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Civil War Genealogy Database
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23rd Arkansas Infantry CSA

Name: Erastus Lynch BlackRank: Lt. Colonel Company:
No Comments.
Contact Name: Richard Lake
Contact E-Mail: Click for E-mail
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Date Added: 5/25/2006Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Hansford WilliamsRank: Private Company:
Hansford Williams William Andrew Thomasson both enlisted the same place/day, and served until well after Appomatox, yet Williams' service in Co H. of the 23rd shows him Present only through 30 Apr 1863.
Williams was killed a good while after Appomatox, and after Mobile surrendered.
With what [irregular?] unit might he have served?

Thomasson's service record shows him Wounded and missing after the battle at Corinth, MS 5 0ct 1862. Clearly Thomasson returned to duty, for he was Captured 9 Ju1 1863 and paroled l0 Ju1 1863 at Port Hudson, LA. Why was he captured, then paroled the next day?

Thomasson, like Williams, served until well after Appomatox.

Thomasson was present when Williams was shot in the head; then Thomasson reported Williams' death to Williams' widow, son and daughter in Clark Co. AR.

Q: With what [irregular?] unit might Thomasson have served?
Contact Name: Bill Forester
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Date Added: 1/9/2008Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: James CareyRank: Private Company: A
James Carey was born June 1836 in Tennessee. He joined the Confedetate Army at Harrisburg, Arkansas on Feb. 26, 1862 and served as a private soldier in Company A, 23rd Arkansas Infantry. He was absent on parole June 30, 1862. He was captured at the Battle of Corinth, Mississippi on Oct. 5, 1862, paroled Oct. 12, 1862 at Boliver, Tennessee. He deserted at Holly Springs, Mississippi, Oct. 25, 1862. Sometime afterwards he returned home to Arkansas and joined Company H, Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers serving with them for the remainder of the war. He surrendered with his Company at Wittsburg, Arkansas and was paroled on May 25, 1865. He was described as age 29, eyes black, hair dark, complexion dark, 5ft. 9in. tall. He died Apr. 10, 1870 and is buried in Pine Log Cemetery south of Jonesboro in Craighead County, Arkansas. He has both civilian and Confederate gravestones. He and Samuel Carey were twins and served together.
Contact Name: Phillip R. Priest
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Date Added: 9/17/2016Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Samuel CareyRank: Private Company: A
Samuel Carey was born in June 1836 in Tennessee. He enlisted in the Confederate Army at Harrisburg, Arkansas on Feb. 26, 1862. He served as a private soldier in Company A, 23rd Arkansas Infantry and was detailed as a pioneer and litter bearer. He was captured at Port Hudson, Louisiana, and paroled July 10, 1863. On returning home, Samuel joined Company H, Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers and served out the remainder of the war. He surrendered with his company at Wittsburg, Arkansas and was paroled May 25, 1865, described as 5ft. 9in., eyes black, hair dark, complexion dark, age 29. Both companies he served with were engaged in numerous battles and skirmishes in Arkansas and Missouri throughout the war. He died in Poinsett County, Arkansas in 1900 and is buried in old Boliver Cemetery north of Harrisburg, Arkansas. He has a Confederate gravestone. Samuel and James Carey were twins and served together.
Contact Name: Phillip R. Priest
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Date Added: 9/17/2016Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: William Krickle (sp)Rank: Private Company: B
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Contact Name: Edward Krickel
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Date Added: 2/22/2010Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Hugh EldridgeRank: Private Company: C
Born abt 1831, Enlisted 23 February 1862 in St. Francis, Arkansas. Went missing after the Battle of Corinth, 2-4 October, 1862. Was later paroled in May 25, 1865 in Arkansas.
Contact Name: Jonathan Hannan
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Date Added: 6/7/2011Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Marion Pinkney ThomasRank: Private Company: C
My Great Great Grandfather
Contact Name: Mike Osment
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Date Added: 9/7/2010Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: John Calvin McClungRank: Sergeant Major Company: D
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Contact Name: Tom Gray
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Date Added: 6/17/2014Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: James K. BonnerRank: Private Company: E
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Contact Name: K. McGee
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Date Added: 1/10/2011Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Thomas J. GolightlyRank: Private Company: E
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Contact Name: Michael Robinson
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Date Added: 1/13/2005Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Edgar Grambry HodgkinsRank: 1st Lieutenant Company: G
Enl 27Mar1862 at Jacksonport, AR. Elected 1Lt 9Aug1862. Age 20, born in MD. Commanding the company Oct1862.
Contact Name: Skeet Hodgkins
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Date Added: 2/21/2005Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: William W. ChamberlainRank: Private Company: H
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Contact Name: Chris Chamberlain
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Date Added: 2/1/2011Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Oliver Perry LylesRank: Colonel Company: H
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Contact Name: Daryell L. Smith
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Date Added: 4/6/2005Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: William Andrew ThomassonRank: Private Company: H
Thamasson and Hansford Williams both served until well after Appomatox, yet

Williams' service in Co H. of the 23rd shows him Present through 30 Apr 1863.

