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(1863) Battle of Gettysburg
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Message
Larry Purtell
Little Meadows
PA USA
Posts: 1061
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/22/2020 4:20:49 PM

From the Evening Star. Washing ton D.C. August 22, 1863.



Charles Powell Adams

Residence was not listed; 29 years old.

Enlisted on 4/30/1861 at Hastings, Dakota County, MN as a Captain.

On 4/30/1861 he was commissioned into "H" Co. MN 1st Infantry
He was Mustered Out on 5/4/1864

On 7/15/1864 he was commissioned into Field & Staff MN Hatch's Battn Cavalry
He was Mustered Out on 6/22/1866


Wounded 7/21/1861 Bull Run, VA
Wounded 6/30/1862 Malvern Hill, VA
Wounded 9/17/1862 Antietam, MD
Wounded 7/2/1863 Gettysburg, PA


Promotions:
Major 10/22/1861 (Estimated date)
Lt Colonel 9/26/1862
Major 7/15/1864 (As of Hatch's Battn MN Cavalry)
Lt Colonel 9/5/1864
Brig-General 3/15/1865 by Brevet



born 3/3/1831 in Rainsburg, PA
died 11/2/1893 in Vermillion, Dakota County, MN
Buried: Lakeside Cemetery, Hastings, MN

Federal Pension Information:
He applied for a pension on 6/17/1864
application # 47,079
His Widow (Mary S Adams) applied for a pension on 12/2/1893 from the state of MN
application # 586,199


After the War he lived in Hastings, MN
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"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.
morris crumley
Dunwoody
GA USA
Posts: 2844
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/22/2020 7:36:36 PM

Colonel Colville and the 1st Minnesota are as great a show of determination as anything the 20th Maine did at Gettysburg.

During the charge of around 260 into about 1,200 confederates thye would loose over 80 percent of the regiment....during the rebel charge on the third day the color bearer of the 1st Minnesota was shot through the hand, the ball going though and shattering the wooden flag staff in-two. The Flag was picked up and carried forward by a corporal O`Brien and, they were able to capture the flag of rebel regiment, ( 20th Virginia) they used the staff of that rebel flag to splice onto what was left of their shattered staff.

Symbolism of what was to come....eventually!

Thanks Larry.

Respects, Morris
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"You are a $70, red-wool, pure quill military genius, or the biggest damn fool in northern Mexico."
Phil Andrade
London
 UK
Posts: 4693
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/23/2020 2:20:06 AM

1st Minnesota at Gettysburg is the Northern counterpart of the 1st Texas at Antietam. Very similar numbers....symbolic indeed.

Regards, Phil
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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
john hayward
Allenstown
NH USA
Posts: 821
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/23/2020 7:18:55 AM

In 1988, I was lucky to be involved in the 125th NPS event at Gettysburg. This was the official one, put on by the NPS and the groups were there by special invite. Each day was scripted as we did demonstrations in which infantry, cavalry, and artillery fired,( i believe this was the first and only time the NPS allowed this) dedicated the AA Humphreys monument, officially returned two flags, one Conf, one Union to be put on display at the old museum. On July 3 the Conf walked from Lee's monument to the Angle. There they were met by Union men at the wall who handed them canteens. The NPS called it "Reunion Day."

On July 2 the demonstration was the charge of the 1st Minnesota. Following a speech by Edwin Bearss, we formed up at the exact location on the battlefield. The NPS made sure we had the exact same number that the 1st had and charged. The NPS even had picked the correct number of survivors, telling the rest to fall in the field. We reached the woods, regrouped and marched back into the field. It was quite a sight. Upon exiting the woods we could see blue bodies scattered in the grass. From the other POV you saw a large number of men head across the field and what appeared to be a handful exit the woods. We then marched to the 1st's monument, laid a wreath and had a moment of silence.

