunted for a submarine in 53-26N, 3-51W reported by D/F.
 
Anti-submarine trawler SEDGEFLY (520grt) attacked a submarine contact off Harwich in 51-53N, 0-43E.
 
German ship loss – German auxiliary patrol boat Vp.301 (trawler WESER, 650grt) was sunk on a defensive minefield near Langeland Island in the Belt.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.10 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers ASSINIBOINE and SKEENA, which left Halifax at 0800/25th and turned the convoy over to the ocean escort, armed merchant cruiser LETITIA at 2359/25th. Destroyers WOLVERINE and VERITY from OA.44 were escorts from 4 to 9 December and destroyers VERSATILE and WITHERINGTON from convoy OB.44, from 4 to 6 December. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 9th.
 
Africa-U.K. inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.10 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser CARNARVON CASTLE, and was joined on 7 December by … [4] destroyers… . The convoy arrived in the UK next day.
 
Caribbean – Australian light cruiser PERTH carried out a reconnaissance in the southwestern Caribbean, and arrived at Kingston on 1 December.
 
Indian Ocean – Heavy cruiser CORNWALL departed Colombo on patrol duty in Force I.
 
African Coast – Light cruiser NEPTUNE departed Freetown on patrol duty.
 
French naval activities – French heavy cruiser ALGÉRIE and destroyers LE TERRIBLE and LE FANTASQUE which departed Dakar on the 21st passed Gibraltar and arrived at Toulon on the 26th. The third member of the 10th Large Destroyer Division, L’AUDACIEUX left Dakar on the 22nd and arrived at Toulon on 4 December for repairs. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/26/2017 2:41:31 PM
November 26. Day 87.
Sunday. Full moon.

Europe
Quote:
Russia charged the Finland had launched artillery barrages on Soviet territory. Moscow also protested “the concentration of Finnish troops in the vicinity of Leningrad,” which Moscow described as a “hostile act.” (Goralski, p 100)

Quote:
Russia demands the withdrawal of Finnish troops from the border. (2194 Days, p 34)

No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=1 (U-106). 12 U-boats at sea. 1 U-boat (U-33) return to Wilhelmshaven after 29 days. No ships sunk. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Norwegian outbound convoy – Convoy ON.3 of six British ships departed Methil escorted by …[3] destroyers … . Destroyer MATABELE departed Newcastle on the 27th and joined the convoy at sea, while anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO provided close cover. The convoy arrived at Bergen on the 30th.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser CARDIFF arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Light cruiser DRAGON departed Loch Ewe on Northern Patrol duties, and arrived back on 2 December.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser CERES departed Sullom Voe on Northern Patrol duties.
 
East Coast waters – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Rosyth on escort duty and arrived in the Thames on the 28th.
 
Harsh weather conditions – During the night of the 26th/27th, submarine TRIAD was crippled off Lindesnes by a fractured hydroplane shaft. Submarine TRIUMPH soon joined to assist and submarine UNITY was ordered into the area. Destroyer MAORI also arrived on the scene and took TRIAD in tow, escorted by destroyer INGLEFIELD, but both destroyers had defective asdic installations. TRIAD arrived at Fosteroey, south of Bergen, on the 30th, but the destroyers were obliged to leave Norwegian territorial waters which they did on 1 December. Tug BANDIT was dispatched to assist TRIAD, but due to extremely heavy weather, was recalled to Scapa Flow. After emergency repairs, TRIAD was able to leave Fosteroey at 1315/2 December under her own power, escorted by Norwegian torpedo boat TRYGG and was joined outside Norwegian waters by INGLEFIELD and MAORI. All arrived safely at Rosyth at 0700/4 December. TRIAD repaired in the Tyne, completing on 12 December and returned to service.
 
During a gale at Ardrossan, destroyer GRIFFIN and patrol boat PC.74 moored alongside were damaged by bumping. GRIFFIN was holed and required docking, and PC.74 was later drydocked.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.42 of nine ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers BROKE and ANTELOPE on the 26th and 27th. Destroyer BOREAS was with the convoy on the 27th and destroyer WREN on the 28th.
 
Convoy OB.42 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WALKER and VANOC until the 29th.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.42 departed Southend, escorted by sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON, and arrived at the Tyne on the 28th.
 
U-boat assaultsU.48 sank Swedish steamer GUSTAF E REUTER (6336grt) 14 miles WNW of Fair Island. One crewman was lost and eight survivors picked up by Northern Patrol armed boarding vessel KINGSTON BERYL.

Steamer LOCH LOMOND (5452grt) was attacked in the Bristol Channel, 10 miles west of Lundy Island. Destroyers MONTROSE and WALPOLE were submarine hunting in the same area and WALPOLE attacked a contact in 51‑08N, 4‑50W.
 
Danish steamer CYRIL (2116grt) was seized by German warships in the Baltic for contraband violations and taken to Swinemünde.
[Editor’s note: «uboat.net» has the Gustaf E Reuter being attacked in the first hour of Nov 27]
Quote:
North Atlantic inbound cconvoy – Convoy HX.10 departed Halifax at 1000 escorted by Canadian destroyers ASSINIBOINE and SKEENA, which detached on the 28th. Ocean escort was heavy cruiser YORK which joined at 0800/28th and proceeded through with the convoy. Destroyer WAKEFUL escorted the convoy in the Western Approaches from 8 December and the convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 10th. YORK reached Liverpool on the 9th and started a refit completed on 10 February 1940. She then left on 21 February for Scapa Flow and the 1st Cruiser Squadron for duty with the Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser EMERALD departed Halifax for Bermuda, and arrived back on 7 December.
 
Mediterranean – In training operations in the Mediterranean, a 770 Squadron aircraft from aircraft carrier ARGUS crashed, killing the pilot Act/Sub Lt (A) M R Pike.
 
Light cruiser CAPETOWN departed Malta on escort duty and arrived back on 5 December.
 
Australian waters – Australian light cruiser SYDNEY arrived at Fremantle.
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/27/2017 6:07:28 PM
November 27. Day 88.
Monday.

Europe
Quote:
Finland denied any shelling of Russian territory and said the firing observed the day before near the village of Mainila actually came from the soviet side of the frontier. (Goralski, p 100)

Quote:


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea. These would continue to December 2.

U-boat activity
U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. 14 U-boats at sea. One neutral ship sunk. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 00.30 hours … the unescorted and [Swedish] neutral Gustaf E. Reuter … was hit in the foreship by one torpedo from U-48 14 miles west-northwest from Fair Isle. The U-boat had spotted the illuminated tanker and a destroyer four hours earlier and missed the ship with a first torpedo at 23.32 hours on 26 November. The drifting tanker was found off Sumburgh… . The next day a gale parted the tow and broke off the bow of Gustaf E. Reuter. … The stern section had to be scuttled by a British warship, probably HMS Kingston Beryl, on 28 November. («uboat.net»)

Gustaf E. Reuter was sailing with lights when she was torpedoed. She was in ballast from Sweden to Curaçao. Complement=34; lost=1.

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – … Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived at Scapa Flow to refuel and departed the next day to rejoin the Main Fleet at sea.
 
Light cruiser SHEFFIELD arrived at Scapa Flow to refuel.
 
Light cruiser GLASGOW departed Scapa Flow and proceeded to Rosyth to boiler clean from 28 November to 5 December.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser COLOMBO departed Sullom Voe on Northern Patrol duties and arrived at Loch Ewe on 2 December.
 
Light cruiser CARDIFF departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser CALEDON arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol in the Faroes-Shetland passage.
 
[Anti-mining tests –Light cruiser MANCHESTER was used for degaussing tests on the 27th while at Portsmouth for refit.
 
Anti-U-boat patrol – Destroyers ECHO and ECLIPSE spent the day off Northern Ireland unsuccessfully searching for a U-boat.
 
Ship defects – Destroyer VIVACIOUS on patrol in the Western Approaches developed an urgent engine room defect and was forced to return to Plymouth.
 
Destroyer ASHANTI on Fair Isle Channel Patrol developed a leak in her reserve fuel tank which reduced her speed.
 
Ship launch and conversion Destroyer KELVIN (Lt Cdr J L Machin) was completed and after working up, joined the 5th Destroyer Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet on 10 January 1940.
 
Destroyer VEGA completed conversion to a fast escort vessel. Following working up at Portland, she joined Convoy C operating from Rosyth.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy SA.19 of two steamers
departed Southampton, escorted by [2] destroyers… , and arrived at Brest on the 29th.
 
Change to East Coast convoys – Starting on the 27th, the East Coast FN and FS convoys would run only between Southend and the Tyne. Ships going further north would then proceed independently the following night.

 German naval minelaying – U.58 laid mines off Lowestoft.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoys – Battlecruiser REPULSE and aircraft carrier FURIOUS, her turbine defects corrected, departed Halifax with destroyer HYPERION to cover convoys HXF.10 and HX.10.
 
Ship movement – Sloop EGRET arrived at Port Said from the Indian Ocean and departed for Malta, en route to England.
 
Indian Ocean waters A Swordfish of 824 Squadron from aircraft carrier EAGLE crashed into the sea on anti-submarine patrol off Colombo. The … [crew] were picked up by destroyer WATERHEN.
 
French naval activity – French large destroyer AIGLE arrived at Gibraltar and left for Oran that afternoon. … («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/27/2017 6:12:06 PM
November 27. Day 88.
Monday.

Europe
Quote:
Finland denied any shelling of Russian territory and said the firing observed the day before near the village of Mainila actually came from the soviet side of the frontier. (Goralski, p 100)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea. These would continue to December 2.

U-boat activity
U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. 14 U-boats at sea. One neutral ship sunk. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 00.30 hours … the unescorted and [Swedish] neutral Gustaf E. Reuter … was hit in the foreship by one torpedo from U-48 14 miles west-northwest from Fair Isle. The U-boat had spotted the illuminated tanker and a destroyer four hours earlier and missed the ship with a first torpedo at 23.32 hours on 26 November. The drifting tanker was found off Sumburgh… . The next day a gale parted the tow and broke off the bow of Gustaf E. Reuter. … The stern section had to be scuttled by a British warship, probably HMS Kingston Beryl, on 28 November. («uboat.net»)

Gustaf E. Reuter (6,336 tons) was sailing with lights when she was torpedoed. She was in ballast from Sweden to Curaçao. Complement=34; lost=1.

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – … Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived at Scapa Flow to refuel and departed the next day to rejoin the Main Fleet at sea.
 
Light cruiser SHEFFIELD arrived at Scapa Flow to refuel.
 
Light cruiser GLASGOW departed Scapa Flow and proceeded to Rosyth to boiler clean from 28 November to 5 December.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser COLOMBO departed Sullom Voe on Northern Patrol duties and arrived at Loch Ewe on 2 December.
 
Light cruiser CARDIFF departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser CALEDON arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol in the Faroes-Shetland passage.
 
[Anti-mining tests –Light cruiser MANCHESTER was used for degaussing tests on the 27th while at Portsmouth for refit.
 
Anti-U-boat patrol – Destroyers ECHO and ECLIPSE spent the day off Northern Ireland unsuccessfully searching for a U-boat.
 
Ship defects – Destroyer VIVACIOUS on patrol in the Western Approaches developed an urgent engine room defect and was forced to return to Plymouth.
 
Destroyer ASHANTI on Fair Isle Channel Patrol developed a leak in her reserve fuel tank which reduced her speed.
 
Ship launch and conversion Destroyer KELVIN (Lt Cdr J L Machin) was completed and after working up, joined the 5th Destroyer Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet on 10 January 1940.
 
Destroyer VEGA completed conversion to a fast escort vessel. Following working up at Portland, she joined Convoy C operating from Rosyth.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy SA.19 of two steamers
departed Southampton, escorted by [2] destroyers… , and arrived at Brest on the 29th.
 
Change to East Coast convoys – Starting on the 27th, the East Coast FN and FS convoys would run only between Southend and the Tyne. Ships going further north would then proceed independently the following night.

 German naval minelaying – U.58 laid mines off Lowestoft.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoys – Battlecruiser REPULSE and aircraft carrier FURIOUS, her turbine defects corrected, departed Halifax with destroyer HYPERION to cover convoys HXF.10 and HX.10.
 
Ship movement – Sloop EGRET arrived at Port Said from the Indian Ocean and departed for Malta, en route to England.
 
Indian Ocean waters A Swordfish of 824 Squadron from aircraft carrier EAGLE crashed into the sea on anti-submarine patrol off Colombo. The … [crew] were picked up by destroyer WATERHEN.
 
French naval activity – French large destroyer AIGLE arrived at Gibraltar and left for Oran that afternoon. … («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/28/2017 4:00:20 PM
November 28. Day 89.
Tuesday.

Europe
Quote:
Britain declared all German exports as contraband.

Moscow renounced the Russian-Finnish nonaggression treaty of 1932. (Goralski, p 100)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea. These would continue to December 2.

U-boat activity
U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One boat (U-61) sailed from Kiel. 15 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern waters – Destroyers SOMALI, PUNJABI and MASHONA after refuelling at Sullom Voe left to join battlecruiser HOOD. Destroyers ZULU and IMOGEN were still on patrol off Stadlandet, AFRIDI, GURKHA and ISIS refuelling at Sullom Voe, TARTAR departed Scapa Flow for repairs in the Clyde, and ASHANTI, after experiencing defects, was assigned to Fair Isle Channel patrol.
 
West of Bergen, heavy cruiser NORFOLK was attacked by U.47, but the torpedoes exploded in the cruiser's wake and no damage was done.
 
Destroyer FEARLESS, her repairs completed, departed Plymouth for Liverpool to return to the Home Fleet. She left Liverpool on the 29th escorting tanker ADELLEN (7984grt) for Scapa Flow.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW arrived at Chatham.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE arrived at Scapa Flow, departed the same day for Northern Patrol and arrived back on 6 December.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer GLOWWORM attacked a submarine contact after it was sighted by aircraft in the North Sea.
 
A submarine was sighted by aircraft in 59-04N, 03-30W. Destroyer KANDAHAR and two anti-submarine trawlers were dispatched to hunt for her.
 
Minesweeper LEDA attacked a submarine contact in 51-49N, 1-50E near convoy FN.43. Submarine TRIBUNE was in the area.
 
Shim movement, damage – Tankers BIRCHOL and BROOMDALE departed the Clyde for Loch Ewe escorted by patrol sloops KINGFISHER and SHELDRAKE.
 
SHELDRAKE was a replacement for escort ship PC.74, damaged by heavy weather at Ardrossan on the 26th before departing. On the 29th, BIRCHOL ran aground on Uist in the Hebrides. Tug ENGLISHMAN was dispatched, but BIRCHOL was lost.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.43 ships of 13 ships departed Southend, escorted by destroyers ESCORT and ELECTRA from the 28th to 30th, and dispersed on 1 December.
 
Convoy OB.43 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers MACKAY and VIMY until 1 December. Anti-submarine trawlers NORTHERN DAWN (655grt) and NORTHERN GEM (655grt) provided local escort from Liverpool.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.43 departed Southend, escorted by sloops PELICAN, HASTINGS and destroyer JANUS departed the Humber to cover this convoy and FS.43. FN.43 arrived at the Tyne on the 29th. There was no FN.44.
 
Convoy FS.43 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers WALLACE and WOOLSTON, which had left Rosyth on the 27th for this duty, and arrived at Southend on the 30th.
 
Mediterranean – Battleship BARHAM departed Malta after a dockyard visit to correct defects, then proceeded to Port Said escorted by destroyers DAINTY and DEFENDER.
 
U.K.-Gibralter inbound passage – Minesweepers DUNOON and DUNDALK arrived at Gibraltar, then departed on the 29th for Plymouth, and duty in Home Waters.
 
French naval activity – French destroyers LA PALME and LE MARS collided near Salins d'Hyers during exercises. LE MARS was escorted by destroyers TORNADE and LA PALME to Salins.
 
African east coast sweep – Force K rendezvoused with Force H off South Africa to sweep towards Mozambique.
 
North- and Southwestern Australian waters – Australian heavy cruiser CANBERRA departed Melbourne on the 23rd and sister ship AUSTRALIA left Sydney on the 25th, escorting steamer KATOOMBA (9424grt). They patrolled off Cape Leeuwin from 28 November to 2 December.
 
Australian light cruiser SYDNEY departed Fremantle to patrol off the northwest coast of Australia.
 
Far East Station – Light cruiser DURBAN departed Hong Kong on patrol.
 
Caribbean – Light cruiser ORION departed Kingston on patrol and arrived back on 5 December.
 
Escort duties – Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM arrived at Hong Kong escorting French liner ANDRE LEBON (13,682grt) («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/29/2017 4:00:38 PM
November 29. Day 90.
Wednesday.

Europe
Quote:
Russia broke off diplomatic relatins with Finland, claiming Finnish troops were continuing attacks on Russian units on the Karelian Isthmus and other points along their frontier.

