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George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/5/2023 2:49:46 PM
FDR was a pretty good friend to Canada during WWII. On that basis I rate him as a good President.

But I know that there was criticism of the way that he handled the economy during the Great Depression. What was the basis of the criticism?

Cheers,

George
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1968
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
4/5/2023 3:39:15 PM
Socialism!
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/5/2023 3:43:56 PM
Quote:
Socialism!


No wonder we liked him. Progressive man.
NYGiant
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This day in World History! Continued
4/5/2023 4:22:10 PM
FDR was the greatest president of the 20th Century as he guided the US through the 2 great crises...the Great Depression and World War 2.
NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
4/5/2023 4:24:08 PM
Actually, FDR studied the results of the Great Depression, and saw that the worst hit in the United States were the young and the elderly. Realize that the Great Depression so overwhelmed existing social organizations like churches , so much so that they could not take care of the massive number of people who lost their jobs and homes. So, President Roosevelt, would address the permanent problem of economic security for the elderly by creating a work-related, contributory system in which workers would provide for their own future economic security through taxes paid while employed. The Social Security act to provide for the general welfare by establishing a system of Federal old-age benefits, and by enabling the several States to make more adequate provision for aged persons, blind persons, dependent and crippled children, maternal and child welfare, public health, and the administration of their unemployment.

Now, as far as Socialism is concerned, a Social Security check is not completely a socialist program. If it were a pure socialist program, the amount that every individual contributed to it would be the same and the amount of the benefits received (paid out) by each individual would be the same. This is not the case.
It’s interesting to note that the U.S. got the idea for a social security system from 19th-century Germany. That very capitalist monarchy launched an old-age social insurance program in 1889 at the behest of Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, partly to stave off radical socialist ideas being floated at the time. The original social security was actually an anti-socialist maneuver by a conservative government.

In reality, Social Security is considered a form of social insurance or a social safety net.

Also, actual socialist programs are free public libraries, and the Inter-state highway system.

Or, as I like to say...I got mine.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/5/2023 5:26:32 PM


Check below for new 4-4 topics in history, most not yet commented on?? Anything else?

1581 Francis Drake knighted by Elizabeth I, was he a pirate or a English naval captain?? What say you??

1832 Charles Darwin & HMS Beatle reaches Rio Dr Janario, how was his theory of Evolution accepted??

1865 RE Lee continues to retreat from Grant in Virginia, his men are with out food & supplies Does the ANV still have a chance to win?? Comments anyone??

1896 Gold is discover in the Yukon, how rich is this strike? Does it ultimately benefit Canada? Comments, anyone??

1944 Fr. Gen. Charles de Gaulle forms a new regime with the Communists! Really?? How does this go over? What's your take on Charles?? Anyone?

1949 NATO is formed, can they still aid in stopping Russia in the Ukraine? What say you, what are their chances of stopping Putin, how have they fared so far?

1968 MLK Jr is killed in Memphis! How far back did this set Civil rights back?? Only the good die young!? Very sad, what say you?? Riots broke out in @ 100 US cities!??

For tomorrow, Check 4-6 in history?

1652, Cape Colony formed by the Dutch in S. Africa! Amazing how Europeans just claimed territory, not even thinking about the various natives that lived there! What say you about this attitude!? Anyone?

1808 John Jacob Aster founds the American Fir Company, what effect will it have on the development of N. America!? Comments?

1886 city of Vancouver BC, incorporated, why did Vancouver, grow by such leaps & bounds??

1945 areas of Holland liberated by the Canadian Army! Any details??

Carry on,
MD
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
4/6/2023 6:38:49 AM
The Civil War explodes in the west as the armies of Union General Ulysses S. Grant and Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston collide at Shiloh, near Pittsburgh Landing in Tennessee. The Battle of Shiloh became one of the bloodiest engagements of the war, and the level of violence shocked North and South alike.

For six months, Yankee troops had been working their way up the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers. Kentucky was firmly in Union hands, and now the Federals controlled much of Tennessee, including the capital at Nashville. Grant scored major victories at Forts Henry and Donelson in February, forcing Johnston to gather the scattered Rebel forces at Corinth in northern Mississippi. Grant brought his army, 42,000 strong, to rendezvous with General Don Carlos Buell and his 20,000 troops. Grant’s objective was Corinth, a vital rail center that if captured would give the Union total control of the region. Twenty miles away, Johnston lurked at Corinth with 45,000 soldiers.



Johnston did not wait for Grant and Buell to combine their forces. He advanced on April 3, delayed by rains and muddy roads that also slowed Buell. In the early dawn of April 6, a Yankee patrol found the Confederates poised for battle just a mile from the main Union army. Johnston attacked, driving the surprised bluecoats back near a small church called Shiloh, meaning “place of peace.” Throughout the day, the Confederates battered the Union army, driving it back towards Pittsburgh Landing and threatening to trap it against the Tennessee River. Many troops on both sides had no experience in battle. The chances for a complete Confederate victory diminished as troops from Buell’s army began arriving, and Grant’s command on the battlefield shored up the sagging Union line. In the middle of the afternoon, Johnston rode forward to direct the Confederate attack and was struck in the leg by a bullet, severing an artery and causing him to quickly bleed to death. The ball severed an artery, and Johnston quickly bled to death. He became the highest ranking general on either side killed during the war. General Pierre G. T. Beauregard assumed control, and he halted the advance at nightfall. The Union army was driven back two miles, but it did not break.

The arrival of additional troops from Buell’s army provided Grant with reinforcements, while the Confederates were worn out from their march. The next day, Grant pushed the Confederates back to Corinth for a major Union victory.


Battle of Shiloh begins
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/battle-of-shiloh-begins?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0406-04062023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2
The Civil War explodes in the west as the armies of Union General Ulysses S. Grant and Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston collide at Shiloh, near Pittsburgh Landing in Tennessee. The Battle of Shiloh became one of the bloodiest engagements of the war, and the level of violence shocked North and South alike. For six […]

================================================== ================================================== ========================

A nice battlefield to visit, almost pristine. And very well interpreted. A side trip to Corinth is a must.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/6/2023 11:39:23 AM
Haven't I seen this posted elsewhere on MHO today??
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
vpatrick
MA MA USA
Posts: 2520
Joined: 2020
This day in World History! Continued
4/6/2023 2:23:07 PM
The day in history where NY learned to cut and paste is a very sad day in history for all on MHO
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nuts
NYGiant
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This day in World History! Continued
4/6/2023 3:42:04 PM
Quote:
The day in history where NY learned to cut and paste is a very sad day in history for all on MHO

Actually, the day I learned how to cut and paste, made me younger and more youthful
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/6/2023 4:14:39 PM
Quote:
1808 John Jacob Aster founds the American Fir Company, what effect will it have on the development of N. America!? Comments?


