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Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/20/2023 7:40:47 AM
World History events for 3-20, welcome to Spring! Check out these topics.?

Again, Last shot at those events on the 19th, not discussed yet??

1863, CSA Cruiser Georgiana, is sunk on her maiden voyage with A cargo of over a $ million dollars in munitions & meds.! What happened to her?? Comments?

1865 the Rebs lose the battle of Bentonville NC. The end is near for the South?? Anyone?

1920 US Senate rejects the League of Nations! Did this hurt the League?? Why?

1931 Nevada legalized gambling! Is it legal in Canada??

1932 the Sydney Harbor Bridge is opened! Why were the Ozonians mad at the British?? Anyone?

1943 the Commonwealthers are in N. Africa! What factors led to them beating Rommel?? Comments?

1969 the Brits invade Anguilla, what ever for! Anyone??

1982 the Argentines invade the Falklands! Why did Argentina do it? Did they think they actually would get away with it?? Politically & militarily it was an interesting situation? & what of Margaret Thatcher's leadership?

Still, Lots to discuss here!?


& On 3-20 in history, check this out!?

1616 Sir Walter Raleigh is released from the tower of London! Why would a Explorer be put in jail?? Anyone??

1815 Napoleon enters Paris after his escape from Elba! What's up with his 100 day rule? Anyone?

1852 Uncle Toms Cabin is published, what was it's theme? What say you? & it's effect on the South & North?

1942 major German attacks on Malta! How did a undermaned Commonwealth hold them off!? The battle for Malta is one of the most heroic of WWII!? What say you?

2003 the US invades Iraq why, & was this justified??

What say you??
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
scoucer
Berlin  Germany
Posts: 3270
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
3/20/2023 7:59:59 AM
Quote:
“We went to war on faulty intelligence.”

Yes, and the British PM, Tony Blair, backed the US President so avidly that you could see his bootlaces hanging out of Bush’s areshole.

To my shame, I was persuaded to believe in what Blair said.

The French, who voiced misgivings, were dismissed as “ cheese eating surrender monkeys.”

Regards, Phil


Yes, I remember it well. The British gutter press also insulting lauding it over the Germans.

Chancellor Schröder ( not exactly the sharpest tool in the box) complained to the US Ambassador " My Nachrichtendienst and Intelligence committees are telling me the intelligence is garbage. There is no United Nations request. There has been no declaration of war against Germany or another NATO country. Do you seriously expect me to lie to the Bundestag? They won´t give me a mandate, they´ll bring the government down and I´ll probably land in jail."

Trevor
----------------------------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/20/2023 3:33:18 PM
Quote:
“We went to war on faulty intelligence.”

Yes, and the British PM, Tony Blair, backed the US President so avidly that you could see his bootlaces hanging out of Bush’s areshole.

To my shame, I was persuaded to believe in what Blair said.

The French, who voiced misgivings, were dismissed as “ cheese eating surrender monkeys.”

Regards, Phil



Phil

Bush, & Blair were like 2 peas in a pod!
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/20/2023 3:36:09 PM
Quote:
Quote:
1945 800 killed on USS Franklin from Kamikaze planes! How many Commonwealthers lost their lives to IJN suicide planes?? Any figures?? Anyone?


From US Naval Institute

Quote:
During Operation Iceberg, the BPF had spent 62 days at sea, with a break of 8 days anchored in Leyte Gulf. Aircraft from five of its fleet carriers flew 5,335 sorties and expended 1,000 tons of bombs and 500,000 rounds of ammunition. The fleet destroyed 42 enemy aircraft in the air and more than 100 on the ground and prevented the Japanese from staging aircraft to Okinawa. In exchange, TF 57 lost 44 officers and men killed on board ships and 41 aircrew. All four operational carriers needed dockyard repairs on their return to Sydney to make good defects and damage inflicted by the enemy.


Many ships in the British Pacific Force were hit by kamikaze including all four aircraft carriers. The steel decks made those carriers less vulnerable to kamikaze attack than the USN carriers.

[Read More]


Cheers,

George



George

It looks like after Europe 1st was completed, the BPF grew in strength just in time to catch the brunt of the IJN Kamikazes!?

MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13550
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
3/20/2023 3:59:13 PM
Quote:
1942 major German attacks on Malta! How did a undermaned Commonwealth hold them off!? The battle for Malta is one of the most heroic of WWII!? What say you?


Malta was geographically and strategically important as the owners of the island could use it as a naval base to control shipping in the Mediterranean. The British and allies were determined to maintain control as to lose it would give easier access to the north coast of Africa. The RN maintained submarines operating out of Malta. The RN and RAF had been very successful in the destruction of German convoys to the point that the Luftwaffe sent over 600 aircraft to Sicily to aid the Italian AF in its attacks on Malta.

By March of 1942 the Luftwaffe and the Regia Aeronautica were bombing Malta regularly. Malta has been described as the most bombed place on earth.

The Hurricanes flown by the RAF at Malta were now inadequate against the German fighters protecting the bombers and RAF leadership was informed that if they did not receive help in days, it would be all over.