The German freighter Idarwild was sunk by the British warship Diomede off the U.S. coast. The American naval ship Broome had been following the Idarwild until the British ship appeared on the scene. Broome stood by as the freighter was destroyed. U.S. neutrality practices might have been challenged by Berlin, but they were not.

Spain ratified its pact of friendship with Germany. Madrid promised the Germans “more than favorable” Spanish neutrality. Secret protocols provided for the use of Spanish ports by the German navy and “cooperative” efforts in police and propaganda matters. (Goralski, p 100)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea. These would continue to December 2.

U-boat activity
U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One boat (U-61) sailed from Kiel. One boat (U-49) returned to Kiel after 21 days. 14 U-boats at sea. One ship sunk by mine. One U-boat lost (U-35). (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:

At 01.30 hours … the Ionian … in convoy FN-43 struck a mine, laid on 21 November by U-20 1.5 miles 132° from Newarp Lightship. The ship was abandoned 4 miles 340° from the lightship and sank in 52°45´15N/01°56´15E. …

[U-35 s]unk … in the North Sea north-west of Bergen, in position 60.53N, 02.47E, by depth charges from the British destroyers HMS Kashmir, HMS Kingston and HMS Icarus. («uboat.net»)

Ionian, a British ship of 3,114 tons, was carrying general cargo from Crete to Hull. Complement=37; lost=0.

U-35 complement=43; losses=0.

At sea
Quote:
Norwegian coastal waters – Admiral Forbes with battleships NELSON, RODNEY, heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE and seven destroyers was sweeping north off the Norwegian coast when RODNEY suffered a serious rudder defect. She was ordered to the Clyde, arriving on 1 December with destroyers GURKHA, PUNJABI and KANDAHAR. Escorted by destroyers IMPULSIVE, IMPERIAL and GURKHA, RODNEY left on the 6th for Liverpool to repair, and arrived on the 8th. IMPERIAL and IMPULSIVE remained at Liverpool until RODNEY was safely docked, when it was found that about one third of her rudder had been torn away. GURKHA went on to Southampton, arriving on the 10th for repairs to her turbines lasting into January 1940. IMPERIAL was to have undergone repairs at Liverpool, but returned to the Clyde on the 9th. Later, when battleship NELSON was docked for mine damage, she was found to have sustained storm damage similar to RODNEY during the sweep.
 
U.35 on her second war patrol, was sighted near convoy ON.3 and destroyer ICARUS delivered an unsuccessful attack. Forbes detached destroyers KINGSTON and KASHMIR and they sank U.35 northwest of Bergen… . None of the crew were lost… .
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK departed the Clyde and arrived at Scapa Flow later the same day.
 
Light cruiser CARDIFF, which had departed Sullom Voe on the 28th, arrived back after heavy weather carried away her main topmast and part of her main mast port antenna.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.44 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop STORK, and arrived at Southend on the 30th. There was no convoy FN.44.
 
Polish naval activity – Polish submarine WILK departed Rosyth on her first war patrol from England.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer KELVIN departed the Clyde for Portsmouth, arriving on the 30th.
 
Armed merchant cruiser FORFAR departed Portsmouth for the Clyde, escorted by destroyer MALCOLM.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer VANESSA was sent to search in Bally Cotton Bay, 51-50N, 8-00W for a reported submarine.
 
Destroyers JUPITER and JAGUAR attacked a submarine contact in 55‑05N, 1‑33E.

Far East – Light cruiser DANAE departed Singapore for Hong Kong, and arrived on 3 December for refitting, completed 14 February 1940. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3525

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/30/2017 1:31:25 AM
November 30, 1939

 With the failure of Soviet diplomacy to obtain changes to the Russo-Finnish border, the USSR bombs Helsinki and invades Finland with ground forces, opening the second major land warfare action of the war in Europe.


Quote:
All we had to do was raise our voice a little bit and the Finns would obey. If that didn't work, we would fire one shot and the Finns would put up their hands and surrender. Or so we thought. - Nikita Khrushchev



Quote:
At the end of November, the Finnish army had deployed on the Karelian Isthmus some 133 000 men, which was some 42 % of the total number of men in the defense forces.

The II Corps under the command of Lt.General H. Öhquist , had 65 400 men and the III Corps under the command of Major General A.E.Heinrichs , 45 600 men.

The delaying / covering groups of Uusikirkko (U-Group), Muolaa (M-Group), Lipola (L-Group) and Rautu (R-group) had a combined total of 21 600 men, which have been counted into the Corps numbers above. The delaying groups were consisted of separate companies, divisional light detachments, Jaeger Battalions, separate artillery batteries and border guard companies in addition to the HRR, URR and the 3.Pr [light infantry battalion] shown on the map.

In addition to the above, the commander of the Isthmus Army, Lt. General H. Österman , had 22 000 men under his command in other duties.

On the Karelian Isthmus, The Red Army had the 7th Army, led by Army Commander 2nd Class V. F. Jakolev , facing the Finnish defenders. The supreme commander of military actions in the Leningrad military district was Army Commander 2nd Class K. A. Meretskov .

The 7th Army had two Corps, the 19th Corps on the west and the 50th Corps on the east. The 7th Army was supported by the 10th Tank Corps (3 Tank Brigades), and at least by 4 artillery regiments of the Soviet High Command.

The total strength of the Soviet forces on the isthmus, when the war started was some 180 000 - 190 000 men, over 900 artillery pieces (including mortars) and between 1 400 - 1 450 tanks. The Leningrad area coastal batteries and the Red Navy on the Gulf of Finland and Lake Ladoga was to provide support along the coastline. The air strength in the Leningrad district was estimated to be around 700 planes.

From these forces, some 60 - 70 % were in the first wave to fight the Finnish delaying forces. The numerical superiority in men was only a little over 1,5 times bigger, but in the weight of fire the defenders were woefully outmatched. The most critical handicap was, that against the armored forces of the Red Army, 1400 + tanks, the Isthmus Army had a total of 67 antitank guns! - winterwar.com



Quote:
[As a part of a pattern of Western aggression against the USSR], at the close of November 1939, Finland's Marshal Mannerheim launched a war against the Soviet Union. (Soviet history of the war, Volume 3)



Image: Karelian Front, 30 November 1939


Image: Northern Europe, November 1939. Green countries are neutral, orange countries have a military alliance with the Soviet Union.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 11/30/2017 3:33:34 PM
November 30. Day 91 (continued)
Thursday.

Europe
No additional notable activity: see above.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea. These would continue to December 2.

U-boat activity
U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One boat (U-59) sailed from Kiel. One boat (U-53) returned to Kiel after an unrecorded number of days. 14 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by U-boat. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:


At sea
Quote:
Northern waters ship distribution – The cruiser line searching for the reported German ships off Norway, were to be in 66‑10N at 0800, steer west until 1300 and then head south. During this time (1) battleship NELSON, light cruiser AURORA and nine destroyers were 100 miles to the SW of the western end of the cruiser line, (2) battleship RODNEY, and destroyers ASHANTI and GURKHA were to the west of Fair Isle Channel, (3) battleship WARSPITE to the west of the cruiser line, and (4) battlecruiser HOOD, the French DUNKERQUE and destroyers SOMALI, PUNJABI and MASHONA 100 miles west of the Faroes.
 
Ease coast movement – Light cruiser CALEDON departed Scapa Flow for the Tyne and arrived on 1 December for docking. After repairs, she left on the 19th and reached Plymouth on the 21st.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers ANDANIA, AURANIA, SCOTSTOUN and WORCESTERSHIRE departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol duties.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer FORTUNE attacked a submarine contact in 59N, 4W.
 
Norwegian waters – Admiral Forbes turned south with his fleet on the 30th and on 1 December ordered the resumption of normal shipping movements.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer NUBIAN departed Portsmouth after repairs and following kite balloon trials, which were conducted on the 28th/29th. She rejoined the Main Fleet at Loch Ewe.
 
Outbound convoy – Convoy OB.44 departed Liverpool, escorted by destroyers VERSATILE and WITHERINGTON until 3 December, when they detached to convoy HXF.10.
 
Norwegion inbound convoy – Convoy HN.3 of 11 British ships, one Finnish, and two Estonian departed Bergen escorted by destroyers ILEX, ICARUS, ESKIMO and MATABELE. Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK, which left Scapa Flow on the 30th and light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON provided close cover. Later when SUFFOLK was relieved for refuelling, light cruiser GLASGOW took her place. The convoy arrived safely at Methil on 4 December. Before then, on the 2nd, destroyers KANDAHAR and ISIS departed Scapa Flow to escort the four ships of the west coast portion of the convoy.
 
East Coast convoys, movement – Convoy FN.45 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop STORK, and arrived at the Tyne on 1 December.
 
Convoy FS.45 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON, and arrived at Southend on 1 December.
 
Steamer ASTRONOMER (8401grt) arrived at Rosyth from the Tyne escorted by destroyer WALLACE.
 
Dutch ship losses – Dutch steamer BEVERWIJK (2948grt) was damaged by grounding off Terschelling in the declared mine area.
 
German ship losses – German auxiliary patrol boat Vp.704 (trawler CLAUS WISCH, 256grt) was badly damaged in a defensive minefield off Trelleborg and run aground, a total loss.
 
Finnish ships scuttled – Finnish motor vessels JAAMERI (299grt) and SYVARI (237grt) were lost at Liinahamari.
These ships were victims of the Winter war, scuttled to keep them out of Soviet control.
Quote:
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.9, which departed Port Said on the 19th, left Gibraltar with 53 ships, escorted by destroyers VORTIGERN and WISHART, and also the French CHACAL and MISTRAL from the 30th November until they arrived at Brest on 8 December. Trawler VULCAN of the 1st Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla proceeded to England with the convoy, which arrived at Liverpool, also on the 8th.
 
Destroyer repair work as at 30 November – At the end of November, the following [33] destroyers were under repair - ACHERON at Portsmouth repairing, ACTIVE at Gibraltar repairing, ARROW at Portsmouth with defects, BRAZEN at Falmouth refitting, BROKE at Plymouth refitting, COSSACK at Leith repairing, DARING at Malta refitting, DIAMOND at Singapore repairing, ENCOUNTER at Plymouth with defects, FAME at Clyde repairing, FORESIGHT at Clyde repairing, FORTUNE at Liverpool repairing, FOXHOUND at Greenock repairing, GARLAND at Malta repairing, GRENADE at Falmouth repairing, GRENVILLE at Devonport repairing, GRIFFIN at Woolwich repairing, INTREPID at Chatham refitting, IVANHOE at Chatham refitting, JAVELIN at Middlesbrough repairing, JERVIS at Grimsby refitting, KELLY at Tyne repairing, MOHAWK at Newcastle repairing, SHIKARI at Plymouth refitting, SIKH at Malta with turbine defects, VANQUISHER at Plymouth repairing, VENETIA at Liverpool repairing, VISCOUNT at Plymouth with defects, VIVACIOUS at Plymouth boiler cleaning, WALPOLE at Liverpool with defects, WESSEX at Cardiff refitting, WHIRLWIND at Liverpool with defects, WIVERN at Sheerness repairing. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/1/2017 6:07:15 PM
December 1. Day 92
Friday.

Finland
Quote:
The Democratic Republic of Finland was established by the Soviets at Terijoki. According to Moscow, “The people already rose in various parts of the country and proclaimed the formation of a democratic republic. Part of the soldiers of Finlands army already have sided with the new government, backed by the people.” (Goralski, p 100)

Quote:
Russian attacks on the Karelian isthmus continue. (2194 Days, p 34)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea. These would continue to December 2.

U-boat activity
U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=2. No boats left or entered. 14 U-boats at sea. Two neutral ships sunk by U-boat. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 04.53 hours … the unescorted and neutral Mercator … was hit near the foremast by one G7a torpedo from U-21 about 12 miles southeast of Buchan Ness and sank after six minutes. One crew member was lost. The U-boat had spotted the ship with lights set only 13 minutes earlier and attacked because no national markings were visible… .

At 09.30 hours … the unescorted and neutral Arcturus … was hit on the port side underneath the fore mast by one G7e torpedo from U-31 and sank by the bow within three minutes about 80 miles east of Rattray Head. The master and eight crew members were lost. The U-boat had spotted the ship with lights set in a rain shower at 05.50 hours, but did not see the national markings, probably due to the low visibility from the periscope and missed with a first torpedo at 09.27 hours. Both lifeboats went down with the ship and the eight survivors rescued themselves on two rafts that floated free after she sank. … («uboat.net»)

Mercator, a Finnish ship of 4,260 tons, was carrying general cargo (mainly foodstuffs) from Buenos Aires to Helsinki. Complement=36; lost=1.

Arcturus, a Norwegian steamer of 1,277 tons, was carrying general cargo from Burntisland (Scotland) to Trondheim. Complement=17; lost=9.

At sea
Quote:
Scharnhorst-Gneisenau search ended – The search for the German warships responsible for RAWALPINDI's loss was discontinued at 0820/1st. Battleship RODNEY, battlecruiser HOOD, destroyers PUNJABI, GURKHA, KANDAHAR and NUBIAN arrived in the Clyde, while battleship NELSON and destroyers FAULKNOR, FURY, FIREDRAKE and FORESTER were north of the Faroes to cover AMCs returning to Northern Patrol.
 
Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE and light cruiser NEWCASTLE were patrolling 62°N between Norway and the Shetlands. Light cruisers SOUTHAMPTON, EDINBURGH and AURORA with destroyers ZULU, AFRIDI and ISIS were returning to Rosyth, with SOUTHAMPTON refuelling at Scapa Flow en route and the ship arriving at Rosyth on the 2nd. Destroyer FORTUNE arrived from Scapa Flow in the Clyde for repairs.
 
The C and D-class light cruisers were returning to port. CARDIFF departed Scapa Flow on the 1st and arrived at Loch Ewe on the 2nd, along with DIOMEDE, DRAGON, DELHI and COLOMBO early on the 2nd. DUNEDIN and CERES reached the Clyde on the 2nd, COLOMBO and CALYPSO arrived in the Tyne for refit, and CALYPSO refitted prior to transfer to the Mediterranean, completing on the 21st.
 

Ship movement – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK … and light cruiser SHEFFIELD arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
French naval movement – French battleship DUNKERQUE was joined by large destroyers MOGADOR and VOLTA, after they refuelled at Belfast, and then proceeded down the west coast of Ireland. They were joined on the 2nd by destroyers GUÉPARD, VALMY, VERDUN and LE TRIOMPHANT, which departed Brest on the 1st. LE TRIOMPHANT then escorted light cruiser MONTCALM to Cherbourg for repairs, arriving on the 3rd. The rest of the force arrived at Brest on the 3rd.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers ANDANIA, ASTURIAS, AURANIA, SCOTSTOUN and WORCESTERSHIRE arrived on their patrol lines south of Iceland, while FORFAR arrived in the Clyde from Portsmouth.
 
[Supply ship search – Destroyers EXMOUTH, ECHO and ECLIPSE, which had departed the Clyde on 30 November, were dispatched to investigate a possible German supply ship detected by W/T procedure in 53°N, 13°W. No ship was located and the destroyers returned to Clyde on the 4th escorting battleship WARSPITE.
 …
Ship movement – Destroyer KHARTOUM departed Plymouth and arrived at Belfast, then continued, reaching the Clyde on the 2nd.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer IMOGEN, IMPERIAL and IMPULSIVE searched for a submarine reported in Edinburgh Channel. IMOGEN returned when her asdic was found to be faulty. Destroyers FEARLESS and later ASHANTI, which was detached from the Pentland Firth patrol, were also involved in the search. When weather conditions made asdic operations unreliable, IMPERIAL and IMPULSIVE returned to Scapa Flow and FEARLESS to Loch Ewe, all on the 2nd.
 
Destroyer VERITY attacked a submarine contact outside Plymouth breakwater at 1445. Destroyer VETERAN was ordered to assist at 1446.
 
Destroyers GLOWWORM and BOADICEA unsuccessfully searched for a U-boat near Kentish Knock and the Tongue Light Vessel.
 
Outbound convoy – Convoy OA.44 of 19 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers WAKEFUL and WHITEHALL from the 1st to 2nd, and sister ships WOLVERINE and VERITY from the 2nd to 3rd. The convoy was dispersed on the 3rd, and WOLVERINE and VERITY joined HXF.10.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy BC.17 of steamers ATLANTIC COAST, BARON GRAHAM, CLAN ROSS (Commodore), COXWOLD, DUNKWA and GUELMA departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyers MONTROSE and VESPER, and arrived in the Loire on the 3rd.
 
East coast convoy – Convoy FN.46 departed Southend, escorted by sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON, and arrived in the Tyne on the 2nd.
 
Convoy FS.46 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops PELICAN and HASTINGS, and reached Southend on the 2nd.

