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G David Bock
Lynden WA USA
Posts: 480
Joined: 2020
Aviation and Aircraft
5/17/2020 1:33:11 PM
Sort of a catch all thread for "history of ..." and presentation/comments/etc. regards specific aircraft, or aspects more general even.

So leading off with this, which is USA centric, but then it is from Smithsonian's Air & Space magazine;

A History of WW2 in 25 Airplanes
...
The 25: J-3 Cub/L-4 Grasshopper ★ PT-17/N2S Stearman ★ T-6 Texan ★ AT-11 Kansan ★ P-40 Warhawk ★ B-25 Mitchell ★ P-39 Airacobra ★ P-63 Kingcobra ★ PBY Catalina ★ F4F Wildcat ★ TBD Devastator ★ SBD Dauntless ★ P-38 Lightning ★ B-24 Liberator ★ P-51 Mustang ★ B-17 Flying Fortress ★ C-47/R4D Skytrain ★ B-26 Marauder ★ A-26 Invader ★ F6F Hellcat ★ TBM Avenger ★ SB2C Helldiver ★ P-47 Thunderbolt ★ F4U/FG-1D Corsair ★ B-29 Superfortress
...
https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/history-ww2-25-airplanes-180954056/
[Read More]

Main article is from about five years back and provides links to other past articles focused on those aircraft.
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TANSTAAFL - There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
G David Bock
Lynden WA USA
Posts: 480
Joined: 2020
Aviation and Aircraft
5/17/2020 1:40:58 PM
Another fascinating article in this month's issue of Air&Space;
The Shocking Resurrection of the F-15
Who says you can’t teach an old eagle new tricks?
https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/shocking-resurrection-f-15-180974446/
[Read More]
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TANSTAAFL - There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
G David Bock
Lynden WA USA
Posts: 480
Joined: 2020
Aviation and Aircraft
5/19/2020 4:22:00 PM
One of my most favorite aircraft is the Boeing 314 Clipper. Here's a link to an image page showing many pics of exterior and interior, etc.;
https://www.google.com/search?q=boeing+314+clipper+interior&client=firefox-b-1-d&sxsrf=ALeKk027ay7Yd0q40EnJ84s4CmZYjPCK0w:1589915644781&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=5oMw4mLtqiEfrM%253A%252CYMiDO16G0kpuPM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRJg9-jopa1dPVw41Ne6rzutnZA3A&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwig--qp0cDpAhVWHjQIHaXWDoQQ9QEwA3oECAMQKQ#imgrc=5oMw4mLtqiEfrM:
[Read More]



And the Wiki page with essential information and data;
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_314_Clipper
[Read More]
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TANSTAAFL - There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
G David Bock
Lynden WA USA
Posts: 480
Joined: 2020
Aviation and Aircraft
5/19/2020 7:23:25 PM
Though it never flew in Luftwaffe service, the Horton Ho 229, 'flying wing' fighter design did use wood extensively (a version of marine plywood for the skin).
EXCERPT:
...
The H.IX was of mixed construction, with the center pod made from welded steel tubing and wing spars built from wood. The wings were made from two thin, carbon-impregnated plywood panels glued together with a charcoal and sawdust mixture. The wing had a single main spar, penetrated by the jet engine inlets, and a secondary spar used for attaching the elevons. It was designed with a 7g load factor and a 1.8× safety rating; therefore, the aircraft had a 12.6g ultimate load rating. The wing's chord/thickness ratio ranged from 15% at the root to 8% at the wingtips.[1] The aircraft utilized retractable tricycle landing gear, with the nosegear on the first two prototypes sourced from a He 177's tailwheel system, with the third prototype using an He 177A main gear wheelrim and tire on its custom-designed nosegear strutwork and wheel fork. A drogue parachute slowed the aircraft upon landing. The pilot sat on a primitive ejection seat. A special pressure suit was developed by Dräger. The aircraft was originally designed for the BMW 003 jet engine, but that engine was not quite ready, and the Junkers Jumo 004 engine was substituted.
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horten_Ho_229
[Read More]


Another interesting site on the Ho 229, with additional images (though appears to be gaming related)
https://wiki.warthunder.com/Ho_229_V3
[Read More]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Of similar note would be the increasing use of composites in aircraft construction over the past few decades. One frequent type for structural and exterior is the carbon fiber impregnated with resins(plastic/glues) derived from petroleum/hydron-carbons. There also is the use of fiberglass products for interiors, such as walls and overhead luggage bins, and Kevlar for underside skin panels, especially wheel well coverings.