The RAF decided to ship Spitfires to Malta and they flew them off aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean. They carried extra fuel in slipper tanks and had been modified for desert conditions. They were launched at the maximum flight distance that a Spit could fly. On March 7, 15 Spits flew from HMS Eagle to Malta. They all arrived safely.



More and more Spitfires continued to arrive with many flying from the deck of USS Wasp. In total, 275 Spitfires were delivered to Malta.

During the month of March alone, the Luftwaffe flew 4,927 sorties to Malta. The RAF lost 12 planes and 9 of the pilots died. 46 more planes were destroyed on the ground and 28 RAF service people were killed on the ground.

While there were no RCAF squadrons based at Malta, we are told that 25% of the pilots flying in Malta were Canadians who had enlisted in the RAF or had been assigned to RAF squadrons. Prior to the war many Canadians had taken basic flight training in Canada and then paid their way to Britain to enlist in the RAF. That was a better bet for anyone who desired a career in military aviation. The RAF also accepted pilots from other Commonwealth countries.

More than half of the Canadians trained for the RCAF who were sent overseas actually wound up in RAF squadrons. That's with 48 RCAF squadrons serving overseas.

The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan also saw men who had enlisted in the RCAF, posted to RAF squadrons. There were so many pilots graduating that the RCAF could not accommodate them all.

From what I have read, the RAF sent excellent pilots to Malta. Many had flown over France and in the Battle of Britain. Some were aces before they arrived. Many became aces at Malta.

One of the most famous fighters who had success at Malta was George (Buzz) Beurling who was an odd duck to many of his fellow RAF pilots. Beurling wanted to join the RCAF but they didn't want him and he headed to Britain and joined the RAF. Not generally known as a team player, he aggravated many a squadron leader. But he was a brilliant fighter pilot with visually acuity about which his mates would comment. He seemed to be able to see dots in the sky that he knew were enemy aircraft well before others did. Beurling was called the Falcon of Malta for his 28 kills.

The efforts of the RAF squadrons on Malta are legendary. But so is the resiliency shown by the people of Malta. They suffered greatly and the island was awarded the George Cross.

This video is pretty good once you get past the little pitch at the top.

[Read More]

Cheers,

George
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/20/2023 5:01:33 PM
Hi George,

Great videos on the Battle for Malta, the video titled SS Ohio & the seige of Malta was especially good! It was amazing how that one tanker getting through to help that embattled island, gave the RAF there, 11 months of fuel to stop 2/3rds of supplies from reaching North Africa!? It was extremely costly for the RN lost a carrier, & A lot other war ships, plus 100's of sailors! Any figures on this??

This one ship may have saved WWII for the good guys?

What say you??
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Brian Grafton
Victoria BC Canada
Posts: 4811
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
3/20/2023 10:21:02 PM
Quote:
“We went to war on faulty intelligence.”

Yes, and the British PM, Tony Blair, backed the US President so avidly that you could see his bootlaces hanging out of Bush’s areshole.

To my shame, I was persuaded to believe in what Blair said.

The French, who voiced misgivings, were dismissed as “ cheese eating surrender monkeys.”

Regards, Phil


Yes, I remember it well. The British gutter press also insulting lauding it over the Germans.

Chancellor Schröder ( not exactly the sharpest tool in the box) complained to the US Ambassador " My Nachrichtendienst and Intelligence committees are telling me the intelligence is garbage. There is no United Nations request. There has been no declaration of war against Germany or another NATO country. Do you seriously expect me to lie to the Bundestag? They won´t give me a mandate, they´ll bring the government down and I´ll probably land in jail."

Trevor

I’m not wild about reliving the issues of the war. I didn’t support it then; I don’t support it 20 years later. Of interest, at least to me, is how differently nationalist values dealt with disagreements. “French” fries were renamed “Freedom” fries; nations (or individuals) that rejected the Bush argument were insulted and mocked, as Phil’s “cheese eating surrender monkeys” suggest. France was not alone in its rejection of the US errors concerning Iraq weapons or threats. But then, as now, I’m amazed at how diplomatic differences became, at least in US eyes, cultural antagonism. Most of this was not reciprocated.

Cheers
Brian G
----------------------------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly. "The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
3/21/2023 7:08:38 AM
Civil Rights Notes- Selma to Montgomery March Begins.


In the name of African American voting rights, 3,200 civil rights demonstrators in Alabama, led by Martin Luther King Jr., begin a historic march from Selma to Montgomery, the state’s capital. Federalized Alabama National Guardsmen and FBI agents were on hand to provide safe passage for the march, which twice had been turned back by Alabama state police at Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge.


In 1965, King and his Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) decided to make the small town of Selma the focus of their drive to win voting rights for African Americans in the South. Alabama’s governor, George Wallace, was a vocal opponent of the African-American civil rights movement, and local authorities in Selma had consistently thwarted efforts by the Dallas County Voters League and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to register local Black citizens.



Although Governor Wallace promised to prevent it from going forward, on March 7 some 600 demonstrators, led by SCLC leader Hosea Williams and SNCC leader John Lewis, began the 54-mile march to the state capital. After crossing Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were met by Alabama state troopers and posse men who attacked them with nightsticks, tear gas and whips after they refused to turn back.

Several of the protesters were severely beaten, and others ran for their lives. The incident was captured on national television and outraged many Americans.



