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17thfabn
Ohio OH USA
Posts: 135
Joined: 2008
Which way was the wind blowing during the Normandy landings.
1/17/2021 12:13:27 PM
I am currently reading "The Dead and Those About to Die" by John McManus.

It is about the U.S. 1st Infantry Division during the Normandy landings.

They talk about how ineffective the pre landing aerial and naval bombardment was.

It got me thinking would heavy use of smoke have helped? Or was the wind conditions such that it would have quickly moved covering smoke in the wrong way?
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Withdrawal in disgust is not the same as apathy.
morris crumley
Dunwoody GA USA
Posts: 2930
Joined: 2007
Which way was the wind blowing during the Normandy landings.
1/17/2021 12:54:54 PM
I believe some smoke was used...but the weather conditions were such that the smoke could not be controlled anyway. In addition, smoke can be a double edged sword..it can conceal the attackers, but conceals enemy positions as well. Smoke would also obscure the landing the beach LZ`s from their assigned landing craft ( which happened in many cases anyway) and would obscure the targets for cover-fire.
Smoke can be useful, but when the Airborne carried out an amphibious assault across the Waal river...the smoke wafted away quickly and did little good in concealing anything.

Respect, Morris
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"You are a $70, red-wool, pure quill military genius, or the biggest damn fool in northern Mexico."
DT509er
Santa Rosa CA USA
Posts: 959
Joined: 2005
Which way was the wind blowing during the Normandy landings.
1/17/2021 4:44:13 PM
Based on the information and video's I have watched, winds were blowing from East/NorthEast in the direction of West/Southwest. Skiys were cloudy but not so heavy that it prevented Paratroop drops and glider landings. But, it was not the winds that scattered the troopers all about the landing areas, that was largely due to aircrews piloting the planes. By midday of June 6th, the sky's cleared up and the sea settled down a bit.

The timing of the assault, based on the meteorological "forecasts" made by Captain James Stagg and his team allowed for the assault to take place in that small window of 'weather time' of June 6th, had Ike delayed until the opportune tides for later in June, the weather then was much worse those few weeks later.

As a side note, based on the article I posted below: "June 1944 was one of the windiest of the century in southeastern England, with only 1917 windier, going back to 1895."[i/]

[Read More]

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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
17thfabn
Ohio OH USA
Posts: 135
Joined: 2008
Which way was the wind blowing during the Normandy landings.
1/17/2021 10:22:36 PM
Quote:
I believe some smoke was used...but the weather conditions were such that the smoke could not be controlled anyway. In addition, smoke can be a double edged sword..it can conceal the attackers, but conceals enemy positions as well.

Respect, Morris


Take a situation where the landing craft are coming in and men are scrambling off the beach are more or less siting ducks in a shooting gallery . "Blindness" would probably work in the attackers favor.

I read a book years ago by a captain from the 116 Regiment of the 29th Infantry Division. On D-Day they landed with the 1st Infantry Division. He stated that one of the most useful effects of the pre invasion bombardment was fires that were started. The smoke helped shield their movement.
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Withdrawal in disgust is not the same as apathy.
RichTO90
Bremerton WA USA
Posts: 581
Joined: 2004
Which way was the wind blowing during the Normandy landings.
1/22/2021 12:57:12 PM
"Smokers", landing craft equipped with chemical smoke dispensers, were an integral part of the landing plan, but proved ineffective because of the prevailing wind speed, which dispersed the smoke too quickly. The accidental grass firs started by shelling between DOG and EASY on OMAHA did produce lasting smoke, which helped shelter the landing of the reserve battalion of the 116th Infantry and 5th Ranger Battalion.

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