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The current time is: 12/14/2017 8:05:56 AM
 (1863) Battle of Gettysburg
AuthorMessage
Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/7/2017 9:27:47 AM
From the National Tribune. Sept. 15, 1892


---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Dave G
Halifax, NS, Canada
Posts: 92
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/8/2017 9:21:05 AM
One of the most interesting incidents at Gettysburg.
The so-called argument, if there was one, was probably between Kilpatrick and Lt. Col Preston.

Some of the newspaper accounts of Farnsworth's Charge are very informative. One reporter from the New York Times was E.A. Paul. He saw the start of the charge, Farnsworth's horse shot, and Farnsworth's fall from a point behind the Union line. Either Farnsworth fell near the start of the charge, as per Andie Custer's version (Blue & Gray Magazine, Spring 2005) or Mr. Paul had extraordinary eyesight, watching Farnsworth on the D-Shaped Hill, about a mile away from his viewpoint west of Bushman's Hill.

Larry, the New York Times - E.A. Paul scans that I have found are very hard to read. If you happen to come across a clearer copy of those reports, would you please try to post them? Thanks for your efforts.
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Dave G

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
Posts: 2960
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/8/2017 9:49:57 AM
BTW; Was Andie Custer related to George Armstrong in any way shape or form??
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/8/2017 10:19:36 AM

Quote:
One of the most interesting incidents at Gettysburg.
The so-called argument, if there was one, was probably between Kilpatrick and Lt. Col Preston.

Some of the newspaper accounts of Farnsworth's Charge are very informative. One reporter from the New York Times was E.A. Paul. He saw the start of the charge, Farnsworth's horse shot, and Farnsworth's fall from a point behind the Union line. Either Farnsworth fell near the start of the charge, as per Andie Custer's version (Blue & Gray Magazine, Spring 2005) or Mr. Paul had extraordinary eyesight, watching Farnsworth on the D-Shaped Hill, about a mile away from his viewpoint west of Bushman's Hill.

Larry, the New York Times - E.A. Paul scans that I have found are very hard to read. If you happen to come across a clearer copy of those reports, would you please try to post them? Thanks for your efforts.
--Dave G


Dave, do you know the date of the article by E.A. Paul?


Larry
---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/8/2017 10:31:47 AM

Quote:
One of the most interesting incidents at Gettysburg.
The so-called argument, if there was one, was probably between Kilpatrick and Lt. Col Preston.

Some of the newspaper accounts of Farnsworth's Charge are very informative. One reporter from the New York Times was E.A. Paul. He saw the start of the charge, Farnsworth's horse shot, and Farnsworth's fall from a point behind the Union line. Either Farnsworth fell near the start of the charge, as per Andie Custer's version (Blue & Gray Magazine, Spring 2005) or Mr. Paul had extraordinary eyesight, watching Farnsworth on the D-Shaped Hill, about a mile away from his viewpoint west of Bushman's Hill.

Larry, the New York Times - E.A. Paul scans that I have found are very hard to read. If you happen to come across a clearer copy of those reports, would you please try to post them? Thanks for your efforts.
--Dave G



Is this the story you mentioned?


---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Dave G
Halifax, NS, Canada
Posts: 92
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/8/2017 4:38:43 PM
Thanks Larry,
That is the July 3 report. It's pretty readable but I'll check it against my text to fix my mistakes in scanning.

There is a second report on July 21, 1863 that is really hard to read. I don't have a headline for it but it gives a lot of ink to describing Farnsworth's death.

A third report is dated July 30 ("THE LATE GEN. FARNSWORTH.") This article is short and readable and describes the ravine where Farnsworth was found and condition of his body, but apparently not with enough precision to convince some so-called experts that it was not on the D-Shaped Field.

---
MD
Andie Custer was related to George by marriage. Her husband was a Custer descendant but I don't know if it was by George or not.

