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The current time is: 12/16/2017 5:41:09 PM
 Visiting Battlefields, Historical Sites, and Museums    
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BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3549

Lad
Posted on: 6/28/2017 3:13:32 PM
 Stopped by the former monastery of Ląd (Poland) the other day. Founded in the 1100's, the monastery eventually ran afoul of Prussian, and later, Russian authorities in partitioned Poland. In 1921, the Salesian Order made the monastery a seminary. When we showed up, no one was around, but a sign offered a telephone number to call. Upon calling, a seminary student answered and swiftly appeared. He then gave us a personal tour of the historical parts of the monastery ... and he was knowledgeable about the subject.

Image: An aerial view of the former monastery:


Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2965

Re: Lad
Posted on: 6/29/2017 8:32:04 AM
Hi BW,

Wow great history, & architecture the Lad Monastery is! Also nice pic, and really cool that you got your own personal tour. I think a lot of people in America think most of Poland's historical buildings were destroyed in WWII? How true is that?

Thanks for sharing,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3549

Re: Lad
Posted on: 6/29/2017 10:01:25 AM
Dave,

 It varies by city. Warsaw really got flattened by combat and subsequent German demolition. The old town of Warsaw was painstakingly rebuilt after the war. Krakow, I believe, mostly escaped war damage and has many historic sites. The post office in Danzig, a site of 1939 resistance by Polish postal workers, is I believe, still intact. A lot of property like residences and small palaces that belonged to the landed classes were severely abused by the communist authorities after the war (using rooms with old frescoes to quarter farm animals etc.) Those are slowly being brought back to their former glory, but it takes a lot of money and there has to be a promise of enough tourism to recoup the investment.

 There are a lot of World War II tourist sites in the country. Everything from former Nazi camps to V-weapons testing facilities to secretive German tunneling dug into the Owl Mountains (look up "Project Riese").

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Brian Williams
Atlanta, GA, USA
Administrator


Posts: 368
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Re: Lad
Posted on: 7/14/2017 11:39:52 AM
Bill, is English spoken quite a bit? For intance, did the seminary student speak English?

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3549

Re: Lad
Posted on: 7/14/2017 11:44:01 AM
Brian,

 Among the young (to age 30s), yes, many speak English. The seminary student spoke a bit of English, but he was fluent in Spanish. He was due for further education in the UK so his English will no doubt dramatically improve.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

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