MHO Home   Forum Home   Help   Register   Login
 
 
Welcome to MilitaryHistoryOnline.com.
You are not signed in.
The current time is: 12/18/2017 2:14:19 AM
 (1914-1918) WWI Battles    
AuthorMessage
Phil andrade
London, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Moderator
Posts: 2603

Passchendaele One Hundred
Posted on: 7/31/2017 5:37:03 AM
Today is the centennial of the Third Battle of Ypres, popularly known as Passchendaele, the site of its culminating and most notorious phase.

BBC has produced a superb commemorative programme, broadcast live last night and being continued this morning.

Those of who who have access might do well to watch.

A very livid scar in the national psyche of my countrymen.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5736

Re: Passchendaele One Hundred
Posted on: 7/31/2017 6:10:21 AM
Indeed, we bear the same scar in Canada for the losses incurred in the part of the battle in which the Canadian Corps participated. That happened in November, several months after thousands of Brits had perished as Haig was convinced that this push was to be the big break out.

The Canadian PM Robert Borden became so incensed at the folly of sending men into this type of combat that he threatened to never allow another Canadian to cross the Atlantic to fight should something like this happen again.

To Lloyd George, he said:


Quote:
‘Mr. Prime Minister, I want to tell you that, if there is a repetition of the battle of Passchendaele [where the Canadian Corps suffered about 16,000 casualties], not a Canadian soldier will leave the shores of Canada so long as the Canadian people entrust the government of their country to my hands.’ ”


Phil do you have the name of the BBC programme. I would like to search to see whether any Canadian outlets have picked it up.

Cheers,

George

Phil andrade
London, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Moderator
Posts: 2603

Re: Passchendaele One Hundred
Posted on: 7/31/2017 6:36:28 AM
George,

Try World War One Remembered:

Passchendaele 2017

It's running now.

Quite a lot of Canadian reference last night.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 687

Re: Passchendaele One Hundred
Posted on: 7/31/2017 9:18:46 AM
Passchendaele has always seemed to me to encapsulate everything grim and awful about the Western Front. Even more so than the Somme or Verdun.
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Phil andrade
London, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Moderator
Posts: 2603

Re: Passchendaele One Hundred
Posted on: 7/31/2017 10:04:53 AM
The sense of waste associated with it is unique.

Perhaps on account of its timing.

Futility, waste and horror are attributable to so many battles in that war ; but Passchendaele carries a special notoriety.

It's quite challenging trying to explain why.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5736

Re: Passchendaele One Hundred
Posted on: 8/4/2017 4:16:46 PM
Men were asked to fight in this quagmire.

Many slipped into the shell holes full of water and drowned.









George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 5736

Re: Passchendaele One Hundred
Posted on: 8/4/2017 4:36:18 PM


It was the Canadian Corps under General Arthur Currie that finally took and held the Passchedaele ridge.

Thousands of British and other Commonwealth troops had fought and died in the mire starting on July 31, 1917.


The Anzacs paid a heavy toll when Arthur Currie was asked by Haig relieve them and to take the ridge.

Currie told Haig that it wasn't worth it but Haig was convinced that the German morale was weak and that they were ready to fold.

And he insisted that an attack through the mud and the torrential rains was necessary.

And so Currie, as was his wont, meticulously planned the battle but told Haig that this would cost the Corps 16, 000 casualties.


So on Oct. 30, 3 months after this battle began, the Canadians plus 2 British divisions assaulted Passchendaele Ridge, in a violent rainstorm.

They seized the ridge and held on through heavy German shelling for 5 days. Many men fought in waist deep mud.

Currie predicted 16, 000 casualties and during this period in the Ypres salient, the Corps totalled 15, 654 casualties.


And that was it for 3rd Ypres with 310,000 British and Commonwealth casualties. The Germans lost over 260,000.



How do we measure the success or failure of this battle?


Cheers,

George




Phil andrade
London, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Moderator
Posts: 2603

Re: Passchendaele One Hundred
Posted on: 8/4/2017 5:09:00 PM
The commemorative events this week attest a phenomenal interest....almost as if the passing of living memory elicits a determination that this must not be abandoned.

No comparable interest was apparent fifty years ago, despite the fact - or maybe because of it - that so many veterans of that battle were alive.

Regards, Phil





---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

 (1914-1918) WWI Battles    
 Forum Ads from Google