German minelaying attempts –U.29 was to have mined the approaches to Milford Haven, but the lay was abandoned due to the port defences. U.29 withdrew when she was detected by anti-submarine forces.
 
French steamer FLORIDE (7030grt) was mined and sunk 1600 yards from Dunkirk Light House off Dunkirk, with the loss of two crew. She was beached at Malo les Bains where the hull broke in two and the ship became a total loss.
 
Danish ship grounding – Danish sailing vessel CRETHE ran aground on South Goodwins. A destroyer rescued seven crew and landed them at Ramsgate. (The Admiralty War Diary identifies the destroyer as BULLDOG which was then in the Indian Ocean.)
 
German losses – German trawler MAGDA (137grt) was lost north of Heligoland.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy activity – Anti-submarine trawler PICT (462grt), escorting convoy OG.8, reported striking a submerged object in 37-29N, 11-09W. French large destroyer CHEVALIER PAUL with the convoy slowed after sighting a periscope.
 
Winter War? – Russian submarine L.1 laid mines off Nyhamn.
 
Allied ships on both sides of the South Atlantic – Allied ships in the South Atlantic were: (1) heavy cruiser EXETER and light cruiser AJAX, refitting a damaged propeller on this date, at Port Stanley in the Falklands, (2) heavy cruiser CUMBERLAND at Rio de la Plata while New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES was patrolling near Rio de Janiero looking for German merchant ships off Trinidada Island and on the 2nd, looking into Cabadello and on the 3rd, visiting Pernambuco, (3) light cruiser NEPTUNE, destroyers HARDY, HASTY, HERO, HOSTILE and submarine CLYDE covering the Freetown to Natal shipping route, and (4) French heavy cruisers DUPLEIX (Flagship Duplat), FOCH with large destroyers MILAN and CASSARD operating north of Dakar.
 
Caribbean – Light cruiser EFFINGHAM and Australian light cruiser PERTH arrived at Kingston. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

kaii
Edinburgh, UK
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 1940

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/1/2017 6:35:07 PM

Quote:
December 1. Day 92
Friday.

Finland
Quote:
The Democratic Republic of Finland was established by the Soviets at Terijoki. According to Moscow, “The people already rose in various parts of the country and proclaimed the formation of a democratic republic. Part of the soldiers of Finlands army already have sided with the new government, backed by the people.” (Goralski, p 100)

Quote:
Russian attacks on the Karelian isthmus continue. (2194 Days, p 34)



--brian grafton


Otto Kuusinen was really lucky that Quisling stepped up in Norway to ensure his name, and not Kuusinen's, would enter the dictionary as a synonym of traitor.

Loving this thread, Interesting to see if you can keep it going for 6 years...

K
---------------
You can be a Dictator or you can design ladies undergarments. You can't do both (Bertie Wooster)

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/1/2017 8:07:34 PM
Kai, I didn't realize there was only room for one synonym!

Glad you're enjoying what Bill and I are throwing together. And I refuse to take your comment as a challenge:
Quote:
Interesting to see if you can keep it going for 6 years...

I don't know how long I can keep up a daily commentary. Hell, until you, there has been scant indication that folks are looking at the thread. I think both Bill and I thought this would become a member activity. Hell, my primary interest is in RAF Bomber Command, yet I'm covering the RN as well.

Any comments about the thread so far you'd like to share, either privately or as a post? I'll admit I truncate a lot of information I offer from other sites, simply because my entries will get larger and larger as the war continues and then expands exponentially. Would briefer information re U-boat warfare be better? I've been trying that by offering a summary of activities, but don't know if the U-boat section could be further reduced. Do you give a good godamn about which individual RN destroyers are escortingwhatever ship? Big navy. Lotta ships. Lotta movement without action.

I'm learning a great deal, to be honest, because I have to consider the information from every source I use. But ancillary issues can always arise that can affect posting. My computer's playing games with me right now, for instance. I've lost email access, standard Mac backup, and I'm being told by some programs I don't have plug-ins for them, though the programs seem to exist for other programs. Taking my computer in to be serviced can break this thread after 92 days, which would be a shame. And if I lose my computer for more than a day, it would be impossible to fill in the blanks.

I've been without email for more than a week now, and have been unable to solve my problem. Pretty soon I'm going to let the techies have a stab. That means my Mac goes into the hospital. I'll try to catch up, but my guess is there will be a permanent gap in the record. After less than 100 days.

Direct challenge, Kai: will you take on a day-to-day description of the German invasion of Denmark and Norway? Would you include Swedish sentiments explaining why they maintained their neutrality. I know that seems a long way away, but we're talking 4 months.

Sorry! At kindest, that is a cheeky challenge!

Cheers
Brian G

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

kaii
Edinburgh, UK
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 1940

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/1/2017 10:13:11 PM
Challenge accepted! I will start posting day to day from scandinavia on April 1st then, just after the end of the winter war and when things started to heat up in scandinavia.

Personally i love the level of details you provide for the naval operations etc. For instance, i thought the British mainly conducted small scale patrols early in the war, but I see from your summaries that they actually did both BB and CA sweeps as well.

I believe more people are looking in and reading this thread, so keep it going as long as possible!

K
---------------
You can be a Dictator or you can design ladies undergarments. You can't do both (Bertie Wooster)

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/2/2017 3:52:26 PM
December 2. Day 93
Saturday.

Europe
Quote:
The 1940 Olympic Games, which were to have been held in Finland, are cancelled. (2194 Days, p 34)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Ongoing, ineffectual RAF BC sweeps of the North Sea. These would continue to December 2.

U-boat activity
U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One boat (U-36) left Kiel. 15 U-boats at sea. One British ship damaged by U-boat. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 23.25 hours … the Eskdene , … a straggler from convoy HN-3 due to a gale, was hit amidships by one G7e torpedo from U-56 … about 70 miles northeast of Tyne in 56°30N/01°40W, but stayed afloat with a heavy list on her cargo of timber that had been loaded in Archangel. The 29 crewmen abandoned ship and were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Hild. HMS Icarus (D 03) … and HMS Ilex (D 61) … searched the area for the U-boat and the floating ship, which was not found although being located by aircraft on 4 December. At dawn on 7 December, the abandoned Eskdene was found by an aircraft in 56°20N/00°15W and the next day towed to the Tyne by the British tug Bullger, escorted by HMS Stork (L 81) … and beached on Head Sands. The ship was later refloated, repaired and returned to service in October 1940. … («uboat.net»)

Eskdene, a British ship of 3,829 tons, was carrying lumber in convoy from Bergen to Methil. Complement=39; lost=0.

At sea
Quote:
The Admiral Graf Spee sinks the British steamer Doric Star. (2194 Days, p 34)

Quote:
Northern waters – Battlecruiser HOOD and destroyers KINGSTON, KHARTOUM and KASHMIR departed the Clyde at 1910 to patrol north of the Faroe Islands.
 
East coast waters – Light cruiser AURORA arrived at Rosyth.
 
Northern Patrol – Six armed merchant cruisers were on Northern Patrol duties, while MONTCLARE left from Scapa Flow and LAURENTIC from Liverpool to join them.
 …
Light cruiser SHEFFIELD departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol in the Denmark Strait.

Ship maintenance – Light cruiser DUNEDIN arrived in the Clyde to refit, completed on the 22nd.
 
Ship movement – Light cruisers DIOMEDE, DRAGON, DELHI, COLOMBO and CARDIFF arrived at Loch Ewe.
 …
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.47 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop BITTERN, and arrived in the Tyne on the 3rd.
 
Convoy FS.47 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops PELICAN and HASTINGS, arriving at Southend on the 3rd.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – U.28 and U.29 were reported radioing each other in 50-17N, 4-35W. Destroyers ANTELOPE, VETERAN and WHITEHALL searched to the west of the location, and destroyers GRENVILLE, VEGA, ACHATES and WINDSOR to the east. The search continued until the 3rd without success.
 
Anti-submarine trawler LOCH DOON (534grt) reported four unidentified ships as apparently destroyers, five miles east of Coquet Light steering north. British aircraft later sighted five Danish fishing smacks 90 miles east of Flamborough Head, and destroyers JERSEY and JAGUAR were sent to investigate.

Outgoing convoys, combined for U.K.-Gibraltar outgoing convoy – Convoy OA.45G of 24 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers ANTELOPE, AMAZON and sloop ENCHANTRESS. The sloop detached on the 4th and the destroyers transferred to HG.9 on the 6th. OA.45G merged with OB.45G to become convoy OG.9, escorted by destroyer VOLUNTEER and sloop DEPTFORD until the 5th.
 
U-boat minelaying – U.61 laid mines off Newcastle during the night of the 1st/2nd, on which one steamer was sunk and one damaged.
 
U.58 laid mines off Lowestoft, on which no shipping was sunk or damaged.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy –Convoy HXF.11 departed Halifax at 1000 escorted by Canadian destroyers ST LAURENT and SKEENA, which detached on the 3rd. Ocean escort was provided by armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA and submarines NARWHAL and SEAL. On the 3rd, 70 miles from Halifax, steamers MANCHESTER REGIMENT (5989grt) and OROPESA (14,118grt) collided. MANCHESTER REGIMENT was taken in tow, but foundered in mid-afternoon, and the crew taken aboard OROPESA.
 
ASCANIA detached on the 12th, while destroyer MACKAY from OB.49 escorted the convoy from the 12th to 15th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
South African waters – Force K received a sighting report at 1030 from a South African bomber of a suspicious vessel in the area south of Cape Agulhas, 74 miles 167° from Cape Point. Battlecruiser RENOWN and heavy cruiser SUSSEX went to the position to investigate and found German passenger ship WATUSSI (9522grt) which had departed Mozambique on 22/23 November. WATUSSI scuttled herself when approached by SUSSEX, and the 196 passengers and crew were picked up by her. To hasten her sinking, battlecruiser RENOWN dispatched WATUSSI with main armament gunfire. The crew and passengers were taken to Simonstown on SUSSEX, arriving at 2359/2nd.
 
South America Station – Light cruiser AJAX departed Port Stanley for Rio de la Plata, and heavy cruiser CUMBERLAND, when relieved, patrolled southward before entering Port Stanley.
 
South Atlantic, off South West Africa – German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE sank steamer DORIC STAR (10,086grt) in the South Atlantic in 19‑15S, 05‑05E.
 
Indian Ocean – Heavy cruiser KENT arrived at Colombo.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser PENELOPE departed Malta on patrol duties and arrived back on the 12th.
 
Destroyer DECOY was refitting at Malta for corrosion to her bulkheads.
 
Africa-U.K. inbound convoy – Convoy SL.11 departed Freetown at 0700/2nd. Escorting sloop FOWEY was slightly damaged in collision with steamer GRAINTON (6341grt) at 2040 in 8-51N, 14-37W, and on arrival at Southampton began a refit. The convoy arrived on the 18th.
 
French naval activity – French battleship BRETAGNE entered the dock at Toulon and was under repairs from 2 December to 3 March 1940. She sailed on 10 March. («naval-history»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1957

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/2/2017 5:58:46 PM
1 Dec 1939

The title "Waffen-SS" becomes official. This organisation embraces the SS Verfugungs Division, the Liebstandarte, the SS Totenkopf Division, the SS Polizei Division, the SS Junkerschulen (training schools), together with their training and replacement units. Service in these formations counts as active military duty.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1957

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/2/2017 5:59:55 PM

Quote:


I believe more people are looking in and reading this thread, so keep it going as long as possible!

K
--kaii


Yes indeed.
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre, PA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant
Posts: 553

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/2/2017 10:00:04 PM
Trevor,

Think you mean Das Reich instead of Polizei. Polizei wasn't formed until 1940.
---------------
A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country.
"to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"


BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3525

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/3/2017 3:49:21 AM
December 3, 1939

Russo-Finnish War

Quote:
Finland makes appeal for intervention by the League of Nations. - Wikipedia


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/3/2017 4:20:53 PM
December 3. Day 94
Sunday. Last quarter.

Europe
Quote:
3-12 December
Finland: Finnish troops withdraw in good order under the pressure of superior enemy forces in the Karelian isthmus, and dig in on the ‘Mannerheim Line’, named after General Carl Gustav Mannerheim, who planned it – a national hero, founder of the Finnish Republic in 1919 and now leading the resistance against the invader. But the ‘Mannerheim Line’ does not really amount to ver much: a modest series of wood and concrete strongpoints stretching some 25 miles across the isthmus of Karelia.(2194 Days, p 34)

Quote:
Finland: Finland sought intervention by the League of Nations in the war with Russia.
Britain: British conscription was extended to all men between 19 and 41 years of age, with limited occupational deferments. (Later in the month the upper age was raised to 60 and women between 20 and 30 were required to serve as auxiliaries or in defence jobs.). (Goralski, pp 100-101)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
NORTH SEA – HELIGOLAND
24 Wellingtons attacked German warships, claiming 1 hit on a cruiser Me 109s 110s … attacked the Wellington formations. …No bombers were lost but one Me 109 was hit and possibly shot down.
1 Wellington, from 115 Squadron, suffered a bomb ‘hang-up’ on its bombing run and this bomb later dropped accidentally on the island of Heligoland. This was the first bomb to drop on German soil during the war. 3 further Wellingtons sent out later to attack these German ships failed to make contact. There were no losses during this day’s operations. (BC War Diaries, p 25)
[Editor: nomenclature for early Messerschmitts is confusing. The original fighter, designed by Willy Messerschmitt, was originally given the designation Bf because it “was designed under the auspices” of Bayerische Flugzeugwerke, a company with which Messerschmitt’s own company, Messerschmitt Flugzeugbau had merged by order of the Bavarian government.
In 1938, following the Bf-109’s signal successes at the Zurich air show of 1937, Bayerische Flugzeugwerke was recreated as Messerschmitt AG for propaganda purposes. Following German naming protocols, the -109 was Bf-109 through all its iterations, while other aircraft (e.g., the -110 or -262) were Me-110 and Me-262 respectively.
In practice, however, the terms Me and Bf were used interchangeably at the factory, even when referring to the same aircraft.]

Between 4 and 11 December, Bomber Command will revert to small-scale, ineffective North Sea sweeps, with one distinction: Whitleys will be used in daylight operations on 10 December for the first time in the war.

U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One boat (U-61) returned to Wilhelmshaven after 6 days. 14 U-boats at sea. Two neutral ships sunk by U-boat. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 00.13 hours … the unescorted and neutral Rudolf … was hit in the stern by one G7e torpedo from U-56 while steaming at 8 knots about 40 miles east of May Island. The ship had been spotted about 45 minutes earlier and was attacked because no nationality markings were visible. The explosion blew away the whole after part, destroying the crew quarters and killing nine crew members. …

At 13.20 hours … the unescorted and neutral Ove Toft was hit amidships by one torpedo from U-31 and sank within four minutes about 100 miles east of the Tyne. The ship had been spotted at 12.55 hours, identified and was attacked because her course was suspicious. («uboat.net»)

Rudolph, a Swedish ship of 2,119 tons, was carrying coal from Hartlepool to Malmö. Complement=23; lost=9.
Ove Toft, a Danish ship of 2,135 tons, was carrying coal from Immingham to Gothenburg. Complement=21; lost=6.

At sea
Quote:
Northern waters – A suspected German battleship was D/F'd in 62-30N, 13W, and battlecruiser HOOD and her destroyers were ordered to proceed as fast as her escorts could steam without damage. Six armed merchant cruisers between Iceland and the Faroes were also to proceed south, but no contact was made.
 
Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE and light cruiser NEWCASTLE were on patrol to the northeast of the Shetlands.
 
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol in the Denmark Strait, and arrived back in the Clyde on the 14th.
 
Ship damage or service need – Destroyer ASHANTI departed Scapa Flow for Liverpool to refit a leaking feed tank.
 
Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON had problems with leakage in several oil fuel tanks and marked vibration at high speed. She entered the dockyard in the Tyne on the 24th to repair.
 
Destroyers out of service on the 3rd were - ASHANTI with leaking feed tanks arrived at Liverpool on the 4th to refit, COSSACK repairing collision damage, FAME repairing weather damage and refitting to complete on the 24th, FORESIGHT repairing weather damage and refitting to complete on the 24th, FORTUNE repairing weather damage, FOXHOUND repairing and refitting to complete on the 11th, GURKHA with turbine defects en route to Southampton, INGLEFIELD to dock at Leith with defects on the 8th, IMOGEN docking to repair asdic, IMPERIAL at Scapa Flow with engine room defects (after escorting battleship RODNEY, IMPERIAL was to repair at Liverpool), INTREPID and IVANHOE refitting to minelaying destroyers to complete on the 9th, KELLY repairing damage and refitting to complete on the 12th, KELVIN repairing collision damage to complete on the 12th, MOHAWK repairing bomb damage, PUNJABI repairing collision damage, SIKH at Malta with turbine defects, and TARTAR refitting and repairing rudder damage to complete on the 15th.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.46 of 19 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers KEITH, WIVERN and VETERAN from the 4th to 5th. On being released, WIVERN proceeded to escort OA.47.
 
