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 (1939-1945) WWII Battles
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brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/21/2018 6:20:47 PM
Feb 21. Day 174
Wednesday.

Finland
Quote:
General Timoshenko regroups his formations as a prelude to a new attack on the Finnish defensive lines.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Poland
Quote:
Work begins on the transformation of Auschwitz, a little town of about 12,000 people, into a German concentration camp.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving base on patrol; one boat (U-52) returning to Helgoland after 2 days. 17 U-boats at sea. One U-boat receives minor damage from depth-charging. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.

One ship (neutral) sunk by torpedoes; one ship written off from torpedo damage. Total tonnage, sunk plus written off, lost to torpedoes=9756.
Tara, a Dutch steam merchantman of 4760 tons, carrying grain from Bahia Blanca to Rotterdam. Complement is unrecorded; lost=0.
Loch Maddy, a British steam merchantman of 4996 tons, carrying wheat, timber and aircraft from Vancouver via Victoria, Panama and Halifax to Leith. Complement=39; lost=4.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 02.54 hours … the neutral Tara … was hit by one torpedo from U-50 west of Cape Finisterre and sank 20 minutes after being hit by a coup de grâce at 03.12 hours. The U-boat had spotted the steamer at midnight, which was according to Bauer en route without visible neutrality markings and missed her with a first torpedo at 01.38 hours. All hands abandoned ship in two lifeboats of which one made landfall at the Spanish coast, while the survivors in the other boat were picked up by the Spanish fishing trawler Milin and landed at La Coruna, Spain.
… At 18.09 hours … the unescorted Loch Maddy…, a straggler from convoy HX-19, was hit on starboard side amidships in the engine room by one G7e torpedo from U-57 (Korth) and was abandoned about 20 miles south-southeast of Copinsay, Orkney Islands. … The master and 34 crew members were picked up by HMS Diana (H 49) (LtCdr E.G. Le Geyt, RN) and landed at Scapa Flow.
At 01.07 hours on 22 February, the drifting Loch Maddy was hit on port side amidships by one G7e torpedo from U-23 as coup de grâce about 12 miles southeast of Copinsay and broke in two. The bow section slowly sank vertically, but the stern section remained afloat on the cargo of timber, was later taken in tow by the tug HMS St. Mellons (W 81) … and beached in the Inganess Bay, Orkney Islands. The cargo was salvaged and the vessel declared a total loss.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship damage/repair – Destroyer KELVIN had been escorting armed merchant cruiser CIRCASSIA since the 19th and on the 21st reported that side plating had split while at sea NW of the Shetlands. She arrived at Scapa Flow on the 22nd.
 
Destroyer KASHMIR's asdic dome and oscillator were defective and docking was required to repair them.
 
Destroyer escort and patrol duty – Destroyers GRIFFIN and GALLANT were detached from patrol to escort steamer CYPRIAN PRINCE (1988grt) from Aberdeen to Kirkwall. At Kirkwall, they joined destroyer IVANHOE on patrol.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser LETITIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser DERBYSHIRE arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Heavy cruiser YORK departed Liverpool to relieve heavy cruiser BERWICK on Northern Patrol. BERWICK reached Greenock on the 21st.
 
Light cruiser MANCHESTER and destroyer KIMBERLEY on Northern Patrol south of Iceland captured German steamer WAHEHE (4709grt) in 62‑50N, 14‑20W following her escape earlier in the month from Vigo. She was towed towards Kirkwall by KIMBERLEY, joined by destroyer KHARTOUM during the afternoon of the 22nd and arrived in the Clyde on 8 March. WAHEHE was renamed EMPIRE CITIZEN for British service.
 
Submarine exercises – Submarines TRIBUNE and TRIDENT exercised in the Firth of Forth.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers BRAZEN and ENCOUNTER arrived at Rosyth.

Luftwaffe marine attacks – Minesweeping trawler SOLON (348grt,) was near missed and damaged by He111 bombers of German KG26 (X Air Corps) off Yarmouth, but was able to enter the port. 
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.96 departed Southend escorted by destroyers VERITY and BEAGLE. Destroyer VETERAN relieved BEAGLE on the 22nd, VERITY detached on the 23rd, and VETERAN left on the 24th when the convoy dispersed
 
Convoy OB.96 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANQUISHER and VERSATILE from the 21st to 24th, when they detached to SL.20.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.100 departed Southend escorted by destroyers JERVIS, WESTMINSTER and sloop LONDONDERRY, the escorts of convoy FN.99 which had been cancelled. The convoy was delayed off Cromer Knoll waiting for minesweepers, but arrived in two parts on the 23rd. Convoy FN.101 was cancelled.
 
Lack of U-boat success – U.22 attacked trawler STRATHCLOVA (210grt) north of Fair Island, but torpedo defects allowed her to escape unharmed.
 …
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers IMOGEN and INGLEFIELD were hunting five miles 346° from Noup Head in 59‑43N, 01‑50W for a contact reported at 0530 by armed boarding vessel NORTHERN ISLES (655grt) in 59-25N, 3-06. 5W. She claimed to have grazed a submerged object which she attacked, and had in fact lightly damaged U.19.
 
Destroyers IVANHOE and INTREPID were searching for a submarine contact reported by aircraft in 58-40N, 00-30E.
 
British Battle aircraft en route to France reported sighting a German submarine ten miles south of Beachy Head. Destroyer VERITY was escorting convoy OA.96 as far as 00-30W and destroyer BEAGLE was sent to reinforce her. Destroyers ACHATES and ANTHONY departed Portsmouth to search for the sighting which was later determined to have been a mine. BEAGLE was recalled and arrived at Dover at 2230.
 
Anti-submarine trawlers YORK CITY (398grt) and HUDDERSFIELD TOWN (399grt), escorting the Milford Haven section of an outbound convoy, attacked a submarine contact off Milford Haven in 51‑28N, 5‑20W. Destroyer WAKEFUL relieved them and made an anti-submarine attack.
 
Minesweepers HARRIER, SKIPJACK, NIGER and SPEEDWELL were sweeping off Wick in 58-21N, 2-35W when an aircraft reported an oil patch on the water. NIGER and SPEEDWELL attacked a contact 30 miles SE of Duncansby Head and in all dropped 32 depth charges.
 
Anti-submarine trawler STOKE CITY (422grt) attacked a submarine contact off Morecombe Light Vessel in 53-54N, 3-33. 5W.
 
Anti-submarine trawler SCALBY WYKE (443grt) attacked a contact in Shapinsay Sound in 58-59. 50N, 2-50. 30W.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.27 of steamers BALTRAFFIC, BARON GRAHAM, BOTHNIA, BRITISH COAST and MARSLEW (Commodore) departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer MONTROSE, and arrived in the Loire on the 23rd.
 
German minelaying – Dutch steam trawler YM 49 (250grt) was mined and sunk in the North Sea.
 
German blockade running – German steamer ANTONIO DELFINO (13,589grt) sailed from Bahia. She reached Haugesand on 23 March, Sandefjord on the 27th escorted by Norwegian destroyer ODIN and two torpedo boats, left there on 1 April, arrived at Gotenhafen and finally reached Kiel safely on the 7th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/22/2018 5:01:51 PM
Feb 22. Day 175
Thursday.

Finland
Quote:
Russian forces gained control of the islands in the Gulf of Finland
(Goralski, p 107)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boat (U-25) entering or leaving base on patrol. 17 U-boats at sea. No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.
One ship (British) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=4580.
British Endeavour, a British steam tanker of 4580 tons, in ballast from Glasgow to Abadan. Complement=38; lost=5.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
[Ed. note: Loch Maddy is listed under 21 February as damaged, and on this date as a total loss. I included her details under 21 February because that is when she was hit and abandoned. Adrift, Loch Maddy was finally dispatched early on 22 February. Her tonnage was recorded in the total tonnage lost for 21 February.]
Quote:
At 00.20 hours on 22 February 1940 the British Endeavour … in convoy OGF-19 was torpedoed and sunk by U-50 about 100 miles west of Vigo, Spain. Five crew members were lost. The master and 32 crew members were picked up by the British steam merchant Bodnant and landed at Funchal, Madeira on 26 February.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE departed the Clyde for Rosyth where she arrived on the 23rd.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser CICILIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Merchant inspection – Armed merchant cruiser ASTURIAS boarded Danish steamer JONNA (1517grt) and sent her to Kirkwall for inspection.
 
Ship repairs – Destroyer DIANA arrived at Rosyth from Scapa Flow for repairs.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers IMPERIAL and DELIGHT arrived at Rosyth after submarine hunting.
 …
Motor torpedo boats MTB.22, MTB.24 and MTB.25 were searching for a submarine off Whitby
 …
Ship movement – Destroyers BOREAS and BRAZEN departed Rosyth for the Humber.
 
Ship transfers – Destroyers ICARUS and IMPULSIVE were transferred from the 3rd to the 20th Destroyer Flotilla.
 
Minelaying – Minelayer TEVIOTBANK departed Rosyth escorted by destroyers BOREAS and BRAZEN on minelaying operation PA 1 in the North Sea.
 
Ship collision – Destroyer GREYHOUND at anchor off Outer Dowsing was damaged when Swedish steamer REX (1013grt) hit her. Her stem was bent, and she repaired at Hull, completing on 20 March.
 
East Coast convoys – The 23rd Anti-Submarine Group departed Methil with an MT convoy covered by sloop LONDONDERRY and destroyers WESTMINSTER and JERVIS. The cover force transferred to convoy FS.103 on the 23rd.
 
Blockship sinking – Blockship CARRON (1017grt) departed the Tyne for Rosyth escorted by destroyer JAVELIN. She reached Scapa Flow and was sunk there on 3 March.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – While escorting
battleship RODNEY and battlecruiser HOOD, destroyer FOXHOUND attacked a submarine contact ENE of Muckle Flugga in 61-11.5N, 3-32W.
 
Destroyer FORESTER, escorting tug BUCCANEER in the Firth of Clyde in 55‑20. 75N, 04‑57.25W, attacked a contact, which further investigation showed to be the wreck of U.33 sunk earlier.
 
Destroyer ACASTA, escorting a homebound convoy, attacked a submarine contact west of Scilly Isle in 50‑00N, 10‑00W.
 
Destroyers WALPOLE and MACKAY, escorting a homebound convoy, attacked a contact SSW of the Scilly Isles in 49‑28N, 06‑48W. This was later determined to be the wreck of steamer VACLITE lost on 30 January.
 
Anti-submarine trawler LORD ESSENDEN (464grt) attacked a contact at 0840 in the Firth of Clyde, two miles 075° from Little Cumbrae in 55-41N, 4-58W.
 
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.14 departed Bergen escorted by destroyers ESCAPADE, ECLIPSE, ESCORT, ELECTRA and submarine NARWHAL, but 22 of the original 37 ships returned to Bergen. (See also the 24th following).
_____
 
U.50 sank tanker BRITISH ENDEAVOUR (4520grt) from convoy OG.19F NW of Cape Finisterre in 42‑11N, 11‑35W. The tanker broke in two and five crew were lost. Steamer BODNANT (5342grt) rescued the 33 survivors. Destroyers HEARTY and ARDENT were sweeping in the area but neither ship made a radio report and the destroyers were unaware of the submarine's presence.
 
German friendly fire losses – German destroyers LEBERECHT MAAS, MAX SCHULTZ, ERICH KOELLNER, RICHARD BEITZEN, THEODOR RIEDEL and FRIEDRICH ECKHOLDT departed Wilhelmshaven early on the 22nd on Exercise WILKINGER, an anti-shipping sweep in the area of Dogger Bank. That evening at 1900, northwest of Borkum Island, the destroyers were attacked by the Luftwaffe - He111's of IV/KG26 of the X Air Corps, which were not informed of the destroyers' movements. Some sources cite II/KG26. LEBERECHT MAAS was struck by three bombs, ran onto a British mine and sank, while MAX SCHULTZ evaded the bombing but also ran onto a British mine and sank. Five hundred and seventy eight crew from both ships were lost including the entire crew of SCHULTZ. There were 60 survivors from MAAS with KOELLNER picking up 24, ECKHOLDT 19 and BEITZEN 17. Heavy fog during the 23rd made further rescue efforts unsuccessful. German auxiliary patrol boat Vp.809 (trawler KONSUL DUBBERS, 408grt) searched through the afternoon. The minefield, hitherto undiscovered, had been laid by units of the British 20th Destroyer Flotilla on the 9th/10th January.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.22 departed Halifax at 1000 escorted by Canadian destroyers RESTIGOUCHE and SKEENA, which detached on the 23rd. Ocean escort was battleship ROYAL SOVEREIGN, left on 2 March. Destroyers VANOC, VETERAN, WALPOLE and WREN escorted the convoy from 6 to 9 March, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.20F departed Gibraltar with 30 ships on the 22nd, [having various] escorts… . [C]onvoy arrived … at Liverpool on 3 March.

U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.21 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser BULOLO until 4 March. Destroyer VANSITTART joined the same day and escorted the convoy until its arrival on the 7th.
 
French naval activity – French destroyer SIMOUN, escorting AUSTRAL and transport GOLO passed Gibraltar. GOLO had departed Toulon on the 17th and Algiers on the 20th. AUSTRAL had also left Toulon on the 17th and joined at Algiers. On the 22nd, the three ships departed as convoy 2F and were joined en route by destroyer FORBIN. They arrived at Brest on the 27th in preparation for allied operations in Finland.
 
French convoy 69.KF departed Casablanca with seven steamers, escorted by large destroyers MILAN, EPERVIER and VERDUN, and arrived at Brest on the 26th. The destroyers also joined the allied preparations for Finland operations.
 
Ship maintenance, India Ocean – Australian light cruiser HOBART arrived at Colombo, where she drydocked from the 25th to 29th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/22/2018 7:29:13 PM
22 Feb 1940

United Kingdom


Irish Republican Army bombs injure 12 in London, England, United Kingdom.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/23/2018 6:43:39 PM
Feb 23. Day 176
Friday. Full moon.

Finland
Quote:
Helsinki requested Sweden and Norway to grant transit rights for foreign troops to enter Finland.
(Goralski, p 107)
Quote:
The Soviet government passes to Finland the final conditions for peace: Finland must surrender the Karelian isthmus and the borders of Lake Ladoga and grant a 30-year lease to the Soviet Union of the Hanko peninsula; and finally must sign a pact of mutual assistance making the Gulf of Finland strategically secure for both countries. In exchange, the Russians will evacuate the Petsamo area.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Sweden
Quote:
Sweden announces officially that it will in no circumstances intervene in the Russian-Finnish conflict and will not allow Allied troops to cross its territory.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
Disagreeable experience at the Swiss border yesterday: the Swiss relieved me of all my provisions – chocolate, soap, canned food, coffee, and a bottle of whisky which Winant had given me. I see their point. They are cut off from the outside world and want to keep what they have and let it get into the hands of the Germans. Bu I was sore. On the German side the Gestapo stripped two thirds of the passengers, including all the women. For some reason, possibly because I was the last to get my passport okayed and the train was late, they let me off.
Arrived here[Berlin] this morning (Friday) to find it a meatless day The food is abominable. Because of the cold spell, no fish. Even at the Adlon I could get only potatoes and some canned vegetables, and my friends said I was lucky because for several days there had not been even potatoes, the city’s supply having been spoiled by freezing. …
Much talk here of the spring offensive. But where?
(Berlin Diary, p 290-91)

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving base on patrol; no boats returning from patrol. 17 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.

No ships) sunk or damaged by torpedoes or by U-boat minelaying. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser BERWICK departed the Clyde for Scapa Flow.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON departed Scapa Flow.
 
Exercise nd convoy duty – Destroyer JACKAL exercised in the Firth of Forth and then left as cover for a TM convoy.
 
Exercise – Sloop GRIMSBY and destroyers WOOLSTON and ENCOUNTER exercised in the Firth of Forth.
 
Return from patrol – Submarine SEAL arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Blockade duty – Submarine SALMON stopped Belgian trawler HELENE (145grt) ten miles east of Smith's Knoll, and put a prize crew on board. Both vessels reached Harwich on the 23rd.
 
Loss to mines – Trawler BENVOLIO (352grt …) was sunk on a mine in the Humber, with the loss of the Skipper and nine ratings.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.15 of two British, twenty Norwegian, six Swedish, three Danish, six Finnish and three Estonian ships departed Methil, escorted by destroyers COSSACK, DELIGHT, DIANA, SIKH, NUBIAN and IMPERIAL. One steamer detached before the convoy crossed the North Sea. Close cover was provided by light cruisers AURORA and PENELOPE which departed Rosyth on the 24th and anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA, which departed Sullom Voe on the 25th, while on the 24th, NUBIAN attacked a submarine attack north of Kinnaird Head in 58‑00N, 1‑19W. The convoy arrived safely at Bergen on the 27th.
 
U.K. outbound convoys – Convoy OA.97 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VANESSA, and was joined on the 24th by sloop FOWEY. Both escorts detached on the 25th and the convoy dispersed on the 26th.
 
Convoy OB.97 departed Liverpool escorted by sloop ROCHESTER and destroyer VOLUNTEER. Both escorts detached on the 26th and the convoy dispersed on the 27th.
 
U.K.-France inbound convoy – Convoy BC.26 of six steamers, including BARON KINNAIRD and DUNKWA (Commodore) departed the Loire escorted by destroyer MONTROSE, and arrived in the Bristol Channel on the 24th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.102 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop HASTINGS, and reached Rosyth on the 25th.
 
Convoy FS.103 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers WESTMINSTER, JERVIS and sloop LONDONDERRY, all three of which had been supporting convoy MT.16. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 25th. Convoy FS.104 was cancelled.
 
Convoy MT.16 departed Methil, escorted by anti-submarine trawlers of the 23rd Anti-Submarine Group. This convoy had been supported by destroyers WESTMINSTER, JERVIS and sloop LONDONDERRY before they joined FS.10 (see above). The convoy arrived in the Tyne the next day.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer GURKHA, then 54 miles SSE of the Faroes in 60‑32N, 06‑14W attacked and sank U.53 in 60‑32N, 06‑10W with the loss of all 42 crew. Destroyers KHARTOUM and KINGSTON joined GURKHA at 0630/24th in patrolling the area and early on the 25th, KINGSTON in company with GURKHA, made a submarine contact west of Sumburgh Head in 59‑55N, 04‑27W.
 
Destroyers GALLANT and GRIFFIN attacked U.61 east of Copinsay in 58‑54N, 1‑05W and inflicted some damage.
 
Sloop BIDEFORD, on escort duty, attacked a submarine contact WSW of Ushant in 46-51N, 10-31W.
[Ed. note: «uboat.net» lists the sinking of U-53 taking place on 24 February, and lists only one attack on U-61, by a 269 Sqn RAF Hudson on 21 July 1940,]
Quote:
French naval activities – French submarine PROTÉE attempted to stop French steamer ARAGAZ (5009grt) in 32-10N, 11-00W, assuming her to be German. ARAGAZ opened fire and the submarine was forced to submerge.
 
French destroyer SIMOUN, escorting convoy 2F from Gibraltar to Brest, reported attacking and ramming a German submarine SW of Cape St Vincent in 36‑15N, 09‑55W. Although no submarine was reported sunk, a drydock inspection at Casablanca revealed the blades of SIMOUN'sport propeller turned up and two yards of the outer keel torn away. The "submarine" may have been a submerged wreck.

New Zealand dockyard – New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES arrived at Auckland for repairs and refitting after being relieved on the South America Station.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer DAINTY arrived at Freetown.
 
French naval activity – French large destroyer ALBATROS sailed from Toulon on the 21st and troopship VILLE D'ORAN from Oran on the 22nd, and both passed Gibraltar on the 23rd on passage for Brest. The ships arrived on the 26th as convoy 3.F in preparation for allied operations in Finland.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/24/2018 5:01:29 PM
Feb 24. Day 177
Saturday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
German military planners completed details for the offensive into France and the Low Countries.
(Goralski, p 107)[Ed. note: this may be incorrect or inaccurate. According to 2194 Days, (p 43) von Mannstein’s plan, which disagreed with OKW’s, was presented to Hitler on 17 Feb. On 6 March various plans for the offensive were debated, and it was only some time after that that Hitler committed to von Mannstein’s plan. Goralski may have been referring to plans for the invasion of Denmark and Norway, though is is speculation on my part. According to one source, von Falkenhorst was given command of that invasion on 20 Feb, and perhaps 4 days would be sufficient for him to approve details of an invasion he was to lead.]