It has been a while since I read about the fur trade but Astor was an assertive man and he did build a successful fur trade business. I wouldn't say that he opened up the west as competing companies were already exploring the fur trade business to the Pacific. There were already two major companies operating out of Canada who had sent their people to explore operations on the Pacific.

The Hudson's Bay Company was a mammoth organization chartered by the crown in 1670 to operate in a huge area called Rupert's Land. HBC had built forts all across the west. Their business mode was to build trading forts and to encourage First Nation people to come to the forts to trade their furs.

The British defeated France in 1759 and all of New France fell to Britain. British entrepreneurs began to arrive and in 1779 a group of Scots established the North West Co. that became a rival to HBC.

The NWC business model was different. Their employees would take goods to the First Nations hoping to take their furs before they travelled to HBC forts. NWC did set up forts as well but their people explored far to the west and that included what the British called the Columbia district and the Americans would come to call the Oregon Territory.

But it was Astor who had a big plan to establish a string of fur trade forts across the continent. He did not succeed but not for want of trying. Ironically, he was at odds with his federal government. The US federal government made the fur trade the first industry to be subsidized in the US. I believe that it was the Indian department that used a model similar to the HBC in establishing forts to encourage First Nation's people to come to them. Unfortunately, the US sponsored businesses didn't carry goods that the indigenous people wanted. The forts were full of shovels, picks and ploughs. What the FN's wanted was guns and ammunition.

Astor was smart enough to give them what they wanted and he purchased British rifles rather than American made because they were better and that is what his clients wanted. If memory serves Astor would not sell alcohol to them though he may have changed his mind because the HBC had gallons of booze to trade to the FN and they wanted that too.

Astor also partnered with some former NWC men to establish the Pacific Fur Company as a subsidiary of his American Fur Company and his men travelled by land and by sea to build Fort Astoria on the Columbia River in 1811, I believe. So he had a leg up. He built another four or five forts in the area hoping that all of the trade would come to him.

He also worked a deal with the Russians to sell their furs in China.

Note the date, 1811. In a few months, Britain and the US would be at war. A British war ship showed up and Fort Astoria was surrendered and renamed Fort George. There were Canadians (many French-Canadians) working for Astor at Fort Astoria and when they received word that Britain was at war, many returned home. Some stayed feeling that they owed that to their employer.

We remember of course that this territory was not US territory. Britain, Spain, Russia and the US all had interests in the territory.

Astor's partners were not interested in continuing partly because Astor would not guarantee his support, and so the Pacific Fur Company was bought out by the North West Company in 1813. The NWC had become quite powerful and was taking a lot of business from HBC. Astor's employees, especially the Scots, opted to join the NWC.

Without going into the gory details, the rivalry between the HBC and NWC was nasty at times and violent. By 1821, the NWC had lost the fur trade war. The British government was tired of the bickering and the violence leading to deaths as the companies competed. NWC was absorbed by HBC partly at the behest of the British government. HBC effectively became the governing body in the Oregon territory. That would last until 1846 when the Oregon Treaty was signed. After that HBC decided to sell its assets in Oregon. The US saw these assets as privately owned and therefore HBC had the right to sell them.

So I would say that Astor's efforts in the far west were unsuccessful as one of his goals was to dominate the fur trade industry around the Great Lakes, the Great Plains and the Pacific.

He was far more successful to the south of the Great Lakes with his fur trade business centred in Chicago. HBC and NWC dominated the Great Lakes area and Astor actually had a working relationship with them. Astor began to provide goods to those companies. That all ended with the War of 1812. Encouraged by Astor the US government banned any foreign nationals from trading with the First Nations. That put a spanner in the works for the British companies still operating to the south of the Great Lakes despite it being US territory. And Astor was more than willing to fill the void.

In the Oregon Territory, the Hudson's Bay Company ruled and while Astor's American Fur Company had a virtual monopoly in the Great Lakes area thanks to the US government, it could not compete well with HBC in the Rocky Mountain and Pacific areas. HBC was a very large company and could be ruthless.

HBC ordered the area around the Snake River to be over trapped. Once the fur supply was gone, there was no point in Astor's company working there.

As well, HBC was large enough to undercut AFC prices. Once the market in Europe for furs began to die, Astor got out of the fur trade business in favour of real estate. He was fabulously wealthy. The company folded in the 1850's.

The Hudson Bay Co. is still in business today having altered its business practices several times. It's chain of department stores is suffering in the same way that most of those chains are. And ironically, the company is now own by an investment firm and I had thought that the CEO was American.

In 1972 my wife and I and two other couples were on a long canoe trip on the Churchill River which was a famous route in the fur trade era. The trip ended at an equally famous Hudson's Bay Co. fur trade outpost at Cumberland House. This was in central/north Saskatchewan. When we entered the establishment, there was a man busily grading muskrat pelts. He was ecstatic to see us and had sent his wife and daughter back east for a holiday. They needed the break. Poor guy was from Hamilton, near Toronto. He had been an assistant manager for a HBC department store and had been overlooked for promotion. He said that he had demanded to know why and they asked him whether he was willing to go west to be a manager. And here he was in a community of about 500 in 1972. It was a Cree First Nation town But he was the manager and only employee of HBC in Cumberland House.

And so while the fur trade business has declined and is under siege, it was not and is not dead dead. But I did check and HBC no longer maintains a store at Cumberland House.

Cheers,

George

Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/7/2023 7:42:47 AM
Hey guys,

1652, Cape Colony formed by the Dutch in S. Africa! Amazing how Europeans just claimed territory, not even thinking about the various natives that lived there! What say you about this attitude!? Anyone?

1862 the CW horrific Battle of Shiloh, proves that in U S Grant, the Union has a general who continues to attack, where other commanders in the past would have probably lost!? What say you??

1886 city of Vancouver BC, incorporated, why did Vancouver, grow by such leaps & bounds??

1945 areas of Holland liberated by the Canadian Army! Any details??

Here's 4-7 note from April history, in 1968!

In 1968, with what will be over 100 US cities about to start Rioting over MLK Jr's Assassination! & Just after hearing of the MLK Jr. Tragedy, Robert F Kennedy had the courage to go into inner city Indianapolis & inform the people there that MLK Jr. was Assassinated, & that King preached non violence, & his own family had also met with A simular tragedy! I don't know of any other well known political figure who would ever even try such a dangerous but sympathetic message. And actually calm the situation. It was indeed courageous! The loss of JFK was indeed tragic for our nation! What say you??
Does anyone have the link on his speech that day?? & could post it, my tablet won't let me post it, it was indeed heartfelt, & courageous! Thanks!

