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NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 7:39:12 PM
In all of World History, not only Blacks were slaves.

The phrase "white slavery" was used by Charles Sumner in 1847 to describe the slavery of Christians throughout the Barbary States and primarily in Algiers, the capital of Ottoman Algeria.[2] It also encompassed many forms of slavery, including the European concubines (Cariye) often found in Turkish harems.[3]

The term was also used by Clifford G. Roe from the beginning of the twentieth century to campaign against the forced prostitution and sexual slavery of girls who worked in Chicago brothels. Similarly, countries of Europe signed in Paris in 1904 an International Agreement for the suppression of the White Slave Traffic aimed at combating the sale of women who were forced into prostitution in the countries of continental Europe.



Cheers, NY Giant
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 7:53:48 PM
Quote:
Some historical events from the last 2 days of the calendar year, please comment on some of them!?? Moved to our new page....

12-30

1853 the US acquired more territory from Mexico with the Garden Purchase, at least this area was not taken by war!
What say you??

1865 Famous British writer Rudyard Kipling was born! Also Japan s Warlord Tojo, Tiger Woods, LeBron James, were also born on this date, on different Years of course!

1902 British Explorer, Robert Falcon Scott, travels further south than any European, previously! Who knows the Inuit probably already achieved this?? Later the Exploration bug would kill Robert F. Scott! What say you? Was his quest, folly!???

2006 Saddam Hussain is executed for crimes against humanity! Was justice served?? Anyone?

12-31,

On New Years Eve, 1857 Canada made Ottawa it's capital! Why? Was this a good choice?? Anyone??

1600 the East India Company was formed, good for England? Bad for everyone else!?? Comments?

1775 American troops led in part by Benedict Arnold lose the Battle of Quebec! You wonder if he was already leaning British?? Any thoughts on this??

1991 the Soviet Union ceased to exist!? Could you believe this happened?? A shocker? Or expected? What say you??

1999 the US keeps it's promise, & turns the Canal over to Panama! Comments??

Happy New Year, Y'all,
MD

Also on a more horrific note today in 2019 the World Health Organization learns of the awful pandemic, Covid 19! It's still strong, & evolving!? How many have we lost? Where does it rank as A deadly disease?? Will it ever go away?? What say you??

Also the day before yesterday famous US Commentator, Barbara Walters passed away at 93! RIP!


1-1 in history!?

What famous events occurred on New Years Day?? Anyone??
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 7:57:55 PM
Emancipation Proclamation was signed by President Lincoln.
Wazza
Sydney  Australia
Posts: 814
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 8:25:24 PM
The Commonwealth of Australia was declared on 1 January 1901 at a ceremony held in Centennial Park in Sydney.
During the ceremony, the first Governor-General, Lord Hopetoun, was sworn-in and Australia's first Prime Minister, Edmund Barton, and federal ministers took the oath of office.
Wazza
Sydney  Australia
Posts: 814
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 8:32:20 PM
In 1962 the US Navy SEALs were formed, fashioned initially after the British SAS but would rapidly evolve.
Wazza
Sydney  Australia
Posts: 814
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 8:38:29 PM
1966 Canada Pension Plan (CPP) Started
Canada Introduces it's earnings-related social insurance program the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) . At age 65 The CPP provides regular pension payments calculated as 25% of the average contributory maximum over the last 5 years.
Wazza
Sydney  Australia
Posts: 814
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 8:40:25 PM
2000 New Millennium
This is the day that the New Millennium took place. The big concern that arose during this time was one considering what was called the possible "Y2K Crisis".

In short, it was originally believed that regional, national, or worldwide computer crisis was going to occur after the clock struck midnight in the year 2000. People were reading books about how to prepare for this crisis, which could affect not only offices but roads, homes, amusement parks, and so on. People also prepared water, food, and other emergency items in case the Y2K Crisis would become a reality. It was originally thought that the year 2000 would be read by most computers as the year "1900". Fortunately, the worst imagined did not happen, and there was no real threat. It was either that or the world was so scared that it would happened that it spent over and above the amount of money needed to ensure that it would not happen.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 8:49:42 PM
Quote:
Quote:
On New Years Eve, 1857 Canada made Ottawa it's capital! Why? Was this a good choice?? Anyone??


Not really Canada as we understand it today. In 1841 the British had united the province of Upper Canada with Lower Canada. The British had been shocked by the 1837 rebellions in Upper and Lower Canada and asked a man named Lord Durham to investigate and make recommendations as to how the two provinces should be administered in the future.

The Durham Report recommended amalgamation and so the Unity Act was passed in the British Parliament and the two provinces, now called Canada East and Canada West became the two provinces in the United Province of Canada. Everybody got that?
Durham's rationale was that the French-Canadians, a group of people that he did not like, were the cause of all the problems. The Unity Act would ensure that the English speaking people, mostly in Canada West would hold all the aces when it came to legislation and loyalty for that matter because they would be in the majority. There were 670,000 people in Canada East in 1857 but about 160,000 of them were Anglos. Add them to the nearly 500,000 Anglos in Canada West and the English speaking people would be at least equal in number. Seats in the amalgamated Parliament were equal and so the Anglos actually had a disproportionate influence on legislation.