Britain
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
Germany and Italy signed a trade agreement, with the Italians to receive substantial quantities of coal.
(Goralski, p 107)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving base on patrol; one boat (U-18) returning to Wilhelmshaven after 14 days. 15 U-boats at sea. One U-boat (U-53) lost this date.
u-53, a Type VIIB boat, lost on patrol in the North Sea. Complement=42; lost=42.
Quote:
Sunk ... in the North Sea west of the Shetland Islands, in position 60.32N, 06.14W, by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Gurkha. 42 dead (all hands lost).
(«uboat.net»)
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=5. Total lost=14.

One ship (neutral) sunk by torpedoes; one ship lost to mining. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes and mines=7106.
Santos, a Swedish motor merchantman of 4840 tons, carrying general cargo from Buenos Aires via Bahia and Kirkwall to Gothenburg. Complement (including at least 3 passengers and 8 repatriating seamen)=43; lost=31 (including at least 3 passengers and 6 repatriating seamen). A slightly different description of included passengers is given in At sea (below).
Royal Archer, a British steam merchantman of 2266 tons, sunk by mine while carrying general cargo from London to Leith. Complement=27; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 21.00 hours … the unescorted neutral Santos was torpedoed and sunk by U-63 about 32 miles east-southeast of Fair Isle. Among the 31 casualties were three passengers and six of eight repatriated seamen from the Liana, which had been sunk by U-14 … on 16 February. On 25 February, the survivors were picked up by HMS Gallant (H 59) … after being directed to their raft by a Hudson aircraft about 50 miles east of Duncansby Head and landed at Invergordon later the same day.
… Royal Archer… , dispersed from convoy FN-100, struck a mine laid on 4 Nov 1939 by U-21 and sank off the Firth of Forth. The master and 26 crew members were picked up by HMS Weston (L 84) … and landed at Rosyth.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Major ship movement – Battleship RODNEY and battlecruiser HOOD with destroyers FAULKNOR, HARDY, FORTUNE, FORESIGHT, FIREDRAKE and FEARLESS arrived at Greenock.
 
Rendezvous at sea – Destroyers KHARTOUM and KINGSTON rendezvoused at sea with armed merchant cruiser CIRCASSIA.
 
Return from patrol – Polish submarine ORZEL arrived at Rosyth from patrol.
 
Diving trials – Submarine TETRARCH conducted diving trials with destroyer FAME.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers IVANHOE, GALLANT and GRIFFIN were submarine hunting.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer INTREPID arrived at Invergordon.
 
Destroyer FURY and FOXHOUND arrived at Greenock.
 
Minelayer TEVIOTBANK and destroyer BOREAS and BRAZEN departed the Humber for Rosyth.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers JACKAL and WALLACE and sloop WESTON were submarine hunting in the Firth of Forth.
 
A German submarine attacked Norwegian steamer BRITTA (6214grt) 100 miles south of Queenstown. Destroyer ACASTA was dispatched to assist, and after being joined by destroyers WAKEFUL and VESPER carried out a search off Cape Clear in 51‑07N, 09‑39W. Attacks were made on a submarine contact and they were joined by destroyer VOLUNTEER on the 25th, but the search was unsuccessful.
[Ed. note: At «uboat.net» two ships named Britta are listed as being attacked and sunk during the war. One is a Norwegian vessel of that name and tonnage, but she was a tanker and was sunk on 6 Dec 1939. The second is a Danish ship of 1146 tons, sunk on 25 March 1940 in the general vicinity of the search area described as “off Cape Clear”. Oddly, both these ships are listed as being sunk by U-47.]
Quote:
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.14 had departed Bergen escorted by destroyers ESCAPADE, ECLIPSE, ESCORT, ELECTRA and submarine NARWHAL, and was reinforced by destroyers INGLEFIELD and IMOGEN at 0700/24th. Still on the 24th, U.63 (O/L Guenther Lorentz), which left Wilhelmshaven on the 17th on her first patrol, attacked the convoy and sank Swedish steamer SANTOS (3840grt) in 59‑17N, 00‑42W. Thirty one crew were lost, and the fourteen survivors (12 from SANTOS and two from steamer LIANA) were later picked up by destroyer GALLANT and landed at Invergordon on the 25th.
 
[Ed.: the remainder of this entry is citing events of 25 Fab.] At 0752/25th, NARWHAL sighted U.63 on the surface near the convoy in 58-35N, 1-05NW and signalled ESCAPADE, after which ESCORT, INGLEFIELD and IMOGEN sank her SE of the Orkneys in 58‑40N, 00‑42W. One crewman was missing, but three officers and twenty one ratings were picked up by INGLEFIELD and IMOGEN which arrived at Leith with them on the 27th. The east coast section of the convoy arrived on the 26th, escorted solely by NARWHAL, while ELECTRA and ECLIPSE escorted the five ships of the west coast section, the two destroyers reaching Scapa on the 25th. The destroyers of HN.14 had all detached for refuelling prior to its arrival.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.103 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop EGRET. The convoy was delayed by fog and anchored shortly after departure in Knock Deep, but reached the Tyne on the 28th.
 
Convoy MT.17 departed Methil and arrived later that day.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Light cruiser EDINBURGH attacked a submarine contact ESE of Muckle Flugga in 60-34N, 1-04W.
 
Anti-submarine trawler LOCH TULLA (423grt) attacked a submarine contact south of Hoxa Gate in 58-49N, 3-05W.
 
Anti-submarine trawler COVENTRY CITY (546grt) attacked a submarine contact in Pentland Firth in 58-45-30W, 3-01-30W.
 
Anti-submarine trawler ARSENAL (389grt) attacked a submarine contact off the Smalls in 51-47-30N, 5-49W.
 
Ship repair – Destroyer BOADICEA was withdrawn from patrol for repairs to her port propeller shaft.
 …
German blockade – Swedish steamer BOHUS (1761grt) was taken in prize by German warships in the North Sea, and renamed GERRIT FRITZEN for German service.
 
French blockade – Finnish steamer RIGEL (3779grt) was brought into the Downs by a French destroyer for examination.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers DIAMOND, DECOY, DEFENDER arrived at Freetown.
 
French naval activity – French submarines MARSOUIN, NARVAL and REQUIN of the 11th Submarine Division departed Oran on the 23rd for Casablanca, and passed Gibraltar on the 24th, escorted by torpedo boat POURSIVANTE.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/24/2018 5:20:08 PM
24 Feb 1940

Germany


Lieutenant General Falkenhorst is ordered to submit his final invasion plan of Norway by 1700 hours on the same day. Having no clue he was to be assigned this commanding role prior to the meeting and given little time to prepare, Falkenhorst purchases a traveler's guide to Norway and uses it to design a general invasion plan; the general plan he would devise in his hotel room, in the Hotel Continental, in the next few hours would generally agree with the plan the OKW had come up with thus far.

Hitler gives approval to detailed plans for the invasion of France and the Low Countries.

British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain condemned Hitler's aggression but said that he was prepared to negotiate with an alternative German government.

---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/25/2018 3:47:31 PM
Feb 25. Day 178
Sunday.

Finland
Not notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
X told me a fantastic story today. He claims a plan is afoot to hid S.S. shock troops in the bottom of a lot of freighters, have them put in a ports in Scandinavia, Belgium, and Africa, and seize the places. I don’t get the point. Even if they got into the ports, which is doubtful, how could the hold them? I suspect this story is a plan and that the Nazis would like us to put it out as part of their nerve war. I shan’t.
(Berlin Diary, p 107)

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.
Quote:
…liner DUCHESS OF BEDFORD (20,123grt, carrying the first Squadron of RCAF to England) … arrived at Liverpool on the 25th.
(«naval-history.net»)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-52) sailing from Helgoland; 3 boats (U-22, -23 and -57) return from patrol after 18, 17 and 18 days respectively. 11 U-boats at sea. One U-boat (U-63) reported lost this date.
U-63, a type IIC boat, sunk while attacking a convoy. Complement=25; lost=1.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16. No ships lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
Sunk … in the North Sea south of the Shetland Islands, in position 58.40N, 00.10W, by depth charges from the British destroyers HMS Escort, HMS Inglefield and HMS Imogen after being sighted by the British submarine HMS Narwhal. 1 dead and 24 survivors.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser BERWICK departed Scapa Flow for Greenock.

Light cruisers EDINBURGH and ARETHUSA arrived at Rosyth.
 …
Flag assignment – Vice Admiral CS 1 hoisted his flag on heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE at sunset.
 
Equipment repair – Destroyers KASHMIR with a defective asdic installation and KANDAHAR arrived at Scapa Flow.
 …
Damage – Destroyer VESPER reported her anti-submarine dome leaking, and returned to Plymouth for repairs.

Destroyer KHARTOUM sustained weather damage to her hull and was capable of only twelve knots.

Escort duties – Destroyer FORESTER departed the Clyde on the 23rd and rendezvoused the same day with destroyer MOHAWK which was escorting tanker IMPERIAL TRANSPORT (8022grt. They met light cruiser ORION (carrying the ashes of the Governor General of Canada) and liner DUCHESS OF BEDFORD (20,123grt, carrying the first Squadron of RCAF to England) in the Western Approaches and arrived at Liverpool on the 25th.
[Ed. note: Lord Tweedsmuir was Canada’s Governor-General from 2 Nov 1935 until his death on 11 Feb 1940.]
Quote:
Refit – Sloop WESTON departed Rosyth for Tees to refit, and arrived on the 26th.

U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.95G departed Southend on the 20th and OB.95G Liverpool on the 21st, with thirty four ships, and merged as OG.19 on the 25th. No escorts are listed for either convoy at this stage, but when it arrived at Gibraltar on the 29th, it was accompanied by destroyer DOUGLAS, French destroyer CHACAL and French patrol vessel CAPITAINE ARMANDE, which joined on the 23rd, and armed boarding vessel ROSAURA.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.105 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY, and arrived at Southend on the 27th.
 
Convoy TM.14 departed the Tyne escorted by anti-submarine trawlers and destroyer JANUS.
 
[Anti-U-boat activity – Sloop FOWEY, escorting a outward bound convoy, attacked a submarine contact off Wolf Rock in 49-43N, 5-38W.
 
Anti-submarine yacht RHODORA (709grt), on patrol off Helwick Light Vessel, was ordered to search for a U-boat sighted off Caldy Island, and attacked a contact south of Caldy Island in 51-29N, 4-39W.
 
Mercantile loss – Steamer CASTLEMOOR (6574grt) in convoy HX.20 foundered in the Atlantic with the loss of forty two crew.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.20 departed Gibraltar with 39 ships on the 25th, [with various escorts during the journey.] Convoy arrived Liverpool on 6 March … .
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/26/2018 5:10:51 PM
Feb 26. Day 179
Monday. Waning gibbous moon.

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
In view of the attack on the Altmark [Ed.: on 16 Feb], Hitler sees Norwegian neutrality as too unreliable. Preparations for Operation Weserübung against Norway and Denmark are therefore accelerated and the Führer signs the first Directive to get it under way. Germany is interested in Norwegian iron ore as well as the strategic position of the two Scandinavian countries
(2194 Days, p 44)[Ed. note: this may be a misplaced entry in 2194 Days, belonging on or near 16 Feb, the day of the Altmark incident.]

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from entries in BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Three U-boats (U-23, -32, -38) leaving Wilhelmshaven on patrol; two boats (U-48, -19) returning to Kiel after 34 and 13 days respectively. 12 U-boats at sea («uboat.net» lists 11 at sea, but omitted U-23, which sailed this date). U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

No ships sunk by torpedo or from mines on this date. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
RN ship’s damage on convoy duty – Destroyer IMPERIAL with convoy ON.15 was in a collision at 0250 with Swedish steamer NORDIA (1316grt) 70 miles WSW of Feistenen in 61-12N, 03-08E. The steamer sank with the loss of two crew, and IMPERIAL, covered by anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA, proceeded to Lerwick for emergency repairs, arriving on the 27th. She left on the 29th to join convoy HN.15 for passage to Rosyth. From Methil, she proceeded on 3 March in convoy MT.22 to the Tyne, where she arrived on the 5th. She did not return to service until 12 April.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers INGLEFIELD, GRIFFIN, GURKHA, TARTAR, INTREPID and IVANHOE were sweeping in Moray Firth when GRIFFIN made a contact in 58‑10N, 02‑22W. INGLEFIELD, GRIFFIN, GURKHA attacked what later turned out to be a wreck. GURKHA and TARTAR then proceeded to Rosyth arriving on the 27th.
… 
Destroyer ESCORT attacked a submarine contact in 58-08N, 2-30W. Again, this was later found to be a wreck.

Ship movement – Destroyers KANDAHAR, KELVIN and KIMBERLEY departed Scapa Flow for the Clyde, arriving on the 27th.
 
Destroyers ECLIPSE, ELECTRA, KHARTOUM and KINGSTON arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Refitting – Destroyer BASILISK departed Dover at 0700 for refitting at Chatham.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine STERLET was exercising off Harwich with sloop MALLARD.
 
Submarine TRIAD arrived at Rosyth from patrol.
 
Submarine SNAPPER departed Harwich on patrol.
 
Submarine UNITY arrived at Harwich from Portsmouth.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy SA.31 of two steamers departed Southampton escorted by sloop FOXGLOVE, and arrived at Brest on the 28th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.18 departed Methil, escorted by sloop FLAMINGO and destroyers WALLACE and JACKAL, and arrived later in the afternoon. JACKAL then joined convoy TM.15, escorted by the 3rd Anti-Submarine Group.

Convoy FS.106 departed the Tyne at 2130 escorted by sloop FLAMINGO and destroyer WALLACE with destroyer JUNO covering. They were to have escorted an MT convoy which was cancelled, and before leaving with FS.106 spent the day covering convoys TM.14 and MT.18. Convoy FS.106 arrived at Southend on the 28th.
 
Outbound convoy – Convoy OB.99 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WALKER and WINCHELSEA until the 29th, and then dispersed next day on 1 March.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Sloop SCARBOROUGH, on escort duty, attacked a submarine contact SW of the Scilly Isles in 49-36N, 6-47W.
 
RNAS loss – A British Gladiator of 770 Squadron from aircraft carrier ARGUS crashed into the sea at Hyeres. Midshipman (A) R W Kearsley was rescued.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.23 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT until 1710/27th, when they turned the convoy over to ocean escort, armed merchant cruiser AUSONIA. She detached on 9 March. Before then, on the 28th, destroyer HEREWARD departed Halifax, overtook the convoy and arrived at Plymouth before going on to Portsmouth on 11 March for refitting which completed on 12 April. HX.23 arrived at Liverpool on 12 March.
 
German merchant losses – German steamer ORIZABA (4354grt) of the Vigo group ran aground off Skjervoy near Hammerfest on the north coast of Norway in 70‑04N, 20‑59E and was lost. Survivors were rescued by Finnish steamer MARGARETA (2155grt).
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/27/2018 5:51:28 PM
Feb 27. Day 180
Tuesday.

Finland
Quote:
Towards evening General Mannerheim orders his army to evacuate the second defensive line.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
Marvin [Ed.: Mary Marvin Breckenridge, a fellow CBS journalist] has been digging out some interesting side-lights on life in war-time Germany. She visited one of the nine Nazi Brides’ Schools where the wives or prospective wives of S.S. men are taught how to be good Hausfrauen and fruitful producers of cannon-fodder for the next war. …
[Ed.: Shirer adds in a footnote a quotation from a Himmler decree of 28 Oct 1939.]”Beyond the borders of perhaps necessary bourgeois laws, customs, and views, it will now be the great task, even outside the marriage bond, for German women and girls of good blood, not in frivolity but in deep moral earnestness, to become mothers of the children of soldiers going off to war … .” (Italics mine.) …
Although the quota of Germans allowed entrance into America annually is 27,000, Marvin found a waiting-list of 248,000 names at the American consulate. Ninety-eight per cent were Jews – or about half the Jewish population left in Germany.
(Berlin Diary, pp 291-2)

Britain
Quote:
Churchill claimed (erroneously) that the Allies had sunk half of Germany’s U-boat fleet.
(Goralski, p 107)
[Ed. note: Churchill was at this time First Lord of the Admiralty, and so was speaking of his own political responsibility.

The best numbers I can find suggest that at the beginning of the war there were 57 U-boats available, but that only 26 of these were ocean-going boats. The remainder were designed for operation in coastal waters. A few boats had been launched, worked up and commissioned since the outbreak of war, but this was still a time of building a U-boat fleet. In addition, 16 boats had been lost.

I do not know how accurately the RN assessed U-boat numbers or RN claims of U-boat losses. I don’t know exactly which numbers WSC might be working from. Depending on variables such as these, RN activities could have accounted for as low as 30 or as high as 60 per cent of U-boats tallied.

Admiral Karl Dönitz had called for 300 boats by the outbreak of war, assuming 100 would be in training or under repairs, 100 in transit to or from patrol areas, and 100 on active patrol. He would finally reach 100 boats at sea on 8 Aug 1942, and would peak at 159 boats at sea on 29 April 1943.]

On the home front:
Quote:
Arnold [the mechanic in the Green family’s garage] announced he was going to join the ARP as he has been asked to. He says, ‘Her people have got free water-boots, tin had and lovely gas mask and I don’t see why I should not join if there’s something to be got out of it.
We have not had any bacon for about 3 weeks as the last we had bought was so salty and objectionable as well as so dear (2/2 per lb). Mother said she would not buy any more. We are not being very skimping with our sugar. As Jenny and I don’t talk it in tea the ration just about allows for the rest and then we have the hoard. Mother makes Arnold bring his sugar in a tine for his afternoon cup of tea, as he usually has 3 spoonfuls in his big cup. As for butter, we know some cows … !
(Muriel Green in Wartime Women, p 81)

Scandinavia
Quote:
Sweden and Norway refused Finland’s regrets for transit rights.
(Goralski, p 107)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Four U-boats leaving on patrol, three (U18, -20, -52) from Wilhelmshaven and one from Helgoland (U-52); two boats (U-37, -61) returning to Wilhelmshaven after 31 and 16 days respectively. 13 U-boats at sea by my count. «uboat.net» claims 11, but seem to be somewhat befuddled or confusing in their data. Note, e.g., that for this date they have one U-boat (U-52) leaving from both Helgoland and Wilhelmshaven; not that more ships have begun a patrol than returned from one, but that their U-boats at sea remains stagnant at 11.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

No ships sunk by torpedoes or to mining. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Gold shipment to Canada – Battleship MALAYA, and armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA departed Greenock with gold for Halifax, and left the Clyde escorted by destroyers FAULKNOR, FAME, FORESTER, FURY and MOHAWK.
 
Ship collision – Destroyer JACKAL sank Swedish steamer STORFOS (545grt) in an accidental collision 12.8 miles 126° from Longstone Light. JACKAL picked up the crew and escorted by destroyer JANUS, proceeded to the Tyne for repairs requiring three weeks. The steamer was determined to be at fault for the collision.
 
Ship movement – Sloop BLACK SWAN departed Portland for Rosyth.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser CORFU departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA departed the Clyde.
 
Ship collision – While liner ORION (23,456grt) was docking at London, she was in collision with destroyer GRENADE, which had just completed refit. GRENADE's sailing was postponed while the damage was assessed and she repaired at Harwich, completing on 3 April.
 
Ship maintenance – Destroyer KINGSTON reported her petrol compartment was leaking and she was only capable of sixteen knots.
 
Outbound convoy – Convoy OA.99 departed Southend escorted by destroyers WINDSOR and WOLVERINE, and dispersed on 1 March.
 
East Coast convoys – A TM convoy departed the Tyne for Methil escorted by the 3rd Anti-Submarine Group and destroyer JACKAL.
 
Convoy FN.104 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WESTMINSTER, WOLSEY and sloops BLACK SWAN and LONDONDERRY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 29th. Convoy FN.105 was cancelled.
 
Convoy FS.107 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS, sloop HASTINGS, and also destroyer JERVIS, joined FS.108 on the 29th and both arrived at Southend on 1 March.
 
Convoy MT.19 departed Methil, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop HASTINGS, and arrived in the Tyne later that day.
 
German aircraft activity – Trawler BEN ATTOW (156grt) was reportedly sunk by a mine seven miles east, one half mile south of May Island. Seekrieg lists her as bombed and sunk by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps). As He111's were carrying torpedoes during anti-shipping missions, a torpedo hit might have been mistaken for a mine explosion.
 
Tanker BRITISH GOVERNOR (6840grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) off the east coast, and then escorted into port by destroyer JANUS. 

Italian steamer MIRA (3165grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) two miles northeast of St Abb's Head.
 …
Anti-U-boat activity – Anti-submarine trawler LE TIGER (516grt) attacked a submarine contact off Fife Ness near North Carr Light Vessel in 56-19N, 2-32W, and was later relieved by sloop PELICAN.
 
