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The current time is: 12/10/2018 3:50:59 PM
 (1866-1899) Other 19th Century Battles
AuthorMessage
Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4288

Battle for Saskatchewan 1877!
Posted on: 4/22/2018 8:34:27 PM
"Is this for real" NWMP & Cree Allies defeat the Sioux Nation in Canada, 1877!?

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Little known battle?
What say you?
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4288

Re: Battle for Saskatchewan 1877!
Posted on: 4/23/2018 9:27:41 AM
This situation led to the Saskatchewan situation!

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Regards,
MD

So What was the most Canadian Mounties involved in a conflict??

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---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 8288

Re: Battle for Saskatchewan 1877!
Posted on: 4/23/2018 11:22:09 AM
Dave, Manitoba and Saskatchewan had experienced violence between the allied Métis and the First Nations during the Red River Rebellion of 1870 and in 1885 with the North-West Rebellion.

The 1885 rebellion ended with the Battle of Batoche. The Métis leader, Louis Riel, was tried for treason and hung.

Chief Poundmaker and Chief Big Bear were sent to jail. 8 others were hung after trial.

The Cree had signed Treaty #6 but the people were starving. Canada wasn't delivering enough food so Poundmaker and Big Bear supported the Métis cause.

The hangings took place in Battleford, Saskatchewan.

Only one of the condemned Cree men elected to speak:


Quote:
"I wish to say Good-bye to you all," he began; "officers as well as men. You have been good to me; better than I deserved. What I have done that was bad. My punishment is no worse than I could expect. But let me tell you that I never thought to lift my hand against a white man. Years ago, when we lived on the plains and hunted the buffalo, I was a head warrior of the Crees in battle with the Blackfoot Indians. I liked to fight. I took many scalps. But after you, the redcoats, came and the Treaty was made with the white man, war was no more. I had never fought a white man. But lately, we received bad advice of what good is it to speak of that now? I am sorry when it is too late. In only want to thank you, redcoats, and the sheriff for your kindness. I am not afraid to die. I may not be able in the morning, so now I say again to you all - good-bye! How! Aquisanee!"


The Métis and FN had legitimate concerns as their land was being surveyed for rail lines and they were not consulted by the new country of Canada.

The North-West Mounted Police were small in number and the force that put down the rebellion was sent from the east by train. Canada only had about 750 permanent soldiers and a larger number were recruited and sent west to put down the rebellion.

That's another story but I relate it to point out that there was unrest and bad blood between the Métis and the FN's and the Canadian government.


Dave, I am a little confused. Your first link was to an American conflict with the Nez Perce which took place two years after the end of the North-West rebellion in Canada. So, I don't see the relationship. EDIT: My apology. The dates are close but I don't see how the Nez Perce movement precipitated unrest in Canada.

I do know that the North West Mounted Police were very small in numbers. They were entrusted with enforcing the laws of Canada initially in what became Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. They had been formed in 1873, only 6 years after Confederation.

There was no large army in Canada in those early days. These policemen enforced the laws.

PM John A. Macdonald was also very concerned about booze runners who crossed the border from Montana and peddled liquor among the First Nations and white settlers.

These men were traders and they came north for Fort Benton, Montana and even established their own fort in Alberta called Fort Whoop-up. These traders were rough men, many with civil war experience.

Their trade was causing violence and bad behaviour among the FN's in Canada.

I believe that the first contingent of NWMP numbered only 150 men. Later another 300 came to the west and split up to cover a huge territory.

In 1874 some of those men arrived at Fort Whoop-up and arrested the remaining whiskey traders for the US who had not fled.

The mounties worked hard at building good relations with the FN tribes and that is why the Rebellion of 1885 is a stain on the record.

In 1877, Chief Crowfoot of the Blackfoot tribe signed Treaty #7 with Canada.

Of the NWMP he said:


Quote:
“If the police had not come to this country, where would we all be now? Bad men and whiskey were killing us so fast that very few of us would have been alive today. The Mounted Police have protected us as the feathers of the bird protect it from the frosts of winter. I wish them all good, and I trust that all our hearts will increase in goodness from this time forward."


It is amazing that this small group of police could exert control over an area that expanded to include the west coast and the Yukon.

They did so by enforcing the rule of law and disarming people who crossed the border, that is, the Americans who always arrived with weapons when the international border didn't mean too much.

Cheers,

George




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