During our charge the Minnesota colors were carried by a man from Minnesota. Upon entering the woods the eagle on top of the staff caught a branch. The staff snapped at almost the same location as it did 125 years before. Needless to say, it was a very powerful moment

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"When fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross."
scoucer
Berlin
 Germany
Posts: 2790
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/23/2020 4:17:16 PM

Quote:
Colonel Colville and the 1st Minnesota are as great a show of determination as anything the 20th Maine did at Gettysburg.

Respects, Morris


A wonderful post-war story about Colville which shows what kind of a man he was. His housekeeper was complaining about him planting melons in his garden again. " I don´t why you´re planting them. The village children steal them all anyway". " I know. That´s why I´m plantig them" he answered.

Trevor
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`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.
morris crumley
Dunwoody
GA USA
Posts: 2844
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/23/2020 11:28:24 PM

Thanks Trevor. He was a self-sacrificing man...even with his melon patch.

Respects, Morris
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"You are a $70, red-wool, pure quill military genius, or the biggest damn fool in northern Mexico."
Phil Andrade
London
 UK
Posts: 4693
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/25/2020 6:40:04 AM

Another good leader....we need such folks now, don’t we ?

No wonder his men followed him into such a lethal predicament.

I wonder what sort of toll those Minnesota men exacted from the Alabamians who fought them.

I can refer to Busey and find out what losses Wilcox’s brigade suffered, but the figures will apply to the whole battle, and will include their significant casualties as they advanced in support of the PPT cohorts on the third day, as well as in the encounters with other Federals they fought on Day Two.

Still, FWIW, Busey’s book reveals that Wilcox’s Brigade lost 90 killed and 439 wounded, of whom 38 died from their wounds. Bloody losses indeed, but nowhere near as bad as those suffered by the Minnesotans. Busey credits the brigade with a strength of 1,831 ( presumably this includes non combat details ), so the 128 combat fatalities represent a relatively modest percentage of the entire command. It’s worth noting though, that the brigade yielded 220 unwounded prisoners , of whom 44 - exactly one in five - perished in captivity.

Busey tells me that the poor Minnesotans lost 79 killed or mortally wounded, which, from such a small command, is really dreadful.

Regards, Phil
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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
morris crumley
Dunwoody
GA USA
Posts: 2844
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/27/2020 11:23:22 AM

It`s rather amazing that Col Colville was not killed ( though he was shot three times in the charge)....I think he was a tall man, 6 ft 4 or 5, leading a charge of men who`s average height would be around 5ft 7 or 8.

Respects, Morris
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"You are a $70, red-wool, pure quill military genius, or the biggest damn fool in northern Mexico."
Phil Andrade
London
 UK
Posts: 4693
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 8/27/2020 4:40:50 PM

Am I right in saying that the commander of the rebel counterpart , 1st Texas at Antietam, also escaped...not only with his life, but actually unscathed ?

Regards, Phil
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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
morris crumley
Dunwoody
GA USA
Posts: 2844
Lt. Col Charles Adams
Posted on: 9/9/2020 1:05:44 PM

Just an aside about the fabled 1st Minnesota. After their heroic works at Gettysburg...and their actions to try and quell the riots in New York....indeed, more than a decade after the war, they continued to fight rebels.

In 1876, former rebel (and still a rebel) Jesse James decided to lead the James-Younger gang on a robbery of the First National Bank of Minnesota, in the farm community of Northfield, Minnesota. It is believed he chose the target, in part because of its ties to two union Generals, Benjamin Butler, and Adelbert Ames...the latter the first commanding officer of the 20th Maine( and ancestor of the coming author, George Plimpton.)

It was a town of ordinary farmers and shop-keepers, and the arrival of a group of men wearing linen dusters, and armed with pistols got their attention. When the gang hit the bank, the townsmen turned out their collection of long guns and shot guns. Two of the gang were killed, almost everyone wounded...Cole Younger would survive being shot eleven times.

Most of the men who shot the hell out of the gang....were veterans of the 1st Minnesota Regiment. They were killing and shooting rebels a decade after the war!

Respects, Morris
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"You are a $70, red-wool, pure quill military genius, or the biggest damn fool in northern Mexico."

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