The union was a failure because legislatively there was still a division. Provincial debts had been consolidated and both sides felt that that was detrimental. The French language was banned for use in Parliament. That went over like a lead balloon in Québec. Specific legislation that protected French language rights in education were suspended.

Note that we have been dealing with this English-French divide since pre-Confederation days and it still plagues us to this day.


Durham also recommended responsible government be established but his British bosses wouldn't go that far.

Ok, now what about the capital of the United Province of Canada?

The capital was moved around a lot which was an expense that had to be dealt with. The spectre of the ethnic divisions still impacted the union and so it was thought fair to move the capital between Canada West and Canada East. And so the first capital was Kingston in Canada West and that remained so from 1841 until 1844.

It was moved to Montréal in Canada East from 1845 until 1849.

From 1849 to 1851, the capital moved to Toronto in Canada West.

1851 to 1855, the capital was in Québec City in Canada East

1855 to 1859, Toronto again

1859 to 1865, Québec City

Finally, the capital of the United Province of Canada was moved to Ottawa from 1866 to 1867. I'm sure everyone can see the pattern here and the craziness of the concept at work.

So what does 1857 have to do with anything? Well, in that year Queen Victoria after listening to a lot of advice selected Ottawa as the capital of the United Province.

But the United Province and the other colonies of BNA were already in discussion to unite as one. Confederation would happen in 1867.

Ottawa was finally selected by Queen Victoria to remain as the capital of the Dominion of Canada. She was asked to do so because the politicians from the other colonies of BNA could not agree. Ottawa which was called Bytown until 1855, was a lumber town on the Ottawa river directly across from the Québec side. It was a dreary and muddy place surrounded by beautiful forests.

Politicians from Montréal, Québec, and Toronto all vied for their city to be selected. And so Queen Vic selected the one candidate to which all of the others showed disapproval, Ottawa. There is one story that is floated about that Victoria just liked the landscape pictures of the Ottawa area and another that said that she looked at a map and stuck a pin in Ottawa which appeared to be about half way between Toronto and Montréal.

There were better reasons to select Ottawa:

1. It wasn't Toronto and it wasn't Montréal. It was right on the provincial border between Canada West and East which would pacify both sides of the ethnic divide.

2. If it wasn't going to be Toronto or Montréal then it had to be Ottawa which was the only sizeable town between the two.

3. There was a beautiful Parliament being built in Ottawa to house the government of the United Province. No need to build another Parliament building in another city.

This is the Houses of Parliament being built on Parliament Hill in 1863, well before Confederation had been approved.



4. Ottawa was far enough away from the border so that it could not easily be occupied by the US should it decide to invade again. The War of 1812 had taught the Canadians that any town or city on the Great Lakes or the St. Lawrence River was vulnerable. In 1826, Colonel John By had started to build the Rideau Canal which would connect the Ottawa River and Bytown on the river, with Lake Ontario. The Rideau was part of the defence system recommended by the Duke of Wellington when he toured the Canadian defence structures.

So Queen Vic picked our capital because we were already fighting about where it should be even before Confederation. Canada asked the Queen to make the call and Ottawa is still our capital.

Cheers,

George


EDIT: MD asked whether Queen Vic made a good choice when she picked Ottawa. In my last year of high school I had to apply to universities for acceptance. I seriously considered an application to U of O or to Carleton. I am embarrassed to admit that when my mates and I had learned that as a government town, the ratio of women to men in Ottawa was 5:1, I had considered heading there. So shallow when I was 18





Hi George,

Thanks for the back & forth story of how Ottawa became Canada's capital city! It sounds like Queen Victoria had the wisdom of Solomon, putting the capital between the two very different provinces!? Hope everyone is happy with the choice?

I know the Red blacks, & Senators are!?

5 to 1 odds, ya gotta like that!? ☺

Cheers,
MD

BTW thanks Wazza, 4 straight posts on this thread! Good show, mate!!!
Also Happy Birthday to the Commonwealth of Australia! Any big celebrations??
I saw few highlights of the fantastic fireworks display over Sydney Harbor! Awesome!!
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13550
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
1/1/2023 8:50:54 PM
Quote:
1966 Canada Pension Plan (CPP) Started
Canada Introduces it's earnings-related social insurance program the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) . At age 65 The CPP provides regular pension payments calculated as 25% of the average contributory maximum over the last 5 years.


It's an excellent plan and well managed with $529 billion CAD in assets. But this pension plan was never designed to be sufficient to cover everyone's retirement needs. So each person still has to plan well for retirement to ensure sufficient funds will be available.

Not everyone contributes to the CPP. If you have never made CPP contributions through work deductions, then you won't qualify.

