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(1939-1945) WWII Battles
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Dogsofwar
Franklinville
NJ USA
Posts: 12

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/5/2019 7:00:08 AM

During WW II while fighting the Japanese in the island hopping campaign, the Japanese would call out Corpsman so they could shoot them when they came to their aid. The U.S. changed the name of Corpsman to something the Japanese had difficulty pronouncing. Can you please tell me what that word was?
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anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS
 UK
Posts: 7899

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/5/2019 7:40:09 AM

During World War II the Government was again forced to borrow heavily in order to finance war with the Axis powers. By the end of the conflict Britain's debt exceeded 200 percent of GDP, as it had done after the end of the Napoleonic Wars.

As during World War I, the US again provided the major source of funds, this time via low-interest loans and also through the Lend Lease Act. Even at the end of the war Britain needed American financial assistance, and in 1945 Britain took a loan for $586 million (about £145 million at 1945 exchange rates), and in addition a further $3.7 billion line of credit (about £930m at 1945 exchange rates).

The debt was to be paid off in 50 annual repayments commencing in 1950. Some of these loans were only paid off in the early 21st century. On 31 December 2006, Britain made a final payment of about $83m (£45.5m) and thereby discharged the last of its war loans from the US.

By the end of World War II Britain had amassed an immense debt of £21 billion. Much of this was held in foreign hands, with around £3.4 billion being owed overseas (mainly to creditors in the United States), a sum which represented around one third.

Regards

Jim
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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper
DT509er
Santa Rosa
CA USA
Posts: 772

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/5/2019 1:21:47 PM

Pretty much the same answer as asked in 2011...

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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." I take offense to your perception of being offended! “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
Dogsofwar
Franklinville
NJ USA
Posts: 12

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/5/2019 6:20:13 PM

You don't ask an answer
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DT509er
Santa Rosa
CA USA
Posts: 772

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/5/2019 6:39:15 PM

Pretty much the same answer as given in 2011...

Better?

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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." I take offense to your perception of being offended! “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
Dogsofwar
Franklinville
NJ USA
Posts: 12

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/5/2019 7:22:16 PM

Why can no one answer it?
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kaii
Tallinn
 Estonia
Posts: 2609

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/6/2019 3:04:02 PM

The code name given to Corpsman was "Sailor" which the japanese would pronouce as "Sairor".

Source: "Breaking the Outer Ring(...)" by John C. Chapin.

K
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I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.
Dogsofwar
Franklinville
NJ USA
Posts: 12

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/6/2019 5:32:54 PM

Thank you very much! I really appreciate it!
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kaii
Tallinn
 Estonia
Posts: 2609

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/6/2019 7:30:44 PM

Quote:
Thank you very much! I really appreciate it!


No worries.

here's a link to the actual page in the book this is mentioned (about half way down the page)

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I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.
Dogsofwar
Franklinville
NJ USA
Posts: 12

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/6/2019 9:23:16 PM

Thanks a lot for the info! I saw a show about it on either the History or Military channel a while ago and it's been bugging me that I couldn't remember it. Thanks again!
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John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre
PA USA
Posts: 965

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/11/2019 11:17:12 AM

Kaii,

The link won't come up in English for me.

I'm also a little skeptical about "sailor" being a official code word for corpsman for a couple of reasons. First corpsman was used in the Marines but medic in the Army. And I'll add that I don't know what the Aussies and Brits called their versions. Second corpsman in the Marines weren't in the Marines but in the Navy so they were sailors. Marines for the most part called sailors "swabbies" if I'm not mistaken. Maybe we are talking for radio messages but I don't think for use of the troops in combat.
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A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country. "to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"
Brian Williams
Atlanta
GA USA
Posts: 698

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/11/2019 7:44:58 PM

"Sailor" is totally believable. It's just one example of hundreds that I assume were used. They won't care which word to use as long as it's difficult for a non-native. As an ex linguist I'd be happy to use any word...how about "Kalamazoo Michigan" as a code word? There's no foreigner that can pull that off. Probably too hard to remember, though.

I can't remember, but one example was during the Vietnam War. It was something like "Orange Juice". That is just one example. There were of course hundreds/thousands depending on the unit and month. You could hear that mispronounced in the next province.
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scoucer
Berlin
 Germany
Posts: 2580

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/12/2019 1:29:24 PM

The Dutch resistance used the name of the town "Scheveningen". Impossible to say as a non-native. You have to imagine trying to say it with acute bronchitus and a hair stuck in your throat.

trevor
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`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.
kaii
Tallinn
 Estonia
Posts: 2609

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/12/2019 7:45:44 PM

John, I think you may well be right that it might not have been an official code word used by all units, I am guessing each unit came up with their own practical solution to this issue when they were faced with it. I can only remember having seen this mentioned once - in this particular book - but I have no idea how widespread it was.

