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The current time is: 12/14/2017 7:59:29 AM
 (1946-1999) Other 20th Century Battles    
AuthorMessage
John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre, PA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant
Posts: 553

9th MEB March 1965
Posted on: 11/18/2017 2:16:50 AM
Was the standard issue still the M-14 when they landed in Vietnam or had at least some of the units been issued the M-16?
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A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country.
"to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"


BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3525

Re: 9th MEB March 1965
Posted on: 11/18/2017 4:43:42 AM
John,

 My understanding is that the -14 was still the standard rifle for the USMC in 1965. Found this on the internet.


Quote:
The Marine Corps were traditional riflemen at the start of the Viet Nam conflict in 1964 and were issued the very accurate iron sighted M-14. However the M-14, made like the WW II M-1 Garands, fired a heavier round and when fired in automatic mode, the first round would hit in the general direction it was aimed. Any shots after that would climb up into the air and were wasted. The strongest Marine could not prevent this from occurring. Some Marines would turn the M-14 sideways 90 degrees to fire it so that the climb would then be lateral. It was not an approved use.

Therefore the Marines were issued the “New and Improved” M-16A1 in mid 1969. These rifles had the necessary improvements of the forward assist device (to overcome the tendency of the rotary bolt jamming), the chrome plated rotary bolt and cleaning kits issued as well. The magazine was increased from 20 rounds to 30 rounds.

The Marines later adopted the M16A2s in 1983 and the M16A4s in 1998.


 Note: Anecdotes on the internet also point to a mid-1967 introduction date for use of the M16 by Marines in Vietnam. Still beyond 1965, though. Image below is (per the caption) of Marines landing at Da Nang in 1965. Their rifles are clearly the M14.



Cheers,

BW
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With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre, PA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant
Posts: 553

Re: 9th MEB March 1965
Posted on: 11/18/2017 11:16:27 AM
BW,

Thanks. In a discussion with a former Marine, post Vietnam, and he won't hear any part of it. Can you tell me where you found the pic?
---------------
A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country.
"to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"


BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3525

Re: 9th MEB March 1965
Posted on: 11/18/2017 11:57:04 AM
John,

 At this URL. [Read More]

Cheers

BW
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With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

wazza
Sydney , Australia
top 25
E-6 Staff Sergeant
Posts: 353

Re: 9th MEB March 1965
Posted on: 11/18/2017 3:35:01 PM
Before the infamous Australian gun buy back I owned a 'Gold Cup' Springfield Arms M-14.
Beautiful rifle to shoot with and very accurate, but yes, certainly kicked like a mule, very similar to my Lithgow .303 after a day of shooting you certainly felt it.

kp
Belle Vernon, PA, USA
New User
E-2 Private


Posts: 9
http://mysite.verizon.net/kpolacek126/
Re: 9th MEB March 1965
Posted on: 11/18/2017 9:46:00 PM
I landed in Vietnam (DaNang)in July, 1968, and was assigned to supply and service battalion. I carried an M-14 for my entire year in country. I loved the M-14 and could accurately put my first round on target at 400 meters almost every time. I nearly always qualified as an expert from basic training on. The M-14 was a great weapon for me when I drove a water tanker. It fit well in the weapons holder in the cab and we kept a wood case of many magazines under the seat.
We had heard of problems with the M-16, but were also told by the Marines in the compound next to us that they had been worked out by 1968-69.
I still had 15 months left when I got back to the states. We were issued M-16s within a year after I got back.
The M-14 was a great weapon at longer ranges while the M-16 was better at close range when it was easy to go full-auto and swing the barrel around.
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With respect,
KP

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3525

Re: 9th MEB March 1965
Posted on: 11/19/2017 2:28:53 AM
KP,

 Thanks for that comment. Sounds like it took the Army a while to field the M-16.

Cheers,

BW
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With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

kp
Belle Vernon, PA, USA
New User
E-2 Private


Posts: 9
http://mysite.verizon.net/kpolacek126/
Re: 9th MEB March 1965
Posted on: 11/19/2017 12:39:16 PM
Not really, BW. Those troops in the infantry got the M-16 early. I was not infantry and did no fighting off my compound. I did spend something like 80 straight nights in guard towers at various locations around the compounds that my unit operated, then on the gates and then in the chemical section of my original company hauling potable water for my battalion. I was never in a job where I would have benefited using an M-16 while in Vietnam.
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With respect,
KP

 (1946-1999) Other 20th Century Battles    
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