King, who was in Atlanta at the time, promised to return to Selma immediately and lead another attempt. On March 9, King led another marching attempt, but turned the marchers around when state troopers again blocked the road.

On March 21, U.S. Army troops and federalized Alabama National Guardsmen escorted the marchers across Edmund Pettus Bridge and down Highway 80. When the highway narrowed to two lanes, only 300 marchers were permitted, but thousands more rejoined the Alabama Freedom March as it came into Montgomery on March 25.

On the steps of the Alabama State Capitol, King addressed live television cameras and a crowd of 25,000, just a few hundred feet from the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, where he got his start as a minister in 1954.


saymedia.com
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/selma-to-montgomery-march-begins?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0321-03212023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2


================================================== ================================================== ==============================

Almost 100 years after slaves were freed and became citizens of the United States, their Constitutional rights were still being denied in the Olde Confederacy. It will be the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 will result in the Olde Confederacy voting Republican. Republican Presidential candidates will always make visits to the South to proclaim their backing of States Rights.


Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/21/2023 9:01:13 AM
Quote:
Keel laid in 1935, launched & commissioned in 1938, decommissioned in 1946, CL-46 USS Phoenix was a fine ship with nine (9) battle stars during WWII under her belt. Her sinking during the Falklands as the ARA General Belgrano while sad to see demonstrated yet again, war is hell.

[Read More]

Dan



Hi Dan,

Yeah for sure war is hell, if I recall from the movie "Iron Lady", British PM Margaret Thatcher gave the order to sink the Gen. Belgrano, even though it was close to the Argentina coast, it still was a threat!? How many sailors lost there lives?

MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Phil Andrade
London  UK
Posts: 6508
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
3/21/2023 10:17:41 AM
Quote:
Quote:
“We went to war on faulty intelligence.”

Yes, and the British PM, Tony Blair, backed the US President so avidly that you could see his bootlaces hanging out of Bush’s areshole.

To my shame, I was persuaded to believe in what Blair said.

The French, who voiced misgivings, were dismissed as “ cheese eating surrender monkeys.”

Regards, Phil


Yes, I remember it well. The British gutter press also insulting lauding it over the Germans.

Chancellor Schröder ( not exactly the sharpest tool in the box) complained to the US Ambassador " My Nachrichtendienst and Intelligence committees are telling me the intelligence is garbage. There is no United Nations request. There has been no declaration of war against Germany or another NATO country. Do you seriously expect me to lie to the Bundestag? They won´t give me a mandate, they´ll bring the government down and I´ll probably land in jail."

Trevor


You mention the British gutter press, Trevor.

There is a link here with Schröder : Rupert Murdoch is about to rival the ex German Chancellor by taking a fifth wife. Two Lords of the Rings now !😂

Regards , Phil
----------------------------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
DT509er
Santa Rosa CA USA
Posts: 1527
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
3/21/2023 11:54:21 AM
Quote:
Quote:
Keel laid in 1935, launched & commissioned in 1938, decommissioned in 1946, CL-46 USS Phoenix was a fine ship with nine (9) battle stars during WWII under her belt. Her sinking during the Falklands as the ARA General Belgrano while sad to see demonstrated yet again, war is hell.

[Read More]

Dan



Hi Dan,

Yeah for sure war is hell, if I recall from the movie "Iron Lady", British PM Margaret Thatcher gave the order to sink the Gen. Belgrano, even though it was close to the Argentina coast, it still was a threat!? How many sailors lost there lives?

MD


Yes, they show that scene in The Iron Lady.

Was the Belgrano a threat has been debated ever since the attack. IMO, yes it was as any weapon of war during a war is dangerous. and the closer to your forces the more potential threat it becomes. The Brits, in their defense (which they really don't need from me ) knew the potential the Belgrano could wreck some serious havoc even though the ship would not get through or close enough to do so, the chance of waiting to see either way was not what the Brits were willing to do.

Dan

----------------------------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." German officer, Italy 1944. “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
3/21/2023 12:54:14 PM
I would not pass up a kill if it was presented. Never have.
Phil Andrade
London  UK
Posts: 6508
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
3/21/2023 4:57:27 PM
The Belgrano’s sinking was rendered controversial because the ship was not in the Exclusion Zone, and by the criterion of its location it should not have been attacked.

A maverick Labour politician by the exquisite name of Tam Dalyell called out the British Government as culpable, and persisted in his claim that there was conspiracy, concealment and cover-up implicit in the claim that the ship posed a threat.

He was not given much credit for this protest.

Right or wrong, “ our boys” were in perilous circumstances, and the majority of the British public were absolutely reconciled to the actions of the Royal Navy. I don’t detect any change in this outlook after the passing of forty years.

Regards, Phil
----------------------------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
3/21/2023 6:51:19 PM
I've always been rational about threats.
Phil Andrade
London  UK
Posts: 6508
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
3/22/2023 5:03:46 AM
Quote:
I've always been rational about threats.



There’s terrific impact in those words !

A good way to cut through the Gordian Knot .

Regards, Phil
----------------------------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
3/22/2023 6:29:30 AM
American Revolution Notes- Stamp Act Imposed on American Colonies.