Convoy OB.46 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyer WALPOLE until the 3rd and destroyer ESCAPADE until the 5th.
 
U.K.-France inbound convoy – Convoy BC.16S of four steamers, including BARON KINNAIRD, departed the Loire escorted by destroyers MONTROSE and VESPER, and arrived in Bristol Channel on the 6th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.48 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop BITTERN. Due to increased German activity in the North Sea, the convoy was supported by destroyers JACKAL, JANUS and the Polish BLYSKAWICA. The Polish ship detached that night, and the convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 4th.
 
Convoy FS.48 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop STORK, and arrived at Southend on the 4th.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyers ICARUS and ILEX carried out an anti-submarine sweep on their way back to Rosyth after a ship had been detected crossing the May Island indicator loop. Destroyers AFRIDI and ZULU searched inshore of May Island, and then proceeded to Rosyth after being relieved by ICARUS and ILEX.
 
Destroyer VEGA attacked a submarine contact 9 miles SW of St Catherines. Destroyers ACHATES and WINDSOR joined in the search.
 
Submarine SNAPPER, returning to Harwich from patrol in the North Sea, was struck by a British 100 pound anti-submarine bomb, dropped by a “friendly” Anson aircraft. A direct hit was scored at the base of the conning tower, but the explosion only shattered four light bulbs.
[Editor: this weapon was finally deemed useless. A program for aerial depth charging was implemented.]
Quote:
Winter war naval spin-offs? – Russian submarine SC.323 damaged German steamer OLIVA (1308grt) with gunfire off Uto. She was damaged again by Russian submarine S.1 off Rauma on the 10th.

North Sea – Steamer MOORTOFT (875grt) was lost in the North Sea to an unknown cause.
 
German naval activity – Lithuanian steamer KRETINGA (542grt) was seized by German warships as a prize in the Baltic and renamed MEMELLAND for German service.
 
German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE sank steamer TAIROA (7983grt) in the South Atlantic in 20‑20S, 03‑05E.
 
South Atlantic waters – Heavy cruiser SHROPSHIRE arrived at Simonstown and Force K arrived at Capetown. After refuelling, Force H departed the same day and Force K on the 4th to patrol the Capetown-St Helena trade route.
 
Light cruiser NEPTUNE departed Freetown and arrived at Dakar on the 4th.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser EFFINGHAM departed Kingston and arrived at Halifax on the 6th. However a serious leak had been discovered in the starboard condenser on the 5th, and she had to return to Kingston for repairs.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.11 departed Freetown on the 3rd escorted by armed merchant cruiser DUNNOTTAR CASTLE and sloop MILFORD, the latter with the convoy for the day only. On the 18th, DUNOTTAR CASTLE developed engine problems and was sent to Gibraltar. She was joined on the 20th by destroyer KEPPEL and on the 21st by French destroyer MAILLÉ BRÉZÉ, and arrived at Gibraltar on the 22nd. Destroyers WHITEHALL and WIVERN joined the convoy in Home Waters.
 
French naval activity – French large destroyer L’AUDACIEUX was proceeding to Dakar to repair minor defects.
 
Mediterranean – Sloop LEITH departed Malta for Gibraltar, en route to England.

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 1957

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/4/2017 1:23:51 PM

Quote:
Trevor,

Think you mean Das Reich instead of Polizei. Polizei wasn't formed until 1940.
--John R. Price


Thanks for pointing that out John. I shouldn´t post from memory. Himmler ordered the creation of the Polizei Division recruited from members of the Ordnungspolizei on the 1st October although it was´nt complete until March 1940 in Münster. Although directly under the command of Himmler they were not (until 1941 )members of the SS but remained policemen. So they were not in the Waffen-SS but responsible for "Order" , in the Nazi sense, behind the lines.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3525

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/4/2017 1:42:24 PM
So they were not in the Waffen-SS but responsible for "Order" , in the Nazi sense, behind the lines.

 The "Order Police" as armed auxiliaries. Boy, that is a huge topic unto itself. For the record, Das Reich was not named such until 21 December 1940. The 1939 formation was titled SS-Division VT (VT stood for Verfügungstruppe.) The Polizei Division was taken into the Waffen-SS on 10 February 1942 (order: SS FHA 604/42). This data from Georg Tessin's Waffen-SS und Ordnungspolizei in Kriegseinsatz 1939-1945.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/4/2017 4:49:02 PM
December 4. Day 95
Monday.

Europe
No notable changes since yesterday.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea shipping search

3 Hampdens failed to locate any targets. (BC War Diaries, p 25)


U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One boat (U-60) sailed from Kiel. 13 U-boats at sea. Two neutral ships sunk by U-boat; one British warship damaged by mine. One U-boat (U-36) lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 01.23 hours … the unescorted Gimle … was torpedoed and sunk by U-31 about 130 miles east of Aberdeen. The ship was struck by one torpedo near #3 hatch and soon listed heavily to starboard. …[T]he starboard lifeboat was destroyed, but the survivors managed to launch the port boat. The master and two men were fished up from the water by the boat. The damaged motorboat with one man had floated free, as well as a raft with another man. The lifeboat with 13 survivors took the raft with three survivors in tow. Several of the survivors were not properly dressed, so they had to sit barefoot in the ice cold water which collected on the bottom. By the time they were rescued they had developed large sores, and were very swollen. Due to stormy weather with heavy seas the tow kept breaking so the men on the raft were transferred into the boat in the afternoon of the 5 December and they dropped a sea anchor. The next morning they set sail for the Scottish coast. At least 14 vessels passed them until they were picked up on 7 December by the Rudolf… .

At 15.42 hours on 4 Dec 1939 the unescorted and neutral Primula (Master Eivin Christian Wang) was hit in the stern by one torpedo from U-31 and sank within two minutes after breaking in two about 120 miles east of Stonehaven. The survivors had to jump overboat because both lifeboats were destroyed and the motor boat got stuck. Seven crew members, three of them injured, rescued themselves on a raft and were picked up by the Danish steam merchant Wm.Th. Malling, which landed them at Methil, Scotland.

At 07.52 hours … HMS Nelson (28) … as flagship of the Home Fleet (Adm Forbes) was badly damaged by a mine laid on 27 October by U-31 at the entrance of Loch Ewe. The battleship was en route with HMS Devonshire (39), escorted by HMS Faulknor (H 62), HMS Fury (H 76), HMS Firedrake (H 79) and HMS Forester (H 74). The explosion seriously damaged her and injured 73 crew members.

The machinery of HMS Nelson (28) was not affected, but she could not be moved for repairs before the area was searched for further mines. On 23 December HMS Glen Albyn and HMS Promotive were lost in the same minefield and only after five more mines were swept, it was possible for the battleship to leave Loch Ewe on 4 January 1940. The ship was escorted by HMS Faulknor (H 62), HMS Foxhound (H 69) and HMS Impulsive (D 11) to Portsmouth, where she was repaired from 14 January to 8 June.

[U-36]sunk ... in the North Sea south-west of Kristiansand, in position 57.00N, 05.20E, by a torpedo from the British submarine HMS Salmon. 40 dead (all hands lost).(«uboat.net»)

Gimle, a Norwegian ship of 1,271 tons, was carrying coke nuts from West Hartlepool to Gothenburg. Complement=19; lost=3.
Primula, a Norwegian ship of 1,024 tons, was in ballast from Oslo to the U.K.. Complement=15; lost=8.
HMS Nelson, a British battleship of 33,950 tons, was leaving for Northern Patrol duties. Complement=unrecorded; lost=0. Injured=73. Other sources give injured as 52.
U-36, a German submarine, was on patrol in the North Sea. Complement=40; lost=40.

At sea
Quote:
A magnetic mine damages the battleship Nelson. This is the last notable victim of the insidious German ‘secret weapon’; English technicians have succeeded in finding a means of neutralizing the magnetic mine by ‘de-magnetizing’ the hull of the ships by means of an electric cable, by a method known as ‘de-gaussing’.
A black day for Allied navies: two destroyers are sunk and two others and one minelayer damaged.(2194 Days, p 35)

Quote:
Mine damage to Nelson – Admiral Forbes with battleship NELSON and heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE, en route to the Clyde with destroyers FAULKNOR, FURY, FIREDRAKE and FORESTER, entered Loch Ewe to enable the destroyers to refuel. At the entrance, NELSON struck a mine 5.4 cables 38° from Rudha nan Sasan triangulation station laid by U.31 on 28 October.

After leaving Gibraltar and sailing via Halifax, which she left on 18 November, battleship WARSPITE arrived in the Clyde, escorted by destroyers EXMOUTH, ECLIPSE and ECHO, which had departed the Clyde on 30 November. The battleship had been originally ordered to go to Portsmouth, but orders were changed in early December due to RODNEY's rudder defect.
 
Submarine patrol – Submarines TRITON and TRIBUNE departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers IMPERIAL and IMPULSIVE arrived at the Clyde from Scapa Flow.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, the six armed merchant cruisers which were ordered to search for a suspected German battleship on the 3rd were returning to their patrol stations between the Faroes and Iceland. Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK and AMC LAURENTIC were west of the Shetland Islands, proceeding to the Denmark Strait.
 
Heavy cruiser BERWICK departed Portsmouth for duty with the Northern Patrol, reached Scapa Flow and departed for patrol on the 12th.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser ENTERPRISE arrived at Portland from Portsmouth.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed the Thames and arrived at Loch Ewe on the 5th to provide protection for damaged battleship NELSON.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers ESKIMO and MATABELE joined destroyers ICARUS and ILEX searching for a submarine in the Firth of Forth.

Patrol sloop MALLARD attacked a submarine contact in Liverpool Bay.

Destroyer BROKE was investigating a submarine contact one mile east of Slapton Sands Hotel near Dartmouth.

Destroyers ESKIMO, MATABELE, ICARUS and ILEX departed Rosyth to search for a suspected submarine in the Firth of Forth.
 
Submarine SALMON departed Harwich on the 2nd for patrol, and at 1330/4th fired six torpedoes at U.36 and sank her 75 miles SW from Lister Light in 57‑00N, 05‑20E; forty crew were lost and there were no survivors. U.36 had been sailing for northern Norway, where she was to join U.38 on patrol and then proceed to a base at Zapadnaya Litsa Bay in Northern Russia for replenishment. At it happened, the base was never used by U-boats.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.47 of nine ships departed Southend escorted by destroyer WREN and sloop ABERDEEN from the 4th to 7th. Destroyer WATCHMAN was with the convoy from the 4th to 5th, and sister ship WIVERN, from OA.46, joined on the 5th, and remained until the convoy dispersed on the 7th.

Convoy OB.47 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WINCHELSEA and VANOC until the 7th.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy SA.20 of one steamer departed Southampton, escorted by destroyer ANTHONY, and arrived at Brest on the 5th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.49 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 5th.
 
Convoy FS.49 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON. Due to increased German activity in the North Sea, the convoy was supported by destroyers JUNO and JUPITER. It arrived at Southend on the 5th.
 
French naval activity – French large destroyer LE TRIOMPHANT departed Cherbourg escorting light cruiser GLOIRE to Brest, arriving on the 5th.
 
Civilian ship damage – Steamer HAMSTERLEY (2160grt) in convoy FN.48 was damaged by collision off Great Yarmouth, with one crewman lost. She was still afloat the next day but seriously damaged.
 
Steamer TONGARIRO (8719grt) reported she had a disabled rudder 180 miles SW of Land's End. At 0315/5th, destroyers VERITY and WOLVERINE from the Plymouth command were ordered to assist. She was taken in tow, but broke away. At 1957/10th, she was 15 miles off the Lizard and as a tug could not tow her, destroyer KEITH was ordered to, escorted by WOLVERINE.

German naval activity – German light cruiser NÜRNBERG laid mines in the Skagerrak off Kristiansand from the 4th to 6th.
 
German auxiliary submarine chaser UJ.117 (trawler GUSTAV KORNER, 450grt) sank on a German defensive minefield in the Belt. Later, in June 1940, she was salved and repaired.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.11, escorted by destroyer HYPERION and Canadian destroyers ST LAURENT and SKEENA, departed Halifax at 1000. HYPERION was detached early on the 5th and at 1600/5th the Canadian ships turned over the convoy to ocean escort by battleship REVENGE and French submarines SFAX and CASABIANCA as protection against German battleships. The submarines were detached off the Lizard on the 16th and arrived at Brest on the 17th, being escorted into port by French sloop COMMANDANT RIVIERE. Meanwhile destroyers WOLVERINE, WANDERER, WALPOLE and ARDENT provided escort in Home Waters from the 16th to 18th, when the convoy reached Liverpool.
 
Indian Ocean – Heavy cruiser KENT departed Colombo on escort duties, and arrived back on the 14th.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer DIAMOND, having completed her refit, departed Singapore en route to the Mediterranean.
 
Destroyer DELIGHT departed Aden to return to the Mediterranean Fleet.
 
Sloop WELLINGTON departed Malta for Gibraltar, where she arrived on the 8th. Next day, she sailed for Freetown to escort convoy SL.13 to the UK.
 
Minesweepers SUTTON and ELGIN arrived at Gibraltar from Malta, and departed on the 8th for Portsmouth.
 
French convoys in December – French convoy 34.KF of four steamers had departed Casablanca on the 3rd, but next day, still near Casablanca, destroyer ORAGE was damaged in collision with French steamer MARRAKECH. The convoy turned back and arrived on the 6th. Steamers JAMAIQUE and LIPARI left with 37.KF on the 8th, and MARRAKECH and MALGACHE with 38.KF on the 10th. ORAGE was able to leave on the 28th for repairs at Bizerte, arriving on the 30th.(«naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/5/2017 5:30:00 PM
December 5. Day 96
Tuesday.

Finland
Quote:
Russia rejected League proposals to settle the war with Finland. Moscow claimed it was no longer at war, having concluded a peace with its puppets. The Soviets said the Finnish Democratic Republic had requested intervention on Dec.1. (Goralski, p 101)

Quote:
The Russians reach the mannerheim line garrisoned by the II Army Corps. (2194 Days, p 35)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea shipping search

3 Wellingtons failed to locate any targets. (BC War Diaries, p 25)


U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One boat (U-60) sailed from Kiel. 13 U-boats at sea.One British ship sunk by U-boat. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 14.40 hours on … the Navasota … in convoy OB-46 [outbound from Liverpool] was hit by one torpedo from U-47 and sank about 150 miles west of Bishop Rock. The master and 36 crew members were lost. 37 crew members were picked up by HMS Escapade (H 17) … and eight crew members by the British steam merchant Clan Farquhar and landed at Capetown. («uboat.net»)

Navasota, a British steamer of 8,795 tons, was in ballast bound for Buenos Aires. Complement=82; lost=37.
[Editorial comment: U-47, which sank Navasota, was commanded by Günther Prien, who sank HMS Royal Oak in Scapa Flow October 14, 1939.

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement (repair) – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK departed Scapa Flow and arrived at Belfast on the 6th, where she began repairing defects, completed on the 21st.
 
Northern Patrol – On the Northern Patrol, seven armed merchant cruisers were on patrol between the Faroes and Iceland, with light cruiser SHEFFIELD eastward of them as close cover and battlecruiser HOOD with destroyers KINGSTON, KASHMIR and KHARTOUM north of the Faroes as distant cover. Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK was proceeding east of Iceland and AMC LAURENTIC was west of Iceland to patrol the Denmark Strait.
 
Nelson aftermath – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed the Thames and arrived at Loch Ewe on the 7th to provide protection for damaged battleship NELSON.
 
Ship damage – Minesweeper SHARPSHOOTER sustained minor damage in collision with a tanker.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outgoing convoy – Convoys OA.45G and OB.45G with a total of 44 ships merged as convoy OG.9. Sloop DEPTFORD escorted the convoy on the 5th and destroyers AMAZON and ANTELOPE from the 5th to 6th. French destroyers TIGRE and PANTHÈRE, which departed Brest on the 4th, joined from the 6th to 11th, and destroyer VOLUNTEER from the 5th to 9th. The convoy arrived at Gibraltar on the 11th with the French destroyers and also destroyers HAVOCK and WATCHMAN, which had joined on the 10th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.50 departed Southend, escorted by sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON, and arrived in the Tyne on the 6th.
 
Convoy FS.50 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers WALLACE and WOOLSTON, arriving at Southend on the 6th.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – [After] U.47 sank steamer NAVASOTA …[, d]estroyer WALPOLE was ordered to search. Destroyers ESCAPADE and WINDSOR attacked U.47 at 1515, inflicting light damage, and were then ordered to meet arriving convoy SLF.10 at 0800/7th.
 
Anti-submarine trawler KINGSTON ANDALUSITE (415grt) attacked a submarine contact off Folkestone. Destroyer BOADICEA was ordered to investigate.
 