A person who retires at age 65 receives $1306 per month. Add that to the Old Age Security of about the same and you have $2600 per month. There are other social programmes available for people without other assets. But if you want to live well in retirement you will need more assets like a private pension or a retirement saving plan.

Cheers,

George
Phil Andrade
London  UK
Posts: 6507
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 3:30:44 AM
“ In all of World History, not only Blacks were slaves. “

That’s incontestable.

Why was the slavery in the antebellum South referred to as “ The Peculiar Institution “ ?

Alexander Stephens explained why in his Cornerstone Speech when he described the nature of the Constitution of the Confederacy.

I’m bound to ask : if the slaves had been white, would there have been such a hard and bloody war as that of 1861-65 ?

Regards, Phil
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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 6:23:06 AM
On this day in US History,....


The Continental Congress publishes the “Tory Act” resolution on January 2, 1776, which describes how colonies should handle those Americans who remain loyal to the British and King George.

The act called on colonial committees to indoctrinate those “honest and well-meaning, but uninformed people” by enlightening them as to the “origin, nature and extent of the present controversy.” The Congress remained “fully persuaded that the more our right to the enjoyment of our ancient liberties and privileges is examined, the more just and necessary our present opposition to ministerial tyranny will appear.”

However, those “unworthy Americans,” who had “taken part with our oppressors” with the aim of gathering “ignominious rewards,” were left to the relevant bodies, some ominously named “councils of safety,” to decide their fate. Congress merely offered its “opinion” that dedicated Tories “ought to be disarmed, and the more dangerous among them either kept in safe custody, or bound with sufficient sureties to their good behavior.”

​The lengths Congress and lesser colonial bodies would go to in order to repress Loyalists took a darker tone later in the act. Listing examples of the “execrable barbarity with which this unhappy war has been conducted on the part of our enemies,” Congress vowed to act “whenever retaliation may be necessary” although it might prove a “disagreeable task.”

In the face of such hostility, some Loyalists chose not to remain in the American colonies. During the war, between 60,000 and 70,000 free persons and 20,000 enslaved people abandoned the rebellious 13 colonies for other destinations within the British empire. The Revolution effectively created two countries: Patriots formed the new United States, while fleeing Loyalists populated Canada.​
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 7:46:52 AM
Quote:
.

Why was the slavery in the antebellum South referred to as “ The Peculiar Institution “ ?





Slavery was considered a “peculiar institution” because slaveholders used physical abuse and mental manipulation to control their slaves.
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 7:53:56 AM
As in "peculiar to one place/area".
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 9:44:02 AM
D
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 10:15:07 AM
Sorry guys having trouble posting "read mores"!??

Don't know why?
MD

----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 10:21:04 AM
There is a book titled The Peculiar Institution, by Kenneth M Stampp that explains the meaning quite well!??

See above,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 10:22:32 AM
en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Peculiar_Institution

Above is the link I was trying to post??

Confusing attempt??
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Phil Andrade
London  UK
Posts: 6507
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 10:45:12 AM
Quote:
There is a book titled The Peculiar Institution, by Kenneth M Stampp that explains the meaning quite well!??

See above,
MD



Yes, that was considered a dated but classic account when I read it at university nearly fifty years ago.

Slavery and Secession, and the crisis of the Union, 1850 to 1862 : that was my special subject in my final year there.

People didn’t refer to “ enslaved people “ then : they were called slaves.

Sensibilities change, and language too.

Editing:

Ulrich B Phillips was another authority on slavery in the antebellum South that I was required to familiarise myself with.

He used the phrase “ American Negro Slavery “ , which is a big taboo now.

Regards, Phil
----------------------------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 10:52:22 AM
"Peculiar Institution" as A term, really raises a lot of sites on US slavery, try googling it!?

MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
GaryNJ
Cumberland NJ USA
Posts: 254
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 11:48:49 AM
Quote:
Sensibilities change, and language too.


This is an important point.

Gary
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/2/2023 7:55:35 PM
Quote:
Quote:
.

Why was the slavery in the antebellum South referred to as “ The Peculiar Institution “ ?





Slavery was considered a “peculiar institution” because slaveholders used physical abuse and mental manipulation to control their slaves.





NYG,

True enough!

MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Phil Andrade
London  UK
Posts: 6507
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
1/3/2023 5:00:50 AM
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
.

Why was the slavery in the antebellum South referred to as “ The Peculiar Institution “ ?





Slavery was considered a “peculiar institution” because slaveholders used physical abuse and mental manipulation to control their slaves.





NYG,

True enough!

MD


Not in my opinion.

Peculiar, in so far as the system of slavery in this case was predicated principally on the subjugation of a race.

Regards, Phil
----------------------------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/3/2023 6:55:50 AM
This day in US History,...

On January 3, 1959, President Eisenhower signs a special proclamation admitting the territory of Alaska into the Union as the 49th and largest state.

