MHO Home   Forum Home   Help   Register   Login
 
 
Welcome to MilitaryHistoryOnline.com.
You are not signed in.
The current time is: 10/21/2017 1:06:55 AM
 The Military Media Room    
AuthorMessage
George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5306

Watchers of the North
Posted on: 5/6/2017 3:40:13 PM
This is a 6 part documentary about the Canadian Rangers. These are Canadian Forces reservists and in the north the Rangers are made up mostly of Inuit people.

They are the eyes and ears of the Canadian military in our far north.

These aren't spit and polish military people but they are remarkably self sufficient and they know the land.

I know that when our southern reservists and regulars are up there for exercises that they much appreciate the advantages that these people give them.

Some beautiful imagery here too. The Arctic is a strangely beautiful place.

[Read More]

Note the Lee-Enfield rifles that they use. This doc was made 2 years ago and the government is replacing these weapons that the Rangers love.

Too hard to get repair parts for the weapons.


Cheers,

George

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2771

Re: Watchers of the North
Posted on: 5/7/2017 8:22:16 AM
George,

Glad to see 1st Nations have our back!

MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5306

Re: Watchers of the North
Posted on: 5/7/2017 8:35:50 AM
Thanks Dave. Just a head's up on how we classify the traditional inhabitants of Canada.

There are 3 groups. First Nations are the aboriginal people below the Arctic, the people that you folks call Indians. (so have we, but the FN's have never liked it)

Then we have the Inuit who are the aboriginal people of the Arctic.

And the third group are the M├ętis who are considered traditional inhabitants even though this cultural group is the product of the union of First Nations people and Europeans.



As you know, the Watchers of the North in that area of the country are mostly Inuit people.

BTW, the Canadian Ranger programme actually got its start on our west coast during WW2 when Canadians, not necessarily First Nations, were asked to be the eyes and ears of the military on the west coast. There was a fear of a Japanese invasion which was unrealistic but there none the less.

So there are Ranger programmes across the country with the best known being the programmes in the far north.

And they do have our backs and seem very proud to do so.



Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2771

Re: Watchers of the North
Posted on: 5/8/2017 7:58:25 AM
George,

Really how likely is the chances of a conventional attack from the Arctic??

but still it's nice to know the "Watchers of the North", are there!
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5306

Re: Watchers of the North
Posted on: 5/8/2017 8:57:21 AM

Quote:
George,

Really how likely is the chances of a conventional attack from the Arctic??

but still it's nice to know the "Watchers of the North", are there!
MD
--Michigan Dave


They have other functions than coast watching like checking out unmanned radar installations that protect the US and Canada from air attacks.


Those US and Canadian fighters that intercepted Russian bombers last week didn't find them by accident.

They perform search and rescue functions. Canadians Forces SAR is based farther south and these people can often get to a lost or injured person before the military.


But primarily, the Rangers allow Canada to establish sovereignty over that vast Arctic that we claim as ours.

It is the Rangers who often report that ships are sailing through the Northwest Passage and who have not announced to Canada that they are there.

Those intruders are trying hard to establish that the passage is a regularly travelled sea route. That provides ammunition so that the International Court could possibly declare those waters to be an international strait.

That could put our coastline in peril as Canada would have no control over the materials, hazardous or not, that are carried through the passage.

Clean-up for a chemical spill would be on us. As well, search and rescue operations could become our responsibility. You can't allow people on the sea to die without trying to help.

So ownership is a big deal and the US and the EU in particular are anxious to have the Northwest Passage declared an international strait.

Canada argues that the NW passage is made up of Canadian internal waters.

It's all part of establishing a Canadian presence in the Arctic. Maintaining the villages and small air bases in remote communities is part of that.

If Canadians and that's what the Inuit are, are using the Arctic including the internal waterways, that goes a long way to establishing sovereignty.


By conventional attack, I presume that you mean Russians landing on the northern shores of Canada and proceeding to the south.

Didn't that happen in that godawful movie Red Dawn?


 The Military Media Room    
 Forum Ads from Google