Anti-submarine trawler RUBY (420grt) attacked a submarine contact in Liverpool Bay in 53-30N, 3-46W.
 
Norwegian steamer ANNFIN (729grt) reported ramming a submarine of unknown nationality outside Norwegian waters in the North Sea.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.98GF departed Southend escorted by destroyer WREN on the 24th, which was then relieved by sloop SANDWICH on the 26th, and OB.98GF departed Liverpool, also on the 24th escorted by destroyers VANOC and WHIRLWIND. The two merged on the 27th as OG.20F, escorts [varied, but convoy] arrived Gibraltar on 4 March with sloops SCARBOROUGH and WELLINGTON.

The two sloops temporarily joined the 13th Destroyer Flotilla to allow destroyers VELOX and VIDETTE to sail for the UK.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/28/2018 6:32:28 PM
Feb 28. Day 181
Wednesday.

Finland
Quote:
Finnish forces began pulling back from their positions around Viipuri.
(Goralski, p 107)
28-29 February
Quote:
Timoshenko’s troops overrun the second Finnish defensive line.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
Grmany warned Sweden not to aid Finland directly or indirectly.
(Goralski, p 107)

Britain
Home Front commentary:
Quote:
Afternoon went for a walk in the rain to look for parish magazine in next village church, but could not find any inside the church door as advised by H. Willcock for M-O. We decided as we walked there is so many mucky smells in our village, you never would smell a gas attack from some of the other odours in the country… .
(Muriel Green in Wartime Women, pp 81-2)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-561); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving port; 2 boats (U-18 and -23) return from patrol after 2 and 3 days respectively. By my reading, 12 U-boats at sea. «uboat.net» lists 11 at sea.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

No ships lost to torpedoes or U-boat mining. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Blockade failure – Submarine TRITON intercepted German steamer WANGONI (7848grt) at 2009 off Kristiansand, north of Hantsholm, but she escaped in the dark and reached Hamburg on 1 March.

U.K.-Norway inbound and outbound convoys – Convoy HN.15 with eight British, twenty nine Norwegian, one Swedish, two Finnish, two Danish ships departed Bergen escorted by destroyers COSSACK, DELIGHT, DIANA, SIKH, NUBIAN. Anti-air craft cruiser CALCUTTA provided anti-aircraft protection. On 29 February, the convoy split into east and west coast sections; the eight ships of the west coast ships were escorted by destroyers KHARTOUM and SIKH and the east coast section by the convoy destroyers, joined by damaged destroyer IMPERIAL. CALCUTTA arrived at Sullom Voe on 1 March. After escorting the west coast section, destroyers KHARTOUM and SIKH proceeded to the Clyde, arriving on 1 March, for boiler cleaning and gun mounting repairs, respectively. The convoy arrived without event at Methil on 1 March.
 
Convoy ON.16 departed Methil with six British, nineteen Norwegian, eleven Swedish, two Danish, three Finnish, two Estonian ships escorted by destroyers ESCAPADE, ESCORT, ENCOUNTER. Anti-submarine trawlers COVENTRY CITY (546grt) and LE TIGRE (516grt) escorting blockship CARRON (1017grt) when abreast of Pentland Skerries was detached from the convoy to Scapa Flow and arrived on 1 March. One other steamer was detached before the convoy crossed the North Sea. The convoy was joined by destroyers ELECTRA and ECLIPSE with six steamers from Kirkwall. (These six included in sailing numbers). Destroyer ELECTRA attacked a submarine contact south, southeast of Duncansby Head in 58-26N, 1-35W on the 29th. Destroyers GALLANT and GRIFFIN were sent to assist. Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departedSullom Voe on 1 March to provide anti-aircraft support. The convoy arrived at Bergen without further event on 2 March.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers KASHMIR and KINGSTON arrived at Greenock.
 
Northrn Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers TRANSYLVANIA and WOLFE departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine STERLET departed Harwich on patrol.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.106 departed Southend escorted by sloop GRIMSBY and destroyers WOOLSTON and JUNO. The convoy arrived at the Tyne on 1 March.
 
Convoy FS.108 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN. The convoy joined convoy FS.107 on the 29th and both arrived at Southend on 1 March.
 
Convoy MT.20 departed Methil, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN, sloop PELICAN, anti-submarine trawlers of the 3RD Anti-Submarine Group. The convoy arrived in the Tyne later that day.
 
VIP passage to France – Destroyer BEAGLE departed Dover at 1710 with the CIGS and arrived at Boulogne at 1840.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers KEITH and WAKEFUL searched unsuccessfully for a German submarine off St Govan Light Vessel.
 
Luftwaffe aerial threat re-armament – 21st Anti-Submarine Group, composed of anti-submarine trawlers LADY PHILOMENA, WOLVES, GRIMSBY TOWN, THURINGIA, BLACKBURN ROVERS were withdrawn from Dover patrol to be fitted with anti-aircraft protection at Hartlepool.
 
German minelaying – German minelayers ROLAND and COBRA, escorted by minesweepers M.5 and M.7, laid 238 mines in an anti-submarine mine barrier off the Ems Estuary.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoys – Convoy SL.22 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser DUNVEGAN CASTLE until 11 March. The convoy merged with convoy SLF.22 on 11 March and both convoys arrived at Liverpool on 15 March.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/1/2018 7:44:35 PM
Feb 29. Day 182
Thursday.

Finland
Not notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9).

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Three U-boats (U-46, -47, -49) sailing from Kiel, and two (U-17, -61) from Wilhelmshaven; two boats (U-13 and -60) return from patrol after 13 and an unrecorded number of days on patrol respectively. By my reading, U-boats at sea=15; «uboat.net» offers a reading of 12. No U-boats lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

One ship (a neutral) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=04211:
Maria Rosa, an Italian steam merchantman, in ballast from Marseilles to Hartlepool. Complement=30; lost=12.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 22.32 … the .. Maria Rosa … was hit on the port side between #1 and #2 holds by one G7e torpedo from U-20 while steaming on a non-evasive course at 5 knots about 10 miles east-southeast of Lowestoft. The ship had been missed with a first G7e torpedo at 21.45 hours and the Germans apparently failed to notice the illuminated neutrality markings in moderate visibility during both attacks. The explosion broke the ship in two with its bow raising and the aft part settling with a list to port. No distress signal could be sent as all power went out and the crew barely managed to launch two lifeboats in rough seas and strong wind before the forward part sank in less than two minutes. They were forced to leave several men behind who were trapped in the forecastle or the engine room and whose cries for help had been heard. The rest of the ship gradually sank with the stern lifting up until disappearing 20 minutes after being hit. Eleven crew members were lost. The master and six crew members were in the port lifeboat, while eleven crew members and a British pilot were in the starboard one. The boats then searched in vain for survivors at the sinking position and unsuccessfully tried to attract the attention of a northbound convoy by firing several blue flares. After using the last flare in another attempt to attract a northbound ship one hour later, the survivors huddled underneath the sails and waited until daylight to set sail for the nearby coast. Underway a small collier passed one of the lifeboats in a distance of only 600 meters without noticing the men waving with rags or blowing whistles. Both lifeboats eventually reached the shore between Thorpeness and Aldeburgh around noon on 1 March. Six crew members were taken to a hospital where one of them died of exposure. All survivors were later taken to London and repatriated to Genoa together with the survivors from Mirella on 14 March.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Aircraft carrier FURIOUS departed the Clyde on the 28th escorted by destroyers HARDY, FEARLESS, FIREDRAKE, KIMBERLEY. The aircraft carrier arrived at Plymouth at 0725/29th for refitting. In the Plymouth approaches on the 29th, FEARLESS was involved in a collision with a trawler. The damage was repaired at Plymouth completing on 10 March. On 2 March, battlecruiser REPULSE escorted by destroyers HARDY, HOSTILE, VIMY departed Plymouth for the Clyde where they arrived during the afternoon of 3 March. Destroyer VIMY immediately returned to Plymouth, via Liverpool. On 3 March, battlecruiser RENOWN with destroyers ACASTA, KIMBERLEY, FIREDRAKE departed Plymouth for the Clyde where they arrived at 1230 on 4 March. ACASTA immediately departed after refuelling for Plymouth, arriving on 5 March.
 
Decoy ships PAKEHA and WAIMANA departed Rosyth escorted by destroyers IMOGEN, INGLEFIELD, TARTAR, GURKHA for Scapa Flow, arriving on 1 March.
 
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Heavy cruiser YORK arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Refitting – Destroyer KELVIN was ordered to proceed to Birkenhead for refitting.
 
Ship damage – Escort vessel WOOLSTON, escorting convoy FN.106, was damaged in the Humber while docking with a merchant ship. Escort vessel WOOLSTON was repaired in the Humber, completing on 5 March.
 
Minelaying activity – Minelayer TEVIOTBANK with destroyers BRAZEN and BOREAS departed Immingham on the 24th for Invergordon where they arrived at 1500/26th. Minelayer TEVIOTBANK escorted by destroyers BOREAS and BRAZEN and minesweepers LEDA and NIGER departed Invergordon on minelaying operation PA 2 in Moray Firth. After the minelay, the ships proceeded to the Tyne. The ships arrived in the Tyne on 2 March and left later that dayin convoy FS.10 for passage to the Humber.
 
Ship movement – Sloop BLACK SWAN, escorted by destroyer WOLSEY, arrived at Rosyth.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Anti-submarine trawler CAPE PORTLAND (497grt) attacked a submarine contact off Dunnett Head in 58-42-45N, 3-18-28W.
 
Ships’ collision – Minesweeping trawler AMETHYST (627grt) was damaged in a collision with steamer BRAMWELL (1927grt). The Hailing Station and Tyne Boom Defense were also damaged in this collision. The trawler was repaired in fourteen days.
 
Outbound convoys Convoy OA.101 departed Southend escorted by sloop BIDEFORD and destroyer VETERAN, which were relieved on 1 March by destroyer VANESSA. Destroyer VANESSA was detached on 2 March and the convoy was dispersed the next day.
 
Convoy OB.101 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANQUISHER and VERSATILE. Both destroyers were detached on 3 March, when the convoy dispersed.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.107 departed Southend escorted by sloop FLAMINGO and destroyers WALLACE and JUPITER. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on 2 March. Convoy FN.108 was cancelled.
 
Convoy FS.109 departed the Tyne escorted by destroyer VEGA, sloop STORK, destroyer JUNO. The convoy arrived at Southend on 2 March.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.28 of steamers BARON CARNEGIE (Commodore), BATNA, KERMA, KUFRA, LOCHEE, PIZARRO departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS. The convoy arrived at Loire on 3 March.

Change of assignment – Australian light cruiser PERTH and light cruiser DIOMEDE departed Kingston, Jamaica, in company, for duty in the Pacific Ocean after being relieved in the Caribbean by light
cruisers DUNEDIN and DESPATCH. Cruiser PERTH departed the Caribbean on 2 March and passed through the Panama Canal on 3 March. She arrived at Sydney on 31 March.

Far East submarine patrols – Submarine PROTEUS departed Hong Kong at the end of February to patrol off the Soviet Far Eastern port of Vladivostok in the Pacific. The patrol ended in March after which no more were carried out.
 
German navy – German pocket battleships LÜTZOW (former DEUTSCHLAND) and ADMIRAL SCHEER were re-classified as heavy cruisers and the former warship type abandoned.
 
Cost of maintaining a fleet at sea – At the end of February, the following destroyers were all under repair – ACHERON at Portsmouth, AFRIDI at Hartlepool, ANTELOPE at Cowes, ARROW at Portsmouth, ARDENT at Plymouth, ASHANTI at Cowes, BEDOUIN at Wallsend, BROKE at Plymouth, CAMPBELL at Plymouth, CODRINGTON at Southampton, DUNCAN at Grangemouth, ECHO at Leith, ESKIMO at Southampton, FEARLESS at Plymouth, GARLAND at Malta, GLOWWORM at Hull, GREYHOUND at Hull, HASTY at Plymouth, HAVANT at Plymouth, HAVOCK at Chatham, HERO at Portsmouth, HUNTER at Falmouth, HYPERION at Portsmouth, ILEX at Rosyth, ISIS at Falmouth, JACKAL at Blyth, JERSEY at Hull, KEPPEL at Malta, KIPLING at Tyne, MALCOLM at Cardiff, MAORI at Clyde, MASHONA at Chatham, MATABELE at Plymouth, PUNJABI at Clyde, SABRE at Grangemouth, SALADIN at Plymouth, SOMALI at Middlesbrough, THRACIAN at Hong Kong, WARWICK at Liverpool, WESSEX at Milford Haven, WHITEHALL at Plymouth, WITHERINGTON at Liverpool, WOOLSTON at Rosyth, WREN at Plymouth, WRESTLER at Malta, ZULU at Leith and Polish GROM at Chatham.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3895

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/2/2018 9:27:17 AM
Thanks Bri!

Again, for all you do this pints for you!

[Read More]

Cheers,
MD

Keep "UP" the good work, keep "Downing" the beers!!!!
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/2/2018 6:36:34 PM
[Editor's comment: Since starting this thread last September, dates and weekdays have coincided. Because 1940 was a leap year, this no longer the case. I have chosen to maintain a focus on the weekday, so from now until 1 March 2020, starting today, my entry date will be one day behind the current calendar date, while the day of the week will remain the same. This may be no big deal. I'm curious for personal research reasons to see what events occur on which day of the week, and chose this option for that reason alone.
The alternative is for me to post two days' events on a single day, which would mean the dates of entry and presentation would be the same but the days of the week would not.?

March 1. Day 183
Friday. Last quarter moon.

Finland
Quote:
The Soviet ultimatum putting peace proposals to Finland expires.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
Hitler issued a formal directive to the German military for the invasion of Norway and Denmark.
(Goralski, p 107)
Quote:
Sumner Welles arrived this morning. He’s supposedly over here on a special mission from the President to sound out the European leaders on their respective standpoints. He saw Ribbentrop and State Secretary Weizäcker today and will see Hitler tomorrow. Much talk around town that the Nazis will pull a fast one on him and suggest a peace that sounds good. Possible; not probable.
Because the offensive seems imminent. Troop trains pouring through Berlin every day west-bound. Many men called up for active service in the last few days. All air-wardens have been warned to be ready for duty after March 15. One hears — you never know here — of big troop concentrations against Holland. From what I saw in the Netherlands, the Dutch will be easy pickings for the Germans. Their army is miserable. Their famous defensive water-line is of doubtful worth. Switzerland will be tougher to crack, and I doubt if the Germans will try. …
(Berlin Diary, pp 292-3)

Britain
No noted activity.

U.S.A.
Cited for an unspecified March date:
Quote:
The U.S. Congress, reluctant to authorize funds beyond “absolute defence needs, began pruning the military budget during the month, killing, among other things, $12 million for Alaskan defence and permitting the purchase of only 57 planes as replacements for the entire Air Corps.
(Goralski, p 107)
Quote:
The US Secretary of State, Sumner Welles, arrives in Berlin from Rome before going on to London and Paris. His government has instructed him to offer American mediation in the search for a basis of agreement between the belligerents. But the enterprise is doomed to failure, first because it is too late, and secondly because by now none of the combatants believes that peace is possible.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-118); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving port on patrol; 1 boat (U-61) enters Kiel after 2 days on patrol; 2 boats (U-26 and -46) return to Wilhelmshaven after 33 and 2 days respectively on patrol. My count shows 12 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 10 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

One neutral ship lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=5340.
Mirella, an Italian steam merchantman, carrying 6900 tons of coal from Tyne to Leghorn. Complement=30; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 03.15 hours … the Mirella was hit in the bow by one torpedo from U-20, but did not sink. The U-boat waited submerged during the daytime, returned to the abandoned ship in the evening and sunk her at 21.14 hours by a coup de grâce. The wreck in position 52°26´09N/02°05´02E was later dispersed.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser YORK departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol.
 
Norwegian waters – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK was on the WR station off North Cape to intercept German shipping.
 
Flag transfer – The flag of Cruiser Squadron 2 transferred to depot ship FORTH.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers FAULKNOR, FAME, FURY, FORESTER, MOHAWK arrived back in the Clyde after escorting battleship MALAYA and armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA.
 
Luftwaffe action – Destroyer JAGUAR departed the Humber for Rosyth. On the 2nd, she was attacked by German aircraft off Longstones, but was able to drive the attack off without damage to herself, and arrived at Rosyth on the 2nd.
 
Ship movement – After delivering Fleet Tenders A and B (decoy ships PAKEHA and WAIMANA) to Scapa Flow on the 1st, destroyer TARTAR departed Scapa Flow again that day.
 
Destroyer KANDAHAR arrived at the Clyde.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers FORTUNE and PUNJABI, returning to the Clyde after full calibre firings, investigated a submarine reported seven miles 254° from Ailsa Craig. Steamer CLAN MACNAUGHTON (6088grt) had reported sighting a periscope.

Submarine exercise – Submarine THISTLE departed Rosyth and performed exercises in the Firth of Forth.
 
Northern Patrol summary, early March – The Northern Patrol from 1 to 14 March sighted 52 eastbound merchant ships and sent into Kirkwall twelve for inspection. Four German merchant ships were encountered and all four scuttled themselves to avoid capture. Armed merchant cruisers ASTURIAS and SCOTSTOUN arrived at the Clyde from Northern Patrol. Armed merchant cruisers WOLFE and DERBYSHIRE departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol. Air escort from Aldergrove was supplied for DERBYSHIRE.
 …
Ship collisions – Sloop GRIMSBY was in a collision with Italian steamer EDERA (5254grt) while berthing in the Tyne, but sustained no damage.
 
Anti-submarine trawler ASTON VILLA (546grt) was damaged in a collision with RFA PETRONEL at Aberdeen.
 
Luftwaffe activity – Norwegian steamer VESTFOSS (1388grt) was bombed and sunk by aircraft of German KG26 (X Air Corps) twelve miles east by south of Copinsay, Orkney Islands. After an unsuccessful attempt to tow VESTFOSS, British steamer STAR OF LIBERTY (205grt) took off the 19 crew. Tug ST MELLONS had been dispatched, but was recalled. Part of the crew from VESTFOSS arrived at Oslo on the 6th. (Note: German X Air Corps flew He111's of KG26, Ju88's of KG30, and two reconnaissance squadrons flying He59's or Do17's.)
 
Norwegian steamer BROTT (1583grt) in convoy FS.109 was machine gunned and bombed by German aircraft off Whitby, and the crew abandoned ship. The steamer waited in Bridlington Bay for tugs. Destroyer JUNO, escort vessel VEGA and sloop STORK were escorting the convoy, one of the escorts picking up a lifeboat from BROTT.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.21 departed Methil for the Tyne. In convoy MT.20, Latvian steamers ELIZABETE (2039grt) was damaged by German bombers five miles east by south of Hartlepool Light Vessel and KATVALDIS (3208grt) off Scarborough, in 54-20N, 00-20W. KATVALDIS was struck by two bombs, one of which did not explode. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 2nd.
 
Ship grounding – Steamer DOMALA (8450grt) ran aground three cables east of Goodwin Knoll Buoy. Downs Guard Vessel GOODWIN, minesweeping trawler CALVI and a tug from Ramsgate stood by until she refloated herself without assistance at 1600.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar convoys – [O]utbound convoy OG.20 was formed from two convoys - (1) OA.100G, which departed Southend on 28 February, escorted by sloop BIDEFORD from 28 February to 2 March and destroyer WILD SWAN from 29 February to 3 March, and (2) OB.100G, which departed Liverpool escorted by by sloop LEITH from 1 to 3 March and destroyer VENETIA from 1 to 2 March, with 31 ships. Both Liverpool escorts were detached to convoy HG.20. French destroyer TIGRE and escort vessel VIKINGS joined the convoy from 2 to 7 March. Destroyer ACTIVE joined on the 6th, and the convoy arrived at Gibraltar on the 7th.
… 
[I]nbound convoy HG.21F departed Gibraltar with 36 ships. French destroyer CHACAL and auxiliary patrol vessel CAPITAINE ARMANDE escorted from 1 to 6 and 7 March, respectively. Destroyers WHIRLWIND from convoy OG.21F and WITCH escorted the convoy from 7 to 10 March, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer BULLDOG and Australian destroyer WATERHEN arrived at Gibraltar.
 
Change of station – Heavy cruiser SUSSEX departed Colombo 1 March to return to Home Waters. She reached Malta on the 10th, departed on the 12th, passed Gibraltar on the 14th, and arrived at Liverpool on the 17th. There she began a refit that continued until 18 May when she joined the 1st Cruiser Squadron operating with the Home Fleet.
 