K
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I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan
MI USA
Posts: 5411

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/13/2019 8:13:49 AM

My late Father, Pacific WWII War Vet, John, said the guys could hear IJA Soldier’s calling out, “Maline, Maline, You die Maline”! The American’s would just yell back, “Tojo eats shit”!

MD
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre
PA USA
Posts: 965

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/13/2019 9:47:41 PM

Kaii,

I've done a hell of a lot of reading on the Pacific and this is the first I've heard of it. I'm not questioning you but I'd like to see the sources the book is using.
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A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country. "to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"
John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre
PA USA
Posts: 965

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/13/2019 9:52:31 PM

Dave,

They yelled back a lot of different colorful statements, Marines aren't known for their piety of language.
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A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country. "to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"
DT509er
Santa Rosa
CA USA
Posts: 772

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/14/2019 12:49:52 AM

Units did not come up, or make their own code words.., standard procedures for codes derived from code books and top-tier directives across the board via standard orders. For units to create their own code words, regardless of what happened at Bastogne which also occurred elsewhere would have been disastrous.
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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." I take offense to your perception of being offended! “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
kaii
Tallinn
 Estonia
Posts: 2609

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/14/2019 3:05:58 PM

Quote:
Kaii,

I've done a hell of a lot of reading on the Pacific and this is the first I've heard of it. I'm not questioning you but I'd like to see the sources the book is using.


No worries John, I had never heard about it either until I saw it mentioned in the passing in this book. I only remembered it again now when the question was asked here on MHO. I should still have the ebook version of it, so I'll try to see what sources are listed.

Here is the actual quote from the book where this is mentioned, from what I understand it looks like this is John C. Chapin telling the story from his own memory from the capture of Roi-Namur in the Marshall Islands.

Quote:
My immediate task was to reorganize my platoon, for it was scattered along the beach. The noise, smoke, and choking pall of burnt powder further complicated things. I turned to my sergeant guide, as we lay there in the sand, and asked him where his men were. He started to point and right before my eyes his hand dissolved into a bloody stump. He rolled over, screaming "Sailor!" , "Sailor!" (This was our code name for a corpsman. Bitter past experiences of the Marines had shown that the Japs delighted in calling "corpsman" themelves, and then shooting anyone who showed himself.) Soon our corpsman crawled over, and started to give the ergeant first aid, so I turned my attention to more pressing matters. (...)


I see Chapin was a Captain in the Marines 1942-45.
[Read More]

K
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I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.
Brian Williams
Atlanta
GA USA
Posts: 698

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/15/2019 9:27:09 AM

DT509er, I think we're talking about unit-level code words. It happened all the time. Meaning, when you send your guys outside the wire or on patrol. Not talking about the operational level sign countersign you're referring to which of course would cause chaos.
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John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre
PA USA
Posts: 965

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/15/2019 5:18:26 PM

Kaii & Brian W,

OK we are talking a platoon or company level thing. My problem is the original post/question said the US changed corpsman to something hard for the Japanese to pronounce implying "sailor" was the word across the entire Pacific with US troops.
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A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country. "to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"
kaii
Tallinn
 Estonia
Posts: 2609

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/15/2019 7:02:13 PM

Quote:
Kaii & Brian W,

OK we are talking a platoon or company level thing. My problem is the original post/question said the US changed corpsman to something hard for the Japanese to pronounce implying "sailor" was the word across the entire Pacific with US troops.


Yeah I think it has to be at small unit level otherwise it would, as Dan pointed out, wreck havoc with encrypted radio traffic. I have only ever seen this metioned once and then only in relation to this particular Marine company, so I don't know how normal it was for individual Marine unit to use their own code words like that.

K
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I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.
John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre
PA USA
Posts: 965

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/16/2019 9:24:51 AM

Kaii,
Couldn't this individual code word practice create its own problems in combat given that there are a limited number of corpsmen assigned to each individual unit and they get hit also. Plus in combat units overlap and co-mingle so you could be a member of A/1/1 and find yourself fighting with B/!/5 all around you. You get hit and start screaming "sailor" and corpsmen from different units don't know what it means and your corpsmen are already down or nowhere near.
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A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country. "to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"
Brian Williams
Atlanta
GA USA
Posts: 698

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/16/2019 7:18:10 PM

Quote:
Kaii & Brian W,

OK we are talking a platoon or company level thing. My problem is the original post/question said the US changed corpsman to something hard for the Japanese to pronounce implying "sailor" was the word across the entire Pacific with US troops.


