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 (1914-1918) WWI Battles    
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anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
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Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/16/2017 5:31:02 AM
Originally planned by General Ludendorff as Operation George but was reduced to Operation Georgette, with the objective of capturing Ypres, forcing the British forces back to the channel ports and out of the war.It was during this operation that Haig issued his famous "Backs to the Wall" Order.

In planning, execution and effects, Georgette was similar to (although smaller than) Operation Michael, earlier in the Spring Offensive.

This operation also failed to achieve it's objective--the question is Why???

Regards

Jim
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Phil andrade
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Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/16/2017 11:58:59 AM
An epic defensive stand by the 55th ( Lancashire) division at a place called Givenchy had something to do with it.

Interpretation of military history diverges between those who attribute failure to logistical problems, and suggest an element of "inevitability " in such offensives running out of steam ; and those who prefer to focus on heroic defensive stands by brave and skilful soldiers .

The King's German Legion at Hougomont in the Battle of Waterloo ; the 20th Maine at Little Round Top at Gettysburg ; the " Battered Bastards" of Bastogne in the Battle of the Bulge....these are legendary actions and military folklore flourishes on the retelling.

With that in mind, I would like to think that those Lancashire men in April 1918 helped to save the Allies.

I've seen their monument at Givenchy.

Now, Jim, what do you think ?

Should we raise the heartbeat and seek out the contingencies of choice and the actions of brave men ; or should we look at the drearier but all too important matter of logistics as the determining factor in the failure of Georgette ?


Edit : Jim, check those dates please. I was under the impression that Georgette commenced on 9 April.

Regards, Phil

---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/16/2017 12:52:09 PM
Well Phil-(thank you for dropping by)-broadly speaking when Haig ordered Plumer to vacate the Passchendaele Ridge and form a strong Defence Line. On 13 April, Plumer duly retired in the south side of the salient to a line from Mt Kemmel to Voormezeele (2.5 mi (4.0 km) south of Ypres), White Château (1 mi (1.6 km) east of Ypres) and Pilckem Ridge with 100,000 men facing an equal number of the enemy.

We shall get to individual performances as the narrative flows. The German barrage began at dawn on the 7th April and continued until dawn on 9 April. The Sixth Army then attacked with eight divisions.

The German assault struck the Portuguese Second Division, which held a front of about 11 kilometres (6.8 mi). The Portuguese division was completely overrun and withdrew towards Estaires.

The British 55th Division, to the south of the Portuguese in a more defensible position, pulled back it's northern brigade; and held its ground for the rest of the battle, despite attacks from two German reserve divisions.

Map showing relative positions
[Read More]

Regards

Jim

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Phil andrade
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/16/2017 2:12:17 PM
A brief survey of the concluding chapter of a book on my shelves attributes German failure to incoherent strategy and lack of means to exploit.

The attacking storm troopers did very well and there was tactical expertise that made significant gains.

These gains were wasted because the following waves of German infantry - not the elite stormtroops - were deployed clumsily and were easy targets.

There were not enough horses to move the German guns forward with the necessary speed.

There were no mobile arms at hand to exploit : a few tanks, an array of armoured cars and some cavalry divisions were what the Germans needed here.

They decided not to use them, and to rely on old fashioned artillery and infantry bludgeoining : profligate at the best of times, and especially unwise in the muddy Flanders landscape.

Strategic incoherence was on display : moving the axis of advance away from Hazebrouk and up towards Ypres was a big mistake.

The Germans made local advances, but then got themselves funnelled into deadly salients where they were smitten by converging artillery and mg fire. Passchendaele in reverse.

This strategic failure was all the more remarkable in view of some of the spectacular successs that the elite German infantry units gained : that at Mount Kemmel in the last days of April being especially worthy of note.

Haig's Order of the Day stands as testimony to the real state of alarm in British HQ.

In retrospect, we see German failure as attributable to traditional WW1 syndrome : but, at the time, it was bloody frightening and things looked pretty grim.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Jim Cameron
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/16/2017 8:00:09 PM
Excellent summation.
One problem with the stormtroopers was that these elite formations tended to be used up as they kept driving forward. Effective, yes, but at excessive cost.
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/17/2017 4:02:59 AM
Once again ,as in Operation Michael;the Germans ran out of thrust via significant losses of their spearhead troops,lack of horses to bring up guns and supplies; and as you say Phil the quality of their "follow up troops"" was found wanting.

