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The current time is: 11/20/2017 2:43:18 AM
 (1939-1945) WWII Battles
AuthorMessage
anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
Posts: 6041
No.100 (Bomber Support Group) RAF in WW2
Posted on: 11/10/2017 5:36:40 AM
No. 100 (Bomber Support) Group was a special duties group within RAF Bomber Command. The group was formed on 11 November 1943 to consolidate the increasingly complex business of electronic warfare and countermeasures in one organisation.

The group was responsible for the development, operational trial and use of electronic warfare and countermeasures equipment. It was based at RAF stations in East Anglia, chiefly Norfolk.

The group was a pioneer in countering the formidable force of radar-equipped Luftwaffe night fighters, using a range of electronic 'homers' fitted to de Havilland Mosquito fighters which detected enemy night fighter radar and radio emissions and allowed the RAF fighters to home in onto the Axis aircraft and either shoot them down or disrupt their missions against the bomber streams.
Other Mosquitoes would patrol around Luftwaffe fighter airfields ready to attack night fighters as they landed.

This constant harassment had a detrimental effect on the morale and confidence of many Luftwaffe crews and indirectly led to a high proportion of aircraft and aircrew wastage from crashes as night fighters hurried in to land to avoid the Mosquito threat (real or imagined).

No 100 Group operated from eight airfields with approximately 260 aircraft, 140 of which were various marks of Mosquito night fighter intruders with the remainder consisting of Handley Page Halifaxes, Short Stirlings, Vickers Wellingtons, Fortresses and Liberators carrying electronic jamming equipment. The group also operated the Bristol Beaufighter for a short time.

Regaeds

Jim
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George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
Posts: 5527
Re: No.100 (Bomber Support Group) RAF in WW2
Posted on: 11/10/2017 6:46:58 AM
Jim, I can recommend a wonderful book that recounts what the life of a bomber pilot was like. The author served in 214 and then 100 squadrons.

214 squadron RAF was equipped with American Fortresses in 1943/44. These were loaded with the electronic surveillance equipment that you mentioned.

214 was transferred to 100 squadron sometime in 1944 and engaged in radio counter measures until the end of the war.

Anyway the book is entitled, "A Thousand Shall Fall".

The author was Murray Peden DFC, who is Canadian and lived in Manitoba.

Peden survived 30 missions and credits his transfer to the Fortress from Stirlings as one of the reasons that his odds improved. He was also a brave and resourceful pilot.

The book is considered one of the finest memoirs of a BC pilot from WW2.

I enjoyed it very much.


cheers,

George

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
Posts: 2862
Re: No.100 (Bomber Support Group) RAF in WW2
Posted on: 11/10/2017 9:00:37 AM
Jim,

Excellent topic, here is a good documentary video on the subject!

[Read More]

The 100 sure rained a lot of destruction on the Reich!

Regards,
MD
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
Posts: 6041
Re: No.100 (Bomber Support Group) RAF in WW2
Posted on: 11/10/2017 12:02:52 PM
Many thabks for the posts MD and George

In 1.44 214 squadron transferred from Downham Market & No. 3 Group to Sculthorpe & No. 100 Group and became known as No. 214 (BS) Sqdn and had a radio counter-measures role.

Sculthorpe : Jan 1944-May 1944
Oulton : May 1944 onwards
Bomber Command WWII Aircraft:

Vickers Wellington I, IA, IC, II : May 1939-Apr 1942
Short Stirling I and III : Apr 1942-Jan 1944
Boeing Fortress II and III : Jan 1944 onwards.

NB George-I have Miles Tripp's book "The Eighth Passenger"
he was a bomb aimer in 218 Sqdn.

