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 Military Wargaming    
AuthorMessage
BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3307

Dunn Kempf
Posted on: 3/25/2016 4:48:12 PM
 Tactical wargaming, U.S. Army style, in the 1970s.


Quote:
The game was developed by Captain Hilton Dunn and Steve Kempf in 1975 while they were students at Fort Leavenworth. They wanted to 'to help generate plausible and complex tactical situations for small unit commanders to have to resolve against aggressive opponents'. The game was such a success that after extensive testing, the Combined Army Centre at Fort Levenworth, packaged the rules into boxed sets with GHQ micro armour tanks, terrain boards, maps and other game accessories. 500 Dunn Kempf games were distributed throughout the army commands around the world.

Wargaming provided the rigor of actually evaluating the plan against a thinking adversary using current (for that time) weapons and tactics set on terrain dictated by the scenario. We used rules developed by the Wargames Research Group for miniatures and terrain boards because they provided more "detail" than abstract symbols on a map.


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Cheers

BW
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With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Society's righteous paranoia lows profoundly. -- random wisdom of a computer

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3307

Re: Dunn Kempf
Posted on: 10/28/2016 2:37:47 AM
 I saw DK once while training as a cadet. The next time I saw a wargame as a training system was on a dedicated computer. It was designed to train battalion commanders and used NATO-standard graphics superimposed on a terrain depiction. In the mid-1980s, the unit I was with made a battlefield study of the Market-Garden battlefields. I had a copy of "Highway to the Reich", an SPI "monster game" of the battle, so I brought it into work and we set up the maps, which were quite detailed for a commercial wargame. Many of the officers had never seen a commercial wargame and were fascinated by it.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Society's righteous paranoia lows profoundly. -- random wisdom of a computer

kaii
Edinburgh, UK
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 1884

Re: Dunn Kempf
Posted on: 10/28/2016 4:56:41 AM

Quote:
 I saw DK once while training as a cadet. The next time I saw a wargame as a training system was on a dedicated computer. It was designed to train battalion commanders and used NATO-standard graphics superimposed on a terrain depiction. In the mid-1980s, the unit I was with made a battlefield study of the Market-Garden battlefields. I had a copy of "Highway to the Reich", an SPI "monster game" of the battle, so I brought it into work and we set up the maps, which were quite detailed for a commercial wargame. Many of the officers had never seen a commercial wargame and were fascinated by it.

Cheers

BW
--BWilson


Interesting that you mention maps Bill,

I have found that when touring battlefields, often maps from war games provide excellent information and background, even if they are not 100% accurate (since they often have to fit a hexagonal grid etc).

I know in military college in Norway, several commercial war games are used as part of the training, amongst them "Arctic Storm" by GMT, and execllent take on the Winter War.

I started playing war games when I was 12 and am still hooked, having built a collection of 100 or so titles )of which I probably regularly play around 7-8...).
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A fool and his money are soon elected.

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