& tomorrow, 4-8 in history these events occurred.

1974 Hank Aaron of Atlanta Braves breaks Babe Ruth's HR record of 714 career HR's, he receives racist death threats in reaction by some!? Comments?

2009 Somali Pirates take over Maersk Tanker from Alabama, Tom Banks made a suspenseful movie on it. Comments on modern piracy? Anyone??

2013 Britains 1st female Prime Minister dies! Comments on her life & times? Anyone??

Take care, & Carry on,
MD



BTW thanks George,

Good post on the Hudson Bay Fur & American Fur Trade, & John Jacob Astor! Wasn't he on the Titanic? Here in Michigan I believe his Fur Company had a post on Mackinac Island as well! Boy Canoeing the Churchill River had to be the adventure? Bet you saw some amazing wildlife, & rugged country??
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
4/7/2023 8:02:13 AM
Two days of heavy fighting conclude near Pittsburgh Landing in western Tennessee. The Battle of Shiloh became a Union victory after the Confederate attack stalled on April 6, and fresh Yankee troops drove the Confederates from the field on April 7.

Shiloh began when Union General Ulysses S. Grant brought his army down the Tennessee River to Pittsburgh Landing in an effort to move on Corinth, Mississippi, 20 miles to the southwest. Union occupation of Corinth, a major rail center, would allow the Yankees to control nearly all of western Tennessee. At Corinth, Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston did not wait for Grant to attack. He moved his army toward Grant, striking on the morning of April 6. Throughout the day, the Confederates drove the Yankees back but could not break the Union lines before darkness halted the advance. Johnston was killed during the first day, so General P.G.T. Beauregard assumed command of the Confederate force.

​Now, Grant was joined by the vanguard of Buell’s army. With an advantage in terms of troop numbers, Grant counterattacked on April 7. The tired Confederates slowly retreated, but they inflicted heavy casualties on the Yankees. By nightfall, the Union had driven the Confederates back to Shiloh Church, recapturing grisly reminders of the previous days’ battle such as the Hornets’ Nest, the Peach Orchard, and Bloody Pond. The Confederates finally limped back to Corinth, thus giving a major victory to Grant.

The cost of the victory was high. Grant’s and Buell’s forces totaled about 62,000, of which 1,754 were killed, 8,408 were wounded, and 2,885 were captured or missing for a total of 13,047 casualties. Of 45,000 Confederates engaged, 1,723 were killed, 8,012 wounded, and 959 missing for a total of 10,694 casualties. The 23,741 casualties were five times the number at the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861, and they were more than all of the war’s major battles (Bull Run, Wilson’s Creek, Fort Donelson and Pea Ridge) to that date combined. It was a sobering reminder to all in the Union and the Confederacy that the war would be long and costly.


Battle of Shiloh concludes
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/battle-of-shiloh-concludes?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0407-04072023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2
Two days of heavy fighting conclude near Pittsburgh Landing in western Tennessee. The Battle of Shiloh became a Union victory after the Confederate attack stalled on April 6, and fresh Yankee troops drove the Confederates from the field on April 7. Shiloh began when Union General Ulysses S. Grant brought his army down the Tennessee […]
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/7/2023 8:26:34 AM
Quote:
Good post on the American Fur Trade, & John Jacob Astor! Wasn't he on the Titanic? Here in Michigan I believe his Fur Company had a post on Mackinac Island! Boy Canoeing the Churchill River had to be the adventure? Bet you saw some amazing wildlife, & rugged country??



Good morning, MD,

You're correct about Mackinac Island. It seems to me that it was a distribution centre for the American Fur Co. That island is in a strategic spot on the Great Lakes.
It had been used as a rendezvous point for French-Canadian fur traders long before Astor came on the scene. The British also saw it as strategically important, militarily.

The British took the island over after the French and Indian War. There was a famous attack on the island during Pontiac's War when FN warriors staged a lacrosse game outside the gates. The British became complacent and opened the gates. The FN women watching the lacrosse game suddenly dropped their blankets and handed weapons to the warriors. At the same time, the warriors had thrown a ball into the fort and charged in to get it only with weapons in hand. A slaughter ensued.

The Brits came back one year later and rebuilt and reinforced the fort.

The island became US property and Astor knew of its importance to trading operations.

I found this photo of the shack that Astor's agents stayed in while assigned to Mackinac. Pretty nice digs, I think.



A member of the Astor family was on the Titanic. It was John Jacob Astor IV. It couldn't have been the original. He was born in 1763.


The Churchill River trip was one of those events that you can never forget. We were on the water for 30 days and saw some of the most majestic geography that this country has to offer. Southern Saskatchewan is flat. Central to north Saskatchewan is on the Canadian Shield which is a massive rock surrounding Hudson's Bay. Rugged country. Thick bush and wild rivers.

The Churchill River itself can be as wide and calm as a lake or narrow with challenging rapids. The wildlife was impressive. We saw Bald Eagles nearly every day and stumbled upon their rookeries too. There were white pelicans in many places. But this is wilderness country. The only people that we encountered other than at a Hudson's Bay outpost were First Nations. I believe that they were all Cree FN.

Oddly they all travelled up and down the river in red wooden boats sold by HBC. Most had a 20 HP Johnson on the back. They didn't pin the motor down so that when they were going up or down rapids they could flip the motor up out of the way to avoid rocks. Many times we encountered a FN man in a back eddy who was replacing the shear pin on his propeller. They carried a tool box full of shear pins.

Embarrassing story time. We stopped one of these men to ask for directions. Our topo maps were top quality but there was a split in the river and if you went the short route to the left you hit a falls, to the right just a big rapid. One of our guys used broken English to ask him which route we should pick. You know, TV Indian talk. The man grabbed the map and said, "For Chissakes, you can see the river narrows on this side. Don't go there. Why don't you guys get a boat with a motor instead of those canoes". True story. Still makes me laugh.

On one three day stretch we could hear the rumbling of a motor. Strange sound to hear way up there, day after day. It got louder as we neared this big island and it was a fly-in fishing camp run by the local Cree FN. There was a man in a fishing boat standing up and waving at us to approach. We paddled in and noticed a big camera mounted on a tripod in the boat. We got close and he said, "You folks Canadians". One of our guys said, " Yeah, right hear in Canada, Imagine that".

Turns out the guy hosted a fishing show on a local station in Minnesota and he needed some footage of Canadians going about their day, I guess. He asked us to paddle back out and come in for a second take. He offered us 6 pickerel (walleye) in exchange. We ate well that night. I couldn't help but notice that the fishing boat was full of pickerel flopping about at the foot of the man and the FN guide. Maybe there was no limit but I doubt that. The sounds of motors were from the gas generators that operated the freezing units on the island. Fly in, fish, fly out with frozen catch.

