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 (1914-1918) WWI Battles    
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Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/29/2017 9:14:50 PM
Still Jim, The Dog fights were high profile, & exciting!

[Read More]

Cheers,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
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Posts: 687

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/29/2017 9:41:17 PM

Quote:
Still Jim, The Dog fights were high profile, & exciting!

Cheers,
MD
--Michigan Dave


They certainly made for more exciting movies!
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 687

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/29/2017 9:41:20 PM

Quote:
Still Jim, The Dog fights were high profile, & exciting!

Cheers,
MD
--Michigan Dave


They certainly made for more exciting movies!
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 687

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/29/2017 9:42:17 PM

Quote:
Still Jim, The Dog fights were high profile, & exciting!

Cheers,
MD
--Michigan Dave


They certainly made for more exciting movies!
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Phil andrade
London, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Moderator
Posts: 2597

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 3:19:21 AM

Quote:
Despite all the attention given the fighters, and dogfighting, observation and reconnaissance was the most important function of WW1 aviation.
--Jim Cameron


Yes.

To a degree, airmen were playing the same role as that of the cavalrymen of earlier warfare.

Indeed, Von Richthofen himself was a cavalryman.

If this was true of the Red Baron, might it have been true of other Aces, too ?

Perhaps the cavalrymen of WW1 were not the obsolete nincompoops of popular legend.

Regards, Phil


---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 3:59:14 AM
Organisation and tactics changed with the introduction of the synchronized machine-gun. At first flying aces adopted "lone wolf" tactics. However, by 1917 British pilots tended to seek out enemy aircraft in groups of six.

The flight commander would be in front, with an aircraft on either side forming a V shape. To the rear and above were two other planes and at the back was the sub-leader. However, when in combat, the pilots operated in pairs, one to attack, and the other to defend. German pilots preferred larger formations and these were later known as circuses.

One of the most important figures in the development of dogfight tactics was Major Mick Mannock. Between May 1917 and his death in July 1918, Mannock became Britain's leading flying ace with seventry-three victories.He was upstaged by Canadian Major Bishop with bo victories and of course the Red Baron

When attacking, the best tactic was to dive upon the target out of the sun. This strategy reduced the time that the pilot being attacked could bank or dive and avoid being hit. Later in the war some observers fixed mirrors in line with their gun, which could them be used to reflect the rays of the sun back into the eyes of the attacking pilot.

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 6:18:23 AM
Before the great air battles of the Flying Aces in 1917/18.The summer of 1915 was a dark time for the RFC; Germany was clearly winning the air war. British pilots called the period the “Fokker Scourge” or “Fokker Scare”. And things were about to get worse.

In August, the planes of 2 Squadron RFC mounted a pre-dawn raid on a vital airfield behind German lines. Flying their slow-moving BE2c aircraft, the British pilots caught their unsuspecting enemies on the ground at 0500 hours. Many Eindeckers were destroyed before they could get airborne, yet some Fokkers managed to get aloft after the raid and tore off in pursuit of the retreating RFC aircraft.

Among the German pilots flying that day were Max Immelmann and Oswald Boelcke, two the Kaiser’s finest fighter aces. Opening their engines up to full throttle, the Fokkers quickly closed to within range of the BE2c raiders; and the slaughter commenced-only two BE2c's escaped.

Picture of Max Immelmann performing his famous manouevre

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Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
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Posts: 687

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 10:19:50 AM
Beware of the Hun in the sun!
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

anemone
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 11:16:55 AM
Absolutely Jim-the Immelmann Climb,Turn,Invert and swoop down and fly in behind the victim was deadly.I thought you may have remarked at the absence of a mention of Eddie Rickenbacker-the American ace.

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

MikeMeech
UK
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Posts: 322

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 12:10:03 PM

Quote:
Before the great air battles of the Flying Aces in 1917/18.The summer of 1915 was a dark time for the RFC; Germany was clearly winning the air war. British pilots called the period the “Fokker Scourge” or “Fokker Scare”. And things were about to get worse.

In August, the planes of 2 Squadron RFC mounted a pre-dawn raid on a vital airfield behind German lines. Flying their slow-moving BE2c aircraft, the British pilots caught their unsuspecting enemies on the ground at 0500 hours. Many Eindeckers were destroyed before they could get airborne, yet some Fokkers managed to get aloft after the raid and tore off in pursuit of the retreating RFC aircraft.

Among the German pilots flying that day were Max Immelmann and Oswald Boelcke, two the Kaiser’s finest fighter aces. Opening their engines up to full throttle, the Fokkers quickly closed to within range of the BE2c raiders; and the slaughter commenced-only two BE2c's escaped.