Norwegian outbound convoy – Convoy ON.4 of seven British ships departed Methil escorted by destroyers ESKIMO, MATABELE, ICARUS and ILEX. Light cruisers GLASGOW and EDINBURGH departed Rosyth on the 6th to provide close support, while battlecruiser HOOD, and destroyers KASHMIR and KHARTOUM, which departed Scapa Flow on the 6th, gave heavy support.

Destroyers KANDAHAR and KINGSTON arrived at Sullom Voe to refuel on the 7th, and left on the 8th to relieve KASHMIR and KHARTOUM for refuelling. The convoy safely arrived at Bergen on the 8th, while GLASGOW and EDINBURGH arrived back at Rosyth on the 11th.
 
German blockade enforcement – Danish steamer ALEXANDRA (1463grt) was seized off Esbjerg by two German armed trawlers, and taken to Germany during the night by three German destroyers.
 
Accidental merchant losses – Belgian steamer KABINDA (5182grt) ran aground and broke in half on the English coast.

Danish steamer EGYPTIAN REEFER (3159grt) ran aground on the west coast of Scotland, but was later refloated and brought into port.
 
U-boat minelaying – U.59 laid mines off Great Yarmouth in Cross Sands near the Cockle Light Ship, on which two steamers were lost.
 
U.28 laid mines in the Bristol Channel, but no shipping was sunk or damaged.
 
Ship transfer – Sloop SANDWICH arrived at Port Said from the Indian Ocean en route to the UK. Reaching Malta on the 9th, she left next day for Gibraltar.
 
Allied merchant captures – German steamer USSUKUMA (7834grt) had departed Hamburg for India before the start of the war, and took refuge at Lourenco Marques, before leaving for Bahia Blanca where she arrived on 13 October. She was ordered by the port authorities to leave within three days, but various extensions were gained and she finally left on 4 December. On the 5th, in 39-25S, 57-15W … [i.e., off the South American coast], … USSUKUMA was intercepted by heavy cruiser CUMBERLAND and light cruiser AJAX, and scuttled herself rather than be captured. AJAX embarked the crew of 23 officers, some on passage returning to Germany, and 84 men.
 
Light cruiser DESPATCH captured German steamer DUSSELDORF (4930grt) off Punta Caldera, Chile and took her to Antofagasta, Chile, before leaving on the 14th for the Panama Canal with a prize crew for the voyage back to Britain. Despite neutralist protests, she passed through the Canal on the 25th, arrived at Bermuda on 12 January 1940 and was later renamed EMPIRE CONFIDENCE for British service.
 
Far East – Light cruiser DANAE was taken in hand for repairs at Hong Kong, completed on 14 February 1940. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/6/2017 2:57:02 PM
December 6. Day 97
Wednesday. Waning crescent moon.

Finland
Quote:
Heavy Russian attacks on the Mannerheim Line. (2194 Days, p 35)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=1 (U-107). No U-boats sailed from or returned to base. 10 U-boats at sea. Three neutral ships lost. One British ship sunk by mine. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 07.54 hours …, U-31 fired one torpedo at a small steamer and observed how the ship sank immediately after being hit amidships about 90 miles northeast of Blyth. The victim was probably Agu … which had left Tyne on 5 December and was never heard of again.

At 23.49 hours … the unescorted and neutral Vinga … was hit in the foreship by one G7a torpedo from U-31 about 100 miles east of Dundee and sank slowly within 20 minutes. The survivors were picked up by the Danish steam merchant Transporter.

At 20.29 hours … the unescorted and neutral Britta … was hit on port side aft by one G7a torpedo from U-47, broke in two and sank slowly about 45 miles southwest of Longships Lighthouse. The Germans had recognized the Norwegian nationality markings, but sank the ship in accordance with orders recieved by radio message on 23 November that authorized the U-boats to attack all tankers within a declared blockade area around Britain without warning. The survivors from Britta were subsequently rescued by the Belgian trawler Memlinc.

At 10.32 hours … HMS Washington … struck a mine, laid on 5 December by U-59 and sank off Caister-on-Sea near Great Yarmouth. The trawler was en route to be fitted out as minesweeping trawler in Great Yarmouth after being requisitioned. («uboat.net»)

Agu, an Estonian steamer of 1,575 tons, was carrying coal bound from Tyne for Gothenburg. Complement=18; lost=18.
Vinga, a Swedish steamer of 1,974 tons, carrying coal bound Tyne for Gothenburg. Complement=22; lost=0.
Britta, a Norwegian motor tanker of 6,214 tons, was in ballast bound from Antwerp to Curaçao. Complement=31; lost=6.
HMS Washington, a newly-requisitioned British trawler of 209 tons, was en route to be fitted for minesweeping. Complement=8; lost=7.
[Editorial comment: Estonia (see Agu, above] was a declared neutral state, but was considered by both Germany and Russia to fall in under Russian control.]

At sea
Quote:
East coast waters – Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla 1 arrived at Portsmouth on the 6th, with base ship VULCAN (trawler, 623grt) reaching there on the 8th after coming from Gibraltar in convoy HG.9. After refitting, the Flotilla was based at Felixstowe and became operational in January 1940.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were light cruiser SHEFFIELD and seven AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and heavy cruiser SUFFOLK and AMC LAURENTIC in the Denmark Strait.
 
Light cruiser NEWCASTLE arrived at Scapa Flow from Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE arrived in the Clyde from Loch Ewe.

Force W consisted of Fleet Tenders A and B (the dummy battleships) and their destroyer escorts. MASHONA and SOMALI arrived at Belfast on the 2nd from escort duty, and BEDOUIN and NUBIAN, which departed the Clyde on the 4th, were to rendezvous off Belfast Lough when Force W departed. The Force was to have departed Belfast on the 4th, but was held until the arrival of the ESCORT and ELECTRA, which left Portsmouth on the 5th. They finally departed Belfast at 0600/6th escorting Force W to Rosyth, where they arrived on the 9th.
 
Submarines THISTLE arrived at Rosyth and SNAPPER at Harwich after patrol.
 
Due to communication and administration problems while at sea, Rear Admiral Destroyers transferred to submarine depot ship TITANIA, allowing light cruiser AURORA to be released to the Clyde for refit. She departed Rosyth, arriving on the 7th for repairs that continued until the 31st. Meanwhile, destroyer depot ship WOOLWICH departed Portsmouth on the 16th, escorted by destroyer BRAZEN, but the latter developed mechanical defects and was detached at Plymouth. Destroyer BASILISK relieved her and WOOLWICH reached the Clyde on the 18th, with Rear Admiral Destroyers transferring to her on the 19th.
 
Destroyer IMPERIAL arrived at Rosyth from Scapa Flow.
 
Continued Nelson impact – Destroyers WARWICK and VIMY arrived at Loch Ewe with portable pumps for damaged battleship NELSON, and sailed later that day for Liverpool, arriving on the 7th.
 
German naval minelaying off Cromer – German destroyers ERICH GIESE, BERND VON ARNIM and HANS LODY departed Wilhelmshaven to lay mines off Cromer. En route, ARNIM had a mechanical breakdown and returned to port, but GIESE carried out her lay during the night of the 6th/7th escorted by LODY. While the minelay was in progress, destroyers JERSEY and JUNO, patrolling in the area, were sighted four miles SE of Cromer Knoll Light. GIESE torpedoed JERSEY at 0235/7th and left her badly damaged with …10 killed, and …12 injured. Sister ships JUNO, JACKAL and JANUS assisted
 … JERSEY received temporary repairs at the Humber Graving Dock until 7 January and then proceeded to Amos Smith Dock, Hull where she was under repair until 23 September 1940.
 
Two British steamers were sunk and one damaged on this minefield:
• On the 8th, steamer COREA … 1½ miles 65° from Cromer Coast Guard Station; eight crew lost, and seven survivors… .
 
On the 12th, steamer KING EGBERT … four miles SW of Haisborough Light off Cromer; one member of the crew lost and 32 survivors… .
 
On the 21st, British steamer DOSINIA … was badly damaged ½ mile SW of Haisborough Light off Cromer. Escorting sloop WESTON detailed a trawler to stand by the damaged ship, which was taken to Hull.
 
Minesweeping trawler ST DONATS (349grt) was positioned 9 miles S of Cromer Knoll Light Vessel to divert southbound shipping away from the mine area, while minesweeping trawler PELTON (358grt) diverted northbound traffic.
 
Ship collisions – Destroyer VANSITTART, escorting a convoy, was in a collision with a transport in the English Channel. She was repaired and refitted at Portsmouth, completing on 19 January.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.48 of 11 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers ACASTA and ARDENT from the 6th to 8th, and destroyer WHITEHALL and sloop ENCHANTRESS from the 8th to 9th, when they detached to OA.49.
 
Convoy OB.48 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WALKER and WHIRLWIND until the 9th.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Anti-submarine trawler LOCH TULLA (423grt) attacked a submarine contact 14.4 miles 105° from Sule Skerry.
 
Destroyer GRENVILLE attacked a submarine contact 18 miles S by E of Orfordness.
… 
Med-U.K. ship transit – Battleship BARHAM departed Alexandria on the 1st escorted by destroyers DAINTY and DEFENDER. The destroyers were relieved off Malta by sisters ships DUNCAN and DUCHESS, later departing Gibraltar on the 6th for the Clyde.
 
French naval activity – French battleship PROVENCE, escorted by three destroyers, which had departed Toulon on the 4th, arrived at Gibraltar with Vice Amiral Ollive onboard to take command of the Casablanca command. They should have sailed that evening, but a wire wrapped itself around PROVENCE’s propeller shaft preventing her leaving. Amiral Ollive embarked in submarine depot ship JULES VERNE, escorted by destroyers BORDELAIS and LA RAILLEUSE, which arrived on the 11th from Casablanca. JULES VERNE departed that day, escorted by destroyers ALBATROS and VAUBAN, while PROVENCE was able to leave Gibraltar on the 12th for Toulon with BORDELAIS and LA RAILLEUSE.
_____
 
Far East waters –Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM departed Hong Kong on the 6th after receiving a report that German steamer BURGENLAND (7320grt) had departed Kobe on the 5th. No contact was made and she patrolled with submarine PANDORA and armed merchant cruiser MORETON BAY in the area of Kii Channel. However BIRMINGHAM did stop a Dutch freighter which was allowed to continue after inspection. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3525

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/7/2017 12:53:22 AM
December 7, 1939


Quote:
Soviets reach main line of Finnish resistance on the Karelian Isthmus. (Wikipedia)




Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/7/2017 5:49:54 PM
December 7. Day 98 (continued)
Thursday.

Finland[lquote]Russian forces advanced to the main Finnish defence line along the Kerelian Isthmus. (Goralski, p 101)
Quote:
A Russian division succeeds in breaking through to the village of Suomussalmi, on Lake Kianta (Kiantajärvi). (2194 Days, pp 35-36)


Europe
Quote:
BERLIN, December 7
Caught Bill White [Editorial comment: don’t know which Bill White this is. Any thoughts?]by telephone in Stockholm and got him off to Helsinki to cover the Finnish war for us. Amusing note: Some of our people in New York thought one of his broadcasts from here the other night was very unneutral and cabled that while they personally agreed with Bill’s personal anti-Nazi bias, he should strive to be more objective. When I got to the Rundfunk House on my return day before yesterday, Diettrich approached me with Bill’s manuscript in his hand. I thought he was going to make an angry scene.
“Read this,” he said.
“What’s the matter with it?” I said, determined to defend it, though it had gone rather far in its biting irony against the Nazis.
“Why, it’s wonderful. We here thought it was a wonderful broadcast, witty but fair – the kind you might do some time if you could forget your personal antipathy to Nazism,” he said.
If I live in Germany a hundred years I shall never understand these people. (Berlin Diary, pp 255-56)

Quote:
The Fascist Ground Council reaffirms Italian non-belligerency. Denmark, Sweden and Norway declare the strictest neutrality in the Russian-Finnish war. (2194 Days, p 36)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One U-boat left Kiel(U-20) and two Wilhelmshaven (U-57, U-61). One returned to Wilhelmshaven (U-41) after 31 days. 12 U-boats at sea. Two ships lost. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 05.24 hours … the unescorted and neutral Tajandoen … was hit amidships by one torpedo from U-47 and sank in flames after a heavy detonation, only a few minutes after the hit. … The U-boat had spotted the ship only four minutes before firing and misidentified the type as tanker. The master, 47 crew members and 14 passengers abandoned ship in the lifeboats and had to avoid burning fuel on the water surface.
The Belgian steam merchant Louis Scheid witnessed the attack and picked up the survivors, despite of the fear of her master of also being torpedoed. After the men were picked up, the ship immediately headed on full speed for the nearest land and by dusk she found herself off the Devon coast in heavy rainfall and a gale. Louis Scheid (6057 grt) struck a hidden rock near Warren Point in the early hours of 8 December and was destroyed by the seas. The Salcombe lifeboat made several dangerous trips and rescued all survivors from both ships.

At 17.09 hours … U-38 fired a spread of two G7a torpedoes at the unescorted Thomas Walton … inside Norwegian territorial waters south of Svolvaer and hit her with one torpedo forward of the bridge, causing the ship to break in two and sink. … At 19.10 hours, the U-boat fired a G7e torpedo on the steamer that stopped to rescue the survivors but it became a circle runner that detonated at the shore after 8 minutes. Shortly after this attack they discovered that this was the German steam merchant Sebu, which picked up the master and 30 crew members and landed them at Bodo, Norway. («uboat.net»)

Quote:
U.23 sank Danish steamer SCOTIA (2400grt) in 57‑31N, 02‑17E. Danish steamer HAFNIA (2031grt) was nearby and searched unsuccessfully for any survivors. She also observed U.23 searching.(«naval-history.net»)
[Editor’s note: «uboat.net» records this sinking at 00:04 on December 8.]
Tajandoen, a Dutch motor merchant of 8,159 tons, was carrying general cargo bound from Amsterdam for Batavia. Complement=68; lost=6.
Thomas Walton, a British steamer of 4,460 tons, in ballast from Port Talbot to Narvik. Complement=44; lost=13.

At sea
Quote:
AtlanticThe Admiral Graf Spee sinks yet another British ship. This dreaded German unit has become the bête noire of the Allied navies. A squadron commanded by Commodore Harwood, consisting of two heavy and two light cruisers, is despatched to the estuary of the River Plate on the assumption that the German raider is bound to return to that area to attack shipping on the crowded American route based on the estuary, which includes among others the ports of Montevideo and Buenos Aires. (2194 Days, p 36)

Quote:
Admiral Forbes transferred his flag to battleship WARSPITE in the Clyde. At this time, his only other capital ship was battlecruiser HOOD, badly in need of attention after her scheduled refit in November had been cut short.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, light cruiser SHEFFIELD and seven AMCs were between the Faroes and Iceland, and heavy cruiser SUFFOLK and AMC LAURENTIC in the Denmark Strait.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Scapa Flow for Loch Ewe.
 
Destroyer IMPERIAL arrived in the Clyde from Rosyth.
 
Battleship RODNEY, destroyers IMPERIAL, IMPULSIVE, GURKHA, three more destroyers and two tugs departed the Clyde for Liverpool.
 
Destroyer INGLEFIELD escorted tanker DAGHESTAN (5742grt) from Invergordon to Scapa Flow.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.51 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers VALOROUS, VIVIEN and sloop BITTERN, arriving at Southend on the 8th. Convoy FN.51 was delayed 24 hours due to the danger of mines.
 
U.23 sank Danish steamer SCOTIA (2400grt) in 57‑31N, 02‑17E. Danish steamer HAFNIA (2031grt) was nearby and searched unsuccessfully for any survivors. She also observed U.23 searching.

Northern Patrol statistics – From the 8th to 21st, 38 eastbound merchant ships were sighted by the Northern Patrol and 24 sent in for inspection. The low numbers was partly due to the fact that from the 9th to 17th, the armed merchant cruisers had been withdrawn from the Patrol.
 
German surface naval activity – German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE sank steamer STREONSHALH … south of Trinidad in 25‑01S, 27‑50W.(«naval-history.net»)
[Editorial comment: this Trinidad is not the Caribbean Trinidad, but an island some 1400 km ENE of Rio de Janeiro. This explains more fully why RN ships were congregating in the South Atlantic Station rather than in the Caribbean]
Quote:
Heavy cruisers EXETER and CUMBERLAND were on patrol in the Falkland Island area. The Admiralty anticipated that the German pocket battleship might attack Port Stanley on the anniversary of the Falkland Island naval battle in which a British force under Vice Admiral Sir Doveton Sturdee defeated a German force under Vice Admiral Graf Maximilian von Spee on 8 December 1914. When the attack did not materialize, they entered Port Stanley on the 9th. EXETER left late that morning to escort Falkland Island Company ship LAFONIA (1961grt) to Rio de la Plata.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser ARETHUSA, which departed Alexandria on the 1st on patrol, arrived at Malta for refitting from the 7th to 18th.
 