Anyway, pretty meaningful trip. I have since been on many other canoe trips but nothing of that length.

Cheers,

George

NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
4/8/2023 6:49:45 AM
On April 8, 1904, with war in Europe a decade away, Britain and France sign an agreement, later known as the Entente Cordiale, resolving long-standing colonial disputes in North Africa and establishing a diplomatic understanding between the two countries.

Formally entitled a Declaration between the United Kingdom and France Respecting Egypt and Morocco, the Entente Cordiale of April 1904 amounted more than anything to a declaration of friendship between these two great European powers. By its terms, France promised not to challenge British control over Egypt; for its part, Britain recognized France’s right, as a Power whose dominions are conterminous for a great distance with those of Morocco to act in that country to preserve order and to provide assistance to bring about whatever reforms in the government, economy or military it deemed necessary.

Through the Entente Cordiale, Britain and France established the beginnings of an alliance, promising, in the concluding words of the agreement, to afford to one another their diplomatic support, in order to obtain the execution of the clauses of the present Declaration regarding Egypt and Morocco. The agreement stopped short, however, of requiring the two nations to provide military support to each other; this aspect of the alliance would come later.

A motivating factor behind the agreement was undoubtedly France’s desire to protect itself against possible aggression from its old rival, Germany, who had steadily been growing stronger in the years since its victory in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71 and now possessed the most powerful land army in the world. Britain was also eager to keep Germany in check, especially in light of a revamped, ambitious German naval program, which—if successful—threatened to challenge Britain’s clear dominance at sea.

The German government, anxious over this agreement, decided to test its limits, sending Kaiser Wilhelm II to Morocco in March 1905 to declare his support for the sultan—a clear challenge to France’s influence in that country, which had been sanctioned by the Entente Cordiale. This bid to shake the Anglo-French alliance failed, as Britain sided with France; an international conference that convened at Algeciras, Spain, the following year also recognized France’s claims in the region.

The clash between Germany and the new allies became known as the First Moroccan Crisis—a second occurred in the summer of 1911, when both France and Germany sent forces to Morocco—and resulted in a tightening and solidifying of the Entente Cordiale, as Britain and France, aiming to confront German aggression, moved from mere friendship to an informal military alliance and, later, to talks and an agreement with France’s ally, Russia. By 1912, then, two powerful and hostile blocs had been formed in Europe, with France, Britain and Russia on one side, and an increasingly isolated Germany—with relatively lukewarm support from Austria-Hungary and Italy—on the other. Two years later, this volatile situation would erupt into the First World War.

​https://www.history.com/this-day-in-...a023eefe0cd3d2
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/8/2023 7:41:43 AM
not worth it.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/8/2023 8:02:00 AM
Today, 4-8 in history these events occurred. I'm sure someone could add to this list??

1974 Hank Aaron of Atlanta Braves breaks Babe Ruth's HR record of 714 career HR's, he receives racist death threats in reaction by some!? Comments?

2009 Somali Pirates take over Maersk Tanker from Alabama, Tom Banks made a suspenseful movie on it. Comments on modern piracy? Anyone??

2013 Britains 1st female Prime Minister dies! Comments on her life & times? Anyone??

Regards,
MD

BTW George, I'm not picking up your read more??
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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/8/2023 11:41:28 AM
I deleted it Dave. All I did was copy it from NY's post and it wouldn't work. Like I said, not worth it.

George
scoucer
Berlin  Germany
Posts: 3269
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
4/8/2023 6:27:47 PM
Quote:
not worth it.


For me as well. I don´t know what website this is from but it is not written by historians. The Entente Cordial had absolutely nothing to do with German Aggression.
But I have no intention of explaining it for someone who isn´t interested in learning.

Trevor
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`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.
NYGiant
home  USA
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This day in World History! Continued
4/8/2023 7:08:21 PM
As explained in the 2nd paragraph...Formally entitled a Declaration between the United Kingdom and France Respecting Egypt and Morocco, the Entente Cordiale of April 1904 amounted more than anything to a declaration of friendship between these two great European powers.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/9/2023 8:02:56 AM
Guys,

Check out April 9th, in history! comment on these, or something new, you found!??

1682, Robert La Salle claims Louisiana for France, again Europeans taking natives land! Didn't anyone respect their lands?? Comments?

1784 The British ratify the Treaty of Paris to end the Revolutionary War, how did this effect the future Canada??

1865 Robert E. Lee surrenders @ 27,000 troops of the ANV at Appomattox Court house! Could Lee have continued the fight using guerilla warfare!? What say you?? Anyone?

1869 the Hudson's Bay Company cedes its lands to Canada!? That's not fair to the US, is it?? Anyone?

1917 Vimy Ridge in France is stormed by Canadian troops! Anyone with details of this battle??

1942 US& Philippineo troops surrender to the Japanese, so will begin the Bataan death march! Does this constitute a war crime against Japan?? What say you??

1945 the Kreigmarine Battleship Admiral Sheer sunk by RAF at Kiel, how tough was it to sink? Any details? Anyone??

Happy Easter,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
4/9/2023 8:21:42 AM
In Appomattox, Virginia, on April 9, 1865, Robert E. Lee surrenders his 28,000 Confederate troops to Union General Ulysses S. Grant, effectively ending the American Civil War. Forced to abandon the Confederate capital of Richmond, blocked from joining the surviving Confederate force in North Carolina, and harassed constantly by Union cavalry, Lee had no other option.

In retreating from the Union army’s Appomattox Campaign, the Army of Northern Virginia had stumbled through the Virginia countryside stripped of food and supplies. At one point, Union cavalry forces under General Philip Sheridan had actually outrun Lee’s army, blocking their retreat and taking 6,000 prisoners at Sayler’s Creek. Desertions were mounting daily, and by April 8 the Confederates were surrounded with no possibility of escape. On April 9, Lee sent a message to Grant announcing his willingness to surrender. The two generals met in the parlor of the Wilmer McLean home at one o’clock in the afternoon.