In an effort to raise funds to pay off debts and defend the vast new American territories won from the French in the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763), the British government passes the Stamp Act on March 22, 1765. The legislation levied a direct tax on all materials printed for commercial and legal use in the colonies, from newspapers and pamphlets to playing cards and dice.

Though the Stamp Act employed a strategy that was a common fundraising vehicle in England, it stirred a storm of protest in the colonies. The colonists had recently been hit with three major taxes: the Sugar Act (1764), which levied new duties on imports of textiles, wines, coffee and sugar; the Currency Act (1764), which caused a major decline in the value of the paper money used by colonists; and the Quartering Act (1765), which required colonists to provide food and lodging to British troops under certain circumstances.

With the passing of the Stamp Act, the colonists’ grumbling finally became an articulated response to what they saw as the mother country’s attempt to undermine their economic strength and independence. They raised the issue of taxation without representation, and formed societies throughout the colonies to rally against the British government and nobles who sought to exploit the colonies as a source of revenue and raw materials. By October of that year, nine of the 13 colonies sent representatives to the Stamp Act Congress, at which the colonists drafted the “Declaration of Rights and Grievances,” a document that railed against the autocratic policies of the mercantilist British empire.

Realizing that it actually cost more to enforce the Stamp Act in the protesting colonies than it did to abolish it, the British government repealed the tax the following year. The fracas over the Stamp Act, though, helped plant seeds for a far larger movement against the British government and the eventual battle for independence. Most important of these was the formation of the Sons of Liberty—a group of tradesmen who led anti-British protests in Boston and other seaboard cities—and other groups of wealthy landowners who came together from the across the colonies. Well after the Stamp Act was repealed, these societies continued to meet in opposition to what they saw as the abusive policies of the British empire. Out of their meetings, a growing nationalism emerged that would culminate in the fighting of the American Revolution only a decade later.​



https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/stamp-act-imposed-on-american-colonies?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0322-03222023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2

================================================== ================================================== ================================

We Americans learn early on about how wrong "Taxation without Representation" was as a policy. What it did do was unite 13 disparate colonies into a united front, and helped to establish committees of correspondence, so that information could be sent more easily.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/22/2023 7:47:31 AM
3-22,

1349 Germans massacre Jews blaming them for the Black Death! Geeze the hatred of the Jewish people knows no bounds! Why?? Anyone??

1622 1st Indian massacre of Colonists in Jamestown, what brought that on?? Comments?

3-22 in World History, just a few events, comments, & other new topics welcome!?

1784 the Emerald Buddha is moved in Thailand! Congrats to him?, her?, it????

1794. Congress bans US ships from moving slaves to other countries!? How prevalent was the slave trade at this time?? Anyone? BTW Did Canada ever have slaves?? What say you??

1903 Niagara Falls runs out of water, because of drought! Any pics or stories on this?? Anyone??

1929 US Coastguard ship sinks Canadian Schooner suspected of carrying liquor! How did both countries perceive this? Anyone know the story on this??

1944 Allies Bomb Berlin! Anyone have the story of the success this mission?? Anyone?

1982 the 3rd shuttle mission is going on! BTW was Canada involved in Space exploration, or other Commonwealthers!?? What say you??

2006, BC Ferry runs aground on Gill Island & sinks! Anyone have the story on this calamity???

What say you on these & other new topics! Anyone??
cheers,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/22/2023 9:11:16 AM
Quote:
The Belgrano’s sinking was rendered controversial because the ship was not in the Exclusion Zone, and by the criterion of its location it should not have been attacked.

A maverick Labour politician by the exquisite name of Tam Dalyell called out the British Government as culpable, and persisted in his claim that there was conspiracy, concealment and cover-up implicit in the claim that the ship posed a threat.

He was not given much credit for this protest.

Right or wrong, “ our boys” were in perilous circumstances, and the majority of the British public were absolutely reconciled to the actions of the Royal Navy. I don’t detect any change in this outlook after the passing of forty years.

Regards, Phil




Phil,

Certainly the realities of war come into play, do you know if either side got outside support??

Anyone?
Regards,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
DT509er
Santa Rosa CA USA
Posts: 1527
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
3/22/2023 1:36:58 PM
Link linked: [Read More]

Quote:
American Revolution Notes- Stamp Act Imposed on American Colonies.

In an effort to raise funds to pay off debts and defend the vast new American territories won from the French in the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763), the British government passes the Stamp Act on March 22, 1765. The legislation levied a direct tax on all materials printed for commercial and legal use in the colonies, from newspapers and pamphlets to playing cards and dice.

Though the Stamp Act employed a strategy that was a common fundraising vehicle in England, it stirred a storm of protest in the colonies. The colonists had recently been hit with three major taxes: the Sugar Act (1764), which levied new duties on imports of textiles, wines, coffee and sugar; the Currency Act (1764), which caused a major decline in the value of the paper money used by colonists; and the Quartering Act (1765), which required colonists to provide food and lodging to British troops under certain circumstances.

