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(1863) Battle of Gettysburg
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Larry Purtell
Little Meadows
PA USA
Posts: 832

July 14, 1863
Posted on: 7/14/2019 12:40:26 PM


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"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.
Phil Andrade
London
 UK
Posts: 3998

July 14, 1863
Posted on: 7/15/2019 3:43:30 AM

Here again, Larry, are articles which testify to the remarkable degree of candour apparent in the contemporary journals. This speaks of mature and responsible democracy : a determined effort to convey truth, without subversion by propaganda.

The citation of 3,500 confederate killed in action is borne out by the research of Busey and Son, who have now identified a figure of 3,446 officers and men from the AoNV who were killed in the battle ( there were a couple of thousand more who were mortally wounded ).

How would that compare with US media reports of the count of enemy dead in the Vietnam War ?

Regards, Phil
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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
Phil Andrade
London
 UK
Posts: 3998

July 14, 1863
Posted on: 7/15/2019 11:59:37 AM

Regarding the fate of " Crittenden " Warren, I investigated the names in the Busey study, and, while there are quite a few Warrens, I turned up this one as the most likely :

John Crittenden Warren, 1st Lieutenant, 52nd North Carolina Infantry...... Slight gunshot wounds to the right thigh and right wrist, and a severe penetrating gunshot wound to the left lung 3 July . Captured at a Gettysburg field hospital, admitted to Camp Letterman, present there 10 August, transferred to West's Buildings Hospital 6 October 1863, exchanged at City Point 6 March 1864, and furloughed from General Hospital #4 in Richmond four months later. Born 13 April 1845 at Edenton NC, to Dr William Christian and Harriet Alexander Warren, enlisted as Sergeant Major 52nd North Carolina 24 April 1862 at Camp Magnum, promoted 2nd Lt Company C 13 September 1862 and 1st Lt 1 April 1863. Left the service mid December 1864, took Oath of Allegiance 5 August 1865, died 21 July 1914 at Atlanta, Georgia.

I note that his death at Atlanta coincided almost exactly with the fiftieth anniversary of the battle by that name.


He was, it appears, surrounded by Doctors - father, brothers, and, no doubt, many more in his army service .

Imagine, being eighteen years old and a field officer in one of the most dramatic and intense battles in the history of your nation !

At least he survived until his seventieth year.

Regards, Phil

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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
Phil Andrade
London
 UK
Posts: 3998

July 14, 1863
Posted on: 7/16/2019 9:59:25 AM

Referring to my post above, heck ! …......this fella was just seventeen when he enlisted and he was made the Sergeant Major of the regiment !

Talk about babes in arms.....eat your hearts out, VMI, the Newmarket Cadets are rivalled in North Carolina.

Does the preponderance of Doctors in this family suggest a high social standing that might account for such rapid promotion of such a youthful person ?

Regards, Phil

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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

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