---------------
Dave G

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/8/2017 7:51:04 PM

Quote:
Thanks Larry,
That is the July 3 report. It's pretty readable but I'll check it against my text to fix my mistakes in scanning.

There is a second report on July 21, 1863 that is really hard to read. I don't have a headline for it but it gives a lot of ink to describing Farnsworth's death.

A third report is dated July 30 ("THE LATE GEN. FARNSWORTH.") This article is short and readable and describes the ravine where Farnsworth was found and condition of his body, but apparently not with enough precision to convince some so-called experts that it was not on the D-Shaped Field.

---
MD
Andie Custer was related to George by marriage. Her husband was a Custer descendant but I don't know if it was by George or not.


--Dave G


As soon as I can I will check the July 21st report.
---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Dave G
Halifax, NS, Canada
Posts: 92
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/9/2017 7:08:35 PM
Larry,
This is the best I could do from the July 21 report. I don't have the copy of the newspaper though. If anyone is interested in taking a guess at the question marks (if we can get the original), maybe we can correct the actual text. I have guessed my way through some of this report. I may have omitted the first part of the July 21 report because I was only interested in the details about Farnsworth when I transcribed it.


The New York Times, July 21, 1863
Having repulsed the enemy, Gen. KILPATRICK received orders to join the main command at "Two Taverns," which place was reached at about 6 o'clock Friday morning, July 3. Three hours afterward the whole command was again in motion, and, by 11 o'clock, made a dash upon the right flank of the enemy, with a view of destroying his train, if possible, and, at all events, creating a diversion. Owing to a misunderstanding, one brigade (Gen. CUSTER's) of this division went to the right, and, consequently, the first object mentioned was not accomplished, but the second was fully. It was known that the enemy would mass his forces on Friday, for the purpose of breaking our right. The sudden and unexpected attack of Gen. KILPATRICK on his own right caused the enemy to fear a flank movement in that direction and changed the character of the battle from attack to simply defensive. Unexpectedly hearing heavy firing, and receiving a brisk attack on the right flank and rear, the enemy sent forward a large force of infantry to cooperate with the cavalry, then being pressed back. Having had their skirmishers driven from the woods, the enemy took a strong position behind two stone and rail fences, one a few rods in the rear of the other, and a similar ..[?].. on the [flanks of]? Gen. KILPATRICK was anxious to carry this position, because, if successful, the enemy's ammunition train could be reached. Every means had been [?] the enemy for a charge, but unsuccessfully. The First Vermont, Col. PRESTON; First Virginia, Maj. [?], and the Eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalry, Col BRINTON, were in position to charge. The First Vermont, First Virginia and a squadron of the Eighteenth Pennsylvania, led by Gen. FARNSWORTH, dashed forward at the word until the stone wall was reached. A few men pulled the rail fence away from the top of the wall. Gen. FARNSWORTH leaped his horse over, and was followed by the First Vermont—the enemy breaking before them and taking a position behind the second fence. The few rods between the fences where our men crossed was a fearfully dangerous place, the little force receiving the concentrated fire of three lines from front and both flanks. The witnesses of the movement stood in breathless silence-—their blood running cold as the chargers gained the second fence. Man after man was seen to fall—-Gen. FARNSWORTH among the rest. "He is killed!" gasped many a one, looking at that fatal spot, but no—that tall form and slouched hat are his—he lives—and all breathe again. His horse had been killed; a soldier gives him his horse; the General again mounts and dashes on. The enemy here make a more formidable stand but are driven away, and the whole force go dashing, reeling over the fence in a whirlpool of shot and shell, such as is seldom ever witnessed by soldiers. The constant roar of musketry and artillery on the main field gave to the [?] a peculiar grandeur. It was fearfully(?) grand. The second fence crossed, and new fires(?) were opened upon this brave band. To retreat at that [?] was certain death, and the only chance of safety was to advance, and advance they did for between one and two miles, to the rear of the rebel army, in sight of the coveted trains—but at what a cost? Dispersing, the men returned under a galling fire as best they could. A few did not get back to their command for hours—many never came. The list of missing gradually lessened, and hope [?] for the return of Gen. FARNSWORTH; and when, with the morning's dawn, no tidings from him were heard, then hope said he was wounded—a prisoner—he has been left seriously, perhaps dangerously, wounded at some house by the roadside. Vain hope! Messengers were sent to every direction to search for the missing [?]. It did not seem possible that he could be dead; and yet so it was. He fell just after crossing the second fence, his bowels pierced by five bullets. There some of the Vermont boys, left behind at the hospital, found his body two days after the fight, and saw it recently interred. The brave, noble and generous FARNSWORTH has gone to his last rest, and the sod that covers his grave has been wet by the tears of those who loved and honored him while living. His name will ever be held in remembrance by every member of the Third division.
Of the three squadrons of the Vermont regiment in the advance to this charge, there were 15 killed, 15 wounded, and 20 or more men missing. The regiment lost 75 men during the fight.