With the passing of the Stamp Act, the colonists’ grumbling finally became an articulated response to what they saw as the mother country’s attempt to undermine their economic strength and independence. They raised the issue of taxation without representation, and formed societies throughout the colonies to rally against the British government and nobles who sought to exploit the colonies as a source of revenue and raw materials. By October of that year, nine of the 13 colonies sent representatives to the Stamp Act Congress, at which the colonists drafted the “Declaration of Rights and Grievances,” a document that railed against the autocratic policies of the mercantilist British empire.

Realizing that it actually cost more to enforce the Stamp Act in the protesting colonies than it did to abolish it, the British government repealed the tax the following year. The fracas over the Stamp Act, though, helped plant seeds for a far larger movement against the British government and the eventual battle for independence. Most important of these was the formation of the Sons of Liberty—a group of tradesmen who led anti-British protests in Boston and other seaboard cities—and other groups of wealthy landowners who came together from the across the colonies. Well after the Stamp Act was repealed, these societies continued to meet in opposition to what they saw as the abusive policies of the British empire. Out of their meetings, a growing nationalism emerged that would culminate in the fighting of the American Revolution only a decade later.​


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/stamp-act-imposed-on-american-colonies?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0322-03222023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2

================================================== ================================================== ================================

We Americans learn early on about how wrong "Taxation without Representation" was as a policy. What it did do was unite 13 disparate colonies into a united front, and helped to establish committees of correspondence, so that information could be sent more easily.

----------------------------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." German officer, Italy 1944. “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13550
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
3/22/2023 1:59:07 PM
Quote:
1929 US Coastguard ship sinks Canadian Schooner suspected of carrying liquor! How did both countries perceive this? Anyone know the story on this??


The schooner was the I'm Alone and it was a rum runner. The US had enacted strict alcohol prohibition laws and in fact, Canada had enacted laws to mitigate the illegal trade of alcohol between Canada and the US. In order to enforce its prohibition laws the US pressured neighbouring countries to stop exporting liquor to the US. There were Canadian owners of rum running vessels as well as Americans.

The captain of Home Alone was Jack Randall and he was a Newfoundlander who had fought in WW1 in the RN. He had commanded an armed trawler that sank two German vessels off the coast of Norway. They were transporting raw materials to Germany. He received a DSC from KIng George V but had previously received medals from the King for his valour during the Boer War where he had been a member of the Royal Canadian Artillery and he received his Boer War medals for that.

In 1917 France awarded Jack Randall the Croix de Guerre for his work in anti-submarine warfare. In 1918 he was awarded two palms to his Croix de Guerre and the British allowed him to wear an oak leaf on his General Service medal. He was promoted to Lt. Commander. So we are talking about a warrior here who chose to make money by running rum to US crime syndicates.

The problem is that the US destroyed the I'm Alone on the high seas in violation of international treaties. Initially the USCG cutter Wolcott intercepted the vessel about 11 miles off the US coast. Indeed it did have a load of rum that it had picked up in the Caribbean. The US knew this vessel and considered it the best of the rum runners as it had eluded them many times.

US consuls stationed in ports like Halifax and Yarmouth would wire ahead to let the Coast Guard know when I'm Alone had left port.

The US, Canada and Great Britain had signed another treaty which would permit US vessels to halt and search British vessels suspected of carrying contraband. However, the seizure could only take place within a distance from the shoreline that the suspect vessel could travel in one hour at best speed.

The captain of I'm Alone refused to stop and he told the captain of the US vessel that he was in international waters beyond the accepted 3 mile limit. The USCGC Wolcott pulled up beside the I'm Alone and ordered the captain to stop. The captain said, ""Captain, you have no jurisdiction over me. I am on the high seas outside of treaty waters. I cannot and will not heave to." He also said that if anyone tried to board he would shoot to kill.

The Wolcott fired into the rigging of the I'm Alone as she fled. Oddly, the captain of I'm Alone permitted a USCG Warrant Officer to board and they negotiated. They talked for an hour and a half. The officer left and the chase began again.

There are full accounts of messages that travelled between the USCG vessel and authorities on shore. Wolcott was ordered to make sure that I'm alone was seized and towed to shore.

The USCG called for help and two other vessels joined the chase. They chased I'm Alone for two days and nights and finally destroyed her. It was USCGC Dexter that fired the shots that sank her. One member of the crew drowned.

Of note, the District Attorney of New Orleans dropped the case against the captain and crew of I'm Alone as they were arrested outside US waters.

The incident was eventually referred to an international commission and the findings were:

1. The vessel was actually owned by an American which was quite common. It had Canadian registry and sailed under a Canadian flag however which was also quite common and a cover for the American brains behind the rum running scheme. This meant that the claim by the Canadian government for $268,386.68 was denied. No compensation for cargo or vessel then.

2. The sinking of the craft was unwarranted as it was in the open seas and the level of force used to stop the vessel was deemed excessive and unlawful. The widow of the man that died was awarded $10,000. $8,000 went to Capt. Randell, master of the I'm Alone. Each of the 7 surviving crew members received $1,000.

In 1935, the new US Secretary of State, Cordell Hull issued the following statement:

Quote:
Although the Commissioners find that the mission and use of the vessel at the time of its sinking were unlawful, nevertheless they also find that its sinking by the United States officers was unlawful. The Government of the United States, therefore, tenders to His Majesty's Canadian Government an apology for the sinking of the vessel.


