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The current time is: 10/17/2017 2:38:42 PM
 (1914-1918) WWI Battles    
AuthorMessage
Lew & Ginny Gage
Cornish, NH, USA
top 60
E-3 Private First Class
Posts: 52

WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/29/2017 12:21:04 PM
Hoping someone can help me with a WWI shell I have. It's approximately 3 3/4" tall and 1 5/8" in diameter.

Anyone have any information on this?





Thanks, BW, for trying to help me! :-)

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3296

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/29/2017 1:47:37 PM
Lew,

 I'm not finding anything on this, but "APX" may stand for "Atelier de Construction de Puteaux", a French armaments firm founded in 1890.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

Society's righteous paranoia lows profoundly. -- random wisdom of a computer

Rick Schaus
Capon Springs, WV, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 548

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/29/2017 3:23:40 PM
It may be a shell casing for this French 37mm gun:

[Read More]

---------------
VR, Rick Schaus

"When things go wrong in your command, start searching for the reason in increasingly large circles around your own desk."
-- Gen. Bruce Clarke

Lew & Ginny Gage
Cornish, NH, USA
top 60
E-3 Private First Class
Posts: 52

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/29/2017 3:43:17 PM
Thank you both!

Ginny

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 669

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/29/2017 6:38:57 PM
Commonly referred to as "trench art."
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Lew & Ginny Gage
Cornish, NH, USA
top 60
E-3 Private First Class
Posts: 52

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/29/2017 7:46:12 PM
Thanks, Jim.

I wonder how many of these were made.

Ginny

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1294

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/29/2017 9:47:17 PM
My guess would be at least thousands.

I have one I have in the past used as an umbrella stand. My brother has its mate, as I recall.

The artwork on mine is not nearly as elaborate or skillfully done, and I've seldom thought about whether it has meaning. Could be a rough rendering of a regimental badge, I suppose. Two hearts separated by what might be a stem with two flowers and two leaves (or a leaf and thorn), and to the right of all this work a single antler.

The base is punched concentrically with '15 DEC' above 'ARSL517 17'. On two separate radii are 'DB' and an 'X' superimposed over either a letter, number or icon that is illegible because of the superimposition.

At any rate, Lew and Ginny's piece is a fine bit of trench art, IMHO.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 669

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/29/2017 10:24:47 PM

Quote:
It may be a shell casing for this French 37mm gun:

[Read More]


--Rick Schaus


More likely the ground version of the gun, which looked like a small artillery piece. It had wheels for transport, but in action was generally employed with the wheels off and was manhandled by the crew. The U.S. received large numbers of them from the French. They were considered very effective against enemy machine gun nests.
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Lew & Ginny Gage
Cornish, NH, USA
top 60
E-3 Private First Class
Posts: 52

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/30/2017 6:37:20 AM
Brian,

Mine isn't large enough to be used as an umbrella stand! I've had it on my desk for many years as a pen/pencil holder!

I just wish I knew who this particular item belonged to. Family member? I had a great-uncle who served in WWI, but I have a letter from my Dad's sister, my great-uncle's niece, that she remembers seeing it in their house growing up. It seems odd that it would belong to him unless he gave it to my grandparents as some sort of gift.

My grandfather was the caretaker at the State Armory in Stamford, CT, when I was growing up, not when he and his family were young, however. It's possible that it was a gift to him from someone back then.

Guess I'll never know for sure.

Ginny

Rick Schaus
Capon Springs, WV, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 548

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/30/2017 10:00:41 AM

Quote:

Quote:
It may be a shell casing for this French 37mm gun:
[Read More]
--Rick Schaus

More likely the ground version of the gun, which looked like a small artillery piece. It had wheels for transport, but in action was generally employed with the wheels off and was manhandled by the crew. The U.S. received large numbers of them from the French. They were considered very effective against enemy machine gun nests.
--Jim Cameron

Why do you believe it was "most likely" for the ground version?




Three Lieutenants with a weapon and no supervision can be dangerous.

---------------
VR, Rick Schaus

"When things go wrong in your command, start searching for the reason in increasingly large circles around your own desk."
-- Gen. Bruce Clarke

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 669

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/30/2017 6:40:18 PM
Just because they were so widely used. But it could have been either.
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Rick Schaus
Capon Springs, WV, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 548

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/30/2017 7:03:10 PM
This is a well-known photograph of US infantry (23rd Regiment) using the Model 1916, 37mm gun in WW1.



---------------
VR, Rick Schaus

"When things go wrong in your command, start searching for the reason in increasingly large circles around your own desk."
-- Gen. Bruce Clarke

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 1294

Re: WWI Shell
Posted on: 1/30/2017 8:57:45 PM
Yeah, Ginny, the provenance of these shells is probably impossible to trace.

The only relative I had who fought in WW1 dies on Nov 4, 1918, on the northwest border of France. He was 18. He didn't bring it back, obviously.

The only other connection I might have is through Harold and Minna Walker, marvellous neighbour of my family during my teens. Both were WW1 vets, which is kinda neat. He was at Gallipoli, where he met Minna – a nurse. He was a Sergeant and she was a Lieutenant. They connected later, when both were in service on the Western Front, though I believe both were by that time quartered in GB rather than France/Belgium.

I have the plate given to them by Harold's Sergeants' Mess (Sgt's Mess, No 5 Canadian General Hospital) on their wedding on December 20, 1917. On his death, he left me other treasures as well, including his collapsible drinking cup and his binoculars. For all I know, he left those two bits of trench art to my parents.

I don't want to exaggerate the size of my tube. Across the base, it is only 85 mm (3 3/8") across. Since I'm assuming from the stamps on the base that this is a British shell casing, I should be able to identify it quite quickly if I wish.

Nice little project for a quiet afternoon.

Cheers
Brian
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

 (1914-1918) WWI Battles    
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