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17thfabn
Ohio OH USA
Posts: 206
Joined: 2008
Light vs. Heavy Cruisers of London / Washington Treaties era
12/4/2023 8:33:29 PM
If I understand correctly most of the cruisers built during the treaty era were around 10,000 tones. Or at least had claimed tonnage of around 10,000 tones.

The typically "heavy" cruiser had eight to nine 8" guns.

The typically "light" cruiser had twelve 6" guns. A few had fifteen "6" guns.

I'm leaving out the odd ball small British cruisers and the U.S.N. Atlanta class with 5" main armament and the RN Dido class with 5.25" guns and similar.

I would guess that it wouldn't happen too often that a light and heavy cruiser would have a one on one shoot out due to most naval actions being a team sport. But there could be actions where a light and heavy cruiser traded shots during an engagement.

How would a light cruiser fare against a heavy cruiser. The heavy has the advantage of bigger shell with better penetration. The light has the advantage of more guns and higher rate of fire.
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Withdrawal in disgust is not the same as apathy.
DT509er
Santa Rosa CA USA
Posts: 1521
Joined: 2005
Light vs. Heavy Cruisers of London / Washington Treaties era
12/4/2023 11:17:06 PM
Quote:
If I understand correctly most of the cruisers built during the treaty era were around 10,000 tones. Or at least had claimed tonnage of around 10,000 tones.

The typically "heavy" cruiser had eight to nine 8" guns.

The typically "light" cruiser had twelve 6" guns. A few had fifteen "6" guns.

I'm leaving out the odd ball small British cruisers and the U.S.N. Atlanta class with 5" main armament and the RN Dido class with 5.25" guns and similar.

I would guess that it wouldn't happen too often that a light and heavy cruiser would have a one on one shoot out due to most naval actions being a team sport. But there could be actions where a light and heavy cruiser traded shots during an engagement.

How would a light cruiser fare against a heavy cruiser. The heavy has the advantage of bigger shell with better penetration. The light has the advantage of more guns and higher rate of fire.


The Battle of Savo Island August 1942 brought forth four heavy Japanese cruisers, Aoba, Kinugasa, Furataka & Kako sailing 10,000+ tons and two light cruisers Yubari and Tenryu sparring in at 3,587 and 4,350 tones, respectively, while the US and Australia sailed eight cruisers into action. Canberra sailed at 10,000 tons, Australia at 9,072 tons, & Hobart slimmed down to 7,115 tons. The US with three New Orleans class cruisers, Vincennes, Quincy and Astoria sailed at 9,950 tons each, the Northampton class cruiser Chicago at 9,300 tons and Atlanta class San Juan at 6,000 tons.

While there is no doubt there was one on one action, this battle had ships taking 8", 6", 5.5", 5", 4.7" and 4" rounds from attacking cruisers, and this is not including secondary armament or torpedos. Obviously the Allies took the Japanese Navy's shelling heavily and would again with one additional US cruiser, Atlanta being sunk while Juneau, Helena, Portland and San Francisco were heavily damaged months later during the First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and indignity and death would be dealt to three more US cruisers during the Battle of Tassafaronga but this time the IJN sent in eight destroyers.

I hope I have at least in some manner addressed your comments properly.

Dan

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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." German officer, Italy 1944. “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
Markus Becker
Westphalia  Germany
Posts: 59
Joined: 2004
Light vs. Heavy Cruisers of London / Washington Treaties era
12/5/2023 9:22:34 AM
The WNT didn’t distinguish between light and heavy. It set max limits and almost everyone saw them as the minimum requirements. But the theoretical advantages of the 8” gun turned out to be well, theoretical.

The 8” hit harder but the early ‘heavy’ cruisers weren’t even protected against 6” gunfire, which was firing much faster too.

Yes, you have a longer range but good luck hitting a 30 knot target at more than 20,000 yards. Later showcased by the battle of the Java Sea and the Komandorski Islands.


So, you got to get close-ish and there the 6” has the RoF advantage. Especially at night because there the ranges were crazy short.
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1968
Joined: 2010
Light vs. Heavy Cruisers of London / Washington Treaties era
12/13/2023 9:06:28 PM
And then throw in some Long Lance ordnance.

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