The US also awarded $50,000 to the owners of the vessel and to the crew ($25K to the owners who were American and $25 K to the crew) which was an international courtesy observed at the time.


I'm Alone






USCGC Dexter, the ship that sank the I'm Alone



[Read More]


Cheers,

George


Brian Grafton
Victoria BC Canada
Posts: 4811
Joined: 2004
This day in World History! Continued
3/22/2023 10:22:53 PM
Quote:
1944 Allies Bomb Berlin! Anyone have the story of the success this mission?? Anyone?
Don’t know if this was a USAAF raid, but there is no record of an RAF BC raid on Berlin for that night. On 22/23 March 1944, BC directed 816 a/c against Frankfurt, with a 4.0% loss rate. On 24 March 1944 162 B-17s of the Eighth Air Force attacked the same city as a secondary target. The combined raid was devastating, but it as against Frankfurt.

There was a raid by RAF Bomber Command on 24/5 March 1944. It was the last raid on Berlin by BC before the bomber focus was redirected (with reluctance, for Bomber Harris)towards targets related to Overlord. It was, in effect, the last major RAF BC raid of the war against Berlin. High winds created chaos with navigation and target-marking. 811 a/c were involved, with 72 losses (8.9%). Damage to Berlin was minimal.

Cheers
Brian G
----------------------------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly. "The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
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This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 6:56:42 AM
On this day in United States History...

During a speech before the second Virginia Convention, Patrick Henryresponds to the increasingly oppressive British rule over the American colonies by declaring, “I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Following the signing of the American Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, Patrick Henry was appointed governor of Virginia by the Continental Congress.

The first major American opposition to British policy came in 1765 after Parliament passed the Stamp Act, a taxation measure to raise revenues for a standing British army in America. Under the banner of “no taxation without representation,” colonists convened the Stamp Act Congress in October 1765 to vocalize their opposition to the tax. With its enactment on November 1, 1765, most colonists called for a boycott of British goods and some organized attacks on the customhouses and homes of tax collectors. After months of protest, Parliament voted to repeal the Stamp Act in March 1766.

​Most colonists quietly accepted British rule until Parliament’s enactment of the Tea Act in 1773, which granted the East India Company a monopoly on the American tea trade. Viewed as another example of taxation without representation, militant Patriots in Massachusetts organized the “Boston Tea Party,” which saw British tea valued at some 10,000 pounds dumped into Boston harbor. Parliament, outraged by the Boston Tea Party and other blatant destruction of British property, enacted the Coercive Acts, also known as the Intolerable Acts, in the following year. The Coercive Acts closed Boston to merchant shipping, established formal British military rule in Massachusetts, made British officials immune to criminal prosecution in America, and required colonists to quarter British troops. The colonists subsequently called the first Continental Congress to consider a united American resistance to the British.​



With the other colonies watching intently, Massachusetts led the resistance to the British, forming a shadow revolutionary government and establishing militias to resist the increasing British military presence across the colony. In April 1775, Thomas Gage, the British governor of Massachusetts, ordered British troops to march to Concord, Massachusetts, where a Patriot arsenal was known to be located. On April 19, 1775, the British regulars encountered a group of American militiamen at Lexington, and the first volleys of the American Revolutionary War were fired.

​https://www.history.com/this-day-in-...a023eefe0cd3d2
================================================== ================================================== ===================================

The American colonies were not going to win a War against the greatest Army in the world at that time, with just untrained local militia. They too had to develop and Army, and they did!!
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 7:20:45 AM
Quote:
Quote:
1944 Allies Bomb Berlin! Anyone have the story of the success this mission?? Anyone?
Don’t know if this was a USAAF raid, but there is no record of an RAF BC raid on Berlin for that night. On 22/23 March 1944, BC directed 816 a/c against Frankfurt, with a 4.0% loss rate. On 24 March 1944 162 B-17s of the Eighth Air Force attacked the same city as a secondary target. The combined raid was devastating, but it as against Frankfurt.

There was a raid by RAF Bomber Command on 24/5 March 1944. It was the last raid on Berlin by BC before the bomber focus was redirected (with reluctance, for Bomber Harris)towards targets related to Overlord. It was, in effect, the last major RAF BC raid of the war against Berlin. High winds created chaos with navigation and target-marking. 811 a/c were involved, with 72 losses (8.9%). Damage to Berlin was minimal.

Cheers
Brian G



Hi Brian,

You're right it was the USAF 8th Airforce! The RAF was not involved in this one!?

Thanks for straightening that out!
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 7:40:36 AM
On this day in United States History...

During a speech before the second Virginia Convention, Patrick Henryresponds to the increasingly oppressive British rule over the American colonies by declaring, “I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” Following the signing of the American Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, Patrick Henry was appointed governor of Virginia by the Continental Congress.

With the other colonies watching intently, Massachusetts led the resistance to the British, forming a shadow revolutionary government and establishing militias to resist the increasing British military presence across the colony. In April 1775, Thomas Gage, the British governor of Massachusetts, ordered British troops to march to Concord, Massachusetts, where a Patriot arsenal was known to be located. On April 19, 1775, the British regulars encountered a group of American militiamen at Lexington, and the first volleys of the American Revolutionary War were fired.