Picture of Max Immelmann performing his famous manouevre

[Read More]


Regards

Jim
--anemone


Hi Jim

Are you sure about this story (date/unit)? What is your source?

Immelmann achieved his first victory on 1 Aug. 1915 against a BE.2c, '1662' of No. 2 Sqn. which was on a bombing mission near Vitry. The BE.2c was forced to land near Douai, the pilot 2Lt Reid was WIA and became a POW. There was no observer as it was carrying bombs and could not carry both. This was the only 2 Sqn. and RFC loss (TSTB 2, page 17). Immelmann's next claim was on 26 Aug. against a French Biplane.
Boelcke's only August 1915 claim was on the 19th (2nd Victory), this was against another No.2 Sqn. aeroplane, probably a BE.2c, although he claimed a Bristol Biplane. The 2 Sqn. machine was forced to land after a fuel pipe was shot through but got back to its own lines near Arras, Capt J G Henderson and Capt W R Barker were both OK (TSTB 2, page 18), again this was the only 2 Sqn. and RFC casualty on this date. Immelmann and Boelcke were members of the same unit, FA62, but their 'victories' against No. 2 Sqn. during August 1915 were on different days. There was no major loss of 2 Sqn. aircraft on bombing missions during that month, total RFC casualties for the month was 12, 4 KIA, 6 POW and 2 WIA (TSTB 2, page 347).

Mike

anemone
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 12:44:06 PM
My mistake Mike -only two lost shown --completely misread the script-(my eyesight is pretty poor) from www. militaryhistoryonlinenow. Thanks for bringing this to my attention-seems the site was also wrong.

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

Phil andrade
London, UK
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 3:45:08 PM
There are two episodes that come to my mind which show how deadly aerial attack on ground forces could be in WW1, but neither of these were on the Western Front, which is not what one might expect, given the preponderance of technology that was lavished on that theatre of the war.

A retreating Bulgarian column was mercilessly strafed by RAF machines in the closing stages of the Macedonian campaign in 1918 ; and at about the same time in the Middle East an Ottoman force was similarly punished by the British airforce when it was caught on the hop.

The resulting carnage was spectacular and a portent for a future generation.

Did these British successes occur in the " sideshows " because of air supremacy, which was not attained in the West ?

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

MikeMeech
UK
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Posts: 322

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 9/30/2017 4:59:37 PM

Quote:
There are two episodes that come to my mind which show how deadly aerial attack on ground forces could be in WW1, but neither of these were on the Western Front, which is not what one might expect, given the preponderance of technology that was lavished on that theatre of the war.

A retreating Bulgarian column was mercilessly strafed by RAF machines in the closing stages of the Macedonian campaign in 1918 ; and at about the same time in the Middle East an Ottoman force was similarly punished by the British airforce when it was caught on the hop.

The resulting carnage was spectacular and a portent for a future generation.

Did these British successes occur in the " sideshows " because of air supremacy, which was not attained in the West ?

Regards, Phil
--Phil andrade


Hi

While in Macedonia and Palestine 'Air Supremacy' was achieved the terrain also played a part in the successful ground attack operations. The Bulgarians were attacked when retreating along the Vardar Valley-Cestovo-Kosturino roads which had ravines and mountain sides giving them no where to run, they were also totally demoralised and did not do much firing back at the aircraft. The attacks on them in the Kresna pass, which was a deep narrow gorge on the Sturma river was also a success for the air attacks for similar reasons.
Palestine was a similar situation, the road from Tul Karm through 'Anebta towards Nablus went through a defile where the Turks transport could not leave the road, this is where the RAF hit them. The other famous attack was on the Wadi el Far'a road, where the head of the retreating Turkish column was hit, blocking the route, with the troops having no where to run among the heights and precipices.

The terrain on the Western Front on the whole gave the Germans more routes to retreat on and places to disperse. Also the German air strength was greater, however, the Jastas operated in larger formations so they could achieve superiority in their attacks. This was successful in limited areas but left much of the front line open for the RAF to attack German troops without interference. One could be cynical and think that this tactic enabled the German 'aces' to continue to build up their 'kills' although it was a poor tactic for the troops on the ground that suffered without air protection. However, if the Jastas had spread there protection over a wider area they may well have been totally overwhelmed even if they did give better protection to more German troops for a limited time period.
That all being said the RAF possibly killed and wounded more enemy troops on the Western front during 1918 in their ground attack missions than they did in the 'side shows'. This is because the RAF ground attacks were a constant aspect of the fighting during the 100 days, when the weather permitted, even if less 'spectacular' than in Macedonia and Palestine.