Williams was killed a good while after Appomatox, and after Mobile surrendered.

With what [irregular?] unit might he have served.

Thomasson's service record shows him Wounded and missing after the battle at Corinth, MS 5 0ct 1862.

Clearly Thomasson returned to duty, for he was
Captured 9 Ju1 1863 and paroled l0 Ju1 1863 at Port Hudson, LA.

Why was he captured, then paroled the next day?

Thomasson, like Williams, served until well after Appomatox. Thomasson was present when Williams was shot in the head; then Thomasson reported Williams' death to Williams' widow, son and daughter in Clark Co. AR.

Q: With what [irregular?] unit might Thomasson have served?
Contact Name: Bill Forester
Contact E-Mail: Click for E-mail
Homepage:
Date Added: 1/9/2008Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Joseph SimmonsRank: Private Company: I
Joseph Simmons joined the Confederate Army at Jonesboro, Arkansas on July 2, 1862 and served as a private soldier in Company I, McNeill's 30th Arkansas Infantry under Capt. Mitchell Adair. In mid-1864 he was transferred, along with his entire company, to Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers where they stayed for the remainder of the war. At the close of the war, Joseph surrendered with Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers at Wittsburg, Arkansas on May 11, 1865 and was paroled on May 25. His company participated in many battles and skirmishes in Arkansas and Missouri with both the 30th Arkansas Infantry and Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers.
Joseph was born in 1836 in the old Grinder Settlement in Poinsett County, Arkansas, a son of John Simmons and Mahulda Grinder of North Carolina and later Tennessee. His family came into this section in the late 1830's, and were famous hunters of the early days. There was very little law and order at that time and the Simmons family had a reputation for being rough characters, the kind that took care of their own business. Several shootings and unexplained disappearances were blamed on them. Joseph farmed and raised stock and died in 1903 in the Gilkerson Township, Craighead County, Arkansas. He drew a Confederate Service Pension from the state of Arkansas, and is buried next to his wife, Rebecca McGowan, in the Gibson Cemetery near Gilkerson in Craighead County and has a Confederate gravestone. Rebecca drew a Confederate service widow's pension from the State of Arkansas after her husband's death.
Contact Name: Phillip R. Priest
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Date Added: 2/23/2011Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: Thomas SimmonsRank: Private Company: I
Thomas Simmons joined the Confederate Army at Jonesboro, Arkansas and served as a private soldier in Company I, Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers. This was originally an infantry regiment but in mid-1864 a part of it, including Company I, was mounted on horses and functioned as cavalry for the remainder of the war. Thomas surrendered with Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers at Wittsburg, Arkansas and was paroled on May 25, 1865. He was described as being 6'2' tall, age 21, eyes blue, hair brown, complexion fair. Brother of Joseph Simmons. He is buried in Gibson Cemetery near Gilkerson in Craighead County, Arkansas. He has a Confederate gravestone.
Contact Name: Phillip R. Priest
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Date Added: 9/14/2016Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
Name: John W. WeaverRank: Private Company: I
John W. Weaver was born about 1837 in Wayne County, Tennessee and was brought to Arkansas by his brother, Ben, who helped him get established before returning to Tennessee. John became a well known farmer and stockman in the old Gilkerson Settlement, located a few miles west of Jonesboro, Arkansas. He joined the Confederate Army at Jonesboro on July 2, 1862 and served as a private soldier in Company I, McNeill's 30th Arkansas Infantry under Capt. Mitchell Adair. In mid-1864 he was transferred, along with his entire company, to Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers. At this time, at least part of the regiment, including Company I, was mounted and functioned as cavalry for the remainder of the war. John surrendered with Lyles' 23rd Arkansas Mounted Volunteers at Wittsburg, Arkansas, on May 11, 1865 and was paroled on May 25. His company, while serving with both regiments, was in many battles and skirmishes in Arkansas and Missouri. At some point during the war, possibly after Price's Missouri Raid, he returned home barefoot and in rags and refused to go back. He said they nearly starved to death and had to bury the dead in such a hurry that their arms and legs were sometimes left sticking out of the ground. He stayed home for a while but eventually rejoined his company and served out the remainder of the war. John was born about 1837 in Tennessee and came to Arkansas as a young man. According to a family legend he killed a man with a Claymore sword back in Wayne County, Tennessee and fled to avoid prosecution. He settled in the Gilkerson Township in Craighead County where he became a well known farmer and stockman. His brother, Benjamin, who accompanied him to Arkansas, eventually returned to Tennessee. John was married four times and had eleven children in all, his first wife being Mary Voss; second, Martha Broadaway; and third, Laura Keller. He died in the Gilkerson Township in 1910 and is buried next to his fourth wife, Fannie Branyon, in Bishop Cemetery west of Jonesboro, Arkansas.
Contact Name: Phillip R. Priest
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Homepage:
Date Added: 2/23/2011Edit Ancestor Edit your relative   Delete Ancestor Delete your relative
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