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Rich Anderson Articles
US Army in WWII

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US Army in World War II
US Army in World War II
Notes, Sources and Links

by Rich Anderson

Notes

This sketch of the United States Army in World War II began as an appendix that I wrote for Hitler's Last Gamble. Since the publication of that book I have gathered more information and this is the result. In a sense this essay remains a work in progress. Eventually I hope to expand it to include more data weapons, equipment, and individual units, as well as links to other sources for further information.

Sources

Balkoski, Joseph. Beyond the Beachhead. Harrisburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 1989. This book is an excellent analysis of an American Infantry Division in combat versus the Germans.

Dupuy, Trevor N., David Bongard, and Richard C. Anderson, Jr. Hitler's Last Gamble. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 1994. Not really the book that I originally envisaged, but still a good general reference on the battle.

The Dupuy Institute Reference Files. These are a collection of nearly forty years worth of research materiel dealing largely with World War II (and military history in general). Included are copies of archival records of the U.S., U.K., German, and Russian armies, as well as memos and letters, many from veterans, dealing with various research projects of the Institute and its predecessors.

Stanton, Shelby. Order of Battle U.S. Army in World War II. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1984. An indispensable and unfortunately out of print book, I have relied shamelessly on Mr. Stanton's excellent scholarship and knowledge of the creation of the wartime U.S. Army.

Weigley, Russell F. Eisenhower's Lieutenants. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1981. A somewhat flawed analysis, but it remains one of the better single-volume histories of the European Theater of Operations.
Stanton, Shelby, Order of Battle U.S. Army in World War II. Indispensable and unfortunately out of print.

Links

The U.S. Armored Forces Center http://armoredforces.com/

The 2nd Armored Division http://www.2ndarmoredhellonwheels.com/unitlist.html

The 4th Armored Division http://www.fourtharmored.com/

The 6th Armored Division http://members.aol.com/super6th/

The 12th Armored Division http://www.acu.edu/academics/history/12ad

The 10th Mountain Division http://www.10thmtndivassoc.org/

The 26th Infantry Division http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Barracks/2422/

The 70th Infantry Division http://www.trailblazersww2.org/

The 75th Infantry Division http://www.plbg.de/75th/index.htm

The 99th Infantry Division http://www.99div.com/checkerboard.html

The 101st Airborne Division http://www.screamingeagle.org/

The 103rd Infantry Division http://www.eastmill.com/103rd/

The 104th Infantry Division http://www.104infdiv.org/

The 106th Infantry Division http://www.mm.com/user/jpk/

The 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment http://www.geocities.com/~the504thpir/

The 644th Tank Destroyer Battalion http://www.644td.com

The 737th Tank Battalion http://www.737thtankbattalion.org/index.htm

The Tunisian Task Force http://members.fortunecity.com/djm1/ww2/tunisian.html

World War II Oral History http://www.tankbooks.com/

Dad’s War: Finding and Telling Your Father’s World War II Story
      http://members.aol.com/dadswar/

Combat Stories of World War II http://members.ols.net/~ernieh/

U.S. Army Insignia Home Page http://www.inxpress.net/~rokats/armyhome.html

The National D-Day Museum http://www.ddaymuseum.org/

The Normandy Campaign 1944 http://home.swipnet.se/normandy/

D-Day Analyzed http://members.xoom.com/patton76

The Huertgen Forest http://members.ols.net/~ernieh/HuertgenForest.html

The Center for Research into the Battle of the Ardennes (CRIBA)
      http://users.skynet.be/bulgecriba

The Battle of the Bulge http://www.eagnet.com/edipage/user/joanie/index.htm

Tactical Air Power http://home.istar.ca/~johnstns/tacair/tacair.html


The Dupuy Institute http://www.dupuyinstitute.org/
 
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Copyright © 2000 Rich Anderson.

Written by Rich Anderson. If you have questions or comments on this article, please contact Rich Anderson at:
richto90@msn.com.

About the author:
Richard C. Anderson, Jr. works as the Chief Historian at the The Dupuy Institute (a non-profit organization dedicated to scholarly research and objective analysis of historical data related to armed conflict and the resolution of armed conflict. The Dupuy Institute provides independent, historically-based analyses of lessons learned from modern military campaigns.

Published online: 2000.
Last Modified: 02/11/2007.

* Views expressed by contributors are their own and do not necessarily represent those of MHO.
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