Indigenous peoples inhabited the region that would become Alaska for centuries. The European discovery of Alaska came in 1741, when a Russian expedition led by Danish navigator Vitus Bering sighted the Alaskan mainland. Russian hunters were soon making incursions into Alaska, and the native Aleut population suffered greatly after being exposed to foreign diseases. In 1784, Grigory Shelikhov established the first permanent Russian colony in Alaska on Kodiak Island. In the early 19th century, Russian settlements spread down the west coast of North America, with the southernmost fort located near Bodega Bay in California.

Russian activity in the New World declined in the 1820s, and the British and Americans were granted trading rights in Alaska after a few minor diplomatic conflicts. In the 1860s, a nearly bankrupt Russia decided to offer Alaska for sale to the United States, which earlier had expressed interest in such a purchase. On March 30, 1867, Secretary of State William H. Seward signed a treaty with Russia for the purchase of Alaska for $7.2 million. Despite the bargain price of roughly two cents an acre, the Alaskan purchase was ridiculed in Congress and in the press as “Seward’s folly,” “Seward’s icebox,” and President Andrew Johnson’s “polar bear garden.” Nevertheless, the Senate ratified purchase of the tremendous landmass, one-fifth the size of the rest of the United States.

Despite a slow start in settlement by Americans from the continental United States, the discovery of gold in 1898 brought a rapid influx of people to the territory. Alaska, rich in natural resources, has been contributing to American prosperity ever since.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/3/2023 8:27:20 AM
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
.

Why was the slavery in the antebellum South referred to as “ The Peculiar Institution “ ?





Slavery was considered a “peculiar institution” because slaveholders used physical abuse and mental manipulation to control their slaves.





NYG,

True enough!

MD


Not in my opinion.

Peculiar, in so far as the system of slavery in this case was predicated principally on the subjugation of a race.

Regards, Phil



Hi Phil,

I didn't mean that the main reason wasn't the subjugation of enslaved people from Africa, I was just saying it's true enough that the "Planter Elite" used physical & mental abuse to control them!??

Sadly so!
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/3/2023 8:55:40 AM
Hey guys,

Checking the dates from the start of the New Years, 1-1 to 1-3, A few events, comments!??

1-1,

1735 Paul Revere, of the British are coming, fame was born!? Comments on this Patriot? Anyone??

1804 after a bloody rebellion, Haiti declares independence from France! How did this cause concern in the Antebellum South!? Anyone??

1808, the US outlaws slavery, however, this does not stop the practice from growing domestically!? With many of the Slaves worth over $1,000 it easy to see how wealthy a Plantation owner with @ 100 slaves would be, plus the free labor!? Sad!?

1863 the Emancipation Proclamation is issued, freeing slaves in the South! How did this effect the Civil War?? What say you?

2002 Euros are introduced as Europes currency! How is that working out?? Anyone?

1-2,

1492 the Spanish regain Grenada from the Moors! Who is El Cid? Comments??

1863 the Union wins the battle of Stones River! Any details??

1905 the Russians surrender Port Arthur to the Japanese! How did the IJN win? Anyone??

1-3

1521 Martin Luther excommunicated by the Pope! Why??

1777 Washington wins the Battle of Trenton!? First American win, how important was it??

1959 Alaska becomes our 49th state!? Politics, or force?? How did this occur? What say you??

1962 even the Pope is against Castro in Cuba!? Why??

Any new topics??
Regards,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Phil Andrade
London  UK
Posts: 6507
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
1/3/2023 10:54:55 AM
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
.

Why was the slavery in the antebellum South referred to as “ The Peculiar Institution “ ?





Slavery was considered a “peculiar institution” because slaveholders used physical abuse and mental manipulation to control their slaves.





NYG,

True enough!

MD


Not in my opinion.

Peculiar, in so far as the system of slavery in this case was predicated principally on the subjugation of a race.

Regards, Phil



Hi Phil,

I didn't mean that the main reason wasn't the subjugation of enslaved people from Africa, I was just saying it's true enough that the "Planter Elite" used physical & mental abuse to control them!??

Sadly so!
MD


Hello Dave,

Sorry that I seem so picky about this, but I’ve got an important point to make here.

Physical and mental abuse was the means of control of impoverished and vulnerable people all over the world in those days, whether they were oppressed Sicilian peasants, Russian serfs or children working as labourers in London and Manchester. Think of Oliver Twist !

“ Peculiar “ is a word which, in my interpretation, implies unique, different or exceptional.

The physical and mental abuse meted out to slaves in the antebellum South was not , in itself, “ peculiar “.

What made that institution peculiar was conflation of slavery with race, with ownership and control being predicated on colour and ethnicity.

I think I’ve laboured this argument to a degree which makes me feel uncomfortable.

Regards, Phil

----------------------------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
Wazza
Sydney  Australia
Posts: 814
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
1/3/2023 2:57:05 PM
Interestingly, we are now looking at Slavery down here in Oz.
While predominantly in regards to the 'Black Birding' of islanders especially from Vanuatu to work in QLD cane fields a small minority are also asking about convict labor when NSW was a penal colony and the expansion of roads and farmland into the interior.
It's a little commented upon part of our history.
Regards
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/4/2023 7:55:07 AM
On this day in US History,...

