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Brian Grafton
Victoria
BC Canada
Posts: 3203
Duly noted ... .
Posted on: 7/6/2020 8:22:53 PM

Did anybody else notice this heart-warming little tidbit in the news today?

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It appeared on sites other than BBC Online (I think I noted it in passing in NYT). I offer it as a reminder that there are hosts of viral challenges which have been around a long time but have never been eliminated. The case in question appears localized in a northeast Asian setting, and is bubonic. But related viruses show up in small positive numbers in other locations, including the US southwest, where hantavirus infests and even kills folks on an annual basis. Hanta is pneumonic, and affects the lungs.

I'm not "that kind of a doctor", so I can't take this very far. Really just wanted to focus MHOers' attention on the existence of other plages beside COVID-19.

Cheers. And stay safe.
Brian G
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"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly. "The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.
GaryNJ
Cumberland
NJ USA
Posts: 67
Duly noted ... .
Posted on: 7/7/2020 11:38:23 AM

Brian,

Infectious diseases is an interesting topic especially with the covid-19 pandemic. Bubonic plague continues to occur in the U.S., as in a number of other countries. Here is an article on it.
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Hantavirus is found in most states in the U.S., although the western states is the primary area. Here is a cumulative count through January 2017.


The article from where it came is [Read More]
Hantavirus is found in many countries in the Western Hemisphere as the following article states.
[Read More]

Here is an article on Hantavirus in Canada.
[Read More]

Gary
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George
Centre Hastings
ON Canada
Posts: 10971
Duly noted ... .
Posted on: 7/7/2020 1:34:23 PM

Gary, thank you for the publication on hantavirus in Canada. Many years ago I used to work for one of my professors at his summer camp for kids. We would encounter deer mice at all campsites when on canoe trips.

At night, while sitting around a fire, we would feel the deer mice running over our feet. Shine a flashlight down and there they were. Cute little guys.

But on some of our trips, we would encounter abandoned cabins and it was hard to resist not throwing the bags down in the cabin rather than pitching tents. Now this was in the early '70's and we had been cautioned not to sleep anywhere where there was a collection of rodent droppings because of the danger of hantavirus.

Your mention of that virus jogged my memory.

There are three routes of transmission apparently:

-most often by breathing in infected dust from deer mice droppings or urine;
-being bitten by an infected deer mouse;
-touching any broken skin after contact with infected material.

According to this article from the Ministry of Health of Ontario, it's supposed to be pretty hard to contract. I don't remember anyone ever contracting this disease in my province

[Read More]

Cheers,

George
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Brian Grafton
Victoria
BC Canada
Posts: 3203
Duly noted ... .
Posted on: 7/10/2020 7:21:05 PM

Gary, thanks for some great information. It's interesting to note that coincidently (?) the studies your various links involve run almost simultaneously (from 1989 in CA and 1993 in the US) and both are 25 year studies. Sounds like there may have been a common root to the two undertakings, with who knows what possible common guidelines and goals. If there was a reference to some commonality, I didn't spot it during my reading.

Timing is interesting as well. The bunching of cases in May and June (at least in CA) on Canada's western plain, and the suggestion that the BC cases all abut or are affiliated with the plains geographical area, combined with the the impact of the Rockies on climate both south and north of the border draws one to relate the annual opening of the soil/and or returning to the land with the "bounce" in infections.

I'm also amazed at the level of fatality associated with HPS: 30% is scary. Of course, the numbers your chart show are 25 year numbers, as are the numbers given in the CA study. Seen that way, Canada averages four cases of HPS/year, with an average death rate of just over one. Hantavirus is there, and deadly, and relatively rare.

So, Gary, thanks for giving me so much to ponder.

Cheers. And stay safe.
Brian G
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"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly. "The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

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