The French- who were fresher than the British- put up a stout defence-causing the advance to halt short of Cassel and Montb des; Cats and thus the British retained the Ypres Salient.

The attempt to reach the sea thus failed.I am convinced the Ludendorff was poor at assessing his logistical needs (As in Michael)This second attempt at reaching the sea cost the Germans 120,000 casualties from the 4th and 6th Armies.

I fear that I too have got ahead of myself-I will try to recoup.

Regards

Jim
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anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/17/2017 5:07:58 AM
BRITISH Order of Battle

First Army (Horne)

XI Corps (Haking)
3rd Division
51st (Highland) Division-Ex Operation Michael
55th (West Lancashire) Division, which fought the defence of Givenchy
61st (2nd South Midland) Division
2nd Brigade of 1st Division
2nd Portuguese Division
3rd Brigade of 1st Portuguese Division.

XV Corps (Du Cane)
29th Division, less 88th Brigade
31st Division
34th Division, less 102nd Brigade
40th Division
50th (Northumbrian) Division-Ex Operation Michael
74th Brigade of 25th Division.-

Second Army (Plumer)

IX Corps (Gordon)
9th (Scottish) Division
19th (Western) Division
25th Division, less 74th Brigade.
62nd Brigade of 21st Division
88th Brigade of 29th Division.
100th Brigade of 33rd Division
102nd Brigade of 34th Division.
108th Brigade of 36th (Ulster) Division
147th and 148th Brigades of 49th (West Riding) Division.


Regards

Jim


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anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/17/2017 7:55:27 AM
On 10 April, German Fourth Army attacked north of Armentières with four divisions, against the British 19th Division and the Germans broke through, advancing up to 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) on a 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) front,pb] and capturing the once hard fought for Messines.

The 25th Division to the south, flanked on both sides, withdrew about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi). By 11 April, the British situation was desperate; it was on this day that Haig issued his famous "backs to the wall" order.Enter the 1st Australian Inf Division and the Fremch are coming to assist us..

Regards

Jim
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phil andrade
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/17/2017 12:36:11 PM
Jim,

You'll see that this series of battles in Flanders lasted longer than their counterparts in Picardy ( 21 days for Georgette, only 16 days for Michael/Mars ) : yet the scale was much smaller.

Those 120,000 German casualties you allude to for the Battle of the Lys ( 9-29 April) were only half those of the battle that raged between 21 March and 5 April.

Likewise, the British casualties in Flanders were only half those of the earlier fighting.

Half the casualties in nearly double the time, more or less.

But the sense of alarm - and, perhaps, dismay - that Haig experienced in the later fighting was clearly more apparent than it had been in March.

The proximity of the Channel Ports made the thing look more existential.

Regards, Phil

---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/17/2017 1:12:59 PM
Yet in the long run Phil -it was logistics that brought about this second failure; and once again the Germans were left with a useless salient-to be shot at from three sides.Michael causing double the casualties in half the time does not surprise me.

For the Germans Michael was a first and an absolutely determined effort to finish off the war-they fought almost recklessly IMO; and the Allies were equally determined that result did not come about and they too fought desperately regardless of losses.

Georgette was not as determined-if it had been- they should have swept aside the weakened 1st and 2nd armies of the British. Again IMO-they were given time to regroup-A HUGE MISTAKE.

Regards

Jim
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Phil andrade
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/17/2017 1:49:52 PM
they fought almost recklessly

You're right, Jim.

The German casualty figures in that fighting speak of profligacy : reckless is the word that fits.

If Haig started to show signs of alarm, one has to wonder how Ludendorff reacted to the realisation that his tactical prowess was not matched by coherent strategy....especially when he took a quarter of a million casualties in a couple of weeks.

Come to think of it, when Haig issued that order of the day, didn't he use the word reckless when he alluded to the sacrifice of lives made by the Germans ?

Regards, Phil

---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/17/2017 1:57:40 PM
SPECIAL ORDER OF THE DAY
By FIELD-MARSHAL SIR DOUGLAS HAIG
K.T., G.C.B., G.C.V.O., K.C.I.E.
Commander-in-Chief, British Armies in France

To ALL RANKS OF THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE AND FLANDERS

Three weeks ago to-day the enemy began his terrific attacks against us on a fifty-mile front. His objects are to separate us from the French, to take the Channel Ports and destroy the British Army.

In spite of throwing already 106 Divisions into the battle and enduring the most reckless sacrifice of human life, he has as yet made little progress towards his goals.