Mike

Phil andrade
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 2:31:19 AM
Thank you, Mike, one could not have hoped for a better answer to the question that I asked.

Am I right when I suggest that British loss of aircraft and crew reached a peak in September 1918, indicating how intense and effective German resistance was at this late stage ?

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 3:29:45 AM
September 1918


Quote:
Known as "Black September;" during the month the Allies lose 560 aircraft, of which 87 are American.

The Royal Air Force begins to issue parachutes to its squadrons for the first time.

September 2 – The Imperial German Navy's air service brings together five of its Marine Feld Jagstaffeln ("Navy Field Fighter Squadrons") – Jagdstaffeln I, II, III, IV, and V – to form its first Jagdgeschwader (fighter wing), the Royal Prussian Marine Jagdgeschwader ("Navy Fighter Wing"), with Gotthard Sachsenberg as its first commanding officer. It is Germany's fourth Jagdgeschwader.
Wiki

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

MikeMeech
UK
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 5:57:01 AM

Quote:
Thank you, Mike, one could not have hoped for a better answer to the question that I asked.

Am I right when I suggest that British loss of aircraft and crew reached a peak in September 1918, indicating how intense and effective German resistance was at this late stage ?

Regards, Phil
--Phil andrade


Hi

We should recall what was actually going on at the time on the Western Front, there was a whole series of big and smaller 'battles', including:

Fighting on the Drocourt-Queant Line.
St. Mihiel Offensive in the south.
Battle of Havrincourt and Epehy.
Allied preparations for attacking the Hindenburg Line.
Battle of the Canal Du Nord.
Battles in Flanders.
Battle for the Hindenburg Line.

The 'air battle' was not separate from the 'ground battle', supporting these operations was the RAF's main duty which was fulfilled. The German Jastas were 'effective' at times and in areas where they appeared in large formations causing quite high casualties to the RAF and other 'allied' air arms. However, they were not 'effective' in preventing the 'allied' air operations over the battlefield that were achieving victories on the ground. Indeed during September, periods of bad weather were a greater hindrance to 'allied' air operations than the Jastas. This is not to diminish the 'success' of Jasta units in shooting down RAF and other 'allied' aircraft but to put it in context. The Jasta victories were, in the great scheme of things, 'limited' tactical successes while the 'allies' were achieving operational and strategic successes on the ground and in the air with their operations. There was a cost to the Germans as well as COGAS, pages 302-310 has around 600 German air personnel casualties in September 1918 (not all on the WF but most were), many of whom could not be replaced. In October the RAF aircraft and personnel casualties drop substantially despite some of the heaviest air fighting of the war taking place in that month (the 30th October being the heaviest of the war).
I hope that helps.

Mike

Phil andrade
London, UK
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 8:38:33 AM
Thanks, Mike, that does help,

I'll conduct some CWGC research and see what it reveals.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
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Posts: 687

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 10:18:02 AM
How effective were RAF attacks on German troops? They certainly get a fair amount of attention, but given the state of aircraft technology, how much actual damage did they inflict?
There seems to have been a distinct morale factor to having enemy aircraft overhead, especially when your own were nowhere to be seen. Was there still something of a novelty to being under attack from the air, regardless of how deadly, that may have come through in the telling? Or for that matter, to attacking ground troops from the air?
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Phil andrade
London, UK
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Posts: 2597

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 10:23:28 AM
Revelations from CWGC database...

Selected three periods of warfare of peak intensity for British and Dominion forces on the Western Front : the month of July 1916 ; April 1917 ; March 1918 and September and October 1918.

In July 1916, fewer than one tenth of one per cent of all British Empire dead in France and Flanders were airmen. In April 1917 - Bloody April - that figure rose to one half of one per cent.

March 1918 - an intense and desperate month - the figure rose to 0.6 %.

For the two months, September and October 1918 - the triumphant phase - the figure jumped to 1.3%.

In actual numbers, the figures are pretty small, reaching a high of 742 in the September- October 1918 period ; but the disparities are more than significant, and attest the development of air power as a crucial feature in the conduct of warfare .

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 11:50:30 AM
The Introduction of the Tank

The first use of tanks on the battlefield was the use of British Mark I tanks at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette (part of the Battle of the Somme) on 15 September 1916, with mixed results; many broke down, but nearly a third succeeded in breaking through.