Oh yeah, I didn't even consider that as a possibility of what we were talking about. That would never work longer than a week. It'd be compromised in a few days. What was D-Day? "Thunder", "Flash"? Something like that. Once the enemy sitting 5 feet in the next bocage heard it, it would (and I'm sure it did) be completely useless. And of course they resorted to who won the World Series, etc, etc.

It definitely had to change frequently.
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DT509er
Santa Rosa
CA USA
Posts: 772

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/16/2019 10:55:24 PM

I would imagine as PFC Merriell 'Snafu' Shelton stated in; The Pacific that Lilliputian would have exposed many an IJN soldier/sailor.



Shown here are Eugene B. Sledge (right) with Merriell A. "Snafu" Shelton (left) and Paul Wright (middle) at a 1st Marine Division reunion in 1983.



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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." I take offense to your perception of being offended! “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
kaii
Tallinn
 Estonia
Posts: 2609

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/17/2019 7:57:55 AM

Quote:
Kaii,
Couldn't this individual code word practice create its own problems in combat given that there are a limited number of corpsmen assigned to each individual unit and they get hit also. Plus in combat units overlap and co-mingle so you could be a member of A/1/1 and find yourself fighting with B/!/5 all around you. You get hit and start screaming "sailor" and corpsmen from different units don't know what it means and your corpsmen are already down or nowhere near.


I could definitely see this being a problem, yes.

K
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I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.
Brian Grafton
Victoria
BC Canada
Posts: 2585

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/17/2019 8:22:25 PM

DT, is that a shot you took? Have you met Eugene Sledge? I thoroughly enjoyed With the Old Breed, which I sense captured much of what made the USMC special in WW2.

Cheers
Brian G
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"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly. "The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.
DT509er
Santa Rosa
CA USA
Posts: 772

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/17/2019 10:33:23 PM

A shot? No, it was a line from the series, The Pacific that Snafu made regarding the Japanese soldiers and the use of the word, Lilliputian.

When Eugene Sledge's book came out, I was in the Army and I can tell you that every Paratrooper I knew who had read the book had the highest of respect for Sledge, Snafu & the rest of their mates. Of any series, movie, documentary, etc., that I have seen, The Pacific reflects as accurately as possible the story's told by Sledge, Robert Leckie & others.

IMO, they were men that I always admired and respected, it is unfortunate that I never meet Sledge and others although, my grandfather fought at Iwo Jima and about 15 years ago I met a sailor who served on the cruiser CL-26 USS Northampton during the Guadalcanal campaign. My daughters even remember that moment as we were in a mall in San Diego County and my girls were shopping. They saw that I was talking to this old vet, informed me they were headed to such and such a store and would meet me were I was talking or at the hot dog stand we liked to visit; they knew how important it was for me to sit there and just talk to him. It. Was. Priceless!

Sorry that I rambled on here but, even with my comment about the password and how it was directed at Japanese soldiers it was not a shot I was taking, just a story I heard and shared.
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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." I take offense to your perception of being offended! “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
George
Centre Hastings
ON Canada
Posts: 9912

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/18/2019 7:33:01 AM

Thanks for the story Dan. The few times that I have had to talk to vets of WW1 or WW2 just left me in awe of them. Regular guys with a job to do and they did it.
My own Dad would never say too much about it.
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Brian Grafton
Victoria
BC Canada
Posts: 2585

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/18/2019 5:29:05 PM

Sorry, bad choice of a slang word on my part. I wondered if you were sharing a personal photograph you had taken of Eugene Sledge at a meeting of vets. I admire the man greatly, and was thinking what an honour it would be to know him.

Cheers
Brian G
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"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly. "The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.
DT509er
Santa Rosa
CA USA
Posts: 772

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/19/2019 12:09:56 AM

Understood and agree Brian.
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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." I take offense to your perception of being offended! “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
DT509er
Santa Rosa
CA USA
Posts: 772

Japanese calling Corpsman
Posted on: 7/19/2019 12:26:29 AM

Quote:
Thanks for the story Dan. The few times that I have had to talk to vets of WW1 or WW2 just left me in awe of them. Regular guys with a job to do and they did it.
My own Dad would never say too much about it.


My grandfather was tight lipped about the war except after my dad returned from Vietnam when he then shared a few stories with my dad (my dad shared that with me before his death). I sometimes wonder if my grandfather understood what my dad had experienced and was providing support for my dad and in someways for himself. When the World at War series came out and the storyline was about Iwo Jima, my dad kept telling me, "Grandpa was there." It wasn't until years later I realized because of what my dad experienced in Vietnam, he got what was taking place on tv about a little island in the Pacific where his dad fought, killed and lived.

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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." I take offense to your perception of being offended! “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

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