Just why was the Boston area so pro revolution compared to the rest of the Colonies?? What say you?

Anyone?
MD

BTW any other major events for 3-23, in world history??
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 7:53:27 AM


I'm Alone






USCGC Dexter, the ship that sank the I'm Alone



[Read More]


Cheers,

George


Hi George,

Quite a interesting story on this rum runner! It sure became an international incident, such a beautiful sailing ship, A shame that the USCG had to sink it!? Great website with the story! You do a great job in most of your replies!!!

Thanks,
MD

----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13550
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 8:47:10 AM
Quote:
Hi George,

Quite a interesting story on this rum runner! It sure became an international incident, such a beautiful sailing ship, A shame that the USCG had to sink it!? Great website with the story! You do a great job in most of your replies!!!


Thanks MD. I do have to dispute the claim that the USCG, "had to sink it".

In fact, the USCG was in violation of international treaties that governed interdiction of smugglers on the seas. Numerous times Capt. Randall told the commander of USCGC Dexter that he had no right to stop or board his vessel. He told a USCG warrant officer that fact in person and at other times with a megaphone as he was ordered to "heave to" He was correct. Randall had managed to sail well beyond the one hour of pursuit distance from the US coast.

The big problem of course was that the American people did not agree fully with the prohibition laws. There was a huge market for contraband liquor and American crime syndicates were more that able and willing to arrange for the transport of liquor to quiet spots on the US coast. At times there were dozens of rum running boats anchored just outside the US territorial limits waiting for another boat to meet them for the exchange. Many were Canadian vessels or American owned vessels under Canadian registry.

As well, there was significant smuggling from the French islands of St. Pierre et Miquelon only 20 km from the coast of Newfoundland. During the prohibition period, the French sailors on the two islands forgot about cod fishing and turned to the lucrative business of smuggling of liquor.

Quote:
The remote islands imported a total of 98,500 liters in all between 1911 and 1918. That was before Prohibition began on January 16, 1920. A decade later, with the ban on the production, importation and sale of alcohol in full swing, more than 4 million liters in whiskey alone flowed into the islands’ warehouses—along with hundreds of thousands of cases of wine, Champagne, brandy, and rum—and then flowed right back out. Almost every drop went aboard rumrunners—smugglers’ ships sailing south with their costly cargo to quench an insatiable American thirst for the prohibited booze.
. source: Smithsonian

Note that Canada had no restrictions on the production of alcohol products but it did pass strict laws to stop exportation to the US The French people of St. Pierre et Miquelon had no such prohibition and Canadian distillers would ship their product to the French islands and from there the product was smuggled into the US. American gangsters were reported to have visited the two islands to check on their stocks of booze sitting in warehouses.

Old warehouses on St. Pierre et Miquelon that were used to store liquor from Canada, the Caribbean and from France



Interesting Smithsonian article

[Read More]


MD, you Americans were a thirsty bunch, weren't you?
George

OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 9:49:01 AM
Joseph P. Kennedy, father of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, got rich doing the rum running thing.
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13550
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 1:35:49 PM
Quote:
Joseph P. Kennedy, father of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, got rich doing the rum running thing.


It would be interesting to know how these people arranged for the deliveries. The supply chain must have been difficult to put together.

I knew that Al Capone and Lucky Luciano were heavily involved in these smuggling operations. One unconfirmed report has Capone visiting St. Pierre et Miquelon to check on his stocks in the warehouses. Capone had a connection in Windsor, Ontario named Blaise Diesbourg who arranged for a regular and daily flight of booze from Windsor to Chicago.

The Hiram Walker Distillery near Windsor, Ontario loaded jugs and casks of booze into US boats for the quick run to the US side near Detroit.

Seagram's Distlllery of Montréal was owned by the Bronfman family and they shipped whiskey directly into the states during the prohibition period or found round about ways to get it there. I read one estimate that suggests that Seagram's was responsible for over half of all booze smuggled into the US.

I sure didn't know about Joseph Kennedy though. Very interesting.

Sounds as though the US wasn't any more successful at alcohol prohibition than we were in Canada.

George
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 2:52:22 PM
We celebrated the end of Prohibition via the 21st Amendment to the Constitution. We remind ourselves of that often.

https://fastly.4sqi.net/img/general/600x600/mR4pr_udH91YchgtvOxiihn26jmWJzLGfvI37qfKAc8.jpg
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/23/2023 8:14:16 PM
Here you go OP,

[Read More]
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NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 6:38:16 AM
On this day in American History,....


On March 24, 1765, Parliament passes the Quartering Act, outlining the locations and conditions in which British soldiers are to find room and board in the American colonies.

The Quartering Act of 1765 required the colonies to house British soldiers in barracks provided by the colonies. If the barracks were too small to house all the soldiers, then localities were to accommodate the soldiers in local inns, livery stables, ale houses, victualling houses and the houses of sellers of wine. "Should there still be soldiers without accommodation after all such publick houses were filled," the act read, "the colonies were then required to take, hire and make fit for the reception of his Majesty’s forces, such and so many uninhabited houses, outhouses, barns, or other buildings as shall be necessary."