Lee and Grant, both holding the highest rank in their respective armies, had known each other slightly during the Mexican War and exchanged awkward personal inquiries. Characteristically, Grant arrived in his muddy field uniform while Lee had turned out in full dress attire, complete with sash and sword. Lee asked for the terms, and Grant hurriedly wrote them out. All officers and men were to be pardoned, and they would be sent home with their private property–most important, the horses, which could be used for a late spring planting. Officers would keep their side arms, and Lee’s starving men would be given Union rations.
​https://www.history.com/this-day-in-...a023eefe0cd3d2

Robert E. Lee surrenders
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/robert-e-lee-surrenders?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0409-04092023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2
In Appomattox, Virginia, on April 9, 1865, Robert E. Lee surrenders his 28,000 Confederate troops to Union General Ulysses S. Grant, effectively ending the American Civil War. Forced to abandon the Confederate capital of Richmond, blocked from joining the surviving Confederate force in North Carolina, and harassed constantly by Union cavalry, Lee had no other option. In retreating […]
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/9/2023 8:36:21 AM
Quote:
1682, Robert La Salle claims Louisiana for France, again Europeans taking natives land! Didn't anyone respect their lands?? Comments?


The short answer is no. Any land that was not occupied by Christians was considered fair game.

The Roman Catholic church had affirmed the Doctrine of Discovery in the 15th century. The doctrine was declared in a series of papal bulls giving the blessing of the church to any nation and its representatives to conquer and possess the lands of non-Christians.

This all coincided with the age of of exploration by Europeans. Vacant land was simply claimed, and I presume that much of North America would have been believed vacant. Encounters with some of the occupants clearly indicated that they were not Christian and that there appeared to be no national government in control of all of this vast territory.

Would the Europeans have come without the blessing of the church? Perhaps but the doctrine provided justification and was accepted as international law.

In Canada we are hearing a lot about the Doctrine of Discovery today. As we attempt to reconcile with the First Nations, they point to this doctrine as the European justification for their subjugation and the failure of European nations to negotiate with them fairly, nation to nation.


Cheers,

George
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/9/2023 4:50:37 PM
Quote:
Two days of heavy fighting conclude near Pittsburgh Landing in western Tennessee. The Battle of Shiloh became a Union victory after the Confederate attack stalled on April 6, and fresh Yankee troops drove the Confederates from the field on April 7.

Shiloh began when Union General Ulysses S. Grant brought his army down the Tennessee River to Pittsburgh Landing in an effort to move on Corinth, Mississippi, 20 miles to the southwest. Union occupation of Corinth, a major rail center, would allow the Yankees to control nearly all of western Tennessee. At Corinth, Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston did not wait for Grant to attack. He moved his army toward Grant, striking on the morning of April 6. Throughout the day, the Confederates drove the Yankees back but could not break the Union lines before darkness halted the advance. Johnston was killed during the first day, so General P.G.T. Beauregard assumed command of the Confederate force.

​Now, Grant was joined by the vanguard of Buell’s army. With an advantage in terms of troop numbers, Grant counterattacked on April 7. The tired Confederates slowly retreated, but they inflicted heavy casualties on the Yankees. By nightfall, the Union had driven the Confederates back to Shiloh Church, recapturing grisly reminders of the previous days’ battle such as the Hornets’ Nest, the Peach Orchard, and Bloody Pond. The Confederates finally limped back to Corinth, thus giving a major victory to Grant.

The cost of the victory was high. Grant’s and Buell’s forces totaled about 62,000, of which 1,754 were killed, 8,408 were wounded, and 2,885 were captured or missing for a total of 13,047 casualties. Of 45,000 Confederates engaged, 1,723 were killed, 8,012 wounded, and 959 missing for a total of 10,694 casualties. The 23,741 casualties were five times the number at the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861, and they were more than all of the war’s major battles (Bull Run, Wilson’s Creek, Fort Donelson and Pea Ridge) to that date combined. It was a sobering reminder to all in the Union and the Confederacy that the war would be long and costly.


Battle of Shiloh concludes
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/battle-of-shiloh-concludes?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0407-04072023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2
Two days of heavy fighting conclude near Pittsburgh Landing in western Tennessee. The Battle of Shiloh became a Union victory after the Confederate attack stalled on April 6, and fresh Yankee troops drove the Confederates from the field on April 7. Shiloh began when Union General Ulysses S. Grant brought his army down the Tennessee […]



BTW, A shout out to Vince for his great video on the Shiloh Battlefield tour!
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 8:09:20 AM
On this day in American Naval History,...On April 10, 1778, Commander John Paul Jones and his crew of 140 men aboard the USS Ranger set sail from the naval port at Brest, France, and head toward the Irish Sea to begin raids on British warships. This was the first mission of its kind during the Revolutionary War.

Commander Jones, remembered as one of the most daring and successful naval commanders of the American Revolution, was born in Scotland, on July 6, 1747. He became an apprentice to a merchant at 13 and soon went to sea, traveling first to the West Indies and then to North America as a young man. In Virginia at the onset of the American Revolution, Jones sided with the Patriots and received a commission as a first lieutenant in the Continental Navy on December 7, 1775.

After departing from Brest, Jones successfully executed raids on two forts in England's Whitehaven Harbor, despite a disgruntled crew more interested in “gain than honor.” Jones then continued to his home territory of Kirkcudbright Bay, Scotland, where he intended to abduct the earl of Selkirk and then exchange him for American sailors held captive by Britain. Although he did not find the earl at home, Jones' crew was able to steal all his silver, including his wife's teapot, still containing her breakfast tea. From Scotland, Jones sailed across the Irish Sea to Carrickfergus, where the Ranger captured the HMS Drake after delivering fatal wounds to the British ship s captain and lieutenant.



In September 1779, Jones fought one of the fiercest battles in naval history when he led the USS Bonhomme Richard frigate, named for Benjamin Franklin, in an engagement with the 50-gun British warship HMS Serapis. After the Bonhomme Richard was struck, it began taking on water and caught fire. When the British captain of the Serapis ordered Jones to surrender, he famously replied, “I have not yet begun to fight!” A few hours later, the captain and crew of the Serapis admitted defeat and Jones took command of the British ship.

One of the greatest naval commanders in history, Jones is remembered as a “Father of the American Navy,” along with fellow Revolutionary War hero Commodore John Barry.


Revolutionary War Commander John Paul Jones sets out to raid British ships
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/john-paul-jones-sets-out-to-raid-british-ships?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0410-04102023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2
On April 10, 1778, Commander John Paul Jones and his crew of 140 men aboard the USS Ranger set sail from the naval port at Brest, France, and head toward the Irish Sea to begin raids on British warships. This was the first mission of its kind during the Revolutionary War. Commander Jones, remembered as […]

======================================================================================================================================

Jones exemplified the determination of the fledging Unites States.
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 8:18:53 AM
Hi Guys,

Check out April 9th, in history! comment on these, or something new, you found!??

1682, Robert La Salle claims Louisiana for France, again Europeans taking natives land! Didn't anyone respect their lands?? Comments?

1784 The British ratify the Treaty of Paris to end the Revolutionary War, how did this effect the future Canada??

1865 Robert E. Lee surrenders @ 27,000 troops of the ANV at Appomattox Court house! Could Lee have continued the fight using guerilla warfare!? What say you?? Anyone?