USN activity – Steamer SOUTHGATE (4862grt) reported being under attack by a U-boat 150 miles northeast of San Juan in 19‑58N, 64‑00W. American destroyers of the 31st Destroyer Squadron, MACLEISH (DD.220, Flagship Commander Destroyer Squadron 31, Captain W.W. Bradley) and SATTERLEE (DD.190) and MASON (DD.191) of the 68th Destroyer Division were dispatched to assist. However, the submarine was not located and SOUTHGATE was not damaged. U.S. Coast Guard cutter UNALGA also searched in the area for the reported submarine. The U-boat, in reality, was one of the four French submarines based on Martinique.
 
German merchant scuttling – During the night of 29 February/1 March, light cruiser DESPATCH off Aruba in the Caribbean intercepted German steamer TROJA (2390grt) shortly after the German ship had put to sea. Rather than be captured, TROJA scuttled herself.
 
Ship transfer – Gunboats APHIS and LADYBIRD left Singapore escorted by light cruiser DAUNTLESS for Penang where they arrived on the 2nd. They departed on the 3rd, and arrived at the Nicobar Islands for refuelling. There, DAUNTLESS was relieved by Australian light cruiser HOBART which took them to Colombo. DAUNTLESS arrived back at Penang on the 8th. The gunboats departed Colombo on the 11th without an escort, and proceeded to Bombay, joined an RFA tanker and proceeded with her to Masirah. At Masirah, they refuelled from the tanker and carried on to Aden, arriving on the 27th, followed by calls at Port Sudan, Suez, Port Said. They arrived at Alexandria on 4 April.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.22 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser MOOLTAN until 12 March. On the 11th convoy SL.22 merged with convoy SLF.22. On the 12th, sloops BRIDGEWATER, ROCHESTER and destroyers AMAZON and VENETIA relieved the armed merchant cruiser. The convoys arrived on the 15th.
 
French navy at Singapore – French heavy cruiser SUFFREN arrived at Singapore for docking, and was undocked on the 7th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/3/2018 7:22:28 PM
March 2. Day 184
Saturday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
Quote:
Some Jews escaped from Lodz ghetto in Poland by hiding in coffins. May Berg, a fifteen-year-old girl living in the Warsaw ghetto, had heard about them. “The Jewish cemetery is outside the ghetto, and it is possible to carry dead persons there,” she wrote. “Thus some people had themselves boarded up in caskets, which were carried off with the usual funeral ceremonies; before reaching the cemetery they rose from their coffins and escaped to Warsaw.” One person died of heart failure, she said, while he was confined. It was March 2, 1940.
(Human Smoke, p 166)

Germany
No notable activity.

Allied nations
Quote:
France and Britain formally requested Swedish and Norwegian approval to send allied troops to Finland through the Scandinavian countries. (Units were to begin arriving by the 20th. Daladier was planning on a force of 50,000 French “volunteers” and 150 aircraft. Britain planned a force which would reach an eventual level of 100,000 men.) The request was rejected. Paris and London were primarily interested in occupying the Swedish iron or fields and denying their strategic output to Germany
(Goralski, p 107)

Britain
No noted activity, but some comments from the Home Front:
Quote:
… caught the 9 train to Cambridge [to attend a WEA meeting].[Ed. note: WEA is probably the Workers’ Education Association. Many such associations and programs existed at the time to receive education and training outside the university structure.] … We looked in every bookshop window we ran into to see if War Begins at Home was there, but regret we did not see it at all. Bought a copy of Peace News off an undergrad in the street, who was delighted to sell one. … We went back to the Art School [where the meeting they were attending was held] at five and looked to see what books were being sold in front. They included mostly Penguin books including The Press, … You and the Refugee, … Finland … and Britain, [the last] by M-O. …
(Muriel Green in Wartime Women, p 82)

France
Quote:
The French army information services reveal German preparations for an attack on Norway and Denmark. Sweden and Norway repeat their warning the Allied troops and war material may not cross their territory.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=1 (U-123); commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-13) leaves Wilhelmshaven on patrol; no boats enter any port from patrol. My count shows 13 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 10 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

Two neutral ships lost to U-boats, one to torpedoes and one to deck gunfire. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=3513.
Rijnstroom, a Dutch motor merchant of 695 tons, carrying general cargo from London to Amsterdam. Complement=12; lost=12.
Lagaholm, a Swedish motor merchant of 2818 tons, carrying 4700 tons of general cargo from Baltimore via New York, Kirkwall and Gothenburg to Malmö. Complement=28; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 21.59 hours … U-17 fired a torpedo at a ship reported as a full loaden tanker of estimated 9000 grt from a distance of 1200 metres. The ship was hit in the bow and sank within five minutes. This must have been the Rijnstroom, which had been reported missing after leaving The Downs on 2 March. Only a capsized lifeboat, some lifebuoys, deckplanks and part of the cargo were later found adrift. A Dutch ship also picked up an empty raft.
…At 07.15 hours … the neutral Lagaholm was ordered to stop by U-32 about 80 miles west of Kirkwall. The crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats after a shot across her bow, they were questioned by the Germans and given the course to the nearest land. At 08.10 hours, the ship was shelled with 40 rounds from the deck gun, caught fire and sank later in 59°42N/05°35W. The survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Belpamela and landed at Kirkwall and North Ronaldsay.
The Lagaholm and Belpamela had been ordered to Kirkwall by the British armed boarding vessels HMS Northern Sky (4.41) … and HMS Northern Princess (4.06) … for contraband inspection. U-32 had first attacked Belpamela with three torpedoes at 01.12, 02.12 and 04.56 hours, but all detonated prematurely. The commander experimented with the torpedo settings between the shots, but gave up after the third attack and decided to stop the other ship with gunfire.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movements – Destroyers KELLY and SIKH arrived at Greenock from Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyer KHARTOUM arrived at Greenock from Scapa Flow.

Protection for U.K.-Norway convoys – Battleship VALIANT, battlecruiser HOOD (Whitworth), and destroyers KELLY (D.5), SIKH and KANDAHAR departed Greenock at 1600, and destroyers FAULKNOR (D.8), FORESTER, FAME departed the Clyde to patrol and cover the progress of the ON/HN convoys at sea. At 1133/3rd off North Minch, FORESTER made a submarine contact in 58-27N, 5-46W and attacked it without result. FORESTER and FAME made further attacks at 1240, 1320, 1423, 1500 in the same area. FORESTER remained at the contact for 24 hours before rejoining the Whitworth force. At 2138/3rd, northwest of Foula Island in 61-06N, 03-58W, KELLY made a submarine contact, also attacking it without result. In a freshening gale, contact was lost and KELLY rejoined the Whitworth force.

 
Ship movement – Battlecruiser REPULSE … with destroyers HARDY, HOSTILE and VIMY departed Portsmouth for the Clyde. The ships arrived during the afternoon of 3 March and VIMY immediately returned to Plymouth, via Liverpool.
 
Single-ship outbound convoy – Liner QUEEN ELIZABETH (83,673grt) departed the Clyde at 0800 escorted by destroyers MOHAWK, PUNJABI, FORTUNE and FOXHOUND. As she was getting underway, MOHAWK was damaged in collision with steamer GARTBRATTAN (1811grt) off Greenock. However, this did not prevent her from joining the escort. Destroyer TARTAR was just arriving from Greenock in the Clyde for boiler cleaning when she received orders to join the outbound "convoy" - the lone QUEEN ELIZABETH. TARTAR relieved MOHAWK, which returned to the Clyde, TARTAR's commanding officer becoming the senior officer of the escort. The destroyers escorted the liner to 200 miles northwest of Rathlin Island before being detached. FOXHOUND and FORTUNE proceeded to Belfast to escort dummy aircraft carrier HERMES (decoy ship MAMARI) on the 3rd. All three left there on the 4th and arrived in the Clyde on the 5th. TARTAR and PUNJABI arrived back at the Clyde on the 4th. MOHAWK entered the Ailsa Shipyard at Troon on the 5th and was repairing until 19 March. QUEEN ELIZABETH arrived safely at New York on the 7th completing her maiden voyage.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser MANCHESTER departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol duties.

Armed merchant cruiser CARINTHIA arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Ship’s refitting – Light cruiser ENTERPRISE arrived at Portsmouth from Halifax convoy escort duty to refit completing on 11 April.
 
Anti-U-boat patrol – Destroyers FURY and KINGSTON proceeded to patrol off Pladda Island in case a U-boat sighted in 55-48N, 6-45W at 1300 was en route to mine the Clyde. The patrol was terminated at 1000/3rd.
 
Ship transfer – Light cruiser GALATEA departed Portsmouth to join the Home Fleet at Scapa Flow, and arrived on the 4th.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.102 departed Southend, and escorted by destroyer CAMPBELL, which accompanied the convoy on 3 and 4 March. On the 5th, the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.102 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WALPOLE and VANOC, until they detached on the 5th to HX.22. The convoy dispersed on the 6th.
 
East coast convoys – Convoy FN.109 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers VALOROUS, JERVIS and sloop HASTINGS, and arrived in the Tyne on the 4th.
 
Convoy FS.110 departed the Tyne escorted by destroyers WHITLEY, BOREAS and sloop EGRET. Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA travelled in the convoy, which arrived at Southend on the 4th.
 
German merchant scuttling – German steamer WOLFSBURG (6201grt) had departed Pernambuco on 5 February. Disguised as Norwegian AUST, she scuttled herself north of Iceland in 67‑20N, 22‑50W when intercepted by heavy cruiser BERWICK on Northern Patrol. BERWICK picked up the German crew of 11 officers and 43 men and sank the steamer with gunfire.
 
Cable mending – Cable ship ROYAL SCOT with destroyers BRAZEN and WOLSEY was involved in mending cables in Largo Bay.
 
Submarine movement – Submarine TRIAD undocked at Rosyth.
 
Ship maintenance – Destroyer BEAGLE went alongside destroyer depot ship SANDHURST in the Submarine Basin at Dover for boiler cleaning and degaussing, returning to service on the 7th.
 
Destroyer KEITH arrived at Dover from Sheerness after repairs.
 
French anti-U-boat patrol – After a report of a German submarine off the Dutch coast, two French destroyers departed Dunkirk that evening to sweep up the Belgian and Dutch coast during the night.
 …
Lost to mines – Steamer ALBANO (1176grt) was sunk on a mine 7.6 miles 128.5° from Coquet Light, midway between Blyth and North Sunderland; nine crew were lost. The survivors were picked up by escort vessel WALLACE and armed patrol trawler STELLA CARINO (440grt).
 …
Luftwaffe activity – Dutch steamer ELZIENA (176grt) was bombed and sunk by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) five miles east of Coquet Island; two crew were killed. The survivors were picked up. (Sources show the rescue ship as Danish ZINE or Dutch SINE, but neither appear in LLOYDS).
 
At 0500, steamer DOMALA (8441grt) was bombed and set on fire by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) 24 miles east of St Catherine's Point, I.O.W, between St Catherine's Point and the Owers. Dutch steamer JONGE WILLEM (1632grt) assisted and was machine gunned and bombed, also by He111's of German KG26. Four to five bombs were dropped, but no damage was done. At 1245, destroyers VISCOUNT, which was en route to pick up convoy OA.102, VENOMOUS and tug STALWART were standing by. Destroyer ANTHONY arrived from Portsmouth shortly after to assist in driving off further air attacks. Soon destroyer ACHATES, tug REVUE and anti-submarine trawler KINGSTON AGATE (464grt) arrived. VISCOUNT picked up 120 survivors, but sustained some damage to her hull while alongside. JONGE WILLEM picked up 51 crew and three dead from lifeboats and took them to Newhaven.
 
U.K.-France inbound convoy – Convoy BC.27 of steamers BALTRAFFIC, BARON GRAHAM, BOTHNIA, BRITISH COAST and MARSLEW (Commodore) departed Loire escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS, and arrived safely in the Bristol Channel on the 4th.
 
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.16 six British, eighteen Norwegian, two Finnish and two Danish ships departed Bergen escorted by destroyers ESCAPADE, ENCOUNTER, ELECTRA and ESCORT. When the convoy split into sections, destroyers INGLEFIELD and IMOGEN took over the seven ships of the west coast section. Convoy HN.16 and ELECTRA, ESCAPADE, ENCOUNTER, ESCORT and ECLIPSE arrived safely at Methil on the 5th. INGLEFIELD and IMOGEN arrived in the Clyde at 0630/6th after dispersing the west bound section of HN.16 at Cape Wrath.
 
Lost by grounding – Rescue tug FAIRPLAY II (282grt, Temporary Lt H L Forster RNR) was wrecked on the Yorkshire coast.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.24 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY, SKEENA and ST LAURENT, the latter returning to Halifax after dark. SAGUENAY and SKEENA turned over the convoy to battleship REVENGE on the 3rd, and they arrived back at Halifax mid-morning on the 4th. REVENGE detached on the 11th. Destroyers VERSATILE, WAKEFUL, WALPOLE and WOLVERINE escorted the convoy from the 14th to 17th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
German merchant losses – Light cruiser DUNEDIN intercepted German merchant ship HEIDELBERG (6530grt) 60 miles WSW of the Windward Passage in the Caribbean. She had departed Aruba the day before with German steamer TROJA, which had also scuttled herself to avoid capture.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/4/2018 5:08:13 PM
March 3. Day 185
Sunday.

Finland
Quote:
General Timoshenko launches a massive offensive in Karelia.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
Welles left tonight, his lips sealed to the last. Those of the Wilhelmstrasse were not, however. They gave the American correspondents front-page copy. They told us Hitler had made it plain to Welles:
1. That there is no chance for an immediate, negotiated peace. The war must be fought out to the bitter end. Germany is confident of winning it.
2. That Germany must be given a free hand in what she considers her Lebensraum in eastern Europe. She will never consent to restore Czechoslovakia, Poland, or Austria.
3. A condition of any peace must be the breaking of Britain’s control of the seas, including not only her naval disarmament but the abandonment of her great naval bases at Gibraltar, Malta, and Singapore.
… My spies report Hitler is in a confident mood these days and thinks he can win the war outright and quickly.
(Human Smoke, p 166)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-7, -14) leave Wilhelmshaven on patrol; one boat (U-13) returns to harbour at Kiel, having sailed from Wilhelmshaven on 2 March. My count shows 14 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 12 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

One ship lost to U-boats, to mines laid by U-boat. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=710.
Cato, a British steam merchantman of 710 tons, carrying400 tons of general cargo from Dublin to Bristol. Complement=15; lost=13.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
On 3 March 1940 the unescorted and unarmed Cato … struck a mine laid on 2 March by U-29 and sank 2.5 miles west of Nash Point in the Bristol Channel. The master and twelve crew members were lost. Two crew members were picked up by HMS Akita (FY 610) … .
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
German merchant blockade loss – The last German ship of the February Vigo group, steamer ARUCAS (3359grt), scuttled herself in 63‑20N, 14‑15W when she was intercepted by heavy cruiser YORK in 63‑08N, 14‑42W. The crew was rescued, but three died. YORK arrived at Kirkwall to land the 39 survivors on the 10th.
 
Minelaying – Minelayer TEVIOTBANK and destroyers ESK, EXPRESS, ICARUS and IMPULSIVE of the 20th Destroyer Flotilla laid mines in Operation IE-1 in the channels through the German mine fields in the Heligoland Bight. The ships arrived back in the Humber on the 3rd. Operation IE 2 was postponed.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.17 of three British, sixteen Norwegian, twelve Swedish, five Danish, two Finnish and two Estonian ships departed Methil at 1700 escorted by destroyers NUBIAN, DELIGHT (SO), DIANA, ILEX and GURKHA, with anti-aircraft support provided by anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA. Destroyer COSSACK was assigned to the convoy, but was held back as unseaworthy for repairs to leaking seams. GURKHA arrived at Scapa Flow from Rosyth on the 2nd as her replacement. On the 4th abreast of Scapa Flow, DIANA and submarine NARWHAL escorting fleet auxiliary GREENAWN (784grt) were detached, with DIANA and GREENAWN arriving at Scapa Flow on the 5th and NARWHAL on the 6th after being delayed by gales. Light cruisers EDINBURGH and ARETHUSA, which departed Rosyth on the 3rd, gave this convoy, as well as ON.17 A and HN.17, close support. ON.17 arrived at Bergen on the 7th without event.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.22 departed Methil, escorted by trawlers of the 1st Anti-submarine Group and sloops BLACK SWAN and GRIMSBY. Destroyer IMPERIAL travelled in the convoy en route to the Tyne for repairs. The convoy arrived in the Tyne later that day.
 
Convoy FN.110 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloops PELICAN and FLEETWOOD, as far as the Tyne, and arrived in the Tyne on the 5th. Destroyer JAVELIN carried on to Methil.
 
Convoy FS.111 departed the Tyne escorted by sloops BLACK SWAN, GRIMSBY and destroyer JERVIS, and arrived at Southend on the 5th.
 
Ship operations – Destroyers BRAZEN and WOLSEY with cable ship ROYAL SCOT departed Rosyth for operations east of May Island. ROYAL SCOT then proceeded to Leith and BRAZEN to Rosyth, arriving on the 5th.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser CIRCASSIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Armed merchant cruiser MALOJA departed Liverpool for the Clyde.
 
Ship movement – Battlecruiser RENOWN departed Plymouth for the Clyde escorted by destroyers ACASTA, KIMBERLEY and FIREDRAKE. Air support was provided from the morning of the 4th. The ships arrived in the Clyde at 1230/4th, and ACASTA, after refuelling, returned to Plymouth.
 
Ship repairs – Destroyers KHARTOUM and KINGSTON departed Greenock for repairs to weather damage to their hulls and refitting at Falmouth. During the evening of the 4th at 1903, WSW of Trevose Head in 50-31.21N, 5-24.4W, they attacked a submarine contact, assessed later as probably a wreck. After searching for another U-boat reported late on the 4th, KHARTOUM and KINGSTON arrived at Falmouth.
 
Escort duty – Destroyers JERVIS, JUNO and JUPITER arrived at Rosyth for escort duty with convoy ON.17 A.
 
Submarine patrol end – Submarine URSULA arrived at Blyth after patrol.
 
Submarine TRUANT arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
RNAS crash – Lt B E H Stranack, Lt (A) J D Stern and Naval Airman J W White of 816 Squadron were killed at Campbeltown when their Swordfish landed and collided with two stationary aircraft, a total of five aircraft being destroyed.
 
U-boat minelaying activity – U.29 laid mines off Newport. …[Ed. note: «uboat.net» does not mention U-29’s minelaying activity, but does note the loss of Cato, a small British ship, to this mine field.]
 
French naval activity – French light cruiser LA GALISSONIERE, escorted by destroyers RAILLEUSE and FORBIN, departed Oran. The destroyers were detached on the 6th at Gibraltar and the cruiser proceeded to Brest. RAILLEUSE and FORBIN then joined light cruiser PRIMAGUET, arriving from Brest, and escorted her to Toulon, which they reached on the 8th.
 
Ship movement, Far East waters – Light cruiser DAUNTLESS departed Singapore.
 
Light cruiser DURBAN arrived at Penang.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/5/2018 5:14:54 PM
March 4. Day 186
Monday.

Finland
Quote:
Russian armoured troops attack the city of Viipuri (now Vyborg, in the USSR), the most important strategic point in Karelia and indeed in southern Finland. The operation is favoured by hick ice covering the waters of the Gulf of Finland.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
No notable activity, but a good incidental description of getting from place to place in wartime conditions. Shirer is describing his daily routine to air his broadcast:
Quote:
The daily broadcast at six forty-five p.m., New York time, means our talking from here at a quarter to one on the following morning. If I could get gasoline for my car I could drive to the studio in twelve minutes. As it is, I have a ten-minute walk down the completely blacked-out Wilhelmstrasse to the subway. It is a rare night that I do not collide with a lamp-post, a fire-hydrant, or a a projecting stairway, or flop headlong into a pile of snow. Safely in the subway, I have a half-hour’s ride to the Rundfunk House. As half of the route is above ground, the train is plunged in darkness for fifteen minutes. My pockets are stuffed full of passes. If I cannot find the right one I must wait in the vestibule on arriving at the station and fill out a paper permitting me to enter. Finally arrived, I go to an office and write my script. Two offices down I can hear Lord Haw-Haw attacking his typewriter with gusto or shouting in his nasal voice against “that plutocrat Chamberlain.”
(Berlin Diary, p 294)

Allied nations
Quote:
France and Britain formally requested Swedish and Norwegian approval to send allied troops to Finland through the Scandinavian countries. (Units were to begin arriving by the 20th. Daladier was planning on a force of 50,000 French “volunteers” and 150 aircraft. Britain planned a force which would reach an eventual level of 100,000 men.) The request was rejected. Paris and London were primarily interested in occupying the Swedish iron or fields and denying their strategic output to Germany
(Goralski, p 107)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)[Ed. note: though this entry has been static for some days, the front is not totally silent. Nor has it been from the beginning of the war. French and German troops are nose to nose, but no main offensive has yet been undertaken.]