Aside from large fuel loads still on board, one factor in the intense heat/burning of the aircraft crashed during the Sept. 11,2001 attacks was these modern jets have as much "plastic" in their composition almost as a scale model kit would have.
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TANSTAAFL - There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
G David Bock
Lynden WA USA
Posts: 480
Joined: 2020
Aviation and Aircraft
5/19/2020 7:42:11 PM
Here's an interesting "first" and also a bit of a footnote to aviation history;
Boeing 307 Stratoliner
...
The Boeing Model 307 Stratoliner was an American commercial transport aircraft that entered service in 1938. It was the first to offer a pressurized cabin, allowing it to cruise at an altitude of 20,000 ft (6,000 m), well above many weather disturbances. The pressure differential was 2.5 psi (17 kPa), so at 14,700 ft (4,480 m) the cabin air pressure was equivalent to an altitude of 8,000 ft (2,440 m). The Model 307 had capacity for a crew of six and 33 passengers. The cabin was nearly 12 ft (3.6 m) across. It was the first land-based aircraft to include a flight engineer as a crew member (several flying boats had included a flight engineer position earlier).[1] In addition to its civilian service it was also flown as the Boeing C-75 Stratoliner by the United States Army Air Forces, who used it as a long-range cargolift aircraft.
...
In 1935, Boeing designed a four-engine airliner based on its B-17 heavy bomber (Boeing Model 299), then in development, calling it the Model 307. It combined the wings, tail, rudder, landing gear, and engines from their production B-17C with a new, circular cross-section fuselage of 138 in (351 cm) diameter,[2] designed to allow pressurization.[3]

The first order, for two 307s (named Stratoliners), was placed in 1937 by Pan American Airways. Pan Am soon increased this to six, and a second order for five from Transcontinental & Western Air (TWA) prompted Boeing to begin production on an initial batch of the airliner
...
The maiden flight of the first Boeing 307 Stratoliner (not a prototype, as it was planned to be delivered to Pan Am following testing and certification), registration NX 19901 took place from Boeing Field, Seattle on December 31, 1938.
...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_307_Stratoliner
[Read More]
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TANSTAAFL - There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
G David Bock
Lynden WA USA
Posts: 480
Joined: 2020
Aviation and Aircraft
12/17/2020 2:51:40 AM
The veteran spy plane too valuable to replace
Satellites – and drones – were intended to replace it. But the 65-year-old Lockheed U-2 is still at the top of its game, flying missions in an environment no other aircraft can operate in.

Nearly twice as wide as it is long, the Lockheed U-2 spy plane is one of the most distinctive aircraft in the United States Air Force – and the hardest aircraft to fly, earning itself the nickname “The Dragon Lady”.

The U-2’s 63ft-long (19m) thin fuselage, two high-aspect, un-swept glider-like wings, and powerful engine are designed to rocket the plane higher than 70,000ft (21km) – and, crucially, keep it there.

The U-2 operates at such height and at such a wafer-thin margin between its maximum speed and its stall speed that pilots call its cruising altitude “coffin corner”. The missions there last hours at a time.

The aircraft’s slender design is sometimes difficult to see. Often, it is covered in pods, spiky antennae, mysterious bulges and nosecones hiding the sensors, radar, cameras and communications equipment it needs to complete its missions. These different sensors can be plugged into the plane almost as if someone was building a model kit. There is an urban myth that one such bulge or pod contains a cloaking device – an electronic signal that renders it invisible to radar.
...
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20201210-lockheed-u-2-spyplane?utm_source=pocket-newtab
[Read More]
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TANSTAAFL - There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
DT509er
Santa Rosa CA USA
Posts: 958
Joined: 2005
Aviation and Aircraft
1/4/2021 11:26:38 PM
I recall seeing a U-2 at an airshow at the Miramar Naval Base in San Diego (it is now a base for the Marines). They had two circles around the a/c with signs spaced out indicating, Air Force security was authorized to shoot if someone entered the second/inner circle. Years later, they would do the same thing when the F-117 was on static display. It was very interesting to walk around the U-2 and finally get a good look at one. Days later, on both occasions, I was able to watch each a/c take off as the a/c would typically fly over a condominium I lived in; yes, during Blue Angel practices and working second shift, it was a great spot to sit, watch and listen!
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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
DT509er
Santa Rosa CA USA
Posts: 958
Joined: 2005
Aviation and Aircraft
1/4/2021 11:30:06 PM
Quote:
Though it never flew in Luftwaffe service, the Horton Ho 229, 'flying wing' fighter design did use wood extensively (a version of marine plywood for the skin).
EXCERPT:
...
The H.IX was of mixed construction, with the center pod made from welded steel tubing and wing spars built from wood. The wings were made from two thin, carbon-impregnated plywood panels glued together with a charcoal and sawdust mixture. The wing had a single main spar, penetrated by the jet engine inlets, and a secondary spar used for attaching the elevons. It was designed with a 7g load factor and a 1.8× safety rating; therefore, the aircraft had a 12.6g ultimate load rating. The wing's chord/thickness ratio ranged from 15% at the root to 8% at the wingtips.[1] The aircraft utilized retractable tricycle landing gear, with the nosegear on the first two prototypes sourced from a He 177's tailwheel system, with the third prototype using an He 177A main gear wheelrim and tire on its custom-designed nosegear strutwork and wheel fork. A drogue parachute slowed the aircraft upon landing. The pilot sat on a primitive ejection seat. A special pressure suit was developed by Dräger. The aircraft was originally designed for the BMW 003 jet engine, but that engine was not quite ready, and the Junkers Jumo 004 engine was substituted.
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horten_Ho_229
[Read More]