On January 4, 2007, John Boehner handed the speaker of the House gavel over to Nancy Pelosi, a Democratic Representative from California. With the passing of the gavel, she became the first woman to hold the Speaker of the House position, as well as the only woman to get that close the presidency. After the Vice President, she was now second in line via the presidential order of succession. Pelosi became Speaker again in 2018.

“It is an historic moment for the Congress, and a historic moment for the women of this country. It is a moment for which we have waited over 200 years,” Pelosi said after receiving the gavel. “For our daughters and granddaughters, today we have broken the marble ceiling. For our daughters and our granddaughters, the sky is the limit, anything is possible for them.”

Pelosi’s Congressional career began 20 years before, when she was one of only 25 women who served in both the House and the Senate. She became the Democratic whip in 2001 and served as the minority leader between 2003 and her election as speaker in 2007. In 2002, she was one of the House members to vote against President George W. Bush’s request to use military force in Iraq.

During her first two terms as Speaker of the House from 2007 to 2011, she developed a reputation as a tireless fundraiser and a successful securer of votes within her caucus. Her terms as speaker also coincided with Barack Obama’s first presidential term, and Pelosi was instrumental on organizing House votes for the Affordable Care Act.

During the 2010 midterms, the National Republican Congressional Committee cited her in 70 percent of its ads. The Democrats lost their House majority that election and Pelosi returned to her position as minority leader. After Democrats reclaimed the House in the 2018 midterms, she received her party’s nomination to be its official candidate for Speaker of the House. In 2019 and again in 2021, as Speaker, Pelosi oversaw the first and second impeachments of President Donald Trump. Pelosi announced she was stepping down from the leadership position in 2022, though she would remain in the House to represent her California district.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/4/2023 8:46:13 AM
Quote:
Interestingly, we are now looking at Slavery down here in Oz.
While predominantly in regards to the 'Black Birding' of islanders especially from Vanuatu to work in QLD cane fields a small minority are also asking about convict labor when NSW was a penal colony and the expansion of roads and farmland into the interior.
It's a little commented upon part of our history.
Regards



Hi Wazza,

I was reading a book on that very subject of "Black birding", in the Pacific Islands. From the great American writer James Mitchener, who in his book Rascals in Paradise, (good read) tells of a American from Ohio named Bully Hayes who made a good living capturing Islanders & selling them in places like Australia!

Regards,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/4/2023 8:57:14 AM
Quote:
Hey guys,

Checking the dates from the start of the New Years, 1-1 to 1-3, A few events, comments!??

1-1,

1735 Paul Revere, of the British are coming, fame was born!? Comments on this Patriot? Anyone??

1804 after a bloody rebellion, Haiti declares independence from France! How did this cause concern in the Antebellum South!? Anyone??

1808, the US outlaws slavery, however, this does not stop the practice from growing domestically!? With many of the Slaves worth over $1,000 it easy to see how wealthy a Plantation owner with @ 100 slaves would be, plus the free labor!? Sad!?

1863 the Emancipation Proclamation is issued, freeing slaves in the South! How did this effect the Civil War?? What say you?

2002 Euros are introduced as Europes currency! How is that working out?? Anyone?

1-2,

1492 the Spanish regain Grenada from the Moors! Who is El Cid? Comments??

1863 the Union wins the battle of Stones River! Any details??

1905 the Russians surrender Port Arthur to the Japanese! How did the IJN win? Anyone??

1-3

1521 Martin Luther excommunicated by the Pope! Why??

1777 Washington wins the Battle of Trenton!? First American win, how important was it??

1959 Alaska becomes our 49th state!? Politics, or force?? How did this occur? What say you??

1962 even the Pope is against Castro in Cuba, he excommunicated him for being a Communist!? Why??

Any new topics??
Regards,
MD


& today 1-4 in history,

1643 Sir Isaac Newton was born! The apple doesn't fall to far from the tree!? Comments on his accomplishments!?

1809 Louis Braille was born, he developed a method for the blind to read! What a noble accomplishment! What say you??

1948 Burma granted independence! Was it also from the British? What's the story? Anyone??

Also thanks Phil, I see your point on the Peculiar Institution of Slavery in the Southern US, it is a different unique situation! Certainly very racially based in nature!

A fair amount of topics to discuss here!? Any ones we missed??
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/4/2023 9:02:27 AM
Quote:
Quote:
1966 Canada Pension Plan (CPP) Started
Canada Introduces it's earnings-related social insurance program the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) . At age 65 The CPP provides regular pension payments calculated as 25% of the average contributory maximum over the last 5 years.


It's a excellent plan and well managed with $529 billion CAD in assets. But this pension plan was never designed to be sufficient to cover everyone's retirement needs. So each person still has to plan well for retirement to ensure sufficient funds will be available.