​As the language of the act makes clear, the popular image of Redcoats tossing colonists from their bedchambers in order to move in themselves was not the intent of the law; neither was it the practice. However, the New York colonial assembly disliked being commanded to provide quarter for British troops—they preferred to be asked and then to give their consent, if they were going to have soldiers in their midst at all. Thus, they refused to comply with the law, and in 1767, Parliament passed the New York Restraining Act. The Restraining Act prohibited the royal governor of New York from signing any further legislation until the assembly complied with the Quartering Act.​

In New York, the governor managed to convince Parliament that the assembly had complied. In Massachusetts, where barracks already existed on an island from which soldiers had no hope of keeping the peace in a city riled by the Townshend Revenue Acts, British officers followed the Quartering Act’s injunction to quarter their soldiers in public places, not in private homes. Within these constraints, their only option was to pitch tents on Boston Common. The soldiers, living cheek by jowl with riled Patriots, were soon involved in street brawls and then the Boston Massacre of 1770, during which not only five rock-throwing colonial rioters were killed but any residual trust between Bostonians and the resident Redcoats. That breach would never be healed in the New England port city, and the British soldiers stayed in Boston until George Washington drove them out with the Continental Army in 1776.​

saymedia.com
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/parliament-passes-the-quartering-act?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0324-03242023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2
===============================================================================================================================

Another example how the American colonists were oppressed by the British Government.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8313
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 7:20:19 AM
Guys,

From 3-24 in history! The following happened!?

1765 British Parliament passes Quartering Act making Colonists house British Military! How did this piss the Colonists off!? What say you??

1837 Canada gives it's Black citizens the right to vote! Why were the so ahead of the US on this?? Comments??

1853 Canada allows a anti slavery newspaper in Windsor! Any info on this? Again Canada is sypathetic to Blacks & slaves! Why so??

1906 census shows The British Empire includes1/5th of the worlds population! Wow, any comments on how this was accomplished!? & was this at it's height??

1941 German troops move into Lybia, how was breaking the German code going to lose the Nazis N. Africa?? Comments, anyone??

1942 the US move Japanese American citizens into camps? Sad what happened after Pearl!?? Comments?

On 3-24-1844 the RAF sends 811 bombers at Berlin?! What's the actual story?? Comments anyone? Also a RAF gunner on this day, falls 18,000 feet without a parachute, & is hardly injured!? How in the hell???

1945, Canadian Paratroopers involved in Operation Varsity over the Rhine! How did this work out for the Allies?? What say you??

1971 Great Britain injects direct rule over Ireland! How did this go over? Anyone??

Some new topics! Comments, anyone??
MD

BTW thanks for everyone's recent comments! Certainly appreciated!!!
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Lightning
Glasgow  UK
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 10:32:33 AM
Quote:
Another example how the American colonists were oppressed by the British Government.


Yes, oppressed by their fellow countrymen who died by the thousands to defend them from French and Indian attacks.
----------------------------------
"There is no course open to us but to fight it out. Every position must be held to the last man: there must be no retirement. With our backs to the wall and believing in the justice of our cause, each one of us must fight to the end."
NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 1:08:20 PM
American colonists also died defending their homes from the French and the Indians. Historians estimate that over 10,000 colonists died in the conflict.

Cheers,
NYGiant
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 1:25:40 PM
Including George Washington.
NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 1:53:28 PM
Quote:
Quote:
Another example how the American colonists were oppressed by the British Government.


Yes, oppressed by their fellow countrymen who died by the thousands to defend them from French and Indian attacks.


Maybe, just maybe, if they had listened to he Colonists on how to adapt and fight like the French and Indians did, they would have not offered such tremendous casualties?

Just sayin'.

Cheers,
NYGiant
Lightning
Glasgow  UK
Posts: 1070
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 2:51:14 PM
Don’t base your history on ‘Last of the Mohicans’. British and colonial forces fought tremendously effectively in the Seven Years War. Casualties were high and the fighting brutal, but ultimately the enemy was crushingly defeated.

It’s probably worth addressing the term ‘American colonists’, when I suppose the correct term should really be ‘British subjects in the American colonies’. The independence of the colonies was, IMO, inevitable but could have been achieved peacefully. The war could have been avoided had the Crown accepted the need to accept representation of those it taxed, and the colonists understood that it had to contribute financially to the regular forces and garrisons.

Cheers,

Colin
----------------------------------
"There is no course open to us but to fight it out. Every position must be held to the last man: there must be no retirement. With our backs to the wall and believing in the justice of our cause, each one of us must fight to the end."
NYGiant
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 3:04:01 PM
I am basing my history on the book "Crucible of War" by Fred Anderson. It is a good read.

Since the American Colonists were not protected by the English Bill of Rights, like British subjects were, they can hardly be considered British. Nor did they had any voice nor representation in Parliament. And since they had no representation, they refused taxation. Taxation without Representation, you know.

Cheers,
NYGiant
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1973
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 3:12:39 PM
I give "Last of the Mohicans" as a example of how the colonial militia worked.
NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
3/24/2023 4:06:22 PM
Quote:
I give "Last of the Mohicans" as a example of how the colonial militia worked.


One of the first books I recall reading. mandatory reading material actually of my native upstate New York. I read the entire Leatherstocking Saga.
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