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(1863) Battle of Gettysburg
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Larry Purtell
Little Meadows
PA USA
Posts: 984
June15, 1863
Posted on: 6/15/2020 6:08:02 AM

From the Wisconsin State journal. June 15, 1863




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"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan
MI USA
Posts: 5841
June15, 1863
Posted on: 6/16/2020 3:01:52 PM

Hi Larry,

If the article on the Battle of Milikens Bend is accurate, this is another example of Afican American Troops being given no quarter??

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Comments, what's the facts?
MD
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Larry Purtell
Little Meadows
PA USA
Posts: 984
June15, 1863
Posted on: 6/16/2020 6:13:31 PM

I found this article which doesn't shed any light on prisoners being killed but does say that the colored troops did they duty and behaved well.


Grant praised the performance of black U.S. soldiers at the battle, observing that "This was the first important engagement of the war in which colored troops were under fire," and despite their inexperience, the black troops had "behaved well."[1] Assistant Secretary of War Charles A. Dana wrote, "the sentiment of this army with regard to the employment of negro troops has been revolutionized by the bravery of the blacks in the recent battle of Milliken's Bend."[2] Having seen how they could fight, many officers were won over to arming them for the Union. Even Confederate commander Henry McCulloch said the former slaves fought with "considerably obstinacy."[3]

U.S. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton also praised the performance of black U.S. soldiers in the battle. He stated that their competent performance in the battle proved wrong those who had opposed their service:

Many persons believed, or pretended to believe, and confidently asserted, that freed slaves would not make good soldiers; they would lack courage, and could not be subjected to military discipline. Facts have shown how groundless were these apprehensions. The slave has proved his manhood, and his capacity as an infantry soldier, at Milliken's Bend, at the assault upon Port Hudson, and the storming of Fort Wagner.

— Edwin M. Stanton, letter to Abraham Lincoln, (December 5, 1863).[4][5]
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"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

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