Not everyone contributes to the CPP. If you have never made CPP contributions through work deductions, then you won't qualify.

A person who retires at age 65 receives $1306 per month. Add that to the Old Age Security of about the same and you have $2600 per month. There are other social programmes available for people without other assets. But if you want to live well in retirement you will need more assets like a private pension or a retirement saving plan.

Cheers,

George



George,

That does it! I'm moving to The Great White North! ☺

Cheers,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
1/4/2023 3:57:07 PM
I have a friend living on a lake "somewhere north of Yellow Knife." If the Vigaro hits the Mixmaster I'm heading up there.
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13550
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
1/4/2023 4:40:54 PM
Quote:
I have a friend living on a lake "somewhere north of Yellow Knife." If the Vigaro hits the Mixmaster I'm heading up there.


Bring some woolies. Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories can be a cold and very dark place in the winter. My daughter worked there for a few months but that was when there was nearly 20 hours of light. I'm not so sure that I could handle it full time but I would love to get up there some day.

Cheers,

George
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
1/4/2023 8:29:30 PM
He said he'd teach me to ice fish. I promised to teach him to fck off.
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/5/2023 6:38:16 AM
I hope you guys have your tip-ups.
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/5/2023 6:39:15 AM
American traitor and British Brigadier General Benedict Arnold enjoys his greatest success as a British commander on January 5, 1781. Arnold’s 1,600 largely Loyalist troops sailed up the James River at the beginning of January, eventually landing in Westover, Virginia. Leaving Westover on the afternoon of January 4, Arnold and his men arrived at the virtually undefended capital city of Richmond the next afternoon.

Only 200 militiamen responded to Governor Jefferson’s call to defend the capital–most Virginians had already served and therefore thought they were under no further obligation to answer such calls. Despite this untenable military position, the author of the Declaration of Independence was criticized by some for fleeing Richmond during the crisis. Later, two months after Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, he was cleared of any wrongdoing during his term as governor. Jefferson went on to become the leader of the Democratic-Republican Party, and his presidential victory over the Federalists is remembered as The Revolution of 1800.

​After the war, Benedict Arnold attempted and failed to establish businesses in Canada and London. He died a pauper on June 14, 1801, and lays buried in his Continental Army uniform at St. Mary’s Church, Middlesex, London. To this day, his name remains synonymous with the word “traitor” in the United States.
====================================================================================================================================================

Traitor.
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13550
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
1/5/2023 8:06:43 AM
Quote:
After the war, Benedict Arnold attempted and failed to establish businesses in Canada and London. He died a pauper on June 14, 1801, and lays buried in his Continental Army uniform at St. Mary’s Church, Middlesex, London. To this day, his name remains synonymous with the word “traitor” in the United States.


The usual incomplete and biased report from History. Not a great source of information.

Benedict Arnold was an effective and bold military officer. He may have been the best of Washington's fighting generals.

Born in Connecticut, he had been in the militia but became a traitor to Britain when he decided to join the Continental Army. For many reasons, most known only to Arnold, he decided to offer West Point to the British as he wished to return to the fold. So double traitor or Loyalist? Probably both.

At the end of the war, Arnold went to England and attempted to set up a trade business. He moved with his lovely wife to Saint John, New Brunswick where he became a very successful businessman operating an import business with most of his trade in the West Indies. He was also a real estate speculator and owned property in Saint John and many other places in New Brunswick.

He was not well liked in Saint John because he was viewed as an unscrupulous businessman who would attempt to reduce his debt in any business transaction by telling a tradesman, for example, that he was not satisfied with the work and would demand to pay less. On the other hand, if Arnold was owed money he would sue at the drop of a hat. Between 1789 and 1791, Arnold filed 19 law suits. That was his most litigious period of his six year tenure in New Brunswick. He sued paupers and members of the legislature alike.

Arnold engaged a ship builder to construct a large vessel to be used in his trade in the West Indies. But during the build Arnold kept insisting upon changes to the original specifications. These were costly changes and he refused to pay extra to the ship builder. This nearly bankrupted the man and made him into a life long enemy of Benedict Arnold. Meanwhile, Arnold himself led trading expeditions to the West Indies aboard his new ship.

Arnold's warehouse on the waterfront mysteriously burnt down on July 11, 1788. Arnold held a £5000 insurance policy on the building and he made a claim. Arnold had a business partner named Munson Hayt. That partnership ended just after the fire but I do not know why. Mr. Hayt was convinced that Arnold had torched the place and he was angry because Arnold had sued him for debts owing to Arnold. Hayt was bitter about that because he was arrested twice for failure to pay. Arnold had sued him twice. The first was for £2500 but the second was a tiny amount of 12 shillings.

Hayt knew about Arnold's insurance policy and he went public with his view that Arnold was an arsonist. The insurance company refused to pay Arnold until the arson issue had been dealt with.