Another interesting site on the Ho 229, with additional images (though appears to be gaming related)
https://wiki.warthunder.com/Ho_229_V3
[Read More]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Of similar note would be the increasing use of composites in aircraft construction over the past few decades. One frequent type for structural and exterior is the carbon fiber impregnated with resins(plastic/glues) derived from petroleum/hydron-carbons. There also is the use of fiberglass products for interiors, such as walls and overhead luggage bins, and Kevlar for underside skin panels, especially wheel well coverings.

Aside from large fuel loads still on board, one factor in the intense heat/burning of the aircraft crashed during the Sept. 11,2001 attacks was these modern jets have as much "plastic" in their composition almost as a scale model kit would have.



Didn't Indiana Jones ground test the prop version of this a/c?
----------------------------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..." “If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford
G David Bock
Lynden WA USA
Posts: 480
Joined: 2020
Aviation and Aircraft
1/5/2021 5:18:14 PM
Quote:
Quote:
Though it never flew in Luftwaffe service, the Horton Ho 229, 'flying wing' fighter design did use wood extensively (a version of marine plywood for the skin).
EXCERPT:
...
The H.IX was of mixed construction, with the center pod made from welded steel tubing and wing spars built from wood. The wings were made from two thin, carbon-impregnated plywood panels glued together with a charcoal and sawdust mixture. The wing had a single main spar, penetrated by the jet engine inlets, and a secondary spar used for attaching the elevons. It was designed with a 7g load factor and a 1.8× safety rating; therefore, the aircraft had a 12.6g ultimate load rating. The wing's chord/thickness ratio ranged from 15% at the root to 8% at the wingtips.[1] The aircraft utilized retractable tricycle landing gear, with the nosegear on the first two prototypes sourced from a He 177's tailwheel system, with the third prototype using an He 177A main gear wheelrim and tire on its custom-designed nosegear strutwork and wheel fork. A drogue parachute slowed the aircraft upon landing. The pilot sat on a primitive ejection seat. A special pressure suit was developed by Dräger. The aircraft was originally designed for the BMW 003 jet engine, but that engine was not quite ready, and the Junkers Jumo 004 engine was substituted.
...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horten_Ho_229
[Read More]

Another interesting site on the Ho 229, with additional images (though appears to be gaming related)
https://wiki.warthunder.com/Ho_229_V3
[Read More]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Of similar note would be the increasing use of composites in aircraft construction over the past few decades. One frequent type for structural and exterior is the carbon fiber impregnated with resins(plastic/glues) derived from petroleum/hydron-carbons. There also is the use of fiberglass products for interiors, such as walls and overhead luggage bins, and Kevlar for underside skin panels, especially wheel well coverings.

Aside from large fuel loads still on board, one factor in the intense heat/burning of the aircraft crashed during the Sept. 11,2001 attacks was these modern jets have as much "plastic" in their composition almost as a scale model kit would have.



Didn't Indiana Jones ground test the prop version of this a/c?

Not exactly. 1st, it's a bent wing design and second the movie takes place in 1936 and the Horten's didn't start work on their -229 until about 1943 or later.
https://indianajones.fandom.com/wiki/Flying_Wing
[Read More]


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TANSTAAFL - There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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