Far eastern waters – Light cruiser DAUNTLESS, now attached to the 9th Cruiser Squadron, departed Singapore on patrol, arriving back on the 23rd.
 
Ship movements – Sloop LOWESTOFT completed her lengthy refit in Hong Kong on the 2nd, and sailed on the 7th. Reaching Singapore on the 13th and Colombo on the 18th, she departed Bombay on 2 January 1940 and arrived at Port Said on the 13th. She arrived at Malta on 18 January and Gibraltar on the 28th, and made Plymouth on 5 February for refitting, completed on the 21st.

After leaving the East Indies Command, sloop EGRET completed a refit at Malta on the 7th, arrived at Gibraltar on the 10th and departed on the 11th to reach Freetown on the 16th. She sailed on the 19th escorting convoy SLF.13 and arrived at Cardiff on 2 January 1940 for duty with Convoy C. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/8/2017 7:12:32 PM
December 8. Day 99
Friday.

Finland
No significant changes.

Europe
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

The USA
Quote:
The U.S. protested the British embargo on German exports, stating, “Whatever may be said for or against measures directed by one belligerent against another, they may not rightfully be carried to the point of enlarging the rights of a belligerent over neutral vessels and their cargoes, or other wise penalizing neutral states or their nationals in connection with their legitimate activities.” (Goralski, p 101)


In the air
Minor sweeps of the North Sea.

U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=1 (U-373). No U-boats left Kiel or Wilhelmshaven. One returned to Wilhelmshaven (U-59) after 9 days. 11 U-boats at sea. Two ships sunk. No U-boats lost; one damaged by air attack. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 00.04 hours … the neutral Scotia was hit in the fore part by one torpedo from U-23 and sank slowly by the bow in 17 minutes. The ship had been missed by a first torpedo at 23.26 hours on 7 December. The survivors were picked up by the Danish steam merchant Hafnia, which had witnessed the attack.

At 11.55 hours … the Brandon…, a straggler from convoy OB-48, was torpedoed and sunk by U-48 80 miles southwest of Fastnet. Nine crew members were lost. The master and survivors were picked up by the Belgian trawlers Marie Jose Rosette and Tritten and landed at Milford Haven. U-48 misidentified her victim as the Navasota, but this ship had been sunk by U-47 (Prien) three days earlier. («uboat.net»)

A flying boat attacked U.48 at 1455 and destroyers WALKER and WHIRLWIND were detached from convoy escort, making two attacks at 1526 in 50-12N, 9-05W. Some damage was done to the submarine. («naval-history.net»)

Scotia, a Danish steam merchant of 2,400 tons, was in ballast from Denmark to the U.K. Complement=21; lost=19.
Brandon, a British steamer of 6,668 tons, was in ballast from Cardiff to Port Everglades. Complement unrecorded; lost=9.

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Light cruiser ENTERPRISE departed Portland for Halifax, NS, arriving on the 15th.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol were two cruisers and one AMC in the Denmark Strait, and seven AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland.
 
Light cruisers DRAGON, COLOMBO, CARDIFF, DELHI and DIOMEDE departed Loch Ewe for Northern Patrol at 1700. DRAGON and COLOMBO arrived at Scapa Flow on the 12th, CARDIFF and DELHI on the 15th via Loch Ewe, and DIOMEDE on the 16th, also via Loch Ewe.
 
Light cruiser NEWCASTLE departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol to relieve light cruiser SHEFFIELD, and arrived back on the 17th.
 
Armed merchant cruiser MONTCLARE arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer ECHO arrived in the Clyde.
 
Destroyer INGLEFIELD arrived at Leith for docking. Repairs were completed on the 11th and she arrived at Rosyth the same day.
 
Submarines TRIDENT and TRIUMPH arrived at Rosyth, while STARFISH arrived at Blyth after patrols.
 
Minor ship damage – Patrol sloops PC.74 and KINGFISHER collided at Eglinton with slight damage to both ships.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.49 of 11 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers KEITH, WHITEHALL, WREN and WITCH, although WHITEHALL was detached to convoy HX.10 on the 9th. Sloop ENCHANTRESS joined on the 8th from OA.48 and stayed until the 11th when she also detached to HX.10. WREN and WITCH detached on the 9th, followed by KEITH on the 11th.
 
Convoy OB.49 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyer MACKAY until the 10th and WARWICK until the 11th.
 
East Coast convoy – After being delayed 24 hours because of mines, convoy FN.51 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WALLACE and WOOLSTON. They arrived in the Tyne on the 9th.
 
Norwegian inbound convoy – Convoy HN.4 of nine British ships departed Bergen escorted by destroyers ESKIMO, MATABELE, ICARUS and ILEX, but the convoy made slow progress in bad weather. Destroyers ELECTRA, ESCORT, NUBIAN and MAORI departed Rosyth on the 10th to relieve the escorts and on the same day, heavy weather forced ESKIMO, ILEX and three steamers to heave to. MATABELE lost touch and patrolled until daylight before attempting to rejoin the convoy. Destroyer ISIS arrived at Scapa Flow on the 9th to escort the four ships of the west coast section with one of the convoy destroyers. Then on the 11th, ELECTRA, ESCORT, NUBIAN and MAORI relieved ESKIMO, ILEX and ICARUS which went on to the Clyde, arriving on the 12th. The convoy reached Methil safely on the 12th.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.10 arrived at Liverpool escorted by heavy cruiser YORK, which began a refit there.

Loss from mining – Steamer MEREL (1088grt) was sunk on a mine near Gull Light Vessel near Ramsgate.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Steamer ULSTER HERO (483grt) reported sighting a submarine 16 miles from Ramsey, Isle of Man. Escort sloop MALLARD and anti-submarine trawler KING SOL (486grt) were sent to investigate.
 
Destroyer WANDERER attacked a submarine contact between Land's End and Penzance.
 
After British aircraft bombed a submarine contact, destroyers ESCORT and ELECTRA, detached from Force W and searched 85 miles NW of Cape Wrath. U.43 was badly damaged in the air attack, but was able to reach Wilhelmshaven on the 14th. Destroyer ISIS joined in the search.
 
Ship loss by collision – Steamer MIDDLESBRO' (989grt) was sunk in a collision with the wreck of steamer GOODWOOD (2796grt) one mile north of Flamborough Head. The crew were rescued by Swedish steamer RUNEBORG (472grt).
 
French maritime activity – French steamer OUED TIFLET (1194grt) arrived at Cartagena after being damaged on a nearby defensive minefield.
 
ship movement – Heavy cruiser CORNWALL and light cruiser GLOUCESTER departed Diego Suarez for Simonstown, after which CORNWALL was to transfer to the South Atlantic Command and GLOUCESTER to join Hunter Force I.
 
South American Station: Admiral Graf Spee – New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES refuelled at Montevideo, left on the 9th for the Plate and joined sister ship AJAX on the 10th. The two then joined heavy cruiser EXETER on the 12th and the three took up patrol in the Plate estuary.
… («naval-history.net»)[/close]
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/9/2017 4:12:38 PM
[B]December 9. Day 100
Saturday.

Finland
Quote:
The Soviet news agency TASS carried a report that Germany was sending supplies to the Finns. Actually, Germany was maintaining its neutrality, but Italy was shipping material to Finland through Germany. Moscow[Berlin relations were strained, nonetheless, but the Italians continued to aid the Finns in their “Anti-Bolshevik” war. (Goralski, p 101)


Europe
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Search
3 Wellingtons failed to locate any targets. (BC War Diaries, p 24)


U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One U-boat left Kiel (U-13) and one (U-34) left Wilhelmshaven. 13 U-boats at sea. Two ships sunk: total tonnage=8,736. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 07.10 hours … the San Alberto … in convoy OB-48 was hit amidships by one torpedo from U-48 about 120 miles south of Cape Clear and broke in two. She had been missed by the first two torpedoes at 06.44 and 06.46 hours. The forepart sank in 49°28N/09°51W and the stern … had to be abandoned in worsening weather and was scuttled by gunfire … by HMS Mackay (D 70) …, which took over the master and 35 crew members of the San Alberto from the Belgian tanker Alexandre André and landed them at Plymouth.

At 19.21 hours … the unescorted and neutral Magnus was hit in the forward hold by one torpedo from U-20 about 40 miles east-northeast of Peterhead. The foreship settled quickly and the vessel sank bow first within 90 seconds. The ship had been missed at 18.41 hours with a first torpedo. The survivor was picked up by the British steam trawler Philippe on 13 December. («uboat.net»)

San Alberto, a British motor tanker of 7,397 tons, was in ballast from Clyde to Trinidad. Complement=37; lost=1.
Magnus, a Danish steam merchantman of 1,339 tons, was in ballast from Denmark to Methil. Complement=19; lost=18.

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Battleship RODNEY, escorted by destroyers ECLIPSE, GURKHA and FEARLESS, arrived at Liverpool for repairs. The ships followed [Africa-U.K. inbound] convoy SLF.10B into port.
 
Battlecruiser HOOD and destroyers KINGSTON, KANDAHAR, KASHMIR and KHARTOUM left their patrol area covering [Norwegian inbound] convoy HN.4 and proceeded to the Clyde, arriving on the 10th.
 
Northern Patrol changes due to mining – Admiral Forbes withdrew the armed merchant cruisers from Northern Patrol. The threat of German mining, brought home by the damage to NELSON, prevented his heavy ships from leaving and entering port, and therefore were unable to cover the Northern Patrol ships. Seven armed merchant cruisers left the Patrol for the Clyde and Liverpool. Light cruiser SHEFFIELD was en route to the Tyne, passing Fair Island Channel at 2100/9th while light cruiser NEWCASTLE proceeded to Scapa Flow to relieve her on Northern Patrol duties. Heavy cruisers SUFFOLK and BERWICK moved from the Denmark Strait to SE of Iceland.
 
Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE departed the Clyde to relieve BERWICK on Northern Patrol, and arrived at Scapa Flow after patrol on the 22nd.
 
Refitting – Heavy cruiser YORK began refitting at Liverpool.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser CERES departed the Clyde, and arrived at Scapa Flow on the 16th.
 
Armed merchant cruiser CHITRAL arrived in the Clyde.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW departed Chatham for Invergordon, arriving on the 10th.
 
Destroyers EXMOUTH, ECHO and ECLIPSE departed the Clyde to rendezvous and escort arriving battleship BARHAM.

Repair work – Destroyer IMOGEN drydocked at Govan to repair defects.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy BC.18 departed Bristol Channel, escorted by destroyers MONTROSE and VESPER, and arrived in the Loire on the 11th. The convoy returned, departing on the 13th and arrived back in the Bristol Channel on the 15th.
 
East Coast convoys –Convoy FN.52 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers VIVIEN, VALOROUS and sloop BITTERN, and arrived in the Tyne on the 10th.
 
Convoy FS.52 departed the Tyne escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop STORK, arriving at Southend on the 10th.

U.K.-Gibraltar convoys – Convoy HG.10 departed Gibraltar with 62 ships, escorted by destroyers WATCHMAN, ACTIVE, HAVOCK and the French CHEVALIER PAUL and TARTU. The French ships remained with the convoy from the 8th to 16th when they arrived at Brest. ACTIVE was detached that evening, still on the 9th. HAVOCK and WATCHMAN detached to OG.9 on the 10th and escorted that convoy for one day before arriving back at Gibraltar. HAVOCK then left on the 12th to return to Sheerness for repairs. On the 15th, the convoy was joined by destroyers VISCOUNT and ANTELOPE from OG.10 and also destroyer VIVACIOUS. All three were with the convoy when it arrived at Liverpool on the 16th.
 
German merchant losses – Northwest of Mossamedes, heavy cruiser SHROPSHIRE of Force H encountered German steamer ADOLF LEONHARDT (2990grt), which had departed Lobito on the 8th. She scuttled herself off South Africa rather than be captured, and her six officers and 19 crew were picked up by SHROPSHIRE.
 
Strait of Gibraltar – French sloop COMMANDANT DUBOC attacked a submarine contact 2.5 miles 357° from Cape Spartel.

Ship movement – Heavy cruiser DORSETSHIRE arrived at Simonstown.
 
Light cruiser EFFINGHAM arrived at Bermuda for refitting, completed on the 23rd.
 
German merchant activities – German merchant ship NORDMEER (5671grt) departed Curacao, and despite efforts by French submarine OUESSANT to intercept her in Mona Passage on the 15th, was able to reach Vigo on 5 January 1940.
 
German steamers SEATTLE (7369grt), HANNOVER (5537grt), WESERMUNDE (5356grt), VANCOUVER (8269grt), PATRICIA (3979grt), ESTE (7915grt), HENRY HORN (3164grt), ALEMANIA (1383grt), KARIBIA (428grt) and FRISIA (561grt) were also at Curacao. Only SEATTLE and HANNOVER had managed to escape before 10 May 1940 when the remaining ships, less steamer WESERMUNDE which had been sold to the United Fruit Company on 28 December 1939, were seized by Dutch forces and renamed for Dutch service – VANCOUVER became CURACAO, PATRICIA the ARUBA, ESTE the SURINAME, HENRY HORN the BONAIRE, ALEMANIA the ST MARTIN, KARIBIA the ST EUSTATIUS, and FRISIA the SABA. On 10 May 1940, two other German steamers were in Dutch Caribbean ports, the ANTILLA (4363grt) at Aruba and GOSLAR(6040grt) at Paramaribo, Suriname. These ships were scuttled by their crews to avoid capture.
(«naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/10/2017 6:43:34 PM
December 10. Day 101
Sunday. New moon.

Finland
Quote:
Finland issues a general appeal for aid, stating it had been attacked by Russia “without the slightest cause.: Helsinki added that “our position as the active outpost of western civilization gives us the right to expect the active resistance of other civilized nations.
The U.S. granted Finland $10 million credit for agricultural supplies, a gesture largely due to Finland’s undue payment of war debts to the United States. (Goralski, p 101)


Europe
A reminder of differences in communication from 1939 to the present:
Quote:
BERLIN, Decemberi 10
Ed[Murrow] and I on this Sabbath evening have just had the first telephone conversations to take place between Berlin and London since the telephone lines were cut at the beginning of the war. It was broadcast. … Our voices actually travelled a long way. I heard Ed’s after it had gone by short-wave from London to New York, from where it was short-waved back to Berlin. Mine travelled the same route in the opposite direction. … [To make such a call], e worked out our conversation in advance, I submitting my questions and Ed’s answers as well as his questions and my answers beforehand to the Germans and he doing the same with the British. Both sides proved very decent about the whole script. It was good to hear Ed’s voice. Once or twice he faded out and I couldn’t hear the cue to cut in, but on the whole it was great fun.
It seems Eleanor K. was arrested by the Gestapo at Bentheim near the Dutch border on her was from Amsterdam to Berlin and jumped out of the top storey of the local hotel where she had been confined. By a miracle she was not killed, though she broke her back, both legs, and an arm. She has now been released and has left for New York, I hear. Must get to the bottom of this. I am positive the secret police had nothing on her. (Berlin Diary, pp 256-57)
[Editor’s comment: Eleanor K first appears in Berlin Diary’s October 2 entry. Just another victim of the war.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Search
3 Whitleys failed to locate any targets. This was the first Whitley daylight operation of the war. (BC War Diaries, p 24)


U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. No U-boats left or entered Kiel or Wilhelmshaven. 13 U-boats at sea. Two ships sunk, one by torpedo and one by mine: total tonnage=6462. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 06.55 hours … U-20 fired one G7e torpedo at a steamer without visible nationality markings, which was hit in the forward hold, broke in two and sank within 3 minutes about 25 miles east-northeast of Rattray Head. This was probably the Føina …, reported missing in the North Sea after leaving Sarpsborg on 7 December 1939. Two bodies in a half-filled lifeboat from this ship were found on 12 December.

At 16.00 hours … the Willowpool …, dispersed from convoy HG-9, struck a mine, laid on 21 November by U-20 3 miles east from Newarp Lightship and sank in 52°52´48N/01°51´12E. The master and 35 crew members were picked up by the Gorleston lifeboat. («uboat.net»)

Føina, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1674 tons, was in ballast from Sarpsborg, Norway to Grangemouth. Complement=18; lost=18.
Magnus, a British steam merchantman of 4815 tons, was in ballast from Denmark to Methil. Complement=36; lost=0.

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, two cruisers were between the Orkneys and the Shetlands, and four cruisers between the Shetlands and Iceland.
 
Armed merchant cruisers TRANSYLVANIA, WORCESTERSHIRE, ASTURIAS and ANDANIA arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol duties. SCOTSTOUN was due to arrive with them, but was delayed by weather and only reached the Clyde on the 11th. Armed merchant cruisers CANTON and DERBYSHIRE departed the Clyde for Portsmouth.
 