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-351); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-56) leaves Wilhelmshaven on patrol and one boat (U-20) enters Wilhelmshaven after 7 days on patrol; one boat (U-50) enters Kiel after 28 days on patrol. My count shows 13 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 10 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

Two British ships lost to U-boats, by torpedo. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=9789..
Thurston, a British steam merchant of 3072 tons, carrying 4500 tons of manganese ore from Takoradi via Dakar to Workington, Cumberland. Total aboard=68 (37 complement + 31 survivors from S.N.A. 1); total lost=64 (34 complement + 30 from S.N.A. 1).
Pacific Reliance, a British motor merchant of 6717 tons, carrying general cargo from London via Liverpool to Manchester. Complement=53; lost=0
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 05.23 hours … the unescorted Thurston … was hit in the stern by one torpedo from U-29 and sank within one minute 32 miles west by north of Trevose Head. The master and 33 crew members were lost. Three crew members were picked up by the British steam merchant Moyle and landed at Cardiff.
Shortly after midnight on 4 March, the French steam merchant S.N.A. 1(2679 grt), en route from Ardrossan to Rouen, collided with Thurston about 60 miles south of Milford Haven and sank in 50°33N/05°47W. 31 crew members were rescued by Thurston, but only two men survived the second sinking by rescuing themselves into an overturned lifeboat. They rightened it, but one of the men died of exposure before a fishing trawler found the last survivor after about 11 hours and brought him to a hospital where he had to stay for a week.
… At 11.00 hours on … U-29 sighted three ships from the recently dispersed convoy OA-102 in very fine weather north of Land’s End and carefully approached the Pacific Reliance … and the San Florentino … sailing close together for a submerged daylight attack, firing one G7e torpedo at each of them at 12.08 and 12.09 hours. The first torpedo already detonated after 25 seconds and the U-boat was badly shaken by the explosion, while only a small detonation was heard from the second torpedo after 75 seconds. The Germans assumed that the first torpedo had hit the freighter, which was observed to stop with the crew preparing to launch the lifeboats but then continued slowly with a fire visible aboard.
In fact, the first torpedo detonated prematurely about half a cable from the starboard beam of San Florentino without damaging her and it was the second torpedo that struck Pacific Reliance on the starboard side abreast her funnel while steaming on a zigzag course at 11 knots. The ship was armed with one 4in gun and had convoy commodore (Capt Richard Percy Galer, RD, RNR) and four naval staff members aboard. The torpedo with a magnetic fuze actually detonated underneath the ship, lifting it up and throwing a huge column of water in the air that came down over the starboard lifeboats and amidships. The starboard engine collapsed from the bottom and the ship immediately took a starboard list of 15° after water entered the holds through the wrecked engine room bulkhead. Cracks in the hull became visible on both sides and the master ordered the crew to get the lifeboats ready after he managed to snap the whistle lanyard as it blew an awful din. To make things worse the cargo of cotton had caught fire and a terrific amount of smoke was seen to come out of #4 hold, the flames soon reaching the cargo of solvens on the fore deck. Most crew members abandoned ship in all four lifeboats after the wireless operator unsuccessful tried to send distress signals, but the last man to leave was the commodore who saw after the boats first, then went down through all the mess and lower deck in darkness to make sure that everyone left, got some clothes as he was only partly dressed and even recovered a code book left behind in the wireless cabin. Meanwhile four men had rescued themselves by climbing aboard a hatch cover floating nearby, but the lookouts aboard the fleeing San Florentino somehow mistook it for a U-boat and fired two rounds from the stern gun. Luckily the shots fired from a distance of about one mile missed and the men were eventually picked up by one of the lifeboats. The distress signal sent by the tanker was heard by the xB-Dienst (radio intelligence service) that wrongly credited U-29 with sinking this ship.
Because the burning Pacific Reliance only settled slowly, the U-boat moved to her port side and fired a third G7e torpedo from the stern torpedo tube at 12.39 hours, but no detonation was heard. However, the ship was then seen to sag in the middle with the bow and stern rising until breaking in two and sinking in two pieces about 19 miles northwest of St. Ives, Cornwall. The air-locked bow turned over on its side and remained afloat for about an hour. An aircraft appeared on the scene and tried to guide the lifeboats in a certain direction, but the survivors hoisted the sails to get away as far as they could to prevent that any vessel trying to pick them up should also be torpedoed. Shortly afterwards the master, the commodore, four naval staff members and 47 crew members were rescued by the British coaster Macville which was guided to them by the aircraft and took the four boats in tow, bringing them to Newlyn, Cornwall.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Return to harbour – Light cruisers PENELOPE and AURORA arrived at Rosyth after covering convoys ON.15 and HN.15.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser PATROCLUS departed Liverpool on Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Armed merchant cruiser MALOJA arrived in the Clyde from Liverpool.
 
Friendly fire – Destroyers INTREPID, GALLANT and IVANHOE arrived at Aberdeen to patrol. INTREPID left to investigate a submarine reported at 0530 six miles NE of Aberdeen, and destroyers JUPITER and JUNO of convoy ON.17A were detached to assist. Trawler BEN CHOURN (197grt) reported an explosion in this area. It was first thought that convoy ON.17 was under attack. It was later ascertained that the submarine was the British NARWHAL, proceeding to Scapa Flow, and that the explosion was a depth charge fired by destroyer NUBIAN.
 
Submarine trials – Submarine TRIAD carried out special trials off Inchkeith.
 
Ship movement and repair – Destroyer VESPER departed Greenock escorting submarine TETRARCH to Portsmouth, where they arrived on the 6th. TETRARCH carried out equipment repairs, and then sailed on 13 April for a war patrol.
 
Brief grounding – Anti-submarine trawler NEIL MACKAY went ashore at Scapa Flow during a storm, but was later refloated.
 
Mining damage – At 2030, tanker CHARLES T. MEYER (10,516grt) of convoy HX.20 A, escorted by sloop FOWEY, struck a floating mine 15 miles south of Dungeness, in 50-21N, 0-18E. FOWEY continued on with the convoy. To assist the damaged tanker, destroyers BRILLIANT was ordered from Dover, BOADICEA from her patrol, and KEITH from Dover when ready. Tug LADY BRASSEY and French torpedo boats and trawlers proceeded to the area. BOADICEA located the damaged tanker at 0400. At 0500, BRILLIANT joined and soon after KEITH arrived. At 0600, BOADICEA took the tanker in tow escorted by BRILLIANT and KEITH. Tugs LADY BRASSEY from Dover and FOREMOST from Newhaven arrived at 0959 and took over the tow. BRILLIANT returned to her patrol at 0700, but KEITH remained as an anti-submarine screen. Tug CALSHOT departed Southampton at 1100 and Admiralty Salvage Vessel RECOVERY OF LEITH departed Dover. KEITH was released when the tow reached Sandown Bay, I.O.W. All units involved arrived safely at Castle Point, Cowes, at 0105/6th.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.17 A of six British, sixteen Norwegian, eight Swedish, eight Finnish, three Estonian and one Panamanian ship departed Methil escorted by destroyers JERVIS, JUNO, JUPITER, JANUS and JAGUAR. One steamer was detached before the convoy crossed the North Sea. The convoy was joined by 17 ships from Kirkwall. These are included in the sailing breakdown from Methil. Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Sullom Voe on the 5th for anti-aircraft protection. Destroyer JERVIS made an attack at 0905/7th on a submarine contact northeast of the Shetlands in 61‑15N, 1‑20E. The convoy arrived safely at Bergen on the 8th, while CALCUTTA arrived back at Sullom Voe on the 9th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.111 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers VEGA, GRENADE and sloop STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 6th.
 
Convoy FS.112 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloop FLAMINGO and destroyer WALLACE, and arrived at Southend on the 6th. Convoy FS.113 was cancelled.
 
Convoy MT.23 departed Methil, and arrived in the Tyne the next day.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy: anti-U-boat work – Sloop LEITH, escorting convoy HG.20, attacked a submarine contact west of Scilly Isle in 49‑57N, 08‑15W. Destroyer VENETIA, also of HG.20, joined her in the hunt.
 …
Anti-U-boat activity – Steamer AUCKLAND STAR (13,212grt) reported she had sighted a submarine (U.28) in 49‑26N, 07‑27W. Sloop LEITH nearby, escorting convoy HG.20 was detached to investigate. On the morning of the 5th, destroyers WILD SWAN and VENETIA were ordered into the area to assist. Later on the 5th, another report of a submarine, led to destroyers WHIRLWIND, VOLUNTEER and VETERAN being ordered into the area.
 
German naval activities – The German Navy began holding submarines in port for WESERUBUNG, the invasion of Norway, and cancelled all other naval operations.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.21 of 34 ships departed Gibraltar escorted by destroyers VELOX, VIDETTE and ACTIVE, the latter detaching on the 6th. VELOX, which had joined from convoy HG.20F, and VIDETTE were detached on the 11th to Portsmouth and Devonport, respectively. Destroyer VIMY escorted the convoy from the 4th to 10th, when she detached to convoy HG.21 (?). Destroyer WINCHELSEA joined from the 11th to 13th in Home Waters for the Liverpool section. Merchant ships not going to Liverpool were escorted by destroyer WINDSOR which was with the convoy from the 11th to 13th. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 13th .
 
Africa coast – Heavy cruiser CORNWALL departed Freetown on patrol.
 
Heavy cruiser CUMBERLAND departed Freetown.
 
Caribbean – Light cruiser DUNEDIN departed Kingston on patrol.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/6/2018 7:18:59 PM
March 5. Day 187
Tuesday. Waning crescent moon.

Finland
Quote:
Finland agreed to discuss Soviet proposals for ending the war.
(Goralski, p 107)
Quote:
The USSR announces that it is ‘once more’ prepared to negotiate peace on the terms offered before, which expired on 1 March. The Finnish government, faced with a desperate military situation, accepts.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave port on patrol; three boats (U-47, -49 and -56) returns to harbour at Wilhelmshaven after 6, 6 and 2 days respectively on patrol. My count shows 10 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 9 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

One ship, a neutral, lost to U-boats, by torpedo. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=920.
Grutto, a Dutch steam merchantman of 920 tons, carrying general cargo from Rotterdam to London. Complement=18; lost=18.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 20.15 hours … the Grutto … was spotted by U-17, heading east-northeast with all navigation lights burning. At 20.40 hours, a first torpedo missed but the second fired 18 minutes later struck the ship amidships and broke her in two. The stern section sank within one minute and the bow followed six minutes later.
In the early morning of 6 March, a ship of the Dutch ’ Batavier’-line spotted wreckage and a raft marked Grutto 7.5 miles southwest of Thornbank. The Belgian pilot boat Loodsboot No 8 also reported this raft and later picked up debris two miles west of the Belgian lightship Wandelaar. This wreckage was later identified as belonging to Grutto. Loodsboot No 5 salvaged the raft and delivered it to Oostende. On 29 March, the bodies of two crewmen washed ashore on the Dutch coast, the body of sailor B. van der Spek near Callantsoog and the one of first steerman R. Teensma on Texel. Both were identified by their families.
(«uboat.net»)[Ed. note: between 3 March and 5 March, six U-boats returned to shore. Of the six, five had been at sea for six days or fewer.]
Quote:
U.52 and U.38 departed Kiel on the 2nd and Wilhelmshaven on the 9th respectively for patrol, but in the Atlantic were recalled, and with U.30, U.43, U.44, U.46, U.47, U.49, U.51 were ordered to stations on both sides of the Orkneys and Shetlands to operate against British naval units. U.30, U.46, U.47, U.51 departed Wilhelmshaven on the 11th, and U.43 and U.44 on the 13th, while U.49 departed Kiel on the 16th.
(«naval-history.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol.
 
Gunnery practice – Destroyers HARDY, HOSTILE, PUNJABI, FORTUNE and FOXHOUND departed Greenock to screen armed merchant cruisers SCOTSTOUN, LETITIA and WORCESTERSHIRE for full calibre firings. SCOTSTOUN ten proceeded to her patrol area, while LETITIA arrived back at 1500, WORCESTERSHIRE at 1700, and the destroyers at 2010. WORCESTERSHIRE and LETITIA were returning from Northern Patrol at the time.
 
Routine maintenance – Destroyer IVANHOE arrived at Rosyth from Scapa Flow, via Aberdeen, for boiler cleaning.
 
Escort duty – Destroyers JAVELIN and WOOLSTON departed the Humber escorting base ship DUNLUCE CASTLE for Rosyth, arriving there on the 6th.
 
Urgent repair – Destroyer WANDERER arrived at Liverpool at 1030 with urgent defects, which were corrected and she was able to sail later that day. She attacked a contact in St Georges Channel in 52‑01N, 6‑27W, which was later determined to be non-submarine.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers SCOTSTOUN and MALOJA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol. Both were given air escort.
 
Submarine activities – Submarine TRITON arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarine SEALION departed Harwich on patrol.
 
Submarine NARWHAL arrived at Scapa Flow for direction finding trials.
 
Submarine THISTLE and the Polish ORZEL departed Rosyth for patrol in the vicinity of Devil's Hole.
 
Submarine TRITON was docked at Rosyth for reballasting.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.104 departed Southend escorted by sloop FOWEY from the 5th to 7th.
 
Convoy OB.104 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers MACKAY and VANQUISHER from the 5th to 8th.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy SA.32 departed Southampton with two steamers, escorted by sloops FOXGLOVE and ROSEMARY, and arrived at Brest on the 7th.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy MT.24 departed Methil, and arrived in the Tyne the next day.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OG.21F was formed from two convoys - (1) OA.103GF, which departed Southend with sloop ENCHANTRESS, and was joined by sloop SANDWICH the next day, and (2) OB.103GF of 48 ships, which departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WHIRLWIND and VOLUNTEER, which remained with the combined convoy from the 5th to 6th, when they detached to convoy HG.21F. SANDWICH and ENCHANTRESS were with OG.21F from the 5th to 11th, when they were temporarily attached to the 13th Destroyer Flotilla as replacements for destroyers WATCHMAN and VORTIGERN which proceeded to England for leave. Destroyer DOUGLAS joined on the 9th and remained with the convoy until its arrival at Gibraltar on the 11th.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.112 departed Southend escorted by sloop EGRET and destroyer WHITLEY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 7th. Convoys FN.113 and FS.113 were cancelled.
 
Ship maintenance – Destroyer TARTAR was boiler cleaning and destroyer KIMBERLEY was shifting her asdic dome alongside destroyer depot ship WOOLWICH at the Tail of the Bank.
 
Course alteration – Owing to reports of floating mines 15 miles SW and SE of Beachy Head, sloop ABERDEEN with convoy HX.20 was ordered southward of the area.
 
Equipment failure – Steamer SCALTSCAR lost her propeller and was drifting on shore 10 miles off Saltburn Pier. Destroyer VIVIEN stood by until a tug arrived.
 …
North Atlanting inbound convoy – Convoy HX.25 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers RESTIGOUCHE and ST LAURENT, which were detached on the 6th. Armed merchant cruiser LACONIA was in the escort and detached on the 18th. At 0650/7th, the convoy was joined by battleship ROYAL SOVEREIGN, returning to Halifax after escorting HX.22. Destroyers ANTELOPE, MACKAY, VANESSA and WOLVERINE escorted the convoy from the 18th to 20th when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
South American Station – Cruiser HAWKINS departed Montevideo for Port Stanley. After a short refit, she departed on the 15th for the Plate area.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser COLOMBO arrived at Gibraltar from England, and sailed on the 6th for Malta.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.23 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser PRETORIA CASTLE. On the 19th, convoys SL.23 and SLF.23 merged and armed merchant cruiser JERVIS BAY joined the escort, relieving PRETORIA CASTLE. JERVIS BAY was relieved on the 20th by destroyer WHITSHED which was joined on the 22nd by armed merchant cruiser ESPERANCE BAY. The convoy arrived on the 22nd.
 
Indian Ocean – Light cruiser GLOUCESTER arrived at Colombo.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/7/2018 4:55:10 PM
March 6. Day 188
Wednesday.

Finland
Quote:
Finnish peace negotiators left for Moscow.
(Goralski, p 107)
Quote:
General Mannerheim, seeing it is useless to continue the one-sided struggle, has accepted the there must be talks with the Soviet Union. The Western powers still continue to offer aid, but send only small quantities of mostly out-of-date arms.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
…[O]n 6 March an important military conference was held in Berlin. Here the various plans for the offensive [against France and the low countries] were discussed, including von Manstein’s code-named Fell Sichelschnitt (Operation Sickle). It was strongly supported by von Rundstedt and Guderian against the continued opposition of the Oberkommando. Several days afterwards Hitler, who had sat in on the discussions without expressing an opinion, decided to adopt von Manstein’s plan. …
(2194 Days, p 43)

Britain
No notable activity. On the home front:
Quote:
At 8.30 Jenny called up the staircase, ‘Did you hear a noise last night?’ ‘No’ ‘An aeroplane crashed and burnt out on the common.’ ’No’ ‘Yes, Mr K. just told me, he was coming home from the parochial meeting and they all saw it fall, and followed to see. Burnt right out. About 8.30 p.m.’ He told here how they and dashed to the place, and all stood round and watched it burn. Then someone stirred the fire and the guns began to go off. All the crowd ran away as fast as they could, while the bullets whizzed by them. I wonder some of them did not get shot. When I went in the shop at 11, A. said, ‘Fancy, them silly rotters on them searchlights never put them up to show that there poor devil where he were. He threw out a flare and they never answered’ …
(Muriel Green in Wartime Women, p 83)

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave port on patrol; one boat (U-63) returns to harbour at Wilhelmshaven after 26 days on patrol. My count shows 9 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 8 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

No ships lost to U-boats on this date. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
German merchant loss – German steamer URUGUAY (5846grt), which had departed Pernambuco on 11 February, was sighted by trawler ST WISTAN (564grt) northwest of Iceland. This enabled heavy cruiser BERWICK on Northern Patrol to intercept her. Rather than be captured, URUGUAY scuttled herself in 67‑52N, 16‑08W; BERWICK rescued 14 officers and 40 men.
 
Transfer of station – Light cruiser DRAGON departed Portland for duty with the 3rd Cruiser Squadron in the Mediterranean Fleet. She departed Gibraltar on the 10th, arrived at Malta on the 12th for refitting, and reached Alexandria on 3 April.
 
Ship maintenance – Armed merchant cruiser ASTURIAS departed the Clyde for Belfast for overhaul and refit.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser CARINTHIA departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol.
 
Ships/ collision – Destroyer VENOMOUS was in a collision with tug SWARTHY at 0321 in Portsmouth Harbour, was under repair at Portsmouth until 29 April, and departed on 2 May.
 
Ship repairs – Destroyer JUNO arrived at Rosyth from convoy duty with defects, and departed on the 9th for repairs at Hull.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer HOTSPUR departed Sheerness for the Clyde, arriving on the 8th.
 
Off patrol – Destroyer GALLANT arrived at Invergordon from patrol.

 
Anti-U-boat zeal – Destroyer FURY departed the Clyde at 1600 for Milford Haven to discharge fuel prior to arriving at Newport for refitting. At 2334/6th, she attacked a submarine contact southwest of Chicken Rock, I.O.M., in 53‑47N, 5‑09W, which was later assessed as probably a wreck. On the 7th, she attacked another submarine contact in 53-48N, 5-06W, also a wreck, and reached Milford Haven on the 9th.
 
Ship movement – Minesweepers BRAMBLE, BRITOMART, HAZARD, SPEEDY and HEBE departed Greenock for Scapa Flow.
 
Anti-U-boat search – Sloops KINGFISHER and FOXGLOVE were searching for a submarine SSE of Portland Bill. FOXGLOVE attacked a contact in 50-10N, 2-12W, and destroyer ANTHONY relieved KINGFISHER in the hunt.
 
Cable repair – Destroyer WOLSEY and cable ship ROYAL SCOT arrived back at Rosyth after cable mending all day.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy TM.20 escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group and destroyer VIVIEN departed the Tyne for Methil.
 
Convoy FN.114 departed Southend escorted by sloops BLACK SWAN, GRIMSBY and destroyer WOOLSTON, and arrived in the Tyne on the 8th.
 
Convoy FS.114 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops LONDONDERRY and FLEETWOOD, and arrived at Southend on the 8th.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer GURKHA attacked a submarine contact ENE of Sumburgh Head in 60‑00N, 00‑00W, which was later evaluated as non-submarine.
 