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Regards

Jim
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Phil andrade
London, UK
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Posts: 2597

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 1:58:58 PM

Quote:
How effective were RAF attacks on German troops? They certainly get a fair amount of attention, but given the state of aircraft technology, how much actual damage did they inflict?
There seems to have been a distinct morale factor to having enemy aircraft overhead, especially when your own were nowhere to be seen. Was there still something of a novelty to being under attack from the air, regardless of how deadly, that may have come through in the telling? Or for that matter, to attacking ground troops from the air?
--Jim Cameron



Jim,

Without giving specific references, I can say that reading Jack Sheldon's books on the German Army in the Great War - and I allude here to his books on the Somme and Passchendaele - I was surprised at how much mention the German soldiers made of their sense of vulnerability at the hands of British airmen who strafed them and made their existence yet more perilous. There must have been some damage, and not to morale only.

If memory serves me - and Mike Meech might help out here - during the early phase of the 1916 Somme battle some RFC ( or were they French ? ) aircraft bombed and strafed a German troop train as the men were about to be deployed, and, it is claimed, killed 250 men. A tall claim, but one that merits investigation.

Regards, Phil

---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
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Posts: 687

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/1/2017 2:47:50 PM
I seem to recall reading of similar complaints from U.S. troops when German aircraft seemed to be unopposed by U.S. planes.
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

anemone
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/2/2017 4:26:39 AM
Is it possible Jim- that this was not a ground attack as such; but another German tactic- which was to send a very small number of aircraft to continually strafe an area - not so much to cause casualties; but to cause alarm and possible lack of morale.????

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

anemone
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/2/2017 4:26:50 AM
Is it possible Jim- that this was not a ground attack as such; but another German tactic- which was to send a very small number of aircraft to continually strafe an area - not so much to cause casualties; but to cause alarm and possible lack of morale.????

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/2/2017 7:09:45 AM

Quote:
I seem to recall reading of similar complaints from U.S. troops when German aircraft seemed to be unopposed by U.S. planes.
--Jim Cameron

For the guys on the ground the friendly air could never get there fast enough. I suspect it was a matter of perception in many cases, a lack of available air assets in others, and just plain SNAFUs in others.

OpanaPointer
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/2/2017 7:14:13 AM
Additionally, interdictions made outside the immediate observation range of the ground troops didn't count for them.

MikeMeech
UK
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Posts: 322

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/3/2017 1:27:47 PM

Quote:
How effective were RAF attacks on German troops? They certainly get a fair amount of attention, but given the state of aircraft technology, how much actual damage did they inflict?
There seems to have been a distinct morale factor to having enemy aircraft overhead, especially when your own were nowhere to be seen. Was there still something of a novelty to being under attack from the air, regardless of how deadly, that may have come through in the telling? Or for that matter, to attacking ground troops from the air?
--Jim Cameron


Hi

Air attacks (sticking to front line or just behind the line operations rather than 'bombing attacks' against targets more to the rear) could be quite effective at hindering or delaying when used in defensive or offensive operations (artillery called in by aeroplanes could be more destructive). For example the RAF Communique for April 12th 1918 mentions aircraft of the 1st and 2nd Brigades employed:

"...bombing and machine-gunning from low height, the enemy's troops between Wytschaete and La Bassee Canal. Pilots flew from anything between 2,000 and 50 feet."

These attack went on all day against attacking German troops, the 1st Brigade dropped 800 bombs and fired 61,000 rounds. The 2nd Brigade dropped 500 bombs and fired 15,000 rounds. They especially targeted locations where enemy troops were massing for an attack (which were reported by aircraft). These would at least cause some disruption.

During the Amiens attack in August the nine fighter squadrons of the 5th Brigade dropped a total 1,563 25-lb bombs and fired 122,150 rounds against ground targets between the opening of the battle and 4 pm on the 9th.

On the 26th August, Battle of the Scarpe, the 10th (Army) Wing squadrons, Nos. 208, 209, 64, and 54 Sqns. were tasked with consecutively attack ground targets from dawn onwards, all directed by Major B E Smythies at Izel Le Hameau aerodrome where all the aircraft were located. They were to fly no higher than 1000 feet. The most suitable targets were suggested to be guns in emplacements or in the open, troops concentrating for action, and men and transport on roads and bridges. The weather was bad and they started the day flying through a rainstorm. They were directed onto targets via the Central Information Bureau, they dropped 553 25-lb bombs and fired 26,000 rounds. There was little German air activity against them although ground fire was heavy.