C- and D-class cruiser re-assignment and refitting – The old C and D-class light cruisers began to be withdrawn from the Northern Patrol as they were relieved by armed merchant cruisers. The first ones to leave for less arduous stations were CARDIFF, CERES, COLOMBO and DRAGON. All the ships were refitted and by the spring of 1940 had been reassigned:
 
CALEDON and CALYPSO of the 7th Cruiser Squadron to the Mediterranean Fleet. They arrived on station late December to relieve light cruisers ARETHUSA and PENELOPE for duty in Home Waters. DRAGON, also 7th Cruiser Squadron, which was refitting at Chatham until the end of February, arrived at Malta on 12 March 1940. From the 11th Cruiser Squadron, DELHI, after completing her refit at Belfast at the end of January, arrived at Malta on 6 February to relieve light cruiser GALATEA.
 
CARADOC and DESPATCH had arrived in the West Indies in October, and were joined by DIOMEDE of the 7th Cruiser Squadron, which left Plymouth for Bermuda on 6 February. She had completed her refit in late January and relieved light cruiser ORION.
 
CARDIFF, 7th Cruiser Squadron completed her refit at Plymouth at the end of January and was to have joined the 8th Cruiser Squadron in the America and West Indies Station. Instead she was assigned to the Gunnery School as a Training Ship, arriving at Portland on 23 February with a reduced complement for this duty. After the invasion of France and during the invasion threat of the summer of 1940, CARDIFF served in the 2nd Cruiser Squadron, Home Fleet, but in October 1940, she returned to the Gunnery School.
 
DUNEDIN, 11th Cruiser Squadron took CARDIFF’S place. She departed Portsmouth for Bermuda on 6 February, and arrived on station in mid-month to relieve Australian light cruiser PERTH, which in turn relieved New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES in the South Atlantic. ACHILLES headed for duty in the East Indies.
 
CERES sailed for the East Indies, via the Mediterranean leaving Scapa Flow on the 28th, and COLOMBO, 11th Squadron joined the 9th Cruiser Squadron in the East Indies, also via the Mediterranean departing Scapa on the 30th.
 
Repair work – Light cruiser SHEFFIELD arrived at Wallsend for docking from the 11th to 17th for repairs, leaving on the 18th.
 
Royal journey to Europe – HM King George VI took passage in destroyer CODRINGTON from Dover to Boulogne escorted by destroyers BASILISK, BEAGLE, BOADICEA, BOREAS and BRILLIANT. The King and the ships arrived back at Dover that night.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyers JERVIS, JUNO, JAGUAR, JANUS and JUPITER departed the Humber to sweep for U-boats off Terschelling. No contact was made and they arrived back on the 11th.
 
Sloop ABERDEEN, on convoy escort with destroyer WAKEFUL, attacked a submarine contact 24 miles 145° from the Owers and then rejoined the convoy. Destroyer ACHERON was sent to investigate, but in St Helen's Bay on the 11th, the starboard engine failed and put her out of action.
 
Patrol sloop PUFFIN attacked a submarine contact in 50-06N, 3-50W.
 
Destroyer FORESTER attacked a submarine contact in 57-59N, 05-25W. Patrol sloop KINGFISHER also searched the area.
 
Destroyer WOLVERINE, escorting steamer TONGARIRO in tow, attacked a submarine contact in 49‑49N, 05‑25W. She was joined by destroyer KEITH, but the contact was not regained.
 
Ship movement – After delivering Force W to Rosyth, destroyers SOMALI and BEDOUIN proceeded to the Clyde. Sister ship MASHONA escorted tanker DAGHESTAN from Invergordon to Scapa Flow, and also proceeded to the Clyde.
 
Destroyer GURKHA arrived at Portsmouth for docking.
 
Sloop FLAMINGO departed Leith at 1300 for Rosyth after completing repairs following her November collision. She joined sloop PELICAN off Inchkeith at 1530 and both headed for the Tyne.

U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.50G departed Southend with 36 ships escorted by destroyers VISCOUNT and ANTELOPE, and on the 11th merged with OB.50G, escorted by destroyers WITHERINGTON and VIMY to form OG.10 - a total of 56 ships. VISCOUNT, ANTELOPE, WITHERINGTON and VIMY were all with the convoy from the 11th to 13th when VISCOUNT and ANTELOPE detached to HG.10. French destroyers JAGUAR and LÉOPARD, which departed Brest on the 12th, escorted from the 13th to 18th, when the convoy arrived at Gibraltar. The day before, the 17th, destroyer WISHART had joined off Gibraltar.
 
Soviet naval activity – Soviet submarine S.1 sank German steamer BOLHEIM (3324grt) with gunfire off Rauma near Bjorneborg.
 
Soviet submarine SC.322 sank German steamer REINBEK (2884grt), en route from Leningrad to Oskarshamn on the west coast of Sweden, in the Gulf of Finland.

Soviet submarine SC.323 sank Estonian steamer KASSARI (379grt) off Uto with the loss of one member of crew.
 
Neutral merchant ship losses – Dutch steamer IMMINGHAM (398grt) struck a mine off Kallautsoog, off the Dutch coast and sank on the 11th; her crew of seven was rescued.
 
Norwegian steamer JOTUN (534grt) was lost by grounding south of Berwick.

Steamer FIRE KING (758grt) was sunk in collision with steamer DUKE OF LANCASTER (3814grt) in the Irish Sea off the Isle of Man.
 
French naval activity – French heavy cruiser ALGÉRIE arrived at Casablanca.
 
North Atlantic inbound troop convoy – Canadian troop convoy TC.1, consisting of troopships MONARCH OF BERMUDA (22,424grt), EMPRESS OF BRITAIN (42,348grt), DUCHESS OF BEDFORD (20,123grt), EMPRESS OF AUSTRALIA (19,665grt) and AQUITANIA (45,647grt) carrying 961, 1,303, 1,312, 1,235 and 2,638 troops respectively, departed Halifax. The convoy was escorted out of Halifax by Canadian destroyers OTTAWA, FRASER, RESTIGOUCHE and ST LAURENT, and battleship RESOLUTION provided heavy support.
 
Battlecruiser REPULSE and aircraft carrier FURIOUS had just arrived at Halifax escorting liner DUCHESS OF RICHMOND (20,022grt), carrying British civilians being evacuated to Canada. REPULSE, FURIOUS, light cruiser EMERALD, and destroyers HUNTER and HYPERION departed Halifax and steamed ahead of the troop convoy to sweep for German raiders. HUNTER and HYPERION were detached at dusk on the 10th and rejoined at 0800/11th. Because of the severe cold, FURIOUS was unable to launch aircraft due to frozen hydraulic lines until the 11th, but then fog soon curtailed operations. Once out of the Halifax approaches, the local escort, HUNTER and HYPERION returned to Halifax, while at sea on the 14th, EMERALD was relieved by light cruiser NEWCASTLE.
 
North Atlantic incoming convoy – Convoy HXF.12 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyer SKEENA, which was detached on the 12th. Ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser ALAUNIA and French submarine ACHILLE. ALAUNIA detached on the 22nd and ACHILLE arrived at Brest on the 22nd, escorted into port by sloop COMMANDANT RIVIERE. Destroyer WALKER escorted the convoy in Home Waters from the 23rd and HXF.12 arrived at Liverpool on the 24th.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser GALATEA departed Malta on patrol and arrived back on the 19th.
 
Indian Ocean – Submarine OLYMPUS departed Diego Suarez to check Prince Edward Island in the southern Indian Ocean for suspected German raiders, but made no sightings.
 
French ship movement – French destroyer TEMPÊTE passed Gibraltar east to west.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.12 departed Freetown escorted by sloop ROCHESTER and arrived on the 26th.
 
Mediterranean – French heavy cruisers TOURVILLE and COLBERT, assisted by sloop D'IVERVILLE, departed Malta for contraband control duties off the west of Greece. The cruisers arrived at Beirut on the 12th.
 
Convoy K.6 departed Bombay with troopships RAJULA (8478grt), D'ARTAGNAN (15,105grt), ROHNA (8602grt), CAP TOURAINE (8009grt), LANCASHIRE (9557grt), TAIREA (7933grt) and TALAMBA (8018grt), escorted by Australian light cruiser HOBART and armed merchant cruisers MALOJA and RANCHI from the 10th to 15th. The convoy arrived at Suez on the 20th and Port Said on the 21st, and was escorted by Australian destroyers VAMPIRE and VOYAGER from the 21st to 24th. They were relieved on the 24th by Australian sister ships VENDETTA and WATERHEN from the 24th to 26th when the convoy reached Marseilles. («naval-history.net)
[Editorial comments:
• Convoy TC.1, includes troopships weighing 150,207 tons, carrying 7449 troops, a small number indeed but heading for the Old Country 91 days after Canada declared war. Many of these troops will not see action until mid-1942.
• The final item under this day’s At Sea section concerning Convoy K.6 has me baffled. My list of convoy codes states that “K” convoys were from Casablanca to Brest. Any thoughts?]
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/11/2017 6:24:10 PM
December 11. Day 102
Monday.

Finland
Quote:
Finland asked for concrete aid, “not merely words of encouragement,” from the League of Nations. (Goralski, p 101)


Europe
Quote:
Hitler meets the Norwegian politician Vidkun Quisling, founder of the ‘National Union’, a Norwegian pro-Nazi movement. (2194 Days, p 37)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Search

3 Whitleys failed to locate any targets. (BC War Diaries, p 24)


U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One U-boat (U-31) entered Wilhelmshaven after 26 days. 12 U-boats at sea. One neutral ship sunk: total tonnage=4708. No U-boats lost. U-61 kept from laying mines by enemy ships.
Garoufalia, a Greek steam merchantman of 4708 tons, was in ballast from Oslo via Trondheim to Kirkenes. Complement=29; lost=4. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 08.19 hours … neutral Garoufalia was hit by one torpedo from U-38, while proceeding inside the Norwegian territorial waters. The torpedo struck in the engine room and killed the crew on watch below. She was sunk with a second torpedo 30 minutes after the first. The survivors, among them two Norwegian pilots, … had observed the U-boat before the attack and this proved to both British and Norwegian authorities that German U-boats operated inside Norwegian territorial waters. This was a huge propaganda blunder for the Germans and they did not send other U-boats on such patrols. U-38 operated as far east as Murmansk and Liebe disregarded all respect of neutral shipping or warning before attack. But most torpedoes failed or missed. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
RN v. U-boats – Battleship VALIANT departed Plymouth on trials after refit, escorted by destroyers ACASTA and ARDENT. She was to have arrived back on the 11th, but due to submarine activity in the area, remained at sea overnight with destroyers ENCOUNTER, ARDENT, ACASTA and GRENADE. She then headed for Portland, reaching there on the 12th and leaving on the 14th for Bermuda. VALIANT was met by destroyer HYPERION on the 21st, 240 miles 70° from Mount Hill Light and reached Bermuda on the 22nd for working up after the refit. She arrived back at Bermuda on the 25th.
 
A U-boat was sighted in the vicinity of the Plymouth indicator loops. Exercises were cancelled and submarine H.43 was ordered to return to harbour on the surface. Destroyer WOLVERINE and sloop LONDONDERRY hunted 60° and 320° respectively from a position 4 miles 45° from Eddystone, and WOLVERINE also took destroyer BRAZEN under orders to join in the search. A tug reported bumping a submerged object inside the loop at 1115. Destroyers ENCOUNTER, GRENADE, WHITEHALL and sloop LONDONDERRY searched without success but WOLVERINE did make a contact 6.5 miles 112° from Rame Head.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser GLASGOW arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Light cruiser EDINBURGH arrived at Rosyth.
 
Old German merchant ship ILSENSTEIN (8216grt), acquired pre-war, departed Rosyth escorted by destroyer ESCORT and escort ship WOOLSTON for Loch Ewe. After reaching the Pentland Firth, WOOLSTON returned to Rosyth. Destroyer ELECTRA was ordered to join ESCORT, but ILSENSTEIN could not proceed in the heavy weather.
 
Ship damage – Destroyer MOHAWK was in collision with a tug as she headed down the Tyne. Temporary repairs were completed in the Tyne on the 14th.
 
Polish naval activity – Polish destroyer BLYSKAWICA fired on an unidentified aircraft off Harwich.
 
East Coast waters – Destroyer BEDOUIN departed Rosyth with tanker DAGHESTAN (5742grt) for Invergordon, then proceeded to Scapa Flow and on to the Clyde, arriving on the 12th.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.51 departed Southend on the 11th escorted by destroyers VETERAN and BROKE until the 13th when they were relieved by destroyers WHITEHALL and WIVERN. After the convoy dispersed on the 14th, WHITEHALL and WIVERN joined SL.11.
 
Convoy OB.51 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyer VOLUNTEER and sloop DEPTFORD.
 
U.K.-France inbound convoy – Convoy BC.17 of steamers BARON GRAHAM, CLAN ROSS (Commodore), DUNKWA and GUELMA departed the Loire escorted by destroyer VESPER, and arrived in the Bristol Channel on the 12th.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy SA.21 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by destroyer WINDSOR which reported a submarine contact in 50-15N, 02-00W. The convoy arrived at Brest on the 12th.
 
Convoy AXS.8 of one steamer, escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS, arrived at Brest from Barry.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.53 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WALLACE and sloop HASTINGS, and arrived at Southend on the 12th. Convoy FN.54 was delayed for 24 hours, but destroyer WHITLEY and sloops FLAMINGO and STORK guarded the ships overnight and were joined by destroyer GREYHOUND.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – A U-boat was reported in the Channel near Portsmouth and destroyers ACHERON, VEGA and WHITSHED were ordered to search.
 
French transfer of gold to Canada – French battleship DUNKERQUE with 100 tons of gold for deposit in Canada and light cruiser GLOIRE departed Brest at 1700 for Halifax escorted by large destroyers MOGADOR, VOLTA, LE TRIOMPHANT, LE TERRIBLE and VALMY. VALMY detached on the 12th and the rest of the destroyers on the 13th. DUNKERQUE and GLOIRE arrived on the 17th.
… 
Mediterranean – Battleship MALAYA, which had been escorted by Australian destroyers VENDETTA and WATERHEN in the Red Sea, arrived at Suez after duty in the Indian Ocean.
 
Submarine OSWALD departed Alexandria for patrol in the Mediterranean until the 23rd.

U-boat activity – U.61 laid mines off the Firth of Forth. («naval-history.net»)

[Editor’s comment: the last-noted activity is disputed by «uboat.net»:
Quote:
U-61 was unable to lay mines in the Firth of Forth as planned due to the presence of numerous enemy escorts.]

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3525

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/12/2017 3:23:42 AM
December 12, 1939

* Finnish troops best the Soviets at Tolvajärvi [Lake Tolva]. Crossing frozen lakes, the Finnish advance disorganized a planned Soviet attack.


Quote:
Finnish losses were over 100 dead and 250 wounded. The Soviet losses are thought to be over 5000 dead and . . . the guns of two artillery batteries, AT-guns, some twenty tanks (amongst others T-26s) and 60 machine guns. (Wikipedia)



Image: Disabled Soviet armored car after the Battle of Lake Tolva.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/12/2017 3:47:03 PM
December 12. Day 103
Tuesday.

Finland
Quote:
Russia turns down a League appeal for a ceasefire and mediation on Finland. (Goralski, p 101)

Quote:
France sends Finland 5,000 1915-model machine-guns; Britain contributes a number of Brandt mortars and light machine-guns made in 1924, with some aircraft. (2194 Days, p 36)


Europe
Quote:
Churchill speaks in favour of a landing in Norway. In his speech he says that ‘it is humanity, and not legality, that we must look to as our judge. (2194 Days, p 36)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
SEAPLANE-BASE PATROLS, 12 December 1939 to 14/15 January 1940

On 12 December, 8 Whitleys commence this new type of operation to harass the German seaplanes which were laying mines off the English coast. Flying in relays, Whitleys flew during the evenings over suspected seaplane bases on the islands of Salt, Norderney and Borkum If flare-paths on the water were seen to be lit, bombs were dropped but only in the water because of the instructions given to bomber units, after President Roosevelt’s bonging-restraint appeal at the outbreak of war, that no bombs should be dropped on any land targets.
These operations were flown on 17 nights between the evening of 12 December 1939 and the night of 14/15 January 1940. A total of 71 Whitley sorties were flown. Bombs were dropped on suspected seaplane take-off areas on at least 3 occasions. One of these was the cause of 2 bombs falling on the Danish island of Römö, which was very close to Sylt, on 10 January 1940. A suspected German U-boat was bombed on 13 December and a Flak ship on 16 December, but no results were claimed. The Whitleys suffered no casualties during these operations; the only attack made on them was by R.A.F. Spitfires off the coast of Lincolnshire on 17 December.( BC War Diaries, pp 25-6)


U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=2 (U-141, -142). One U-boat (U-60) left Wilhelmshaven. 13 U-boats at sea. One British ship sunk by mines: total tonnage=496. No U-boats lost.
Marwick Head, a British steam merchantman of 496 tons, was carrying coal from Bo’ness to London. Complement=10; lost=5. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 08.15 hours … the Marwick Head … struck a mine, laid on 5 December by U-59 and sank 0.5 miles south of North Caister Buoy. Five crew members were lost. The master and four crew members were picked up … and landed at Great Yarmouth. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Adhering to Admiralty instructions to refrain from unrestricted warfare, the British submarine Salmon permitted the 52000-ton German liner Bremen to proceed to Germany The Bremen had been intercepted off the Norwegian coast on her return from New York. (Goralski, p 101)

Quote:
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, three cruisers were between the Orkneys and the Faroes, and four cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland. There was no patrol in the Denmark Strait on this date. Light cruisers COLOMBO and DRAGON arrived at Scapa Flow.