Anti-submarine trawler NORTHERN WAVE (655grt) attacked a submarine contact north of Kinnaird Head in 57-51N, 2-03W.
 
Altmark afterword – Shadowing submarine UNITY reported German supply ship ALTMARK departing Jossing Fjord escorted by two Norwegian destroyers, and was later ordered to take up a position ten miles north of Hantsholm. Submarine ORZEL was in a patrol area off Hantsholm, and both submarines were to intercept ALTMARK if she left Norwegian territorial waters. On the 7th, UNITY sighted three darkened destroyers two miles west of Hantsholm, but could not attack.
 
Submarine refit – Submarine STERLET arrived at Lowestoft from patrol for reballasting.
 
Luftwaffe activity – Aircraft of German X Air Corps (He111's of KG26 or Ju88's of KG30) attacked tanker SHELBRIT 2 (695grt) off Girdle Ness, steamer ROYSTON (2722grt) 10 miles north of Hartlepool, steamer JACOBUS (1262grt) 10 miles south of the Tyne, and convoy TM.20. No casualties were sustained.
 
Dutch maritime losses – Dutch submarine O.11 at Den Helder was sunk in an accidental collision with Dutch dockyard tug BV.3 (AMSTERDAM). She was raised on the 10th, but was still under repair when Holland fell in May.
 
Latvian ship loss – Latvian steamer LATVIS (1318grt) was seized in the Baltic by German warships, and renamed EDITH FAULBAUMS for German use.
 
French naval activity – French battleship PROVENCE, heavy cruiser DUQUESNE, and British aircraft carrier HERMES with destroyers DECOY and DEFENDER patrolled off the African coast between 10W and 20W from the 6th to 16th. On the 14th, Portuguese steamer GANDIA (4333grt) was stopped and a German citizen removed, and on the 15th, Portuguese steamer MOUZINHO (8374grt) was also stopped and another German citizen removed.
 
Far East waters – Light cruiser DANAE departed Hong Kong on patrol.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/8/2018 4:07:12 PM
March 7. Day 189
Thursday.

Finland
No reported activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity. Dealing with the Home Front, lengthy diary entry from Muriel Green concerning plane crashes, but also containing this minor gem of a simile:
Quote:
[Attending an auction on a whim,]… I saw about the first 20 lots sold. Auctions fascinate me. The auctioneer announced before he began to sell, that the air raid siren was to be sounded for practice at 12. Just as I got outside it went off, I had never heard one before. It is a very weird wail and sounds like an ill animal. …
(2194 Days, p 44)

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave port on patrol; one boat (U-17) returns to harbour at Wilhelmshaven after 8 days on patrol. My count shows 18 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 7 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

One ship, a neutral, lost to U-boats, by torpedo. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=1965.
Vecht, a Dutch steam merchantman of 1965 tons, in ballast from Rotterdam to Lobito. Complement=22; lost=22.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 04.30 hours … the unescorted and neutral Vecht … was hit aft by one G7a torpedo from U-14, settled by the stern and sank after 20 minutes in 51°42,3N/03°14,5E. The U-boat had spotted the ship three hours earlier, but reported that she carried no neutrality markings.
(«naval-history.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Fleet buildup around Scapa – Completing patrol, battleship VALIANT and battlecruiser HOOD with destroyers FAULKNOR, FAME, FORESTER, KELLY, KANDAHAR and SIKH arrived at Scapa Flow at 1600 after dummy battleships REVENGE (decoy ship PAKEHA) and RESOLUTION (decoy ship WAIMANA) from Rosyth spent some time at Scapa Flow testing the base's ability to resist air attacks. After VALIANT and HOOD arrived in the anchorage, aircraft of German KG26 (X Air Corps) dropped mines in the main entrance to Scapa Flow.
 
Battleship RODNEY (C-in-C, Forbes) and battlecruisers RENOWN and REPULSE with destroyers HARDY (D.2), HOSTILE, INGLEFIELD (D.3), IMOGEN, FOXHOUND, FORTUNE, FIREDRAKE, PUNJABI and KIMBERLEY departed the Clyde at 1615/7th to arrive at 1600/8th. The ships were taken to the west of the Orkneys for 24 hours while the channel was swept. Winston Churchill was on RODNEY, and he transferred to KIMBERLEY, which carried him on to Scapa Flow, where he spent the night on HOOD. Destroyers FAULKNOR and FORESTER left Scapa Flow on the 8th and joined the Commander in Chief off Cape Wrath. RODNEY, RENOWN, REPULSE with destroyers HARDY, HOSTILE, INGLEFIELD, IMOGEN, FOXHOUND, FORTUNE, FIREDRAKE, PUNJABI, FAULKNOR and FORESTER arrived at Scapa Flow at 1000/9th.
 
Heavy cruiser NORFOLK departed the Clyde for Scapa Flow.
 
After patrol – Armed merchant cruiser SALOPIAN arrived at the Clyde from patrol.
 
Cable repair – Destroyers WOLSEY, BRAZEN and cable ship ROYAL SCOT departed Rosyth to mend cables.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyers INTREPID, GRIFFIN and anti-submarine whalers BUTTERMERE (560grt) and WASTWATER (560grt) made attacks on a contact sighted by aircraft at 1448, ESE of Noss Head in 58‑17N, 02‑26W. INTREPID attacked at 1715 and 1744, and GRIFFIN at 1730. The two destroyers were joined by destroyers FAME at 1800/7th and SIKH at 1900. These two were ordered to join the hunt until required to escort base ship DUNLUCE CASTLE and three other steamers from convoy ON.18 into Scapa Flow. After GRIFFIN, SIKH and FAME detached, INTREPID was left to stand by the contact, later leaving for Invergordon where she arrived at 1300/8th. Destroyer GALLANT joined the search at midday on the 8th, but the search was unsuccessful. FAME buoyed the location on the 8th, and INTREPID and GALLANT returned to patrol the area.
 
Submarine activities – TRIDENT arrived at Rosyth from patrol with a damaged asdic dome, and docked later that day. She undocked on the 11th.
 
SEAL was undocked at Rosyth.
 
SNAPPER arrived at Harwich after patrol.
 
URSULA was docked at Blyth to make good leaking glands, and undocked on the 8th.
 
TRUANT was undocked at Rosyth.
 
TRITON was docked at Rosyth for reballasting, and undocked on the 9th.
 
SEAWOLF departed Portsmouth under escort for Harwich.
 
SALMON departed Harwich on patrol.
 
 L.23 was undocked at Blyth.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound and inbound convoys – Convoy ON.18 of ten British, thirteen Norwegian, twelve Swedish, two Danish, four Finnish and two Estonian ships departed Methil at 1700 escorted by destroyers COSSACK (D.4), ESCORT, ECLIPSE, ELECTRA and ENCOUNTER. Destroyers KELLY (D.5) departed Scapa Flow on the 8th and KANDAHAR from Kirkwall on the 8th with a detachment of ten ships for the convoy. These ten ships are included in the sailing breakdown. They joined off Scapa Flow, relieving COSSACK which joined convoy HN.17. On the 8th, German aircraft attacked the Kirkwallsection. Two bombs were dropped, but no damage was done. Base ship DUNLUCE CASTLE and three other merchant ships for Scapa Flow proceeded with the convoy. Light cruisers EDINBURGH, ARETHUSA and anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO provided near cover. CAIRO departed Sullom Voe on the 9th to join the convoy. Destroyers FAME and SIKH put out from Scapa Flow. The destroyers met four merchant ships from the convoy at 1300 and escorted them into Scapa Flow, arriving on the 8th. The convoy arrived at Bergen without event on the 10th.
 
Convoy HN.17 of eight British, nineteen Norwegian, one Danish and one Finnish ship departed Bergen escorted by destroyers NUBIAN, DELIGHT, DIANA, ILEX and GURKHA. On the 9th when the convoy split, DELIGHT and DIANA were assigned the west coast section and were reinforced by destroyers KIMBERLEY, which came out from Scapa Flow at 1800/9th, and KELLY, detached from convoy ON.18. GURKHA obtained a submarine contact at 1412/9th southwest of Fair Isle in 59‑15N, 1‑08W and dropped six depth charge patterns in 59-07N, 0-44W. ILEX stood by the contact while the convoy continued. Destroyer FOXHOUND arrived from Scapa Flow at 0300/10th to relieve ILEX, which rejoined the convoy before it arrived at Rosyth. The submarine contact was later found to be sunken steamer SANTOS. At 0520/9th, KELLY reached convoy HN.17 in heavy weather ,collided with GURKHA, and GURKHA's propeller guard tore a thirty foot gash in her bow, requiring KELLY to leave the convoy for repairs. After emergency repairs at Lerwick and then from depot ship WOOLWICH at Scapa Flow, KELLY departed Scapa Flow on the 14th and was escorted by destroyer SIKH to Blackwall for repairs .
 
GURKHA was able to continue with HN.17 and was repaired at Methil in less than a week. After suspected enemy vessels were reported four miles NE of Kinnaird Head, destroyer COSSACK was informed and light cruisers EDINBURGH and ARETHUSA were advised to investigate. No contact was made and the vessels were later determined to be destroyers GALLANT and GRIFFIN. On the 10th, the convoy arrived at Methil with COSSACK (D.4), NUBIAN, GURKHA and ILEX.
 
DELIGHT and DIANA, after escorting the five ships of the west coast portion of the convoy to Cape Wrath, arrived at Scapa Flow. On arrival, DELIGHT reported a defect in her feed tank.
 
Ship movements – Minelayer TEVIOTBANK escorted by destroyers ICARUS and IMPULSIVE departed the Humber for Invergordon, where they arrived on the 9th
 
Destroyer MASHONA departed Sheerness for the Clyde, arriving on the 8th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy TM.21 departed the Tyne escorted by the 3rd Anti-submarine Group, and supported by sloop EGRET and destroyer WHITLEY.
 
Convoy MT.25 departed Methil escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group, supported by sloop PELICAN and destroyer VIVIEN, and arrived later that day.
 
Convoy FS.115 departed the Tyne escorted by sloop PELICAN and destroyer VIVIEN, and arrived at Southend on the 9th.
 
Ship maintenance – Destroyer BEAGLE completed boiler cleaning and degaussing alongside depot ship SANDHURST. Destroyer BRILLIANT went alongside SANDHURST for similar work and repairs which were completed on the 12th.
 
Minelaying – British minefield DML 9 was laid by auxiliary minelayer HAMPTON, escorted by Polish destroyers BURZA and BLYSKAWICA from Harwich and destroyers KEITH and BOADICEA from Dover, in the English Channel, between 51-53N and 51-59N in a direction 20° east to 20° west. Minesweeper FRANKLIN had already laid the mark buoys. After the operation, the destroyers returned to Harwich.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – A submarine contact report by anti-submarine yacht MAID MARION (506grt) eight miles from Eddystone Light caused destroyers WILD SWAN, ESKIMO and VANESSA to be dispatched from Plymouth to investigate.
 
Anti-U-boat striking force – The 12th Anti-submarine Striking Force, comprised of anti-submarine trawlers, was operating in Moray Firth in 57-55N, 02-15W.
 
At 1500/7th, NORTHERN WAVE (655grt) made a submarine contact, which NORTHERN PRIDE (655grt) and NORTHERN SPRAY (655grt) attacked.
 
At 0026/8th in Moray Firth in 58-02.7N, 2-09W, NORTHERN DAWN (655grt) made a contact which was attacked by NORTHERN SPRAY.
 
At 1310/9th off Buchanness in 57-31N, 1-38W, NORTHERN PRIDE made a contact which was attacked by NORTHERN GEM (655grt) and NORTHERN PRIDE.
 
At 1940/9th, east of Kinnaird Head in 57-42N, 1-35W, NORTHERN DAWN made a contact which was attacked by NORTHERN SPRAY and NORTHERN DAWN.
 
At 0955/10th, ENE of Kinnaird Head, NORTHERN PRIDE made a contact which was attacked by NORTHERN GEM and NORTHERN PRIDE.
 
At 0100/11th, north of Kinnaird Head in 57-52.5N, 1-56W, NORTHERN WAVE made a contact which was attacked by NORTHERN WAVE and NORTHERN SPRAY.
 
Collision damage – Patrol sloop MALLARD damaged her bows in collision with an unknown ship off Harwich, and was under repair at London from 9 March to 27 April.
 
Minesweeping trawler CEDAR (649grt) was damaged in collision with the dockyard wall at Leith.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.29 of six steamers, including steamer BARON KINNIARD (Commodore) departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS, and arrived in the Loire on the 9th.
 
Luftwaffe shipping attacks – From 1940 to 2005, shipping in the Downs was attacked by German aircraft. Ramsgate guardship LORMONT and steamer DOVER ABBEY (958grt) were bombed by He111's of KG26 (X Air Corps), but no damage was done.

German naval minelaying – German naval auxiliary Schiff 11 (Estonian steamer HANONIA (2564grt)) which had been captured on 24 September 1939) departed Wilhelmshaven and on the 9th, disguised as a neutral ship, laid mines off North Foreland. [Over the next 11 days, f]ive ships of 14,152 tons were lost on this minefield.
 …
German minelayers ROLAND and COBRA laid two anti-submarine mine barriers west of Heligoland during the 7th and 8th.
 
U-boat minelaying – U.32 laid mines north of Liverpool Bay, on which one merchant ship was lost.
 
U.28 laid mines southeast of the Isle of Wight off Portsmouth.
 
U.14 sank Dutch steamer VECHT (1965grt) in 51‑45N, 03‑05E.
 
Luftwaffe shipping attacks – Belgian fishing vessel YOLANDE MARGUERITE (26grt) was bombed and sunk by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) off Noord Hinder.
 
Dutch steamer CONFID (249grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) 6½ miles 350° from Flamborough Head.
 
Italian steamer AMELIA LAURO (5335grt) was damaged by German bombing in 52‑55N, 02‑19E. Italian steamer TITANIA (5397grt) rescued the 37 crew and took them to the Downs. Sloops PINTAIL and LONDONDERRY were also involved in the rescue. The steamer was taken to Immingham, and was still there on 10 June, when she was seized and renamed EMPIRE ACTIVITY for British use.
 
French naval loss through collision – French auxiliary minesweeper MARIE YETTE (286grt) was sunk in collision with French steamer SPRAMEX (2560grt) in the River Gironde.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/9/2018 6:45:09 PM
March 8. Day 190
Friday. New moon.

Finland
Quote:
The Russians take Viipuri. The USSR refuses a Finnish request for an immediate armistice.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
Diplomatic circles buzzing with talk of a secret peace parley in Stockholm to end the Russo-Finnish war. A decree today orders all persons and firms who possess old metal or scrap iron to deliver it to the state. Lack of iron may lose Germany the War.
(Berlin Diary, p 295)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave port on patrol; one boat (U-7) returns to harbour at Wilhelmshaven after 6 days on patrol. My count shows 7 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 6 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

One ship lost to mines laid by U-boat. Total tonnage lost=5068.
Counsellor, a British steam merchantman of 5068 tons, carrying general cargo, including cotton, from New Orleans via Halifax to Liverpool. Complement=70 + 8 RN members; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
… [T]he Counsellor …, the ship of convoy commodore in convoy HX-22, struck a mine laid on 6 January by U-30 six miles 280° from Liverpool Bar Lightship and sank the next day. The master, the commodore (Rear Admiral H.G.C. Franklin, RN), seven naval staff members and 69 crew members were picked up by HMS Walpole (D 41) … after the destroyer tried to take the vessel in tow and landed them at Liverpool.
(«naval-history.net»)[Ed. note: for contradictory information on the loss of the Counsellor, see At Sea, Loss to Mines, below]

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruisers NORFOLK from the Clyde and BERWICK from Northern Patrol arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Ship movements – Anti-aircraft cruiser CURACOA arrived in the Humber.
 
Destroyer VIMIERA departed Portland for Rosyth.
 
Submarine SEAWOLF arrived at Harwich after patrol.
 
Structural problems – Destroyer KANDAHAR developed structural defects.
 
Anti-U-boat action – Destroyer VIVACIOUS, escorting convoy BC.29 dropped depth charges on a submarine contact 15 miles from Ushant Island.
 
Patrol trawlers CHILTERN (324grt) and CLOUGHTON WYKE (324grt) fishing in 58-12N, 9-18W, northwest of St Kilda were attacked by a submarine with gunfire. They drove her off with no damage to themselves or the submarine.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.106 departed Southend escorted by destroyer VANESSA from the 8th to 9th.
 
Convoy OB.106 departed Liverpool escorted by sloop ROCHESTER and destroyer VENETIA. On the 11th, when the convoy dispersed, they joined convoy SL.22.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.115 departed Southend escorted by sloop FLAMINGO and destroyer WALLACE, and arrived in the Tyne on the 10th.
 
Convoy MT.26 departed Methil escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group and supported by destroyer JAVELIN. Convoy TM.22 also departed the Tyne. When the two convoys crossed, JAVELIN detached to the north-bound TM convoy and escorted it to Rosyth. The south-bound MT convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 9th.
 
Convoy FS.116 departed the Tyne escorted by destroyers VEGA, WOOLSTON and sloop STORK, and arrived at Southend on the 10th.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy AXF 1 arrived at St Malo.
 
Anti-U-boat actions – Armed boarding vessel NORTHERN REWARD (655grt) attacked a submarine contact SE of Munken Rock, Faroes, 110 miles 348° from Cape Wrath in 60-32N, 4-57W.
 
Sloop ABERDEEN, escorting convoy HX.20, attacked a submarine contact SW of Portland Bill in 50-09N, 2-44W.
 
Loss to mines – Steamer COUNSELLOR (5068grt, Commodore HX.22) was sunk by a mine laid on the 7th by U.32 off Mersey Light Vessel in 53‑38N, 03‑23W. Destroyer WALPOLE unsuccessfully attempted to tow her to safety; the entire crew was rescued. (Note: Rohwer's "Axis Submarine Successes" lists her as COUNCILLOR, and confirms the mines were laid by U.32. UBoat.net reports they were laid by U.30, and that WALPOLE rescued 78 survivors.)
 
Ship inspection – Finnish steamer JULIETTE (1449grt) was brought into the Downs for inspection by French torpedo boat L'INCOMPRISE.
 
German loss to blockade – German steamer HANNOVER (5537grt), which departed Curacao during the night of the 5th/6th, was captured early on the 8th by light cruiser DUNEDIN and Canadian destroyer ASSINIBOINE (Cdr E R Mainguy RCN) off Santa Domingo in the Mona Passage. DUNEDIN took her in tow for Kingston, and while on passage ASSINIBOINE had to fight a fire onboard after the crew attempted to scuttle her. HANNOVER arrived at Kingston on the 13th with DUNEDIN and ASSINIBOINE secured on either side. French light cruiser JEANNE D' ARC had also been involved in the search for this German ship and arrived at the same time. The captured ship was renamed EMPIRE AUDACITY for British service and later became HMS AUDACITY, the Royal Navy's first escort carrier.
 
French naval activities – French light cruiser PRIMAUGUET after repairs at Lorient departed Brest on the 3rd and arrived at Toulon on the 8th. She departed on the 11th, escorted by destroyer LYNX and arrived at Casablanca on the 13th, after passing Gibraltar the same day. LYNX departed Casablanca on the 20th and arrived at Brest on the 25th, while PRIMAUGUET left Casablanca on 1 April and arrived at Fort de France on 10 April.
 
French submarine REDOUTABLE, escorted by destroyer LA PALME, which departed Toulon on the 4th, arrived at Gibraltar. The destroyer continued on to Casablanca, but the submarine remained at Gibraltar for ten days for anti-submarine exercises with the British Gibraltar Force escorts, and then departed on the 18th, escorted by armed yacht ALPHEE, flying the flag of Vice Amiral Ollive.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/10/2018 4:46:53 PM
March 9. Day 191
Saturday.

Finland
Quote:
The Finnish army is no longer able to hold its positions and General Mannerheim asks the politicians to come to terms with the enemy.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
Admiral Raeder told Hitler the British and French might occupy Norway and Sweden under the pretext of aiding the Finns and encouraged an invasion of Norway at the earliest time.
(Goralski, p 107)

Britain
No notable activity.