We owe this to the determined fighting and self-sacrifice of our troops. Words fail me to express the admiration which I feel for the splendid resistance offered by all ranks of our Army under the most trying circumstances.

Many amongst us now are tired. To those I would say that Victory will belong to the side which holds out the longest. The French Army is moving rapidly and in great force to our support.

There is no other course open to us but to fight it out. Every position must be held to the last man: there must be no retirement. With our backs to the wall and believing in the justice of our cause each one of us must fight on to the end. The safety of our homes and the Freedom of mankind alike depend upon the conduct of each one of us at this critical moment.

(Signed) D. Haig F.M.
Commander-in-Chief
British Armies in France

General Headquarters
Tuesday, April 11th, 1918

Regards

Jim
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anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/17/2017 2:04:04 PM
On 12 April, the Sixth Army renewed its attack in the south, towards the important supply centre of Hazebrouck-the goal, another 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) to the west. The Germans advanced some 2–4 kilometres (1.2–2.5 mi) and captured Merville--short by some 4 miles

On 13 April the attackers were stopped by the First Australian Division, which had been hurriedly transferred to the area.This entire operation by the Germans was far too scaattered to achieve it's pbjective

The British Fourth Division defended Hinges Ridge, the Fifth Division held Nieppe Forest and the 33rd Division was also involved.

Regards

Jim
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anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/18/2017 3:49:51 AM
There were nine separate battles over a broad front in this Operation.
IMO it was too diverse to gain the objective chosen-to reach the coast.

Question-what would the Germans[b[ have been able to do had they reached the coast ????


Regards

Jim
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phil andrade
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/18/2017 11:16:02 AM
Jim,

In his memoirs, Hindenburg makes comments that are virtually tailor-made to address the comments and questions you pitch...

Our infantry had suffered extremely heavily in their fight with the enemy machine gun nests, and their complete exhaustion threatened unless we paused in our attack for a time. On the other hand, the situation urgently exacted an early decision. We had arrived at one of those crises in which the continuation of the attack is extremely difficult, but when the defence seems to be wavering. The release from such a situation can only come from a further attack and not by merely holding on.....We had to capture Mount Kemmel.

There you have it : a kind of " mission creep ", whereby the Germans were winning tactical successes but were digging themselves deeper into a hole.

It would be interesting to investigate his comment about the seemingly wavering defence.

Hindenburg makes a significant admission It is true that we had received reports about the failure of certain of our units . I wonder what kind of "failure " he alludes to.

He goes on to emphasise the dire prospects that faced Britain if the Germans were able to consolidate their hold in such a manner as to put the Channel Ports in range of their guns... If no French help arrived England would probably be lost in Flanders....I believed that the war would be decided if this attack were successfully carried through. If we reached the Channel Coast we should lay hands directly on England's vital arteries. In so doing we should not only be in the most favourable position conceivable for interrupting her maritime communications, but our heaviest artillery would be able to get a portion of the South Coast of Britain under fire. The mysterious marvel of technical science, which was even now sending its shells into the French capital from the region of Laon, could be employed against England also. The marvel need only to be a little greater to get the heart of the English commercial and political world within its range from the coast near Calais. That would be a serious prospect for Great Britain, not only for the moment, but for her whole future !

There you go, then...a chilling reminder that the Germans were as eager to use their " Vengeance " weapons in 1918 as they were to be a generation later ; and while it's tempting to use hindsight to see how flawed their logistics were, and how their grasp exceeded their reach, we must not forget that this was an existential crisis, and that Haig meant it when he said that backs were to the wall.

Yes, it was frightening and truly perilous, and we must not allow ourselves the luxury of retrospective complacency.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/18/2017 12:09:50 PM
Many thanks Phil for the Hindenberg revelations; but their penny packet attacks over a protracted time did for the whole Operation.I would assume that the failure of some of their units would be the poor quality "follow up" units-which I have read "refused to go on under very heavy m/c gunfire".


The withdrawal from Passchendaele Ridge

Quote:
On 16 April, patrols went forward during the morning and found the area between the old and new front lines to be empty, the Germans still apparently in ignorance of the retirement; one patrol captured a German officer scouting for observation posts who did not know where the British were.