1869 the Hudson's Bay Company cedes its lands to Canada!? That's not fair to the US, is it?? Anyone?

1917 Vimy Ridge in France is stormed by Canadian troops! Anyone with details of this battle??

1942 US& Philippineo troops surrender to the Japanese, so will begin the Bataan death march! Does this constitute a war crime against Japan?? What say you??

1945 the Kreigmarine Battleship Admiral Sheer sunk by RAF at Kiel, how tough was it to sink? Any details? Anyone??

4-10 1778, the father of the USN John Paul Jones take his ship the Bonhomme Richard, for battle off England, & France!!

Hope everyone had a Happy Easter,
MD

BTW,
I know Vinyl Ridge was a huge victory for the Canadians over the Germans, I believe it lasted 4 days! Anyone with a post or good site on it??
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
OpanaPointer
St. Louis MO USA
Posts: 1968
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 8:24:53 AM
https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/documents/atrocity-crimes/Doc.3_1946%20Tokyo%20Charter.pdf
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 8:28:19 AM
[Read More]
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 2:09:08 PM
On this day in American Naval History,...On April 10, 1778, Commander John Paul Jones and his crew of 140 men aboard the USS Ranger set sail from the naval port at Brest, France, and head toward the Irish Sea to begin raids on British warships. This was the first mission of its kind during the Revolutionary War.

After departing from Brest, Jones successfully executed raids on two forts in England's Whitehaven Harbor, despite a disgruntled crew more interested in “gain than honor.” Jones then continued to his home territory of Kirkcudbright Bay, Scotland, where he intended to abduct the earl of Selkirk and then exchange him for American sailors held captive by Britain. Although he did not find the earl at home, Jones' crew was able to steal all his silver, including his wife's teapot, still containing her breakfast tea. From Scotland, Jones sailed across the Irish Sea to Carrickfergus, where the Ranger captured the HMS Drake after delivering fatal wounds to the British ship s captain and lieutenant.



Was this the only attack on the British Isles by Americans during the Revolutionary War? Certainly very brash of Cmd. John Paul Jones!? Any posts videos or websites on this naval attack??

Anyone?
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Lightning
Glasgow  UK
Posts: 1064
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 2:32:36 PM
Quote:

1865 Robert E. Lee surrenders @ 27,000 troops of the ANV at Appomattox Court house! Could Lee have continued the fight using guerilla warfare!? What say you?? Anyone?



Hi Dave,

Let's be glad that Lee saw sense and gave up the fight. We can see from the 2nd Anglo-Boer War what happens when a conventional war turns into a guerilla fight. The British, despite some early setbacks, eventually smashed the field forces of the two Boer republics and the war was, apparently, as good as over, with the British C-in-C Lord Roberts heading home from Pretoria for his meeting with the Queen. The Boers saw it differently, managing to slip away from the British forces into the veldt and from there dispersing into a hundred or so small (but lethal) units that terrorised the British and Imperial forces for another two years. Only after Kitchener scorched the earth did the Boers come back in to talk; even then, there were still Boers who wanted to fight on.

Now imagine the same, but in Virginia and elsewhere 1865, with a variety of terrain highly suitable for irregular warfare. The Union army would have suffered the same casaulties again in its efforts to suppress the Southerners as it had in the set piece battles and sieges. I'm not sure the Union public could have stomached another four years of their husbands and sons being slaughtered. Lee knew the cost would have been too high for both sides, with the irreversible ruin of the South; we must be grateful that he agreed to surrender than to try to fight on.

Cheers,

Colin
----------------------------------
"There is no course open to us but to fight it out. Every position must be held to the last man: there must be no retirement. With our backs to the wall and believing in the justice of our cause, each one of us must fight to the end."
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 3:15:42 PM
Quote:
1917 Vimy Ridge in France is stormed by Canadian troops! Anyone with details of this battle??


The battle of Vimy Ridge was a seminal moment in Canadian military history as it was the first time that the four divisions of the Canadian Corps attacked together. The Corps at that time was led by Gen. Julian Byng who was British. The commander of the 1st division was Arthur Currie who would later become the Corps Commander and one of the most successful and noted generals on the British side.

Vimy was a part of the battle of Arras. And the Canadians would be attacking over land that had seen 100,000 French soldiers wounded or killed. The German forces had the high ground and the advantage.

Tactically the battle was brilliant. The Canadians accomplished what others had not been able to do. Taking place in April of 1917, the corps demonstrated the greater sophistication in combat arms that the British and Commonwealth forces had adopted. The Canadians rehearsed this attack and lost a lot of men well away from the front who were engaged in preparation and rehearsal but were struck by artillery fire. Soldiers were taught to think for themselves and to press the attack even if officers and NCO's were killed or wounded.

Eleven tunnels totally 6 km in length were dug to move men and ammunition and wounded back and forth to the front. They used soldiers in specialized roles as MG men or bombers for example. Realizing that men who knew where they were going and what their short and long term objectives were would be more effective, the soldiers had specialized maps and aerial photos to guide them to those objectives.

Still I think that it was the sophisticated artillery shoots well before the actual battle and during that were the key success. A creeping barrage allowed the Canadians to hit the German positions before the German soldiers could ready themselves.

AT 5:30 AM on April 9, 15,000 Canadian soldiers attacked the 9 km long ridge. It was a brilliant effort with many examples of individual courage and small unit combat skills. The Germans were pushed back all along the ridge. Still it took four days to subdue the last of the defenders with a bayonet charge at the highest point, Hill 145.

Gen. Arthur Currie would go on to lead much more important victories and he probably would have pointed to other battles like Hill 70 as more important than Vimy.

However, when it came time to honour the Canadian Corps, the country and the men who fought there would point to Vimy Ridge as the point in the war that they felt that the Corps was an impressive fighting unit. There are some who say that Canada became a nation at Vimy Ridge and no longer just a colony of Great Britain. France granted that land to Canada in perpetuity.

And it is on this ridge that the memorial to all the Canadians killed in this conflict sits, on the highest point of Vimy Ridge.

The Vimy Monument in the distance with old shell holes in the foreground.



The cost? 3598 men were killed. Over 7,000 were wounded. Four men were awarded Victoria Crosses for bravery, and only one of these men survived the war.

Strategically, the victory was not that important as costly as it was. The Battle of Arras was not a great success and the Vimy portion of it is the only successful part of it.

I have been to Vimy Ridge. It was one of the most memorable events in my life. I am not one to wax poetic but I felt something when I was there. As one walks about the comparatively gentle slope of the ridge to the monument, one senses the spirits of one's countrymen present.