Britain and France
Quote:
Britain and France told the Finns troops and planes would be sent to fight the Russians if Helsinki would request such aid.
(Goralski, p 107)

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-109); launched=1 (U-124); commissioned=0. No U-boats leave from or return to harbour. [Ed. assumption: the fleet is being provisioned and prepared for the upcoming Norwegian campaign, now just one month away.[ My count shows 7 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 6 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

Five ships, including 2 neutrals, lost to U-boats, by torpedo. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=8520. Three U-boats accounted for the losses.
Borthwick, a British steam merchantman of 1097 tons, carrying 700 tons of general cargo from Antwerp via Rotterdam to Leith. Complement=21; lost=0.
Leukos, an Irish steam trawler of 216 tons, carrying 21 tons of fish taken from the grounds in Donegal Bay to Dublin. Complement=11; lost=11.
P. Margaronis, a Greek steam merchantman of 4,979 tons, in ballast from Antwerp to Canada. Complement=30; lost=30.
Abbotsford, a British steam merchantman of 1585 tons, carrying steel and flax from Ghent to Grangemouth. Complement=18 + 1 gunner; lost=19.
Akeld, a British steam merchantman of 643 tons, carrying general cargo from Rotterdam to Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Complement=13; lost=13.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 05.42 hours … the unescorted Borthwick … was hit by one G7e torpedo from U-14 and sank after breaking in two north of Zeebrugge. The master and 20 crew members were picked up by the Flushing pilot boat Loodsboot No.9 and landed at Flushing on 10 March.
… At 21.13 hours …the neutral Leukos … was attacked without warning by U-38 about 30 miles northwest off Tory Island. At 20.00 hours, the U-boat had spotted six trawlers all with their lights set near Tory Island and Liebe thought that they were forming a patrol line. He decided to give one of them a warning and fired one shot from its deckgun at the Leukos from a distance of 200 meters. The shot hit the trawler in the engine room and she dissappeared in a cloud of steam and smoke. The U-boat waited until the trawler sank after one hour and then continued the patrol.
The Leukos was reported missing on 12 March, when the ship failed to arrive in Dublin. On 21 March, a lifeboat bearing the logo of the ship was washed ashore near Scarinish on Tiree off the west coast of Scotland.
… At 23.17 hours … U-28 fired one G7e torpedo at an illuminated westbound freighter without flag about 70 miles south-southwest of the Scilly Isles and observed that the ship sank by the stern within 90 seconds after being struck on port side just ahead of the aft mast and breaking in two. This must have been the P. Margaronis which was reported missing after 8 March southwest of Land’s End.
… At 23.30 hours … the Abbotsford was hit in the foreship by one G7e torpedo from U-14 north of Zeebrugge and caught fire. The Akeld was ahead of the vessel and apparently turned around to help the torpedoed ship, but at 23.45 hours was struck herself amidships by a G7a torpedo from the same U-boat and sank within seconds. At 23.55 hours, the first ship was sunk by a coup de grâce.
The master, 17 crew members and one gunner from the Abbotsford (Master Alexander John Watson) were lost.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruisers NEWCASTLE and GALATEA, departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol.
 
Destroyer activities – Destroyer JERVIS attacked a submarine contact 4.6 miles 102° from Bell Rock. Sisters ship JUPITER and JANUS hunted in the area until dark. Meanwhile JERVIS and JAGUAR, also sister ships, arrived at Rosyth after escort duty with convoy ON.17 A, with JUPITER and JANUS reaching there on the 9th.
 
Ship refitting – Destroyers KHARTOUM and KINGSTON arrived at Falmouth for refittings.
 
Anti-U-boat action – Destroyer KANDAHAR departed Scapa Flow at 0745 for Hull to repair structural damage to her petrol tank compartment. On passage she attacked a submarine contact east of Berwick in 55‑04N, 1‑41W at 2042, and another one off Filey Brig in 54‑17N, 00‑09W at 0735/10th before arriving in the Humber on the 10th.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer ESKIMO departed Portsmouth on the 8th after refitting at Southampton and arrived at the Clyde on the 9th.
 
Calibration exercise – Destroyers HOTSPUR and MASHONA departed the Clyde at 1200 to provide escort for armed merchant cruiser LETITIA on a full calibre firings in the Forth of Clyde. Afterwards, the destroyers carried out their own full calibre firing. LETITIA proceeded to her station on Northern Patrol, and the destroyers arrived at Tail of the Bank.
 
Submarine deployment – Submarine SEAWOLF departed Harwich for a special patrol in the vicinity of Outer Dowsing Light Vessel.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.116 departed Southend with destroyer VIMIERA joining on the 9th for the voyage to Rosyth. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 11th.
 
Convoy FS.117 departed the Tyne escorted by sloop EGRET and destroyer WHITLEY, and arrived at Southend on the 11th.
 
Anti-U-boat action – Anti-submarine trawler CORNELIAN (568grt) on patrol near Bar Light Vessel in Liverpool Bay in 51-30.5N, 3-29W attacked a submarine contact. Destroyer WHIRLWIND and anti-submarine yacht VIRGINIA (712grt) searched the area on the 10th in daylight, but were unable to reestablish contact.
 
Trawler JUST REWARD sighted a light nine miles NE by E of Scarborough, and considering it to be a dan buoy, approached. However, on arrival at the light, the trawler found a submarine which dived immediately.
 
U.K.-France inbound convoy – Convoy BC.28 of steamers BARON CARNEGIE (Commodore), BATNA, KERMA, LOCHEE, PIZARRO and RAMON DE LARRINAGA departed the Loire escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS, and arrived in the Bristol Channel on the 11th.
 …
Ship loss from grounding – Steamer ASHLEY (1323grt) ran aground 1.4 miles 225° from East Goodwins Light Vessel. Destroyer BEAGLE was dispatched to assist, but returned to patrol when two tugs arrived. The steamer broke up on the tide on the 11th.
 
Ship loss from collision – Steamer MAINDY HILL (1918grt) was lost in collision with steamer ST ROSARIO (4312grt) three miles NE of Hartlepool. ST ROSARIO was able to proceed to the Tees.
 
Luftwaffe attacks – Belgian fishing vessel SANTA GODELIVIA (33grt) was lost to unknown cause in the North Sea. Later research attributes her loss to attack by aircraft of KG26.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.22F departed Gibraltar with 30 ships escorted by French destroyer TIGRE, patrol vessel VIKINGS and British destroyer ACTIVE. The French ships detached on the 15th and arrived at Brest on the 16th. The convoy was escorted at sea by sloop LEITH and destroyer VANOC, and arrived at Liverpool on the 18th.
 
British-French sweep – French battleship PROVENCE, heavy cruiser DUQUESNE and British aircraft carrier HERMES with destroyers DECOY and DEFENDER departed Dakar for a sweep, returning on the 16th.
 
Ship relocation – Base ship EDINBURGH CASTLE arrived at Freetown.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.26 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA. Canadian destroyer OTTAWA also escorted the convoy at the start. At 1800/11th, the convoy was turned over to battleship MALAYA, which detached on the 22nd. Destroyers VANSITTART, VENETIA, VIMY and WOLVERINE escorted the convoy from the 24th to 26th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.23 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser JERVIS BAY, and on the 19th, merged with SL.23, the combined convoy arriving at Liverpool on the 22nd.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/10/2018 5:51:56 PM
March 10. Day 192
Sunday.

A world shattering event. In Ryan, Oklahomo. Chuck Norris was born.

Trevor

Editor: Excuse the humour.I couldn´t resist this one.
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/11/2018 6:46:12 PM
March 10. Day 192
Sunday.

Finland
Negotiations continue in Moscow.

Germany
Quote:
Today is Memorial Day in Germany, a day to remember the dead who’ve been slain in all the wars. … How perverse human beings can be! A front-page editorial in the Lokal Anzeiger says: “This no time for being sentimental. Men are dying for German day and night. One’s personal fate now is unimportant. There is no asking why if one falls or is broken.”
That’s the trouble. … General von Rundstedt, one of the leading military figures in the conquest of Poland, writes in the Völkische Beobachter; “Memorial Day — 1940: Certainly we think earnestly of the dead, but we do no mourn.” And this paper bannerlines in red ink across Page one: “OVER THE GRAVES FORWARD!”
… All Germans I talk to afraid hell will break loose this month.
(Berlin Diary, pp 295-96)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave port on or return to port from patroll. My count shows 7 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» tallies 6 boats. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=7. Total lost=16.

No ships lost to torpedoes or to mines laid by U-boat. Total tonnage lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol.
 
Heavy cruiser YORK arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser WORCESTERSHIRE departed Greenock on Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser CORFU arrived at Greenock after Northern Patrol.
 
At 1710, armed merchant cruiser WOLFE reported sighting nine vessels, believed to be warships, which were later determined to be ice.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer depot ship WOOLWICH escorted by destroyers TARTAR, ESKIMO and MASHONA departed the Clyde at 1000, and arrived at Scapa Flow at 1700/11th .
 
Monitor MARSHAL SOULT, towed by three tugs, was escorted by destroyers EXPRESS and ESK, from Sheerness to Portsmouth.
 
Light cruiser GALATEA departed Scapa Flow for Rosyth, where she arrived on the 11th.
 
Needed repairs – Destroyer DELIGHT reported her feed tank leaking.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine NARWHAL departed Scapa Flow escorted by anti-submarine trawler BUTTERMERE and two other trawlers of the Group for exercises in the Fair Isle Channel.
 
Submarine THISTLE arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarine SUNFISH departed Lowestoft for Harwich, where she arrived later that day.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.107 departed Southend escorted by destroyer VETERAN from the 11th to 12th, although she was damaged in collision on the 11th (q.v.). The convoy dispersed on the 13th.
 
Convoy OB.107 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VERSATILE and WALPOLE from the 10th to 15th, when the convoy dispersed.
 
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.18 of three British, eleven Norwegian, twelve Swedish, eight Finnish and two Estonian ships departed Bergen escorted by destroyers ENCOUNTER, ESCORT, ELECTRA and ECLIPSE. Submarine NARWHAL joined the convoy on the 11th. Destroyer KIMBERLEY departed Scapa Flow at 1800/9th for patrol and then joined the westbound section. When the convoy split into sections, destroyers FAME, which departed Scapa Flow on the 11th, and KIMBERLEY joined to escort the west coast section of ten steamers. NARWHAL joined the convoy on the 12th. Three steamers from the Orkneys joined for passage to east coast ports. The convoy of 25 steamers arrived at Methil on the 13th without incident, escorted by ENCOUNTER, ESCORT, ELECTRA and ECLIPSE. On the same day, FAME and KIMBERLEY arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.27 of nine steamers departed Methil escorted by the 1st Anti-submarine Group, supported by destroyer JAVELIN, and arrived in the Tyne later that day. JAVELIN went on ahead to the Tyne to escort Norwegian steamer MIRA (1152grt) to Methil, where they arrived on the 11th.
 
Convoy FN.117 departed Southend escorted by sloop PELICAN and destroyer VIVIEN, and arrived at the Tyne on the 12th.
 
Convoy FS.118 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops BLACK SWAN and GRIMSBY, and arrived at Southend on the 12th.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer FORESTER attacked a contact east of South Ronaldsay in 58‑47.8N, 02‑45.9W at 1044, which was later found to be the wreck of sunken collier GIRALDA.
 
Destroyer FOXHOUND, after standing by the scene of destroyer GURKHA's submarine attack, was ordered to return to Scapa Flow. En route, she was diverted to Rosyth, where she arrived on the 11th.
 
Destroyer HASTY, which departed Devonport on the 9th en route to the Clyde after refitting, attacked a submarine contact at 0315, SW of Chicken Rock, I.O.M. in 53‑47N, 05‑16W. The attack was unsuccessful, and the contact was later assessed as probably a collier wreck. HASTY arrived in the Clyde at 1100/10th.
 
Destroyer KELLY, on passage from Lerwick, attacked a contact at 1230 off Stronsay in 59-00-07N, 2-18-09W, which was later determined to be non-submarine. She later arrived at Scapa Flow for temporary repairs.
 
Sloop FOLKESTONE on convoy duty SW of Milford Haven in 51-32N, 5-21W attacked a submarine contact, which was determined to be non-submarine, and rejoined the convoy. Later at 1925/11th, FOLKESTONE, ahead of her convoy of two ships, attacked a submarine contact in 55-29N, 4-56.5W off Holy Isle in the Firth of Clyde.
 
Anti-submarine trawler JUNIPER (530grt) attacked a submarine contact at 1700 in 57-15N, 7-00W off Ushinish.
 

ship transfer
Light cruiser DRAGON arrived at Gibraltar from Portland and departed the same day for Malta.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/12/2018 8:14:17 PM
March 11. Day 193
Monday.

Finland
Negotiations continue in Moscow concerning the end of the Soviet-Finnish War.

Germany
Quote:
A talk today with General von Schell, a wizard who is responsible for oil and automobiles. He claimed he would have enough oil for a ten-year war. He said his factories are now producing only 20 types of trucks as compared with 120 last year.
Beginning April 20, all German youths between ten and eighteen will be compelled to join the Hitler Youth. Conscription of youth was laid down in a law dated 1936, but only goes into effect new. Boys between seventeen and eighteen will receive preliminary military training
(Berlin Diary, p 297)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=2 (U-333, -352); launched=0; commissioned=1 (U-101). Six U-boats (U-30, -34, -46, -47, -49, -51) leave Wilhelmshaven on patrol; one boat (U-14) returns to harbour at Wilhelmshaven after 9 days on patrol. Agreed count=7 U-boats at sea.

One U-boat (U-31) lost this date:
U-31, lost to an RAF bomber. Complement: 45 + 13 other personnel=58; lost=58.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=8. Total lost=17. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
Sunk … in the Jade Bight in position 53.37N, 08.10E by bombs from a British Bristol Blenheim aircraft (82 Sqn RAF/O). 58 dead (all hands lost).
Raised on 15 March 1940, repaired at Wilhelmshaven and returned to service on 30 July 1940.
(«uboat.net»)

One neutral ship lost to RN fire after being struck by torpedos. Total tonnage lost=6236.
Eulota, a Dutch motor tanker of 5068 tons, in ballast from Rotterdam to Curaçao. Complement=42; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 03.17 hours … the unescorted and neutral Eulota … was hit on starboard side amidships by one G7e torpedo from U-28 while steaming on a non-evasive course at 11 knots in clear weather about 130 miles west of Ushant, France. The explosion broke the back of the tanker and opened a large hole just below the waterline, but she only settled slowly aft with an increasing list to starboard. The U-boat did not wait for the ship to sink before departing the area and left the survivors in doubt about the reason for the explosion. The crew of 42 men abandoned ship in three lifeboats after about one hour, remained nearby and reboarded the tanker at dawn in an attempt to right her, but discovered that a fire had broken out amidships and left again at 09.30 hours.

A French patrol aircraft sighted the burning Eulota in the afternoon and the nearby HMS Broke (D 83) … and HMS Wild Swan (D 62) …from convoy OG-21 were directed to the tanker, which broke in two in the meantime and only the bow section was still afloat when the destroyers arrived. The latter picked up the survivors, five of them slightly and one severely wounded, while HMS Broke scuttled the wreck by gunfire in 48°38N/08°22W. They were then ordered to hunt the U-boat together with Frondeur and La Capricieuse that had been sent from Brest, but U-28 had long departed the area. The survivors were landed at Plymouth on 12 March.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Flag transfer – Vice Admiral Battlecruiser Cruiser Squadron raised his flag on battlecruiser RENOWN.
 
Ship movements – Light cruiser EDINBURGH arrived at Rosyth.
 
Heavy cruisers NORFOLK, BERWICK and YORK, after completing their practices, were to proceed to Rosyth where they arrived on the 13th.
 
Light cruiser GALATEA became flagship of the 2nd Cruiser Squadron at 1600.
 
Refitting – Light cruiser ORION, which arrived from the West Indies in the Clyde on 25 February, completed her refitting at Devonport, and departed for Bermuda on the 14th.
 
Destroyer dutiy – Destroyers HASTY and HOTSPUR departed the Clyde escorting tankers BACCHUS, PRESTOL and BRITISH LADY to Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyer VETERAN, en route from Portsmouth to Plymouth in convoy OA.107, was sent to search for steamer CLAN STUART (5760grt), which had been damaged in a collision. VETERAN was herself damaged in collision with tanker HORN SHELL (8372grt), also of OA.107, ten miles 176° from Start Point,. Her stern was damaged, maximum speed was restricted twelve knots, and she was taken to Devonport for repairs, completed on 17 April.
 
Anti-U-boat exercises – Anti-submarine exercises were conducted at Scapa Flow with all available destroyers participating under HARDY (D.2).
 
Submarine activity – Submarine UNITY arrived at Blyth after patrol.
 
Submarine L.23 departed Blyth on patrol.
 
Submarine STERLET departed Lowestoft and arrived at Harwich.
 
Submarine TRIBUNE conducted her full speed trial, which was unsatisfactory, and docked at Rosyth later in the day.
 
RN minelaying – Minelayer TEVIOTBANK, destroyers ICARUS, IMPULSIVE, and minesweepers SEAGULL and SHARPSHOOTER departed Invergordon on the 11th on minelaying mission PA 3 off Kinnaird Head in Moray Firth. The mines were laid on the 12th.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – … Convoy OG.21 was formed from two convoys - (1) OA.105G, which departed Southend on the 7th, escorted by sloop ABERDEEN, and (2) OB.105G, which departed Liverpool on the 8th escorted by destroyers VIMY and WINCHELSEA, with 38 ships. OB.105G was delayed due to fog and diverted to Milford Haven, arriving on the 9th. WINCHELSEA escorted the convoy from Milford Haven, and destroyers BROKE and WILD SWAN escorted the OB.G section from Isle of Wight on the 9th. Destroyer VIMY from convoy HG.21 joined on the 11th. The convoy was escorted by destroyers WINCHELSEA, VIMY and BROKE until the 11th March. French destroyer PANTHERE and patrol vessel MERCEDITE joined the convoy on the 10th and destroyer WISHART on the 14th. The convoy arrived at Gibraltar on the 17th, escorted by the two French ships and the British destroyer.
 
Blockship movement – Blockship JUNIATA (1139grt) departed the Tyne under the tow of tug KROOMAN, and escorted by the 1st Anti-submarine Group and destroyer JUPITER. The blockship arrived at Methil on the 12th. On the 13th, JUNIATA departed Methil escorted by anti-submarine trawlers IMPERIALIST … and ALOUETTE … for Scapa Flow. She was later deployed at Scapa Flow.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.19 of eight British, fourteen Norwegian, seven Swedish, two Danish, five Finnish, four Estonian ships for Norway and one ship for Aberdeen departed Methil at 1500 escorted by destroyers COSSACK, NUBIAN, GURKHA and ILEX. The convoy was joined by a section of 13 merchant ships from Kirkwall escorted by destroyers FAULKNOR and FORTUNE which departed Scapa Flow on the 12th. These merchant ships are included in the sailing breakdown from Methil. Destroyers FAULKNOR and FORTUNE relieved ILEX which returned to Scapa Flow. On the 13th, at 1715 east of Duncansby Head in 58-37N, 1-06W, NUBIAN attacked a submarine contact. The destroyer then returned to the convoy. Light cruiser EDINBURGH and anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO arrived at Scapa Flow on the 12th to provide close support for the convoy.
 
CAIRO after sailing from Scapa Flow was forced to return with sea damage. Antiaircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Sullom Voe on the 13th to provide anti-aircraft support. The convoy arrived safely at Bergen on the 14th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.28 of twenty one ships departed Methil, escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group and covered by destroyers JERVIS and JAGUAR, and arrived in the Tyne the next day.
 
Convoy FN.118 of 27 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyer VEGA, sloop STORK, destroyer WOOLSTON, and arrived in the Tyne on the 13th.
 
Convoy FS.119 departed the Tyne escorted by sloop LOWESTOFT, HASTINGS and destroyer VALOROUS and covered by destroyers JERVIS and JAGUAR. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 13th.
 …
French naval activities – French battleship BRETAGNE and heavy cruiser ALGERIE, carrying 147 tons of gold to be deposited in the United States, departed Toulon escorted by large destroyers VAUBAN, AIGLE, MAILLE BREZE. The ships passed Gibraltar on the 13th. Since the United States was still a declared neutral, the battleship and heavy cruiser proceeded to Halifax where the gold was unloaded and shipped to the United States. The destroyers were detached at sea and returned to Casablanca on the 17th. VAUBAN and AIGLE departed Casablanca on the 21st and joined armed merchant cruisers EL KANTARA, EL MANSOUR, VILLE D' ORAN and EL DJEZAIR which departed Brest on the 20th after the cancellation of Finland operations. Destroyers TARTU and CHEVALIER PAUL departed Brest with the cruisers, but were ordered to return for other duties. VAUBAN and AIGLE passed Gibraltar with the cruisers on the 23rd and arrived at Oran on the 24th. Destroyer MAILLE BREZE with steamer MEDIE II departed Casablanca on the 19th and passed Gibraltar on the 20th. They arrived at Marseilles on the 22nd with troops.
 