Only in the late afternoon did German troops begin to close up to the new line and the British troops in the Battle Zone easily repulsed the German infantry, the 4th Army diary recorded that patrols discovered the withdrawal at 4;40 a.m. that afternoon. Next day, the Belgian Army defeated an attack from Houthulst Forest (The Battle of Merckem) against the 10th and 3rd Belgian divisions from Langemarck to Lake Blankaart by the 58th, 2nd Naval and the 6th Bavarian divisions, with help from the II Corps artillery.

The Germans captured Kippe but were forced out by counter-attacks and the line was restored by nightfall. On the afternoon of 27 April, the south end of the outpost line was driven in when Voormezeele was captured, re-captured and then partly captured by the Germans; another outpost line was set up north-east of the village


I am not at all sure that the German offensive could have reached the coast- both militarily and logistically-it would mean a sort of corridor stretching from say Ypres which would be extremely vulnerable to flank attacks and would be cut and finally isolated-Dunkirk fashion.--

In the event more French reinforcements arrived in the latter part of April, the Germans had suffered many casualties, especially among the stoßtruppen and attacks toward Hazebrouck failed. ]

It was clear that Georgette could not achieve its objectives; on 29 April the German high command called off the offensive.

Regards

Jim






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Phil andrade
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Re: Operation Georgette -7-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/18/2017 5:52:25 PM
Haig might have been worried about the reliability of his own army at that juncture.

I can produce nothing definitive to exemplify this : it's a suspicion I have.

The Order of the Day was uncharacteristic of Haig.

On two other occasions that I can think of British commanders have issued orders redolent of this one : the first before Le Cateau, and the second before El Alamein.

In both those instances the respective British armies had undergone retreat and defeat, yielding many prisoners, and senior officers were twitchy about the resolve of their men.

I wonder if Haig felt that way in April 1918 .


Regards, Phil
---------------
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"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

scoucer
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Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/18/2017 7:29:02 PM

Quote:
Edit : Jim, check those dates please. I was under the impression that Georgette commenced on 9 April.

Regards, Phil--Phil andrade


Yes, Ludendorff`s birthday.

Trevor
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Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/19/2017 3:29:48 AM
I admit that the assault by troops commenced om the 9th; but so as I am aware the pre assault bombardment commenced on the 7th.The 17th is a mistake I did not correct early enough.

Re.British troop morale-there were too many shattered infantry divisions sent north to recover from Operation Michael eg. 50th and 51st amongst others

Regards

Jim
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Phil andrade
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Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/19/2017 4:20:38 AM
Jim,

There is a lurid - and, IMHO, fabricated - account by a British officer in the MG Corps about an incident in the retreat of March 1918.

The officer's name was Seton Hutchison, and he relates how he turned his own MGs on a group of British soldiers who were fleeing the field, killing all forty of them .

The consensus is that this is a preposterous story, invented by a maverick who later joined the Fascist party and liked to espouse the more drastic and ruthless facets of right wing military leadership.

And yet...the phrase " no smoke without a fire " comes to mind : perhaps there was a real crisis of morale in some parts of the army, and I wouldn't be surprised if this accounts for the rather unrestrained tone of Haig's Order of the Day.

Maybe Haig had been getting unsettling reports, and was understandably anxious about the ability of his army to hold.

That comment Many amongst us our now tired is a pregnant one.

Why would he state that ? Surely, that would go without saying ?

There is something in the tone and timing of that order that merits reflection.

The Germans, I think, were far more open about countenancing problems of this kind : a degree of candour makes for a good didactic in an army that cherishes devolved command and control. You'll see that Hindenburg alludes to that " failure "....perhaps the British were more censorious in that regard ?

One thing, however, stands as irrefutable evidence of effective and lethal British resistance : a German casualty list of 350,000 killed or wounded in forty days.

Regards , Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/19/2017 5:02:02 AM

Quote:
Maybe Haig had been getting unsettling reports, and was understandably anxious about the ability of his army to hold.

That comment Many amongst us our now tired is a pregnant one.

Why would he state that ? Surely, that would go without saying ?

There is something in the tone and timing of that order that merits reflection.
Phil

I have no option but to agree entirely with your assessment Phil-but Haig's Order came as a smack in the face for men of the 19th,25th, 50th and 51st divisions who had fought so hard in Operation Michael-they had little left in the morale tank-it was not that they did not fight-it was for the likes of them the last straw and probably felt hard done by,especially as their ranks had been filled by raw bare faced boys.The French coming at that time- just was not true

Regards

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phil andrade
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Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/19/2017 6:11:19 AM
Jim,

The French coming at that time - just was not true .

