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The current time is: 12/14/2017 8:04:31 AM
 (1863) Battle of Gettysburg
AuthorMessage
Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Very early use of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 11/28/2017 7:31:43 PM
This reference to Devils Den appeared in the Brookville Republican, Brookville Pa on August 5, 1863. The letter being written on July 17th. How did a soldier from Western PA pick up the name for this local landmark? The soldier in question is Joseph Potter Miller. His company which was-K, was from or near Indiana Pa.



This is a cut of the article showing the reference to Devils Den.


---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Dale Trotter
Uniondale, PA, USA
Posts: 12
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 11/29/2017 4:18:24 AM
Thanks for posting this. You don't seem to hear much about the PA reserves. I had a Great Great Uncle in the 6th reserves and specific info about their service at Gettysburg is hard to come by.

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 11/29/2017 6:41:10 AM

Quote:
Thanks for posting this. You don't seem to hear much about the PA reserves. I had a Great Great Uncle in the 6th reserves and specific info about their service at Gettysburg is hard to come by.
--Dale Trotter



Hi Dale. Was your GG uncle in company-K, the Susquehanna volunteers?.
---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Dale Trotter
Uniondale, PA, USA
Posts: 12
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 11/30/2017 4:21:49 AM
No, Captain James Carle co. G. He was from Tioga county. Interesting story though, he ended up a Brevet Brigadier General by the end of the war.

Phil andrade
London, UK
Posts: 2597
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 11/30/2017 6:12:53 AM
Another first rate contribution, Larry !

The allusion to the want of a regiment that used buck and ball caught my eye.

For all the talk of this war being defined by the greater range and accuracy of the rifled musket, there was still - in some circumstances - nothing better than the old fashioned smoothbore buck and ball effect when it came to close quarters fighting .

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 11/30/2017 12:51:22 PM

Quote:
Another first rate contribution, Larry !

The allusion to the want of a regiment that used buck and ball caught my eye.

For all the talk of this war being defined by the greater range and accuracy of the rifled musket, there was still - in some circumstances - nothing better than the old fashioned smoothbore buck and ball effect when it came to close quarters fighting .

Regards, Phil
--Phil andrade


Hi Phil. The amount of AOP regiments armed partially or completely with smoothbores is surprising. Never been able to find a source for armaments of confederate regiments.

Larry.
---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Phil andrade
London, UK
Posts: 2597
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 11/30/2017 2:18:11 PM
Larry,

Did you pick up on that poetic phrase bearding the lion in his den ?

I’ve read of seeing the elephant , but the allusion to the lion is something new and I’d like to explore its provenance.

The casualties mentioned are indicative of a semi detached form of combat : 42 wounded, but only 3 killed. I wouldn’t be surprised if the number of wounded who died exceeded that of those who were killed outright.

Let me see if I can investigate that.

Regards , Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
Posts: 687
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 11/30/2017 8:21:11 PM

Quote:
Another first rate contribution, Larry !

The allusion to the want of a regiment that used buck and ball caught my eye.

For all the talk of this war being defined by the greater range and accuracy of the rifled musket, there was still - in some circumstances - nothing better than the old fashioned smoothbore buck and ball effect when it came to close quarters fighting .

Regards, Phil
--Phil andrade


Interestingly, the AOP Order of Battle shows the 11th PA as armed with .69 rifle muskets. It was also part of the 3rd Brigade, not the 1st.
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 12/1/2017 12:07:11 PM

Quote:

Quote:
Another first rate contribution, Larry !

The allusion to the want of a regiment that used buck and ball caught my eye.

For all the talk of this war being defined by the greater range and accuracy of the rifled musket, there was still - in some circumstances - nothing better than the old fashioned smoothbore buck and ball effect when it came to close quarters fighting .

Regards, Phil
--Phil andrade


Interestingly, the AOP Order of Battle shows the 11th PA as armed with .69 rifle muskets. It was also part of the 3rd Brigade, not the 1st.

--Jim Cameron


The 11th reserves were part of the 3rd brigade but were detached and served with the 1st brigade during the fighting July 2-3. For a full account of who and how the 11th was detached read Brevet Brigadier General Samuel M. Jackson (who commanded the 11th at Gettysburg)in Pennsylvania at Gettysburg. Volume-1 pages 274-280.
---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Gregory C. White
Canton, GA, USA
Posts: 174
Re: Very early use of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 12/2/2017 1:34:58 PM
Larry,

I have a letter dated July 8, 1863 from a soldier in the 11th Georgia of Tige Anderson's Brigade that mentions the "Devil's Den".

An even bigger question is how would a stranger from Georgia have known the name of that sector of the battlefield?

Best Regards,

Greg
---------------
"I do not believe that any man can adequately appreciate the world of to-day unless he has some knowledge of...[and] some feeling for...the history of the world of the past." Theodore Roosevelt

Jim Cameron
North Bellmore, NY, USA
Posts: 687
Re: Very early us of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 12/2/2017 6:25:46 PM

Quote:


The 11th reserves were part of the 3rd brigade but were detached and served with the 1st brigade during the fighting July 2-3. For a full account of who and how the 11th was detached read Brevet Brigadier General Samuel M. Jackson (who commanded the 11th at Gettysburg)in Pennsylvania at Gettysburg. Volume-1 pages 274-280.
--Larry Purtell


Thanks, forgot about that part.

As far as ammo, .69 rifle muskets could in fact use buck & ball (and smoothbores could use minie balls), so anything was possible.
---------------
Jim Cameron

Every time I go to Gettysburg, I learn two things. Something new, and, how much I still don't know.

Phil andrade
London, UK
Posts: 2597
Re: Very early use of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 12/3/2017 2:38:33 AM

Quote:
Larry,

I have a letter dated July 8, 1863 from a soldier in the 11th Georgia of Tige Anderson's Brigade that mentions the "Devil's Den".

An even bigger question is how would a stranger from Georgia have known the name of that sector of the battlefield?

Best Regards,

Greg
--Gregory C. White


Very good point .....might the parlance of yankee prisoners account for it ?

A lot of union soldiers were taken prisoner in that sector, and there must have been some banter between them and their captors.


Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

Gregory C. White
Canton, GA, USA
Posts: 174
Re: Very early use of "Devils Den"
Posted on: 12/3/2017 9:35:54 AM

Quote:

Quote:
Larry,

I have a letter dated July 8, 1863 from a soldier in the 11th Georgia of Tige Anderson's Brigade that mentions the "Devil's Den".

An even bigger question is how would a stranger from Georgia have known the name of that sector of the battlefield?

Best Regards,

Greg
--Gregory C. White


Very good point .....might the parlance of yankee prisoners account for it ?

A lot of union soldiers were taken prisoner in that sector, and there must have been some banter between them and their captors.


Regards, Phil

--Phil andrade



Unless a Union prisoner was from Gettysburg, there must have been some interaction between the visiting
Confederates and local citizenry in order to learn the name "Devil's Den".

Could "Devil's Den" have been indicated on a local map?
---------------
"I do not believe that any man can adequately appreciate the world of to-day unless he has some knowledge of...[and] some feeling for...the history of the world of the past." Theodore Roosevelt