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 Military Wargaming    
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BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3296

Reinterpreting old titles
Posted on: 12/12/2016 3:46:54 AM
 I've been looking at Cyberboard, a freeware program that allows creative people to digitize board games and play them as long as they know what the rules for the game are. Some of these works are very well done. A long time ago, I had a copy of a game called 1776 about the American Revolution. I don't recall the board being as beautiful as this -- part of a Cyberboard representation of the game.



Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Society's righteous paranoia lows profoundly. -- random wisdom of a computer

Brian Williams
Atlanta, GA, USA
Administrator


Posts: 362
http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com
Reinterpreting old titles
Posted on: 12/12/2016 9:04:21 PM
I'm almost sure I played that game. That is nice looking.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3296

Reinterpreting old titles
Posted on: 12/13/2016 6:49:04 AM
Brian,

 IIRC, it was one of the few titles that dealt with the entire conflict.

 Another image from a different game of roughly the same area. This game was SPI's The American Civil War.



 Interesting possibilities here to revive old titles but with vastly improved graphics and digital presentation. I also noted there is more freeware called "Zun Tzu" that uses the same Microsoft framework that you had for the World War II game. There are some 200 game representations available for ZT.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Society's righteous paranoia lows profoundly. -- random wisdom of a computer

kaii
Edinburgh, UK
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 1884

Reinterpreting old titles
Posted on: 12/13/2016 3:40:48 PM
Those are really nice maps Bill. I have used another software called VASSAL to digitalise old war games. It seems to work along the same principle, i.e. you can digitalise maps, counters etc, but need to know the rules to be able to actually play the game electronically. The newest versions do include the ability to include some basic rules (movement, combat, supply etc) but still some way off being a full blown game creator.

This is a screenshot of the 2nd Fleet game from Victory Games


---------------
A fool and his money are soon elected.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3296

Reinterpreting old titles
Posted on: 12/14/2016 11:31:33 AM
Kai,

 One thing about Cyberboard, VASSAL, etc. that is interesting is that, besides the ability to bring the old games to a digital presentation, these packages could just as easily be used to create new games. I have been slowly messing around with a platoon-level tactical game, but haven't tried to "port" it to one of these programs. By "new games", I mean someone would have to place pieces on the digital map. It sounds like a set-up in which a referee would "run" the game and players would give orders for their formations, sort of like miniatures wargaming. Once the orders are in, the referee makes the moves and resolves any resulting combat, and then emails out the latest situation map to the players. Great potential for hidden movement, ambushes, realistic movement (don't get out of radio range or into "dead" spots), and only as much information about the other side as would be realistic ("tracked vehicle movement at a distance on this bearing from location X,Y").

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Society's righteous paranoia lows profoundly. -- random wisdom of a computer

kaii
Edinburgh, UK
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 1884

Reinterpreting old titles
Posted on: 12/14/2016 12:34:21 PM

Quote:
Kai,

 One thing about Cyberboard, VASSAL, etc. that is interesting is that, besides the ability to bring the old games to a digital presentation, these packages could just as easily be used to create new games. I have been slowly messing around with a platoon-level tactical game, but haven't tried to "port" it to one of these programs. By "new games", I mean someone would have to place pieces on the digital map. It sounds like a set-up in which a referee would "run" the game and players would give orders for their formations, sort of like miniatures wargaming. Once the orders are in, the referee makes the moves and resolves any resulting combat, and then emails out the latest situation map to the players. Great potential for hidden movement, ambushes, realistic movement (don't get out of radio range or into "dead" spots), and only as much information about the other side as would be realistic ("tracked vehicle movement at a distance on this bearing from location X,Y").

Cheers

BW
--BWilson


I was part of a group a few years ago that set up something like this for one of the Winter War games, where each player took the role of a Division commander (Regiments for the Finns) and basically played it via email with a turn due each week. The Game Master would update the position of the counters, conduct the ordered combat operations and post the results, and, for good measure, throw in a few unforeseen events. Initially the GM would use the actualy board game and send photos of the placement of the counters etc, but after putting it on Vassal, game turns could be updated there and sent out as VASSAL updat files - much easier. Unfortunately the initiative kind of filtered oput as people drifted away but we kept going a good coupl of years.

I'd definitely be up for setting something like that up again.
---------------
A fool and his money are soon elected.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3296

Reinterpreting old titles
Posted on: 12/14/2016 2:04:13 PM
Kai,

 One concept that occurred to me is the use of hex grids. It seems the actual use of hex grids is more useful for the game master than the actual players ("order: move regiment X to location Y"). A map without grids is much easier to produce; if players are comfortable with the game master controlling the resulting placement of units, then it seems more realistic (to me) than a placement coerced by structure of a grid. As much as such movement control schemes advanced wargaming back in the 1960s, they may be something, for refereed games at least, to be something managed in the background, or, to simply serve as a guide.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Society's righteous paranoia lows profoundly. -- random wisdom of a computer

kaii
Edinburgh, UK
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 1884

Reinterpreting old titles
Posted on: 12/14/2016 4:38:41 PM

Quote:
Kai,

 One concept that occurred to me is the use of hex grids. It seems the actual use of hex grids is more useful for the game master than the actual players ("order: move regiment X to location Y"). A map without grids is much easier to produce; if players are comfortable with the game master controlling the resulting placement of units, then it seems more realistic (to me) than a placement coerced by structure of a grid. As much as such movement control schemes advanced wargaming back in the 1960s, they may be something, for refereed games at least, to be something managed in the background, or, to simply serve as a guide.

Cheers

BW
--BWilson


I agree, hexgrids do tend to distort maps a bit and make them "gamey". That is, of course often necessary in order to be able to define set rules for movement, terrain etc (how far can actually a unit move during a certain time, what terrain affects are present in a given battle etc) but there are other ways of managing that too. Hexes tend to be more useful in strategic or large scale tactical simulations, than in small scale tacitcal sims.

Many computer games have the option of switching off the grid and just use the map itself, but movement and combat is still usually regulated by the underlying hex grid to make it manageable. There are alternatives, of course, in miniature games one often uses measure tapes to determine how far a unit ca move, range of fire etc.

In principle, any scheme the players are happy with could be used, and as long as everyone trusts the Gm to make the right calls, any map couldin principle be used.
---------------
A fool and his money are soon elected.

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