Now here's something to discuss !

The French were bitter with recrimination ; they decided that the German breakthrough on 21 March was attributable to British ineptitude and made their feelings very apparent.

Hindenburg's memoirs contain a huge error in this respect : he states that the British lost Mt Kemmel in late April, and that the French, furious again, were given the job of rectifying the situation and saving the British.

In fact, the French were given the Mt Kemmel sector to hold, and they - not the British - were the people who lost it. This time, the British made their opinions of the French very clear.

When the Germans turned their principal effort against the French army one month later along the Chemin des Dames, the French front was blown apart in short order, and those who had criticised the British in March were left with a significant amount of egg on their faces.

But there is also a tendency of some historians to understate the efforts of the French in those March - April battles. They sustained 92,000 casualties in direct support of the British in participation in the Michael/ Mars/ Georgette fighting, in addition to many thousands of casualties they suffered elsewhere along the Western Front. The British figure was 236,000, out of a total of 300,000 for the entire front in France and Flanders. The significant thing that I pick up on in these figures is the scores of thousands that were killed, wounded, gassed or taken prisoner in so called " quiet sectors " when the really big headline battles were occurring elsewhere.

A lot of diversionary attacks were launched by the Germans, sometimes in sectors far removed from their main effort. For example, when they were in the process of capturing Mount Kemmel in Flanders - a feat of arms by the Germans that I reckon was so outstanding that it merits more attention - they resurrected their attacks in the Somme area a long way to the south, resulting in the legendary action at Villers Brettoneux.

There is a Latin phrase that I love - Furor Teutonicus - and I can think of no better exemplar of its meaning than the performance of the German armies in France and Flanders in the spring and early summer of 1918 !

Regards, Phil

---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/19/2017 7:04:25 AM
How do I follow that JHC!!!

Second Battle of Kemmel (25–26 April)[edit]


Quote:
French marshal, Foch, had recently assumed supreme command of the Allied forces and on 14 April agreed to send French reserves to the Lys sector. A French division relieved the British defenders of the Kemmelberg.

From 25–26 April, the Fourth Army made a sudden attack on the Kemmelberg with three divisions and captured it. This success gained some ground but it made no progress toward a new break in the Allied line.


Cannot sa there was anything remarkable about that victory by the Germans -3 to 1 against.

French antipathy-were they duped by Haig over Operation Michael-the collapse of 5th Army was it real or staged???
The end result was a useless salient made by the Germans

Regards

Jim
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anemone
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Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/19/2017 9:02:15 AM
Shaw Sparrow on 5th Arny's performance

"The troops of the Fifth Army were exposed in such scanty numbers to an attack so well organized and so formidable that, without exaggeration it can be said, they seemed to have no chance whatever of saving the situation.

Yet they did save it, and that they succeeded is due
entirely to the truly wonderful and magnificent manner in
which they fought and fought on. Courage to face terrific
dangers for a few hours would not have sufficed. Their
claim to honour rests on a much greater foundation than
this, since they supported fatigue and exhaustion through
days and nights, and yet maintained throughout their courage
and their " will to act."

We wonder how they did it. I can only surmise that
it came from the great and gallant spirit that animated the
Fifth Army, super-imposed on the virtues of honour and self-
sacrifice which are the heritage of all our race."

What can I say ???

Regards

Jim
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Phil andrade
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Posts: 2475

Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/19/2017 11:05:22 AM
What can I say ???


You can say, Jim, that your grandfather, at the cost of his life, demonstrated the truth of that citation you posted.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 5947
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/19/2017 11:16:23 AM
Awarded the Military Cross.

Captain James Cunliffe LEASK,
5th Battalion , Northumberland Fusiliers , T.F.,
attached 5th Btn . , Border Regiment.

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to-duty '
in leading a counter-attack through a village. After,
severe fighting , he successfully cleared the village and
enabled a force to be.extricated, thus greatly assisting the
withdrawal that was in progress.He behaved with gallantry and skill

Extract London Gazette,
28th July 1918

Regards

James Cunliffe Ainslie aka Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 5947
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: Operation Georgette -17-29 April 1918
Posted on: 9/20/2017 3:20:54 AM
It is ironic to know that some of the British divisions (incl.the 5oth) which had participated in Georgette were sent to the Chemin des Dames to recover; and again it was the wrong place-this was the setting for Operation Blucher-Yorke which commenced on 27th May.Following this battle the 50th had to be rebuilt

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

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