We send our high school students to Vimy. Usually they have been charged with investigating the life of a soldier who died there. The kids are often in tears when they find the name of their soldier on the monument. These are the names of soldiers for whom no grave exists. They just vanished. The names are not just from the Vimy battle but for the whole conflict.

University students guided us on a tour of the site and they do a great job. It was long ago that I attended Vimy but I recall that the students recounted a story of a very old veteran of the battle and they were escorting him into the tunnels. He said to them, "I know this tunnel. I was here the night before we attacked. They humoured him of course but then he told them that there was a shunt coming up and his buddy had scratched a maple leaf into the chalk walls with the man's initials in the leaf. He point to a shunt which is a cut away into the chalk walls used for storing ammunition or as a first aid station. He said, "This one" and these kids told me that they were blown away to see a maple leaf etched into the chalk complete with the initials of this man's good friend.

That story tells me just how much this even meant in the life of that old soldier.

Some creative work done by soldiers waiting to go into battle






The details of the battle are fascinating but probably not appropriate in this section of the forum.

This video is a longer documentary for those interested in great detail

[Read More]

And this one is only 6 minutes long and narrated by William Shatner

[Read More]

Cheers,

George

Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 7:58:55 PM
Quote:
Quote:
1917 Vimy Ridge in France is stormed by Canadian troops! Anyone with details of this battle??


The battle of Vimy Ridge was a seminal moment in Canadian military history as it was the first time that the four divisions of the Canadian Corps attacked together. The Corps at that time was led by Gen. Julian Byng who was British. The commander of the 1st division was Arthur Currie who would later become the Corps Commander and one of the most successful and noted generals on the British side.

Vimy was a part of the battle of Arras. And the Canadians would be attacking over land that had seen 100,000 French soldiers wounded or killed. The German forces had the high ground and the advantage.

Tactically the battle was brilliant. The Canadians accomplished what others had not been able to do. Taking place in April of 1917, the corps demonstrated the greater sophistication in combat arms that the British and Commonwealth forces had adopted. The Canadians rehearsed this attack and lost a lot of men well away from the front who were engaged in preparation and rehearsal. Soldiers were taught to think for themselves.

Eleven tunnels totally 6 km in length were dug to move men and ammunition and wounded back and forth to the front. The use of soldiers in specialized roles as MG men or bombers for example. Realizing that men who knew where they were going and what their short and long term objectives were would be more effective, the soldiers had specialized maps and aerial photos to guide them to those objectives.

Still I think that it was the sophisticated artillery shoots well before the actual battle and during that were the key success. A creeping barrage allowed the Canadians to hit the German positions before the German soldiers could ready themselves.

AT 5:30 AM on April 9, 15,000 Canadian soldiers attacked the 9 km long ridge. It was a brilliant effort with many examples of individual courage and small unit combat skills. The Germans were pushed back all along the ridge. Still it took four days to subdue the last of the defenders with a bayonet charge the highest point, Hill 145.

Gen. Arthur Currie would go on to lead much more important victories and he probably would have pointed to other battles like Hill 70 as more important. However, when it came time to honour the Canadian Corps, the country and the men who fought there would point to Vimy Ridge as the point in the war that they felt that the Corps was an impressive fighting unit. There are some who say that Canada became a nation at Vimy Ridge and no longer just a colony of Great Britain.

And it is on this ridge that the memorial to all the Canadians killed in this conflict sits, on the highest point of Vimy Ridge.

The Vimy Monument in the distance with old shell holes in the foreground.



The cost? 3598 men were killed. Over 7,000 were wounded. Four men were awarded Victoria Crosses for bravery, and only one of these men survived the war.

Strategically, the victory was not that important as costly as it was. The Battle of Arras was not a great success and the Vimy portion of it is the only successful part of it.

I have been to Vimy Ridge. It was one of the most memorable events in my life. I am not one to wax poetic but I felt something when I was there. As one walks about the comparatively gentle slope of the ridge to the monument, one senses the spirits of one's countrymen present.

We send our high school students to Vimy. Usually they have been charged with investigating the life of a soldier who died there. The kids are often in tears when they find the name of their soldier on the monument. These are the names of soldiers for whom no grave exists. They just vanished. The names are not just from the Vimy battle but for the whole conflict.

University students guided us on a tour of the site and they do a great job. It was long ago that I attended Vimy but I recall that the students recounted a story of a very old veteran of the battle and they were escorting him into the tunnels. He said to them, "I know this tunnel. I was here the night before we attacked. They humoured him of course but then he told them that there was a shunt coming up and his buddy had scratched a maple leaf into the chalk walls with the man's initials in the leaf. He point to a shunt which is a cut away into the chalk walls used for storing ammunition or as a first aid station. He said, "This one" and these kids told me that they were blown away to see a maple leaf etched into the chalk complete with the initials of this man's good friend.

That story tells me just how much this even meant in the life of that old soldier.

Some creative work done by soldiers waiting to go into battle






The details of the battle are fascinating but probably not appropriate in this section of the forum.

This video is a longer documentary for those interested in great detail

[Read More]

And this one is only 6 minutes long and narrated by William Shatner

[Read More]

Cheers,

George




Hi George

BTW,thanks for the great post on Vinyl Ridge, perhaps Canada's best WWI moment, Nice short video from William Shatner on the topic!? I didn't realize he was Canadian? From the Montreal area I believe??

Least we forget,
Regards,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/10/2023 8:45:21 PM
Plenty of Canadians in show biz down in the states. They get their start here and then go for the money.

Believe it or not, William Shatner was a Shakespearean actor at the acclaimed Stratford Festival.

The Canadian Corps had many notable achievements during WW1 and especially during the final 100 days. Vimy captured the hearts of the nation however. People who don't know much about Canadian history often will be able to recall the word Vimy if asked about WW1 and Canada.

2017 was the 100th anniversary of the battle and the Royal Canadian Mint commemorated the event.

Here is a two dollar coin that we call the "toonie"



George


NYGiant
home  USA
Posts: 953
Joined: 2021
This day in World History! Continued
4/11/2023 7:26:28 AM
On April 11, 1945, the American Third Army liberates the Buchenwald concentration camp, near Weimar, Germany, a camp that will be judged second only to Auschwitz in the horrors it imposed on its prisoners.

As American forces closed in on the Nazi concentration camp at Buchenwald, Gestapo headquarters at Weimar telephoned the camp administration to announce that it was sending explosives to blow up any evidence of the camp–including its inmates. What the Gestapo did not know was that the camp administrators had already fled in fear of the Allies. A prisoner answered the phone and informed headquarters that explosives would not be needed, as the camp had already been blown up, which, of course, was not true.