Challenging Bremen – Submarine SALMON sighted German liner BREMEN (51,731grt) at 0930 in 57‑37N, 05‑15E, but British submarines were not permitted to sink merchant ships without warning at this time. Instead, SALMON attempted to stop her 70 miles SSW of Lister Light in 57-00N, 5-45E, but BREMEN ignored her and an arriving German Do.18 aircraft forced SALMON to dive. BREMEN arrived safely at Wesermünde midday on the 13th.
 
Ship repairs – Submarine UNDINE arrived at Blyth for repairs until the 23rd.
 
Ships’ collisions – Destroyers EXMOUTH, ECHO and ECLIPSE departed the Clyde to escort battleship BARHAM. Meanwhile BARHAM and destroyers DUCHESS and DUNCAN, which had departed Gibraltar on the 6th for service with the Home Fleet, were 9 miles west of the Mull of Kintyre when DUCHESS … was run down at 0437 in an accidental collision with BARHAM. Struck abreast the forecastle, DUCHESS capsized and then exploded killing many men in the water. She sank at 0503 with the loss of … [six officers] and 124 ratings. Only Py/Lt J R Pritchard RNVR and 22 ratings were rescued … . EXMOUTH and DUNCAN screened BARHAM's entry into the Clyde while ECLIPSE and ECHO stood by at the location of the sinking until daylight.
 
Auxiliary patrol trawler EMILION (201grt) was damaged in a collision with Spanish steamer MONTE NAVAJO (5754grt) near the Goodwin Buoy. She sustained slight damage and the Spanish ship continued without taking any action.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers SOMALI, BEDOUIN, MASHONA, and ILEX arrived in the Clyde.
 
Activities surrounding inbound convoy TC.1 – [12 d]estroyers … departed the Clyde to sweep ahead of Canadian troop convoy TC.1 as it approached the British Isles and bring it into the Clyde. However, … [one] was held up and did not join, and destroyer MATABELE joined the escort force at sea.
 
Submarine SALMON and RAF Coastal Command aircraft sighted [five] German destroyers … in the North Sea en route to the Tyne on a minelaying mission. Admiral Forbes, concerned for the safety of convoy TC.1, departed Greenock with battleships WARSPITE, BARHAM, battlecruiser HOOD, and destroyers INGLEFIELD, ICARUS, IMOGEN, IMPERIAL, ISIS and FOXHOUND on the 13th. Destroyers FORESTER and FIREDRAKE departed Loch Ewe and joined the force off the Mull of Kintyre.
 
Heavy cruisers BERWICK, DEVONSHIRE and light cruiser GLASGOW on Northern Patrol patrolled in 53‑55N, 25‑00W to cover the convoy. Light cruisers SOUTHAMPTON and EDINBURGH departed Rosyth, called at Scapa Flow, proceeded to Fair Island Channel and then patrolled between the Shetlands and the Faroes. Destroyers AFRIDI, MAORI and NUBIAN departed Rosyth and swept north at 25 knots.
 
Light cruisers DIOMEDE, CARDIFF, CERES and DELHI on Northern Patrol were to concentrate 10 miles 180° from Myggenoes Light in the Faroes, where they were joined by light cruisers COLOMBO and DRAGON which were proceeding to patrol stations.
 
Submarines SEAHORSE, STURGEON, UNITY and L.23 departed Blyth around midnight on the 12th/13th, SUNFISH and SNAPPER departed Harwich on patrol, and SHARK, already on patrol, was moved to a position off the mouth of the Jade River.
 
Convoy TC.1's only incident of the voyage occurred on the 17th off Northern Ireland in 55-30N, 6-54W as the convoy neared its destination. Outward-bound liner SAMARIA (19,597grt) entered the eastbound convoy in fog and collided with aircraft carrier FURIOUS, carrying away several antennas and lifeboats and grazing liner AQUITANIA. On arrival in the Clyde, FURIOUS and battlecruiser REPULSE returned to the command of Admiral Forbes, who reached the Clyde on the 17th after escorting TC.1 into port.
 
German naval minelaying – HERMANN KÜNNE, FRIEDRICH IHN, ERICH STEINBRINCK, RICHARD BEITZEN and BRUNO HEINEMANN laid the minefield off the Tyne near Newcastle during the night of the 12th/13th. On the return, HEINEMANN had a fire in her turbine room and had to stop, STEINBRINCK standing by, but she was able to restart and carry on. Destroyers IHN and STEINBRINCK later suffered equipment defects and were detached to Wilhelmshaven. Eleven Allied merchant ships grossing 18,979 tons were sunk and destroyer KELLY and a large tanker badly damaged in the field… .[Editorial note: I make it tonnage of 16, 248 lost, including five vessels from neutral countries. Total human lossess=119.]

East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.53 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloops FLAMINGO and STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 13th.
 
RN patrol activities – Trawler VALERIA (189grt) reported sighting a suspicious vessel near 5A Buoy off Lowestoft, course ESE. Polish destroyer BLYSKAWICA was dispatched to assist, but ordered to return to Harwich at daylight if no contact was made.
 
The 20th Destroyer Flotilla was re-formed for minelaying duties for the first time since the First World War.

British minefield SC was laid on the 12th, 18th and 27th December, 16 January and 14 February by auxiliary minelayer HAMPTON westward of Folkestone Gate.
 
Outbound convoy – Convoy OB.52 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WINDSOR and WALPOLE until the 14th. OA.52 did not sail.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.53, after being delayed a day by weather, was escorted from the south by destroyer GREYHOUND with close escort by escort vessel WHITLEY, sloops FLAMINGO and STORK. The convoy was especially important as it included six tankers.
 
Soviet naval activity in Gulf of Finland – Russian submarine SC.322 damaged German steamer HELGA BOGE (2181grt) with gunfire, four miles north of Revalstein.
 
U-boat mining – U.13 laid mines off Dundee in the Firth of Tay, on which one ship was sunk.

Neutral losses to mines – Swedish steamer TORO (1467grt) was sunk on a mine 35 miles S of Copenhagen, off Malmo between Trelleborg and Falsterbo in 55‑20N, 13‑04E.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.12 departed Halifax at 1000 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA. At 1800/14th, they handed the convoy over to an ocean escort consisting of French submarine PASTEUR which detached on the 20th, and armed merchant cruiser AUSONIA, which left on the 25th. PASTEUR was joined by French large destroyer VALMY and sloop GAZELLE on the 23rd, and later arrived at Brest. Destroyers WANDERER and WALKER escorted the convoy from the 24th to 27th, when it arrived at Liverpool on the 27th.
 
Africa-U.K. inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.12 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser CILICIA and arrived at Liverpool on the 25th.
 
On the eve of the Battle of the River Plate – Allied Hunter Groups in the South Atlantic were disposed late on the 12th as follows:
 
Force G - Heavy cruiser EXETER, light cruiser AJAX and the New Zealand ACHILLES off the Uruguay coast near Rio de la Plata.
 
Force H - Heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE sweeping off the west coast of Africa.
 
Force I - Aircraft carrier EAGLE, heavy cruiser CORNWALL, light cruiser GLOUCESTER arrived at Durban on the 12th, low on fuel, after chasing into the Indian Ocean on a false raider report. EAGLE and GLOUCESTER were expected to need a week to boiler clean at Simonstown.
 
Force K - Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL and battlecruiser RENOWN in the Pernambuco area.
 
Force X - Aircraft carrier HERMES, French heavy cruisers DUPLEIX, FOCH, and British destroyers HARDY, HOSTILE and HERO were north of St Paul Rocks. British light cruiser NEPTUNE joined Force X on the 12th.
 
Additionally, heavy cruiser CUMBERLAND was in the Falklands, boiler cleaning and refitting on short notice. Sister ship DORSETSHIRE was at Simonstown, preparing to relieve heavy cruiser EXETER on the South America Station. Submarine SEVERN was halfway between St Helena and Bahia en route to the Falklands, and sister CLYDE approaching Dakar. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1451

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/13/2017 3:35:20 PM
December 13. Day 104
Wednesday. Waxing crescent moon.

Finland
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
BERLIN, December 13
The liner Bremen has successfully run the British blockade and made its way back from Murmansk along the Norwegian coast to a German port. The British navy hasn’t look very good on this one. …
The government is loosening up a little on rations over Christmas. Everyone will get a quarter of a pound of butter and a hundred grams of meat extra, and four eggs Christmas week instead of one.(Berlin Diary, pp 257, 259)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One U-boat (U-22) left Kiel and one entered Kiel (U-20) after 7 days. 13 U-boats at sea. One British ship and one Estonian ship sunk: total tonnage=5274. No U-boats lost.
Deptford, a British steam merchantman of 4101 tons, was carrying 6000 tons of iron ore from Narvik to Middlesbrough. Complement=39; lost=34.
Mina, an Estonian steam merchantman of 1173 tons, was in ballast from London to Gothenburg. Complement=17; lost=17. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 15.28 hours … the unescorted Deptford … was struck by one torpedo from U-38 in the foreship 0.24 miles north-northwest of Honningsvaag, Norway, and sank within five minutes. The master, 31 crew members and two Norwegian pilots were lost. …

At 19.15 hours … the unescorted and neutral Mina was hit in the stern by one G7e torpedo from U-57 about 20 miles southeast of Lowestoft and broke in two. The stern part sank immediately and the fore part within 30 seconds. The ship had been missed by a first torpedo at 19.03 hours. («uboat.net»)


At sea
[Editor’s note: From 13-17 December (some extend the date to 20 December), the Battle of the River Plate held much of the world’s attention. I offer one overview of the events that is brief, covers the essentials, and captures the accepted impact of the series of events that comprise the battle. I will also allow events of the coming seven days unfold to on a day-to-day basis through other sources.]
Quote:
The Graf Spee was trapped in the Battle of the River Plate. At 6:16 A.M. on the 13th, the British heavy cruiser Exeter identified a German pocket battleship in the mouth of the River Plate off the coast of Uruguay. It turned out to be the Graf Spee, the warship-raider which had accounted for the sinking of nine Allied ships (50,000 tons) since the beginning of the war. For the rest of the day the Graf Spee was engaged in a running battle with Exeter, the British light cruiser Ajax and the New Zealand light cruiser Achilles. Exeter, Ajax, and Graf Spee were heavily damaged, and the German ship was forced to enter Montevideo harbor, where, by international law, she was permitted temporary neutral sanctuary. On instructions from Berlin, the Graf Spee’s captain scuttled the ship on the 17th in full view of thousands who had gathered on the Montevideo waterfront. Captain Hans Langsdorff of the Graf Spee committed suicide three days later. The incident was significant in that the Royal Navy showed it could still operate throughout the world and take action against marauding German raiders. (Goralski, p 101)

Quote:
North Sea – Submarine SALMON on patrol 130 miles W of Jutland in the North Sea in 56-47N, 4-00E sighted German light cruisers KÖLN, NÜRNBERG and LEIPZIG at 1036 while they were covering the five German destroyers returning from the minelaying mission off the Tyne. She fired six torpedoes at 1124, hitting LEIPZIG amidships with two torpedoes and NÜRNBERG with one. At 1357, the cruisers were joined by destroyers HERMANN KÜNNE, RICHARD BEITZEN and BRUNO HEINEMANN of the Tyne force, two F-boats and four M-boats. After she got home, LEIPZIG was laid up for a time and decommissioned for repairs on 27 February 1940 which did not complete until 1 December 1940. Even then, she did not return to active duty and with some guns removed and a maximum speed of 22 knots, was relegated to training duties. NÜRNBERG's bow was blown off and her repairs were not completed until late May 1940. («naval-history.net»)
[Editorial comment: Salmon’s skipper must have particularly savoured this chance, given his orders not to torpedo Bremen the preceding day.]
Quote:
Anti-U-boat activities – The following destroyers proceeded to carry out anti-submarine patrols - AFRIDI, MAORI and NUBIAN from Rosyth in 56-15N, 3-30E; JERVIS, JUNO, JANUS, JAGUAR and JUPITER of D.7 from the Humber in 54-55N, 3-10E; and eight ships of D.1 from Harwich in 53-30N, 3-00E.
 
Escort duties – Destroyer KELLY departed Rosyth to relieve destroyer BASILISK escorting destroyer depot ship WOOLWICH in 57-08N, 1-53W.
 
Escort ship WOOLSTON departed Rosyth to search for a submarine reported by aircraft. It was found to be the Polish WILK, and WOOLSTON returned.
 
Ship movement – Light cruisers SOUTHAMPTON and EDINBURGH departed Rosyth and arrived at Scapa Flow later the same day.
 
Light cruiser COLOMBO departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol duties and arrived back on the 18th.
 
Destroyer DUNCAN departed the Clyde escorting steamer DUFFIELD (8516grt) to Liverpool, and arrived back on the 14th.

East Coast convoys – Destroyer VANITY, which departed Rosyth on the 12th for the Humber, was in a collision in the North Sea with steamer WELSH TRADER (4974grt) in convoy FS.54. VANITY was able to continue to the Humber where she received emergency repairs. She left on the 17th for permanent repairs and conversion to an escort ship at Plymouth, arriving on the 19th.
 
Convoy FN.54 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WALLACE and sloops PELICAN and HASTINGS, and arrived in the Tyne on the 14th.
 
Convoy FS.54 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers VALOROUS, VIVIEN and sloop BITTERN, arriving at Southend on the 14th. There was no convoy FS.55 as it was delayed by fog and later cancelled.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Anti-submarine trawler CAPE SIROTOKO (590grt) attacked a submarine contact five miles 170° from Portland Bill.
 
Patrol sloop PINTAIL attacked a submarine contact seven miles 164° from Portland Bill.
 
Anti-submarine trawler LADY ELSA (518grt) attacked a submarine contact six miles NNE of Kentish Knock. A destroyer stood by at the location.

Neutral shipping losses – Swedish steamer ALGOL (978grt) was damaged on a mine in 55‑19N, 12‑28E. Six of the crew were rescued.
 
Battle of the River Plate – Light cruiser AJAX (Flagship Commodore Harwood…), New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES … and heavy cruiser EXETER … encountered German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE off Rio de la Plata in 34‑28S, 49‑05W. The battle began at 0620 and in a short engagement, EXETER was wrecked by SPEE's gunfire and forced to retire at 0729 in a near sinking condition to the Falklands where she arrived on the 16th.
 
EXETER received four 11in hits with …four officers… and fifty six ratings killed, and …and additional four officers … and twenty ratings wounded.
 
AJAX had two of her four turrets put out of action and ACHILLES fired 1240 rounds of 6 inch ammunition, almost her entire stock. AJAX had seven ratings killed and two wounded, and ACHILLES four ratings killed and three crew wounded.
 
Damage to ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE, both material and psychological, caused her captain to turn away and head for Montevideo for repairs in that port. Thirty seven crew had been killed and 57 wounded. She arrived in Montevideo very early on the 14th, followed closely by AJAX and ACHILLES which immediately took up blockade of that port against SPEE's departure.
 
British Force H with heavy cruisers SUSSEX and SHROPSHIRE arrived at Capetown for refuelling before setting off for Rio de la Plata. Allied Force X with aircraft carrier HERMES and French heavy cruisers FOCH and DUPLEIX arrived at Dakar for refuelling, also before setting off for Rio de la Plata. …
 
Gibraltar patrol duty – Destroyers DOUGLAS and VIDETTE departed Gibraltar to conduct a night-time patrol off Cadiz.
 
Australian waters – Australian light cruiser SYDNEY, escorting liner STRATHALLAN (23,722grt) with the 2nd Australian Imperial Force to the Middle East, was relieved by Australian light cruiser ADELAIDE which continued the escort round the Leeuwin Promontory before returning to Fremantle. SYDNEY arrived at Sydney on the 18th for a refit that lasted from then until the 5 January.
 
North Pacific Asian waters – Submarine REGULUS departed Hong Kong on the 13th and patrolled off the Soviet Pacific port of Vladivostok to check if U-boats were using it. She spent Christmas Day in Bosfor Vostochny Strait, the channel leading to Vladivostok and reported "The patrol was disappointing. No German merchant ships were sighted", before arriving back on 4 January.
(«naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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