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The current time is: 11/23/2017 1:22:11 PM
 (1863) Battle of Gettysburg
AuthorMessage
Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 495
From our army
Posted on: 7/25/2017 10:04:17 AM
From the Evening Bulletin, Charlotte North Carolina.


---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Dick Evick
Waco , TX, USA
Posts: 154
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/25/2017 2:35:06 PM
Larry how long before casualty lists reached the public?

Likely they would reach North Carolina and Virginia before the deeper south.

Dick.

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 495
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/25/2017 2:54:22 PM
Hi Dick. From what I have seen in Southern papers accurate casualty lists began appearing about ten days after the battle.

Larry
---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Gregory C. White
Canton, GA, USA
Posts: 172
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/25/2017 4:51:45 PM
Dick,

In my experience with Georgia newspapers and Gettysburg coverage, I believe the first detailed cas. list appeared about July 8th; with most trickling in mid to late July, and through the month of August. Some were telegraphed in; others mailed in, usually by the regimental adjutants.

Best Regards,

Greg
---------------
"I do not believe that any man can adequately appreciate the world of to-day unless he has some knowledge of...[and] some feeling for...the history of the world of the past." Theodore Roosevelt

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 495
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/26/2017 1:10:39 PM
Here is a brief report on the 26th and 47th N.C regiments and their losses at Gettysburg. I looked through several N.C. papers for detailed regimental losses and found none up to July 15th. Only reports of individual deaths.



Larry
---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Phil andrade
London, UK
Posts: 2549
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/26/2017 6:36:14 PM
Both North and South Carolina gave a more complete post war reckoning of their battle casualties than the other confederate states. I wonder why this was so.

But at Gettysburg , even the terrible totals that were reported were short of the mark.

Pettigrew's Brigade - all North Carolinian regiments , made an official return of its Gettysburg casualties: 190 killed in action and 915 wounded. There was no figure for those taken prisoner.

The actual total, as revealed by John and Travis Busey, was truly awful : 275 killed in action and 1,419 wounded. This shows us that the reported total of killed and wounded was short by 53%. Worse still, of the wounded,188 died from their wounds, seventy percent of them in enemy hands. And 206 were unwounded prisoners of war : forty per cent of these did not survive their captivity.

No other brigade of the AoNV at Gettysburg - not even in Pickett's division - suffered such terrible loss, in both absolute and proportionate terms.

Editing : Davis' Mississippi Brigade, also of Heth's Division , very closely rivalled Pettigrew's command in terms of proportionate casualties.

A brief survey of the Federal first and second corps makes it apparent that these casualty rates were matched in the hardest hit units in the AoP at Gettysburg .

Regards , Phil

---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
Posts: 2883
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/27/2017 7:57:18 AM
Larry,

I notice in both articles it seems important to relay that any officer who was slain or gravely wounded was gallant in their effort!

Chivalry is very important in the South,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Phil andrade
London, UK
Posts: 2549
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/27/2017 1:06:55 PM
It always surprises me how much prominence is given to the officers.

Understandable, to a degree : officers are valuable and being conspicuous is part of their remit.

But you would think, wouldn't you, that in these democratic and largely volunteer armies, the fate of the enlisted men might have merited more mention?


Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Gregory C. White
Canton, GA, USA
Posts: 172
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/27/2017 2:24:03 PM

Quote:
Both North and South Carolina gave a more complete post war reckoning of their battle casualties than the other confederate states. I wonder why this was so.

But at Gettysburg , even the terrible totals that were reported were short of the mark.

Pettigrew's Brigade - all North Carolinian regiments , made an official return of its Gettysburg casualties: 190 killed in action and 915 wounded. There was no figure for those taken prisoner.

The actual total, as revealed by John and Travis Busey, was truly awful : 275 killed in action and 1,419 wounded. This shows us that the reported total of killed and wounded was short by 53%. Worse still, of the wounded,188 died from their wounds, seventy percent of them in enemy hands. And 206 were unwounded prisoners of war : forty per cent of these did not survive their captivity.

No other brigade of the AoNV at Gettysburg - not even in Pickett's division - suffered such terrible loss, in both absolute and proportionate terms.

Editing : Davis' Mississippi Brigade, also of Heth's Division , very closely rivalled Pettigrew's command in terms of proportionate casualties.

A brief survey of the Federal first and second corps makes it apparent that these casualty rates were matched in the hardest hit units in the AoP at Gettysburg .

Regards , Phil


--Phil andrade




Phil,

For at least 20 years I've scrutinized Georgia war-time newspapers - Savannah, Atlanta, Columbus, Augusta, Macon, Athens, Milledgeville and a few others, focusing primarily on the Gettysburg Campaign, and I'd have to say the editors were rather blunt and straight-forward in regard to their post-battle assessment. Some were quite brutal. Georgia had 43 commands @ Gettysburg, and I've located casualty lists for all with the exception of about 5. The missing casualty lists may have existed, but did not survive the war.

Best Regards,

Greg




---------------
"I do not believe that any man can adequately appreciate the world of to-day unless he has some knowledge of...[and] some feeling for...the history of the world of the past." Theodore Roosevelt

Phil andrade
London, UK
Posts: 2549
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/27/2017 7:30:15 PM
Greg,

The Busey study tabulates four thousand Georgian battle casualties at Gettysburg, of whom 578 were killed in action and 314 died from wounds. Unwounded prisoners totalled 726 ; of these, 175 perished in captivity.

Only North Carolina and Virginia lost more men in the battle.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 495
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/28/2017 8:59:09 AM
I believe this post will show a fraction of the loss North Carolina troops suffered at Gettysburg. Each name represents a father,son,brother,uncle or dear friend who has paid a terrible price.


---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Phil andrade
London, UK
Posts: 2549
Re: From our army
Posted on: 7/28/2017 10:01:28 AM
Larry,

That's an invaluable document for those of us trying to appreciate the impact of Gettysburg on those communities throughout the South.

In the case of North Carolina, the loss assumed dreadful dimensions.

This is the Busey reckoning on the cost of the battle for that state :

972 killed in action

588 died of wounds ( 439 in enemy hands )

3,945 wounded ( 1,899 in enemy hands )

1,179 unwounded prisoners ( 392 died in captivity )

This was not only appalling in terms of sheer numbers ; what rendered it desperately distressing was the very large proportion of casualties who were abandoned on the field and left in enemy hands. This, in my opinion, was a crucial indicator of victory or defeat : not only were very close to one thousand North Carolinians killed outright in the battle ; over half of the four and a half thousand wounded or dying were abandoned to the enemy. What this meant to their families - and to their brothers in arms - in terms of emotional impact to is hard to imagine : the grief compounded by awareness of their fate at the mercy of the foe.

Add on to this the fact that captivity was to prove fatal for one third of even those who were captured unwounded, and the dimensions of the tragedy become yet more apparent.

Regards, Phil

---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes