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The current time is: 10/23/2017 2:15:23 AM
 Civil War - General    
AuthorMessage
Dick Evick
Waco , TX, USA
top 40
E-4 Corporal
Posts: 143

Confederate Conscription.
Posted on: 7/19/2017 10:06:54 AM
After reading the post "1862 A Year of Bloody Battles" I was wondering if the losses sustained initiated the draft in Confederate States.

Dick.

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 5960
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: Confederate Conscription.
Posted on: 7/19/2017 10:22:43 AM
Yes-Dick -they certainly did-there were some unsavoury exemptions -see below :-

The first general American military draft was enacted by the Confederate government on April 16, 1862, more than a year before the federal government did the same.

The Confederacy took this step because it had to; its territory was being assailed on every front by overwhelming numbers, and the defending armies needed men to fill the ranks.

The compulsory-service law was very unpopular in the South because it was viewed as a usurpation of the rights of individuals by the central government, one of the reasons the South went to war in the first place.

Under the Conscription Act, all healthy white men between the ages of 18 and 35 were liable for a three year term of service. The act also extended the terms of enlistment for all one-year soldiers to three years.


A September 1862 amendment raised the age limit to 45, and February 1864, the limits were extended to range between 17 and 50. Exempted from the draft were men employed in certain occupations considered to be most valuable for the home front, such as railroad and river workers, civil officials, telegraph operators, miners, druggists and teachers.

On October 11, the Confederate Congress amended the draft law to exempt anyone who owned 20 or more slaves. Further, until the practice was abolished in December 1863, a rich drafted man could hire a substitute to take his place in the ranks, an unfair practice that brought on charges of class discrimination.

NB Thanks for reading my thread-would obviously have liked a comment

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

Dick Evick
Waco , TX, USA
top 40
E-4 Corporal
Posts: 143

Re: Confederate Conscription.
Posted on: 7/19/2017 1:19:12 PM
Thanks Jim for the info. I can imagine how unpopular decrees issued by the Central Government must have been.

Were bounties being offered for enlistment rather than being drafted? Some border states did offer bounties earlier in the war I believe.

Dick.

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 5960
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: Confederate Conscription.
Posted on: 7/19/2017 1:34:31 PM
From 1861 to 1865 the Federal government, along with states and localities, paid about $750,000,000 in recruitment bounties.

Congress authorized a $100 bounty in July 1861 to men enlisting for three years.

With the passage of the Enrollment Act (March 3, 1863), three-year enlistees received $300 and five-year recruits got $400, but these sums were divided up and paid in monthly installments with the soldiers’ regular compensation.

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5313

Re: Confederate Conscription.
Posted on: 7/19/2017 3:34:21 PM
There were some unscrupulous practices by recruiters, mostly for the union side, that made their way to Canada West. (now Ontario) and the maritime provinces and Canada East (now Quebec), that became Canada in 1867.

There were accusations that American recruiters were crossing the border to bribe or even kidnap men to serve.

These men were called crimps or crimpers.

Posters like this one from a regiment raised in Detroit, Michigan would appear in Canada West border towns.

[Read More]

The crimpers were offering money to entice recruits in the Province of Canada.

That province and Nova Scotia enacted legislation leading to the arrest and conviction of crimpers.

In 1864, members of the British military arrested several crimpers in Brockville which is near Kingston, Ontario.

Two of the group were sentenced to four and five years in prison. It was found that they had drugged a British subject and were leading him to the border.

Just one example of many.

Rewards were offered to anyone who turned in a crimper and in 1864, the reward was raised to $200 in Canada. Extra border guards were hired as well to apprehend these crimpers.



Most British subjects were supportive of the Confederacy, primarily because of the noises being made by Seward in the US that a foreign war would unite the union and the confederates. Fears of annexation by the union side made Canadians angry toward the union.

Hard to explain then that most of the 40,000 Canadians who volunteered, did so in the union army.

I don't know whether the Confederates were actively recruiting in the Canadas or the Maritimes. There was a problem of the union army being in the way of course.

Union and Confederate spies were very active in cities like Toronto and Montreal.


Dick Evick
Waco , TX, USA
top 40
E-4 Corporal
Posts: 143

Re: Confederate Conscription.
Posted on: 7/20/2017 10:14:21 AM
I've read somewhere that immigrants were also recruited as they entered New York and various other harbors.

Dick.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2773

Re: Confederate Conscription.
Posted on: 7/20/2017 8:11:01 PM
Hi Dick,

I'm reading on some of the Confederate Raiders, Blockade Runners, seeing immigrants, being trained & sent right into the Union Army from Islands & Coastal holding areas!?

MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Lightning
Glasgow, UK
top 20
E-7 Sgt First Class


Posts: 442

Re: Confederate Conscription.
Posted on: 7/21/2017 7:40:53 AM
There was talk, especially in 1862 as foreign recognition seemingly loomed near, of British Crimean War veterans trying to get overseas and join the armies engaged in conflict.

As for conscription, was it not that many men felt they had done their bit (the initial enlistment of one year) and simply wanted to go home? Obviously the resulting loss of experienced manpower would have been devastating for the Confederacy and ended their war effort overnight, hence the draft.

Cheers,

Colin
---------------
"There is no course open to us but to fight it out. Every position must be held to the last man: there must be no retirement. With our backs to the wall and believing in the justice of our cause, each one of us must fight to the end."

 Civil War - General    
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