What did Arnold do? He sued for slander. Anyway, to shorten the tale, the courts found that Arnold had been slandered and that there was no conclusive proof that arson had taken place. Back in the day, Hayt's lawyers were forbidden to bring up any other events unrelated to the arson that may have cast further aspersions on Arnold's character. Arnold won his slander case but was only awarded a few pounds. He had sued for £5000. Since he won his case, the insurance company had to award him his £5000.

The general public were incensed. Arnold wasn't popular and the people made his life uncomfortable. At one point a mob surrounded his beautiful home in Saint John and burned him in effigy. Munson Hayt was likely the organizer of this affair.

So Arnold packed up and left for Britain. He had debts but he also owned a lot of land in NB.

Once back in Britain he continued to trade in the West Indies and gave service to the crown as a spy, providing information on the activities of British rivals in the Caribbean. For that and previous service to the crown, in 1799 he was awarded thousands of acres of land in Upper Canada (now Ontario). The Arnold tract in Upper Canada was nearly 14,000 acres and Arnold made sure that it was divided between him, his children and his wife Peggy. Arnold was apparently a doting father. One piece of land in Upper Canada was left to his illegitimate son. Arnold descendants held property in UC until the 1880's. Neither Arnold nor his wife ever saw the property. I believe that son Henry did live there.

Arnold died in England at the age of 60. He named Peggy as executor and she and the children inherited all of the properties in New Brunswick. Peggy Arnold (nee Shipton) was actually well loved in New Brunswick and she had a lot of friends. She was very proud of the fact that she was able to sell property to clear her husband's debts in NB.

Quote:
I have paid every ascertained debt due from the Estate of my late lamented husband, within four or five hundred pounds, and this I have the means of discharging. I will not attempt to describe to you the toil it has been for me; but may without vanity add, that few women could have effected what I have done.
. Peggy Arnold

And to her children she wrote:

Quote:
I have rescued your father’s memory from disrespect, by paying all his just debts, and his children will now never have the mortification of being reproached with his speculations having injured anybody beyond his own family; and his motives, not the unfortunate termination, will be considered by them, and his memory will be doubly dear to them.


He was quite a complex man who expected that he would be awarded for deeds done. When overlooked for promotion in the Continental Army or when accused of misdeeds as governor of New York (have I got that right?), he got his nose out of joint. He was hurt and disillusioned with the rebel cause.

To pass this man off with one word, "Traitor" is not helpful when trying to discuss the importance of this man to the revolution You know, let's do some history. Even as amateurs we may do better than a one word cryptic response. Write a few words for god sake.

George



NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
1/5/2023 8:13:03 AM
Arnold tried to hand over West Point to the British.

Traitor to the American cause.

Or as William Shakespeare has written.....The evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8310
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
1/5/2023 11:40:52 AM
Quote:
Quote:
After the war, Benedict Arnold attempted and failed to establish businesses in Canada and London. He died a pauper on June 14, 1801, and lays buried in his Continental Army uniform at St. Mary’s Church, Middlesex, London. To this day, his name remains synonymous with the word “traitor” in the United States.


The usual incomplete and biased report from History. Not a great source of information.

Benedict Arnold was an effective and bold military officer. He may have been the best of Washington's fighting generals.

Born in Connecticut, he had been in the militia but became a traitor to Britain when he decided to join the Continental Army. For many reasons, most known only to Arnold, he decided to offer West Point to the British as he wished to return to the fold. So double traitor or Loyalist? Probably both.

At the end of the war, Arnold went to England and attempted to set up a trade business. He moved with his lovely wife to Saint John, New Brunswick where he became a very successful businessman operating an import business with most of his trade in the West Indies. He was also a real estate speculator and owned property in Saint John and many other places in New Brunswick.

He was not well liked in Saint John because he was viewed as an unscrupulous businessman who would attempt to reduce his debt in any business transaction by telling a tradesman, for example, that he was not satisfied with the work and would demand to pay less. On the other hand, if Arnold was owed money he would sue at the drop of a hat. Between 1789 and 1791, Arnold filed 19 law suits. That was his most litigious period of his six year tenure in New Brunswick. He sued paupers and members of the legislature alike.

Arnold engaged a ship builder to construct a large vessel to be used in his trade in the West Indies. But during the build Arnold kept insisting upon changes to the original specifications. These were costly changes and he refused to pay extra to the ship builder. This nearly bankrupted the man and made him into a life long enemy of Benedict Arnold. Meanwhile, Arnold himself led trading expeditions to the West Indies aboard his new ship.

Arnold's warehouse on the waterfront mysteriously burnt down on July 11, 1788. Arnold held a £5000 insurance policy on the building and he made a claim. Arnold had a business partner named Munson Hayt. That partnership ended just after the fire but I do not know why. Mr. Hayt was convinced that Arnold had torched the place and he was angry because Arnold had sued him for debts owing to Arnold. Hayt was bitter about that because he was arrested twice for failure to pay. Arnold had sued him twice. The first was for £2500 but the second was a tiny amount of 12 shillings.