This was the last charge of the day at this point. It caused the enemy to concentrate a still larger force upon his right flank until their whole line fell back. Night soon came on, and with it a drenching shower, in which the cavalry, exhausted with the labors of the day, retired two miles and sought such repose as could be obtained in so open field(?).
The day had been exceedingly hot and many men were prostrated by the heat. The Fifth New York supported a battery which was exposed to a very hot fire. A shell passed through the body of DANIEL HURLEY, Company C, killed a horse, and wounded JAMES BULKLEY, of the same company.


The New York Times, July 30, 1863 -- THE LATE GEN. FARNSWORTH.
As every reliable fact in connection with the death of the much lamented Gen. FARNSWORTH is of interest, especially to those who had the pleasure of his acquaintance, I will here add some particulars furnished me by Surgeon Wood, Medical Director. Gen. FARNSWORTH, it will be remembered, was killed on the left at Gettysburgh, Friday, July 3, while leading the First Vermont, First Virginia and Eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalry in a charge. Dr. WOOD, on Sunday, sent out twice to search for his and other bodies. Both times the party was fired upon by the enemy's sharpshooters. Later in the day Dr. WOOD went himself upon the field, and found the body of Gen. FARNSWORTH a few rods beyond the second stone wall, a little to the right in a rocky ravine. The body had been stripped of everything save an undershirt and socks. Near by was the General's favorite horse. Immediately after leaping the first stone fence, the General's horse was shot and he himself wounded in one leg. An orderly gave him another horse, and as he remounted and urged on the charge, he was seen to lean forward and press one hand upon his stomach. It is probable that he then received the ball through his stomach. At the second fence the enemy had placed a lot of rails close together, so that it was impossible to leap it, and Gen. FARNSWORTH directed the First Virginia to left oblique and the First Vermont to right oblique. The First Virginia obeyed the order. The First Vermont did not hear it, or at all events the movement was not executed by them, and consequently they got under a more disastrous fire than if the order had been heard and executed. Gen. FARNSWORTH's body was pierced by fire balls—one in each leg, one through the shoulder, one through the stomach, and the last one just above the heart. When found his face was as calm and pleasant as when in life. The last shot must have killed him instantly. His remains were interred at Gettysburgh. The fatal bullet is now in the possession of Dr. WOOD.
E.A. PAUL
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Dave G

Dave G
Halifax, NS, Canada
Posts: 92
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/11/2017 8:45:15 AM
Incidentally I checked Farnsworth out on FindAGrave since the above article mentioned that he was buried at Gettysburgh. It seems a bit off on both of these entries. As per MD, what say you?

Elon Farnsworth [Read More]
Elon John Farnsworth [Read More]

Edit: I've sent the Find-A-Grave site a comment about the discrepancies.
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Dave G

Larry Purtell
, USA
Posts: 515
Re: Farnsworth rides again
Posted on: 12/11/2017 9:49:48 AM



---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.