The camp held thousands of prisoners, mostly enslaved laborers. There were no gas chambers, but hundreds, sometimes thousands, died monthly from disease, malnutrition, beatings and executions. Doctors performed medical experiments on inmates, testing the effects of viral infections and vaccines.

Among the camp’s most gruesome characters was Ilse Koch, wife of the camp commandant, who was infamous for her sadism. She often beat prisoners with a riding crop, and collected lampshades, book covers and gloves made from the skin of camp victims.

Among those saved by the Americans was Elie Wiesel, who would go on to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.


The U.S. army liberates Buchenwald concentration camp
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-u-s-army-liberates-buchenwald-concentration-camp?cmpid=email-hist-tdih-2023-0411-04112023&om_rid=21539c69abde70e4e3fda02b9d14d1819c3badeaf5a2bcab48a023eefe0cd3d2
On April 11, 1945, the American Third Army liberates the Buchenwald concentration camp, near Weimar, Germany, a camp that will be judged second only to Auschwitz in the horrors it imposed on its prisoners. As American forces closed in on the Nazi concentration camp at Buchenwald, Gestapo headquarters at Weimar telephoned the camp administration to […]

================================================== =========================

What is frightening , is that some people the Holocaust never occurred. They must have skipped school that day.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/11/2023 8:02:42 AM
From last year on this date.

Quote:
Busy day in history, but few events worth writing about at length. Among items I find interesting for one think or another are the following:
• 1814. Under pressure from his own officers, Napoleon abdicated unconditionally at Fontainebleau.

• 2007. Kurt Vonnegut, best known for his Slaughterhouse-Five (1969), a noire novel following GI prisoners from the Bulge to Dresden, died at 84. Vonnegut is normally considered a “cult” writer, but he deserves more serious attention.

• 1961. The eight-month long trial of Adolf Eichmann began in Jerusalem, leading to the only death sentence Israel has ever imposed (through their courts).

• 1951. President Truman relieved General Douglas MacArthur of his command during the Korean police action.

• 1895. José Martí led an invasion of Cuba to overthrow Spanish rule. He remains a revered man to this day.

Cheers,
Brian G



Thanks Brian,
MD
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
Michigan Dave
Muskegon MI USA
Posts: 8302
Joined: 2006
This day in World History! Continued
4/11/2023 11:36:02 AM
Quote:
Plenty of Canadians in show biz down in the states. They get their start here and then go for the money.

Believe it or not, William Shatner was a Shakespearean actor at the acclaimed Stratford Festival.

The Canadian Corps had many notable achievements during WW1 and especially during the final 100 days. Vimy captured the hearts of the nation however. People who don't know much about Canadian history often will be able to recall the word Vimy if asked about WW1 and Canada.

2017 was the 100th anniversary of the battle and the Royal Canadian Mint commemorated the event.

Here is a two dollar coin that we call the "toonie"



George






Hi George,

Your site showing the Canadian $2 toonies didn't come through so I looked them up! Cool coins from 1999 til 2021, did they stop coming up with new ones after that?? Are they kind of rare and worth more than $2 today?? What metals are in them? I see that one has the HMS Shannon, what's the story on this ship with regards to Canada??

Thank,
MD

BTW I can see Shatner doing Shakespeare!!!!
----------------------------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/11/2023 12:08:45 PM
Quote:
Quote:
Plenty of Canadians in show biz down in the states. They get their start here and then go for the money.

Believe it or not, William Shatner was a Shakespearean actor at the acclaimed Stratford Festival.

The Canadian Corps had many notable achievements during WW1 and especially during the final 100 days. Vimy captured the hearts of the nation however. People who don't know much about Canadian history often will be able to recall the word Vimy if asked about WW1 and Canada.

2017 was the 100th anniversary of the battle and the Royal Canadian Mint commemorated the event.

Here is a two dollar coin that we call the "toonie"



George






Hi George,

Your site showing the Canadian $2 toonies didn't come through so I looked them up! Cool coins from 1999 til 2021, did they stop coming up with new ones after that?? Are they kind of rare and worth more than $2 today?? What metals are in them? I see that one has the HMS Shannon, what's the story on this ship with regards to Canada??

Thank,
MD

BTW I can see Shatner doing Shakespeare!!!!



MD, I don't know what a specimen set of the "Vimy" toonie would be worth. There are quite a fewof them because they released 10 K of these coins into circulation. Periodically I find one in my change.

The most common toonies have a polar bear on them. Millions have been minted.

But the Royal Canadian Mint often produces special releases and you can buy a specimen set in a display case or just wait to find a worn and dirty one in your loose change.

HMS Shannon fought in the War of 1812. That's the connection to Canada. Shannon captured USS Chesapeake off Boston harbour in 1813. That's the ship whose captain instructed the crew, as he lay dying, "Don't give up the ship". Of course, they had to surrender or die.

Cheers,

George
GaryNJ
Cumberland NJ USA
Posts: 254
Joined: 2010
This day in World History! Continued
4/11/2023 1:12:44 PM
MD,

That HMS Shannon coin was part of a War of 1812 collection issued by the Royal Canadian Mint. I have the collection that includes a total of nine coins. One of the HMS Shannon, two each of Sir Isaac Brock, Tecumseh, Laura Secord, and Charles-Michel De Salaberry. You can see the collection at the website below.

[Read More]

Gary
George
Centre Hastings ON Canada
Posts: 13539
Joined: 2009
This day in World History! Continued
4/11/2023 2:23:06 PM
Quote:
MD,

That HMS Shannon coin was part of a War of 1812 collection issued by the Royal Canadian Mint. I have the collection that includes a total of nine coins. One of the HMS Shannon, two each of Sir Isaac Brock, Tecumseh, Laura Secord, and Charles-Michel De Salaberry. You can see the collection at the website below.

[Read More]

Gary


Thanks Gary. I do remember the pitch that the mint sent to me to buy the set about the time of the anniversary of the war and I didn't get around to it. Hope you enjoy them.

George
Lightning
Glasgow  UK
Posts: 1064
Joined: 2005
This day in World History! Continued
4/11/2023 2:59:11 PM
Vimy Ridge is a special, haunting yet peaceful place; the terrain remembers the toll taken here in 1917. Many people report these feelings when visiting the Great War battlefields. I wonder if this will pass with time as the conflict moves out of living memory?

Yet, I answer my own question with my own recent experiences. Culloden and Glencoe both have a similar feel to the Great War battlefields, although it perhaps they are more morose given the aftermath of both of these traumatic episodes of Scottish history. I will probably not revisit either location; I am glad I went but I don't think I particularly enjoyed either visit on an emotional level.

Cheers,

Colin

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