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The current time is: 12/14/2017 8:09:58 AM
 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2960

1st US-Canadian Special Sevice Forces of WWII; the Black Devils!
Posted on: 11/11/2017 9:15:30 PM
The US and Canada formed a very elite Special Forces group that raised hell with the Nazis, in WWII!

Check out the Black Devils!

[Read More]

Also a video documentary on the elite WWII Co-operative Canadian US Special Forces Unit!

[Read More]

What say you about this Devils Brigade!?

Cheers,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2960

Re: 1st US-Canadian Special Sevice Forces of WWII; the Black Devils!
Posted on: 11/12/2017 10:09:47 AM
Surviving members of the Devils Brigade, honored!

[Read More]

Respectfully on 11/11 weekend,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5704

Re: 1st US-Canadian Special Sevice Forces of WWII; the Black Devils!
Posted on: 11/12/2017 12:27:55 PM
Well certainly a mythology surrounding this group has survived.

It was involved in some heavy, specialized combat in Italy (Monte La Difensa) but then seemed to be employed as traditional infantry at Anzio.

The Canadian Army and government considered pulling the Canadian contingent out because of that but relented partly under pressure from Washington. After all, the exploits of this unit were very positive PR.

The other reasons that the Canadians eventually pulled the plug were because they needed the men. Canada's forces were all volunteer remember and the men in the FSSF were outstanding.

The Canadians felt that they would be better used as members of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion and when the unit was disbanded, that is where most of the men went.


The Canadians never planned to properly reinforce the FSSF because the unit was only supposed to survive for one mission, Operation Plough.

Plough was supposed to allow the allies to learn how to fight in the snow in Norway, using a specialized vehicle conceived in the mind of Geoffrey Pyke.

The Canadians were working on an armoured snowmobile called the "Penguin"

These are Mark lll's manufactured by Bombardier. The Mk ll was dubbed the Penguin.



So a special force was needed and was to be made up of Americans, Canadians and Norwegians. There were insufficient numbers of Norwegians available, so the force became Can/AM

The Canadian government authorized the mission but wanted it kept secret so it called the men who were to participate, the 2nd Canadian Parachute Battalion and sent them off to Montana to train.

Even as the FSSF was deployed to the Aleutians, the Canadians kept the option open to withdraw the Canadians should they be needed in other places.

The Canadian Army actually wanted to do that in Dec. of 1944, after some of the successes in Italy. But they were persuaded not to do that and the unit had developed a considerable reputation. It wouldn't have looked good to pull them out and especially when the senior Canadian officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Don Williamson, was recommended for the Legion of Merit. (source: Canadian soldiers)

I believe that the Americans also wanted to break up the force as they felt that the men would be better used elsewhere.

The Canadians struggled with keeping up with reinforcements to the FSSF and the parachute battalion was considered a better place to use these superb soldiers.

Perhaps the legacy of the force is in the development of special forces in the post war era.



Segregation in the American forces reared its head when the Canadians found good troops to reinforce the FSSF.

At Anzio, the Canadian contingent of the FSSF was shrinking but during the fighting 15 officers and 240 OR joined.

3 Canadians were rejected however and returned to a Canadian base. These soldiers were recommended for service in this unit and wanted to be there. One man was a Canadian of East Indian ancestry and the other two were Canadian black men. Not good.


Cheers,

George

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2960

Re: 1st US-Canadian Special Sevice Forces of WWII; the Black Devils!
Posted on: 11/15/2017 2:50:07 PM
George

Isn't some snow traction vehicle like the Penguin used in the Canadian Arctic today??

Cheers,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5704

Re: 1st US-Canadian Special Sevice Forces of WWII; the Black Devils!
Posted on: 11/15/2017 4:36:19 PM
Canadian Forces and Canadian Rangers use snowmobiles.

There is some research happening to create a stealth snowmobile, believe it or not. I hope that that includes a muffler. You can hear the damned things from miles away.

I looked it up and the new snowmobile is a hybrid and able to go on silent mode as needed.

Department of National Defence has named the snowmobile, "Loki" after the Norse shape shifting god.

I haven't heard much about Loki in the last three or four years.



But the army also has the BV 206 Tracked Carrier (Bandvagn 206)

It's a Swedish design and if I am not mistaken, is amphibious. I think that the Canadians had some in Afghanistan during Operation Anaconda.



It's a pretty popular vehicle and used by military around the world.

And the Domestic and Arctic Mobility Enhancement Project sees Canada looking for an armoured replacement for the BV206.

 (1939-1945) WWII Battles    
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