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The current time is: 7/17/2018 11:14:09 PM
 (1914-1918) WWI Battles
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anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
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Posts: 6794
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The Hindenburg Lime and it's Breachings in 1918
Posted on: 7/8/2018 7:19:32 AM
The Hindenburg Line (Siegfriedstellung or Siegfried Position) was a German defensive position of World War I, built during the winter of 1916–1917 on the Western Front, from Arras to Laffaux, near Soissons on the Aisne.

In 1916, the German offensive at the Battle of Verdun had been a costly failure along with the parallel Battle of the Somme although not a German failure had bee very costly in manpower and materiel.

A series of very large scale offensive operations between 12 September and 12 October 1918 that advanced to and broke the Hindenburg Line system. Carried out by the First, Third and Fourth Armies these victories rank among the greatest-ever British military achievements.

The German Army fights on but it is increasingly clear that their ability to do so is declining fast.British, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and United States Divisions all played key parts.


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Regards

Jim

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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 6794
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: The Hindenburg Lime and it's Breachings in 1918
Posted on: 7/8/2018 9:12:38 AM
Phase: the Battle of Havrincourt, 12 September 1918--A Success

Third Army (Byng)
IV Corps (Harper)
37th Division
New Zealand Division.
V Corps (Shute)
17th (Northern) Division
38th (Welsh) Division.
VI Corps (Haldane)
Guards Division
2nd Division
62nd (2nd West Riding) Division.

Phase: the Battle of Epehy, 18 September 1918-a Success

Third Army (Byng)
IV Corps (Harper)
5th Division.
V Corps (Shute)
17th (Northern) Division
21st Division
38th (Welsh) Division.
VI Corps (Haldane)
Guards Division
2nd Division
62nd (2nd West Riding) Division.

Fourth Army (Rawlinson)
III Corps (Butler)
12th (Eastern) Division
18th (Eastern) Division
58th (2/1st London) Division
74th (Yeomanry) Division.
IX Corps (Braithwaite)
1st Division
6th Division.
Australian Corps (Monash)
1st Australian Division
4th Australian Division.



Would anyone care to elaborate on the above initial and successful operations successful battles

Regards

Jim
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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
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E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3680

Re: The Hindenburg Lime and it's Breachings in 1918
Posted on: 7/8/2018 9:39:30 AM
Hi, Jim,

One of the brighter victories for the Allies in WWI.

Defensive lines seemed to be made to be breached in the Great War?

Cheers,
MD
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 6794
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: The Hindenburg Lime and it's Breachings in 1918
Posted on: 7/8/2018 9:56:37 AM
Thank you for your reply Dave.These battles were near the end of the Great War when the Allies were hitting hard and relentlessly to take the Germans out of the war; and make them Sue for Peace.

1.The victory at Havrincourt was not particularly showy or impressive, but it highlighted a growing lack of fighting spirit among the German soldiers on the Western Front. While some took no notice of this small battle, others noted its significance – indeed, Byng himself saw it as a turning point of sorts.

2.Although Épehy was not a massive success, it signalled an unmistakable message that the Germans were weakening and it encouraged the Allies to take further action with haste (with the offensive continuing in the Battle of St. Quentin Canal), before the Germans could consolidate their positions

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 6794
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: The Hindenburg Lime and it's Breachings in 1918
Posted on: 7/8/2018 2:27:36 PM
Phase: the Battle of the Canal du Nord, 27 September – 1 October 1918

First Army (Horne)
XXII Corps (Godley)
4th Division
56th (1st London) Division.
Canadian Corps (Currie)
11th (Northern) Division
1st Canadian Division
3rd Canadian Division, which captured Bourlon Wood
4th Canadian Division
Brutinel’s Brigade.

Third Army (Byng)
IV Corps (Harper)
5th Division
37th Division
42nd (East Lancashire) Division
New Zealand Division.
VI Corps (Haldane)
Guards Division
2nd Division
3rd Division
62nd (2nd West Riding) Division.
XVII Corps (Fergusson)
52nd (Lowland) Division
57th (2nd West Lancashire) Division
63rd (Royal Naval) Division.

Regards

Jim

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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 7444

Re: The Hindenburg Lime and it's Breachings in 1918
Posted on: 7/8/2018 4:30:25 PM
The Battle of Canal du Nord was incredibly audacious.

CDN Gen. Currie had his plan approved to breach the canal but it was risky and he was warned that if he failed, he would be going home.

Currie sent all his men across a dry section of the canal, a section that had yet to be opened. If the Germans had twigged and brought in artillery as they formed up, it could have been a disaster.

So all the men crossed and then fanned out on the other side.

It was a feat accomplished through combined arms and appropriate use of the engineering corps.

And the artillery had to keep up with the offensive as the objective was to penetrate deeply into German territory.

It was tactically quite brilliant, though risky as I said.

Building bridges

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George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 7444

Re: The Hindenburg Lime and it's Breachings in 1918
Posted on: 7/8/2018 5:08:28 PM
Hello Jim,

What can you tell us about Lieutenant Colonel John Gort who won the VC as part of Julian Byng's 3rd Army in this battle?

He went on to make a name for himself, didn't he?

You know, we alway say that the Germans were on the run but the casualties in the Battle of Canal du Nord were very heavy for Canadian and British forces.

Cheers,

George


anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 6794
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: The Hindenburg Lime and it's Breachings in 1918
Posted on: 7/9/2018 3:12:53 AM
Yes George-the opening two rounds were pretty tame (General Byng was quite sanguine) when compared to the Battle of the Canal du Nord-"a different kettle of fish" altogether.

The Arras and Canal du Nord battles cost over 30,000 Canadian casualties but helped break the German army’s final defensive positions.

After Canadian and other Allied troops crossed the Canal du Nord, the German forces were in full retreat. The end of the war was close.

BTW -I could not open your Read More-try as I might

Re. Viscount Gort in WW1

Gort was appointed to command the 4th battalion of the Grenadier Guards. On the first day of the Third Battle of Ypres (31 July 1917), he led his battalion in the attack on Pilckem Ridge.

Here he displayed his disregard for personal risk, winning a bar to the DSO for remaining with his men after he was badly wounded. He was back in the field in time to be wounded again during the battle of Cambrai, and again in time to take part in repulsing the first of Ludendorff’s first great offensives of 1918, the Second Battle of the Somme.

Gort won his Victoria Cross on the first day of the Battle of Cambrai-St. Quentin, 27 September-9 October 1918. At the time he was temporarily in command of the 3rd Guards Brigade, which had the job of capturing the third line of objectives in the attack on the Canal du Nord. Unfortunately the second objective was not entirely in Allied hands, and so Gort was forced to lead his men to their starting point under heavy German fire.

Once again he was wounded, but remained with his men to take command of the attack itself. He was then wounded for a second time, but refused to leave the front, and left his stretcher to direct the battle. Later on he collapsed as a result of his wounds, but refused to leave until he knew the third objective had been seized.

A very brave soldier= who IMO- did not make a particularly good Field Marshal

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Regards

Jim Rtd

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