The Eighth Passenger was first published it was acclaimed as one of the most remarkable first-hand accounts of combat flying in the Second World War. Over the years the author has learned much, which for security reasons, he could not have known at the time of the book's first publication. This edition, while retaining the integrity of the original, uses this added knowledge to reappraise the events of those fearful years. Seven young men, brought together by chance, and almost literally from the four corners of the earth, wake up day after day fully aware that the odds on their seeing another sunrise are relentlessly shortening. This story of a bomber crew flying through darkness and flak over Hamburg, Essen, Cologne, Dresden and Berlin, and always accompanied by an eighth passenger - fear - makes compulsive reading. Of nearly 7,500 Lancaster bombers built, no fewer than 3,349 were lost in action - killing nearly half of the young men who flew with Bomber Command.

Regards

Jim





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MikeMeech
, UK
Posts: 307
Re: No.100 (Bomber Support Group) RAF in WW2
Posted on: 11/10/2017 12:06:53 PM

Quote:
No. 100 (Bomber Support) Group was a special duties group within RAF Bomber Command. The group was formed on 11 November 1943 to consolidate the increasingly complex business of electronic warfare and countermeasures in one organisation.

The group was responsible for the development, operational trial and use of electronic warfare and countermeasures equipment. It was based at RAF stations in East Anglia, chiefly Norfolk.

The group was a pioneer in countering the formidable force of radar-equipped Luftwaffe night fighters, using a range of electronic 'homers' fitted to de Havilland Mosquito fighters which detected enemy night fighter radar and radio emissions and allowed the RAF fighters to home in onto the Axis aircraft and either shoot them down or disrupt their missions against the bomber streams.
Other Mosquitoes would patrol around Luftwaffe fighter airfields ready to attack night fighters as they landed.

This constant harassment had a detrimental effect on the morale and confidence of many Luftwaffe crews and indirectly led to a high proportion of aircraft and aircrew wastage from crashes as night fighters hurried in to land to avoid the Mosquito threat (real or imagined).

No 100 Group operated from eight airfields with approximately 260 aircraft, 140 of which were various marks of Mosquito night fighter intruders with the remainder consisting of Handley Page Halifaxes, Short Stirlings, Vickers Wellingtons, Fortresses and Liberators carrying electronic jamming equipment. The group also operated the Bristol Beaufighter for a short time.

Regaeds

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

--anemone


Hi

For detailed information on the RAF's 100 group there are two books by Martin Streetly, these are:
'Confound and Destroy - 100 Group and The Bomber Support Campaign', Macdonald and Jane's, 1978.
'The Aircraft of 100 Group - A Historical Guide for the Modeller' Robert Hale, 1984.

Together they give a very detailed account of 100 Group operations and their equipment.

Mike

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
Posts: 6041
Re: No.100 (Bomber Support Group) RAF in WW2
Posted on: 11/11/2017 6:26:03 AM
From 1944–45, the Mosquitos of 100 Group claimed 258 Luftwaffe aircraft shot down for 70 losses. The gradually increasing threat from the RAF fighters also created what the Luftwaffe crews nicknamed Moskito Panik as the night fighter crews were never sure when or where they may come under attack from the marauding 100 Group fighters.
Top Mosquito ace with 100 Group was Wing Commander Branse Burbridge of 85 Squadron, with 21 claims from 1944–45.

Regards

Jim
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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
Posts: 6041
Re: No.100 (Bomber Support Group) RAF in WW2
Posted on: 11/12/2017 4:45:52 AM

Special equipment used included Airborne Cigar (ABC) jammer, Jostle (jammer), Mandrel (jammer), Airborne Grocer (jammer), Piperack (jammer), Perfectos (homer), Serrate (homer), Corona (spoofer), Carpet (jammer) and Lucero (homer), used against German equipment such as Lichtenstein, Freya, and Wurzburg radars.

“ The combination of the Pathfinders' operations, the activities of No. 100 Group, the British advantage in radar, jamming and Window techniques, combined with intelligent attacking tactics, as well as the discipline and bravery of the RAF crews, have been remarkable. We had our (sic) severe problems in trying to defend Germany in the air.

Regards

Jim
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