Mike

MikeMeech
UK
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Posts: 322

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/3/2017 3:21:28 PM

Quote:

Quote:
How effective were RAF attacks on German troops? They certainly get a fair amount of attention, but given the state of aircraft technology, how much actual damage did they inflict?
There seems to have been a distinct morale factor to having enemy aircraft overhead, especially when your own were nowhere to be seen. Was there still something of a novelty to being under attack from the air, regardless of how deadly, that may have come through in the telling? Or for that matter, to attacking ground troops from the air?
--Jim Cameron



Jim,

Without giving specific references, I can say that reading Jack Sheldon's books on the German Army in the Great War - and I allude here to his books on the Somme and Passchendaele - I was surprised at how much mention the German soldiers made of their sense of vulnerability at the hands of British airmen who strafed them and made their existence yet more perilous. There must have been some damage, and not to morale only.

If memory serves me - and Mike Meech might help out here - during the early phase of the 1916 Somme battle some RFC ( or were they French ? ) aircraft bombed and strafed a German troop train as the men were about to be deployed, and, it is claimed, killed 250 men. A tall claim, but one that merits investigation.

Regards, Phil


--Phil andrade


Hi

The station attack may be referring to the bombing of St. Quentin Station on 1 July 1916. The details of the effect of this raid appears in RFC Communique No. 46 on 2nd August where a POW report is printed. This states:

"About 3.30 p.m. the 1st Battalion of the 71st Res. Regt. and 11th Res. Jaeger Battalion were at St. Quentin Station ready to entrain [to proceed to the Somme front], arms were piled, and the regimental transport was being loaded on the train. At this moment English aeroplanes appeared overhead and threw bombs. One bomb fell on a shed which was filled with ammunition and caused a big explosion. There were 200 wagons of ammunition in the station at the time; 60 of them caught fire and exploded; the remainder saved with difficulty. The train allotted to the transport of the troops and all the equipment which they had placed on the platform were destroyed by fire.
The men were panic stricken and fled in every direction. 100 men of the 71st Reserve and 80 men of the Reserve Jaeger Battalion were either killed or wounded. It was not till several hours later that it was possible to collect the battalion of the 71st Reserve Regiment; it was then sent back to its billets at Etriellers. The next day it was entrained at another station and sent to Ham, where it was re-equipped. From there it was sent to Peronne and placed in the Reserve near the Peronne-Eterpigny Road."

Mike

Phil andrade
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/5/2017 3:13:19 AM
Many thanks, Mike.

It's reassuring to have your expertise on hand when it comes to the narrative of such episodes as these...although , come to think of it, I would guess that this sort of attack was rare indeed - especially in the first half of the war.

It's a singularly striking achievement on a day that was otherwise a monstrously bloody setback for British arms , and I'm surprised that it is not more widely acknowledged .

Regards , Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
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Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/5/2017 3:32:03 AM
Some details of my Grandfather's nephew- who a fighter pilot in the Great War.Do hope it is not out of place here.


Quote:
He later joined No. 84 Squadron, taking command of "A" Flight, and returning to France in September Flying a S.E.5a

Leask gained his first aerial victories on 21 October 1917, when he and John Steele Ralston drove down out of control a German Type C reconnaissance aircraft east of the Roulers–Menin road, and twenty minutes later Leask drove down a Albatros D.V solo.

He drove down another D.V over Menin on 31 October, and destroyed another reconnaissance aircraft south-east of Bouzincourt on 30 November. His fifth victory came on 30 January 1918 by driving down another D.V over Villers-Outréaux, making him an ace.

His last three victories came in March, with three more D.Vs, two destroyed and one driven down, on the 6th at Renansart, the 18th at Wassigny, and the 23rd north-east of Ham.


He survived three crashes whilst on operations


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Regards

Jim

---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

MikeMeech
UK
top 30
E-5 Sergeant
Posts: 322

Re: Military Developments during the Great War
Posted on: 10/5/2017 7:48:29 AM

Quote:
Many thanks, Mike.

It's reassuring to have your expertise on hand when it comes to the narrative of such episodes as these...although , come to think of it, I would guess that this sort of attack was rare indeed - especially in the first half of the war.

It's a singularly striking achievement on a day that was otherwise a monstrously bloody setback for British arms , and I'm surprised that it is not more widely acknowledged .

Regards , Phil
--Phil andrade

Hi

Attacks on railway stations were fairly 'common' (as much as the small numbers of aeroplanes would allow)in the early war years. Wiiliam Rhodes Moorhouse received the first 'air' VC for an attack on Courtrai station in April 1915. This was part of a series of bombing missions against railway targets during the first battle of Ypres. Other station attacks included Roubaix, Tourcoing, Thielt, Staden, Deynze and Ingelmunster.

Targets like these re-occur throughout the war for obvious reasons.

Mike

 (1914-1918) WWI Battles    
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