Hayt knew about Arnold's insurance policy and he went public with his view that Arnold was an arsonist. The insurance company refused to pay Arnold until the arson issue had been dealt with.

What did Arnold do? He sued for slander. Anyway, to shorten the tale, the courts found that Arnold had been slandered and that there was no conclusive proof that arson had taken place. Back in the day, Hayt's lawyers were forbidden to bring up any other events unrelated to the arson that may have cast further aspersions on Arnold's character. Arnold won his slander case but was only awarded a few pounds. He had sued for £5000. Since he won his case, the insurance company had to award him his £5000.

The general public were incensed. Arnold wasn't popular and the people made his life uncomfortable. At one point a mob surrounded his beautiful home in Saint John and burned him in effigy. Munson Hayt was likely the organizer of this affair.

So Arnold packed up and left for Britain. He had debts but he also owned a lot of land in NB.

Once back in Britain he continued to trade in the West Indies and gave service to the crown as a spy, providing information on the activities of British rivals in the Caribbean. For that and previous service to the crown, in 1799 he was awarded thousands of acres of land in Upper Canada (now Ontario). The Arnold tract in Upper Canada was nearly 14,000 acres and Arnold made sure that it was divided between him, his children and his wife Peggy. Arnold was apparently a doting father. One piece of land in Upper Canada was left to his illegitimate son. Arnold descendants held property in UC until the 1880's. Neither Arnold nor his wife ever saw the property. I believe that son Henry did live there.

Arnold died in England at the age of 60. He named Peggy as executor and she and the children inherited all of the properties in New Brunswick. Peggy Arnold (nee Shipton) was actually well loved in New Brunswick and she had a lot of friends. She was very proud of the fact that she was able to sell property to clear her husband's debts in NB.

Quote:
I have paid every ascertained debt due from the Estate of my late lamented husband, within four or five hundred pounds, and this I have the means of discharging. I will not attempt to describe to you the toil it has been for me; but may without vanity add, that few women could have effected what I have done.
. Peggy Arnold

And to her children she wrote:

Quote:
I have rescued your father’s memory from disrespect, by paying all his just debts, and his children will now never have the mortification of being reproached with his speculations having injured anybody beyond his own family; and his motives, not the unfortunate termination, will be considered by them, and his memory will be doubly dear to them.


He was quite a complex man who expected that he would be awarded for deeds done. When overlooked for promotion in the Continental Army or when accused of misdeeds as governor of New York (have I got that right?), he got his nose out of joint. He was hurt and disillusioned with the rebel cause.

To pass this man off with one word, "Traitor" is not helpful when trying to discuss the importance of this man to the revolution You know, let's do some history. Even as amateurs we may do better than a one word cryptic response. Write a few words for god sake.

George







Hi George,

Your above synopsis of Benedict Arnold especially post war Canada part, seems to bring out his true character! It seems he was egotistical & driven by greed for wealth at any cost!?

Regards,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13550
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
1/5/2023 1:09:12 PM
Quote:
Hi George,

Your above synopsis of Benedict Arnold especially post war Canada part, seems to bring out his true character! It seems he was egotistical & driven by greed for wealth at any cost!?

Regards,
MD
--------------------


Hi MD,

I didn't really mean to convey that impression of the man. People are complex and I am aware of the relationship of the man to the US and the fact that his story has been spun to paint him as evil. The US has done a masterful job in creating a narrative favourable to itself. Why not? The US won the revolutionary war. All countries create historical records and in this case it was convenient to paint Benedict Arnold as the epitome of evil and a man who would betray his brothers and sisters.

All the slogans associated with this war are part of the propaganda that was created to paint the British as evil tyrants and to paint the rebels as somehow noble crusaders. Different cities in the colonies established Committees of Correspondence which became effective propaganda arms to encourage support for rebellion.

And so Benedict Arnold was conveniently described after his return to his first loyalty, Great Britain, as a snake in the grass. I think that that does a disservice to him and to the historical record. There is much more to the man. He is an interesting study and I choose not to be stymied by his portrayal as a traitor, full stop.

So why not discuss whether Arnold's legal troubles in Philadelphia placed him in a predicament? He stood to be convicted in a court martial on trumped up charges. Was he being framed by a rival who was also a traitor to the rebel cause and to Washington in particular? Did Arnold have good reason to reject the revolution since it had become apparent that a strong national government was not in the cards and that power seemed to have been accorded to individual states? Did Arnold have good reason to feel that he was no longer fighting for the same cause for which he had signed on?

Or was his defection solely because of his need for money; money to pay down debts and money needed to make the lovely Peggy Shipton happy?

Here is an interesting article published in the Smithsonian. It speaks to the error in painting people like Benedict Arnold as traitors only. I think that the narrative that has been spun makes it difficult to have nuanced discussions about people and issues in this revolution.

I hope that the article explains my thoughts on the matter better than I have done.

[Read More]

Cheers,

George
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