Swordfish loss – In night air accident, a Swordfish of 823 Squadron crashed at Hal Far. Lt T W G French, Naval Airman J O'Riley, and LAC G A Lawrence of 812 Squadron were killed.
 
German navy raiding preparation – German auxiliary cruisers ATLANTIS and ORION departed Kiel for gunnery exercises in the North Sea prior to departing on mercantile raiding missions. As the Kiel Canal was still icebound, ex battleship HESSEN, acting as an icebreaker, cleared the Canal for their passage to the sea. After these exercises, both returned to Kiel for final preparations and provisioning.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruisers CAPETOWN, CALEDON and CALYPSO arrived at Alexandria after a short exercise.
 
U-boat activitiesU.30, U.46, U.47, U.49, U.51 departed Wilhelmshaven to take stations off Norway to combat British STRATFORD operations and later support their own WESERUBUNG operation.
[Ed. note: U-34 is also recorded as leaving Wilhelmshaven this day.]
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/13/2018 5:26:55 PM
March 12. Day 194
Tuesday.

Finland
Quote:
The Russo-Finnish war ended with an agreement signed in Moscow. Russia got an area of about 16,000 square miles, including the Karelian Isthmus, the naval base at Hangö, and the city of Viipuri. Two hundred thousand Finns in the ceded areas were to be sent to Finland. The campaign cost Russia a dear price. More than 68,000 men were killed in action, and 1,600 tanks and 700 aircraft were lost. Finland suffered 24,923 military dead.
(Goralski, pp 107-8)
[Ed. note: the cost to Russia may have been high, but this war placed the entire Gulf of Finland under Soviet control. As a defensive action against the real enemy, Germany, this “costly battle” may have saved Leningrad after Barbarossa]
Quote:
The conditions dictated by the Soviet government and accepted by the Finns are severe; they include the cession of Karelian isthmus, including Viipuri, of part of western Karelia, and of the Rybachiy peninsula in the Barents sea. The terms confirm that the Hanko peninsula must be lasted to the USSR for 30 years and that Russian personnel and materials must be allowed free passage in the region of Petsamo. Stricken and humiliated, Finland still retains its independence.
(2194 Days, pp 44-5)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=1 (U-99); commissioned=0. No U-boats leave on patrol; One boat (U-29) enters Wilhelmshaven after 31 days on patrol. Ten U-boats at sea. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=8. Total lost=17.

No ships lost to U-boat action by mine, deck gun or torpedo. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser MANCHESTER arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol.
 
Destroyer activities – Destroyers HARDY (D.2), FIREDRAKE, HOSTILE, TARTAR escorted heavy cruisers BERWICK, NORFOLK and YORK of the 1st Cruiser Squadron on a full caliber shoot west of the Orkneys. After the shoot, the cruisers proceeded to Rosyth. The destroyers INTREPID and GRIFFIN proceeded 1931 to search for a submarine reported by aircraft at 1900 east of South Ronaldsay in 58‑49N, 02‑20W. Destroyers HARDY, FIREDRAKE, HOSTILE, ILEX, TARTAR were ordered at 2000 to join. At 2130, HARDY and FIREDRAKE attacked a submarine contact and at 2140, TARTAR attacked a submarine contact east of Copinsay in 58‑53.5N, 02‑15W.All the attacks were unsuccessful. The contact was later assessed as probably a wreck. HARDY, HOSTILE, TARTAR arrived at Scapa Flow after the hunt on the 13th. FIREDRAKE was detailed to patrol on a line south of Canntlick Head to Sandwick Bay, South Ronaldshay.
 
Destroyers ESKIMO, PUNJABI, MASHONA departed Scapa Flow at 0030 for the Clyde for escort duties, and arrived late on the 12th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy TM.25 departed the Tyne, escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group and supported by destroyer JAVELIN.
 
Convoy FN.119 departed Southend escorted by destroyer JERVIS and WHITLEY, sloop EGRET, and arrived in the Tyne on the 14th.
 
Ships’ damage – Destroyer WREN was damaged in a collision with steamer LACKLAN (8670grt) 16 miles 180° off the Lizard. The stern of the destroyer was damaged. The steamer proceeded to Falmouth. WREN was repaired at Plymouth completing on 13 April.
 
Destroyer WOLSEY was slightly damaged when she grounded alongside an oiler in the Firth of Forth.
 
Anti U-boat activity – Anti-submarine trawlers LE TIGER … and COVENTRY CITY … attacked a submarine contact off Aberdeen in 57-13N, 1-56W.
 …
 Destroyers ILEX, GRIFFIN, INTREPID were submarine hunting in Moray Firth after a report by a British aircraft. INTREPID was joined on the 13th by destroyers FOXHOUND and IVANHOE.

Command reassignment – The 1st, 7th and 12th Destroyer Flotillas and the I's of the 20th Flotilla were placed under the control of the Commander in Chief, Home Fleet.
 
Ship fitting – Destroyer BRILLIANT completed boiler cleaning and degaussing alongside depot ship SANDHURST at Dover. Destroyer BOADICEA went alongside SANDHURST for similar work.

Escort work – FOXHOUND and IVANHOE had escorted steamers DEVON CITY (4928grt) and SPANKER (1875grt) from Methil departing at 1200/12th and arriving at Scapa Flow on the 13th.
 
Submarine activity – Submarines NARWHAL and SWORDFISH departed Scapa Flow for Rosyth and Blyth, respectively. Anti-submarine whaler BUTTERMERE (560grt), escorting the submarines in Moray Firth … made attacks on a submarine contact. The contact was probably a buoy laid by minesweeper NIGER after her submarine attack on 21 February. NARWHAL arrived at Rosyth on the 13th. SWORDFISH continued on to Blyth where she arrived later on the 13th.
 
Cable repairs – Destroyers WOLSEY, BRAZEN and cable ship ROYAL SCOT arrived at Rosyth after completing the work of repairing the cables.
 
Submarine activity[-/b] – Destroyer VENETIA, escorting convoy OB.106, attacked a submarine contact west of Ushant in 48‑10N, 09‑14W at 1910. Sloop ROCHESTER was in company and reported an underwater explosion at 1940.
 
Submarine PORPOISE departed Portsmouth for Rosyth, and on the 13th, left Southend in convoy FN.120 for the passage north.
 
Submarine URSULA departed Blyth for patrol, and on the 14th, was ordered to the vicinity of Gotenburg to attack German destroyers reported operating in the area.
 
Submarines TRITON, TRUANT and SEAL departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Naval air loss – Lt P.G. Philcox RNVR and Able Seaman D. Lewis were killed when their Proctor of 758 Squadron crashed near Worthy Down.
 
Merchant ship activity – Steamers MACGREGOR LAIRD (4015grt) and LOMBARDY (3379grt) arrived at the Clyde from the south, leaving there on the 16th to return to Newport.
 
French merchant lost to mines – French fishing vessel ROSE EFFEUILEE (35grt) was lost on a mine laid by German minelaying Ship 11 in the North Sea in 51.25N, 01.45E; the entire crew was rescued.
 
Impact of Soviet-Finnish peace – A peace treaty between the USSR and Finland was announced and signed on the 13th. British operation STRATFORD, and Plan R 3, the proposed landing of troops at Narvik and Trondheim on the 20th to be followed shortly by landings at Stavanger and Bergen to relieve Finnish troops, was cancelled. The ships of the operation were released on the 15th. Heavy cruisers of the 1st Cruiser Squadron returned to Northern Patrol duties. Light cruisers GALATEA and AURORA with destroyers of the 6th Destroyer Flotilla departed the Clyde to return to Scapa Flow.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar homebound convoy – Convoy HG.22 of thirty nine ships departed Gibraltar escorted by destroyers WATCHMAN and VORTIGERN from 12 to 19 March. WATCHMAN and VORTIGERN were detached to Devonport and Portsmouth, respectively, for leave. Destroyers VANQUISHER, WITCH, ACASTA escorted the convoy in Home Waters from 19 to 21 March. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 22nd.
 
Ship repairs, Mediterranean – Destroyer WRESTLER arrived at Gibraltar after repairs at Malta.
 
French naval collision damage
– French large destroyers MILAN and ÉPERVIER collided during preparations for the Finland operations. MILAN was repaired at Cherbourg completing on 4 April and ÉPERVIER at Brest, completing on 12 April.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/14/2018 6:12:31 PM
March 13. Day 195
Wednesday. Waxing crescent moon.

Finland
Quote:
At 11.00 a.m. all hostilities cease on the Finnish front. In its war with the Soviet Union, Finland has lost some 25,000 dead, as against 200,000 lost by the Russians; the wounded number 45,000 against an unspecified, but certainly higher, number by the Russians. By the end of the operations on the Finnish front, at least 45 Russian infantry divisions, 4 cavalry divisions and 12 armoured groups have been deployed. The Finns have never been able to put more than 200,000 men altogether in the field.
(2194 Days, p 45)

Germany
Quote:
In Moscow last night peace was made between Russia and Finland. It is a very hard peace for Finland and in Helsinki today, according to the BBC, the flags are at half-mast. Berlin, however, is delighted. …It removed the danger of Germany having to fight a war on a long northern front, which she would have had to supply by sea and which would have dispersed her military forces now concentrating in he west for the decisive blow, which may begin any day now.
(Berlin Diary, pp 297)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-43; -44) leave Willhelmshaven on patrol. Total U-boats at sea=11. One U-boat (U-44) reported lost to mines this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18:
• U-44, a Type IX U-boat, lost on the first day of her second patrol. Complement=47; lost=47.

No ships lost to torpedoes or to mines laid by U-boat. Total tonnage lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
Sunk on or about 13 March 1940 in the North Sea north of Terschelling, in approx. position 54.14N, 05.07E, by a mine in the British minefield Field No. 7, laid by the British destroyers HMS Express, HMS Esk, HMS Icarus and HMS Impulsive. 47 dead (all hands lost).
(«boat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Light cruisers ARETHUSA and PENELOPE departed Rosyth for Scapa Flow, and arrived on the 14th.
 
Light cruisers GALATEA and AURORA departed Rosyth for the Clyde, and arrived on the 14th.
 
Light cruiser EDINBURGH arrived at Rosyth after practices.
 
Armed merchant cruiser FORFAR arrived at Greenock after Northern Patrol.
 
Destroyers HOSTILE and TARTAR departed Scapa Flow for the Clyde, and arrived at 1630/14th.
 
Destroyer SOMALI departed the Tees after refitting at Middlesborough for Scapa Flow to conduct a high speed trial en route. She arrived in the Clyde at 1400/14th being diverted en route.
 
Destroyer JAGUAR arrived at Dundee.
 
Ships’ damage – Destroyer KEITH was damaged in a grounding near South West Goodwin Buoy. Damage was limited to her asdic dome, and she was taken to Chatham on the 15th for repairs completed on the 20th.
 
Anti-U-boat patrol – Due to damage to the anti-submarine nets at Scapa Flow, destroyer FIREDRAKE was detached from a U-boat search and began anti-submarine patrol at daylight in the approaches to Hoxa Sound. At 2000, destroyer IMOGEN relieved FIREDRAKE on this patrol station. At 0800/14th, destroyer FOXHOUND relieved IMOGEN. The work on Hoxa Boom was completed at 1900/14th and FOXHOUND returned to Scapa Flow.
 
Convoy escort duty – Destroyers ESKIMO (escort SO), PUNJABI, MASHONA departed the Clyde with convoy NS 1 for Plan R.3. At 0233/15th, the convoy was ordered back to the Clyde with ESKIMO and PUNJABI, while MASHONA continued to Scapa Flow escorting tanker WAR BHARATA.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer HUNTER arrived in the Clyde at 1935 on completion of her refitting at Falmouth.
 
Submarine activities – Submarines NARWHAL, TRIAD, THISTLE and TRIDENT departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Submarine SPEARFISH departed Newcastle and conducted diving trials off Blyth, escorted by a trawler, before arriving at Blyth.
 
Submarine TRIBUNE undocked at Rosyth.
 
Ship collisions – Patrol sloop GUILLEMOT was damaged in a collision with an unknown ship off Southwold, and patrol sloop WIDGEON stood by. She was repaired at Great Yarmouth from 18 March to 19 April.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.109 departed Southend escorted by destroyer WHITEHALL. The convoy was joined on the 14th by destroyers ANTELOPE and ACASTA, with ANTELOPE being relieved on the 15th by destroyer VANESSA. The convoy was dispersed on the 16th with ACASTA and VANESSA in the escort at that time.
 
Convoy OB.109 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers MACKAY and VOLUNTEER from 13 to 16 March, when they were detached to convoy HX.25.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.29 of six ships departed Methil at 0800 escorted by the trawlers of the 1st Anti-submarine Group, sloop FLEETWOOD and destroyer VIMIERA. The convoy arrived later in the day.
 
Convoy FN.120 departed Southend escorted by sloops BLACK SWAN and GRIMSBY. The convoy included submarine PORPOISE on passage to Rosyth. PORPOISE was detached at 0200/15th and arrived on the 16th. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 15th.
 
Convoy FS.120 of 29 ships and an additional five ships from Middlesborough and five from the Humber departed the Tyne escorted by sloops LONDONDERRY, FLEETWOOD and destroyer VIMIERA. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 15th.
 
U..K.-France convoys – Convoy SA.33 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by sloops FOXGLOVE and ROSEMARY, and arrived at Brest on the 15th.
 
Convoy AXF 2 of one steamer arrived at St Malo.
 …
U.30 on patrol encountered a British submarine.
 
German blockade loss – German merchant ship LA CORUNA (7359grt), which had departed Rio de Janiero on 3 February, was intercepted east of Iceland in 63‑00N, 10‑20W by armed merchant cruiser MALOJA on Northern Patrol. The German steamer, disguised as Japanese steamer TAKI MARU, set herself afire when she was unable to escape. The British ship rescued the 18 officers and 50 ratings of the German crew.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.27 departed Halifax at 0700 escorted by Canadian destroyers RESTIGOUCHE and ST LAURENT. At 1500/13th, RESTIGOUCHE was ordered by armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA to assist French submarine SIDI FERRUCH which was having trouble getting through the ice area. At 1340/14th, the convoy was turned over to the ocean escort armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA, which was detached on the 25th. Destroyers AMAZON, VANOC, VERSATILE and WINDSOR escorted the convoy from 25 to 28 March, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
Ship collision in convoy – Steamer ROSSINGTON COURT (6922grt) and tanker ATHELVIKING (8779grt) of convoy HX.26 collided six hundred miles east of Halifax. The tanker had to return to Halifax.
 
German mercantile lossses – German steamer ESCHERSHEIM (3303grt) was lost near Loenstrup and Hirtshals off the coast of Jutland after hitting a submerged wreck. Flooding became uncontrollable, and she was run aground in 57-36N, 09-57E to prevent sinking.
 
Southern Atlantic ship movement – Armed merchant cruiser RANPURA, cable ship MIRROR and A.S.I.S. PHILOMEL departed Gibraltar, escorted by destroyers ACTIVE and WRESTLER until dark on the 15th. The armed merchant cruiser and A.S.I.S. ship headed for Freetown, via Dakar and the cable ship for St Vincent, Cape Verde Island, for cable repair. ACTIVE arrived back at Gibraltar on the 16th after escorting the cable ship, and WRESTLER arrived back at Gibraltar on the 17th after escorting the Freetown ships.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/15/2018 4:59:03 PM
March 14. Day 196
Thursday.

Germany
Quote:
...ITEMS: Two more germans beheaded today for “damaging the people’s interests.” A third sentenced to death; same charge. … The Germans boast that prices here have not risen. Today in the Adlon I paid a dollar for a dish of boiled carrots. … Göring today decrees that the people must give up their copper, bronze, brass, tin, lead, and nickel. How can Germany fight a long war lacking these? In 1938 Germany imported from a broad nearly a million tons of copper, 200,000 tons of lead, 18,000 tons of tin, and 4,000 tons of nickel.
(Berlin Diary, p 299)

Britain
Quote:
In London last night, one Mohamed Sing Azad shot and killed Sir Michael O’Dwyer. Not Ghandhi, but most other Indians I know, will feel this is divine retribution. O’Dwyer was once Lieutenant-Governor of the Punjab and bora a share of responsibility in the 1919 Amritsar massacre, in which General Dyer shot fifteen hundred Indians in cold blood. When I was at Amritsar eleven years after, in 1930, the bitterness still stuck in the people there. Goebbels makes the most of the assassination.
(Berlin Diary, pp 298-9)

China
Quote:
Only three of 30 Chinese fighters escaped destruction when they engaged a flight of 12 Japanese Zeros over Chengtu. The Japanese suffered no losses
(Goralski, p 108)

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-375); launched=0; commissioned=0. Nine U-boats (U-7; -9; -19; -20; -24; -56; -57; -59) leave Wilhelmshaven; no U-boats return to harbour from patrol. Total 19 U-boats at sea. No U-boats reported lost this date.
U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

No ships lost to U-boats by torpedo, mine or deck gun.. Total tonnage lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Major ship movement – Battlecruiser HOOD departed Scapa Flow at 1515 escorted by destroyers HARDY (D.2), HOTSPUR and IMOGEN for the Clyde.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser CALIFORNIA departed Greenock on Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruisers CILICIA and TRANSYLVANIA arrived at Greenock from Northern Patrol.
 
Collision repair – Destroyer KELLY departed Scapa Flow at 0400 for Sheerness to repair her collision damage of 9 March at Blackwall.
 
Destroyer activities – Destroyers KASHMIR and FORESIGHT departed the Clyde for Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyer INTREPID arrived at Invergordon from patrol.
 
Destroyer IVANHOE departed Scapa Flow at 0715 for Moray Firth Patrol.
 
Minelayer TEVIOTBANK and destroyers ICARUS and IMPULSIVE arrived at the Humber to load mines.
 
Submarine activity – Submarines STERLET and SNAPPER departed Harwich on patrol.
 
Submarine SEAWOLF arrived at Harwich from patrol.
 
Polish submarine WILK was undocked at Dundee.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OG.22F was formed from two convoys - (1) OA.108G, which departed Southend on the 11th escorted by destroyer WITCH, and (2) OB.108G, which departed Liverpool on the 11th, escorted by sloops BIDEFORD and FOWEY, of thirty ships. BIDEFORD joined the convoy on the 12th and FOWEY on the 13th. Destroyer WRESTLER joined on the 19th. Both sloops and the destroyer travelled with the convoy to Gibraltar where it arrived on the 19th. The sloops were temporarily assigned to the 13th Destroyer Flotilla to replace sloops SCARBOROUGH and WELLINGTON.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.30 of twenty three ships departed Methil escorted by the 3rd Anti-submarine Group, sloop PELICAN, destroyers VIVIEN and JAVELIN. The convoy arrived in the Tyne later in the day.
 
Convoy FS.121 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloop PELICAN and destroyer VIVIEN, and arrived at Southend on the 16th.
 
Destroyer JANUS and the 1st Anti-submarine Group escorted convoy TM.26 from the Tyne.
 
Anti-U-boat actions – After a steamer sighted a periscope one mile southwest of Elie Ness, escort vessel WHITLEY and sloop EGRET were dispatched to investigate. They were joined by destroyer BRAZEN, escort vessels VEGA, WOOLSTON, sloop STORK, and the 19th Anti-submarine Group. WHITLEY and STORK made attacks but further investigation showed this contact to be non submarine.
 
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.19 of three British, sixteen Norwegian, seven Swedish, four Finnish and five Estonian ships departed Bergen escorted by destroyers COSSACK, NUBIAN, GURKHA, FAULKNOR and FORTUNE. The convoy was covered by light cruiser EDINBURGH. At 0824/16th, EDINBURGH made a submarine contact in 59-07N, 00-57W, southeast of Fair Isle, and she and COSSACK attacked the contact. At 1330/16th, COSSACK attacked a contact east of Duncansby Head in 58-36N, 1-35W.This contact had been earlier attacked by aircraft. At 2330, EDINBURGH made an attack off Tod Head in 56-54N, 2-13W. When the convoy split into two sections, FAULKNOR and FORTUNE escorted the west coast section of 15 ships to Cape Wrath where the convoy was dispersed. The destroyers arrived at Scapa Flow on the 17th at 0700. Destroyers FAULKNOR and FORESTER anchored in Longhope pending the clearance of Gutter Sound. The convoy of 20 ships arrived at Methil without incident on the 17th. COSSACK, NUBIAN and GURKHA arrived at Rosyth at 1700/17th.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.30 of seven steamers, including BATALLINN, BARON GRAHAM (Commodore), EILDON, MARSLEW departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS, and arrived in the Loire on the 16th.
 
U-boat operations against submarines – An unsuccessful operation was mounted by German submarines to hunt down British and French submarines in the North Sea. Submarines deployed were U.7, U.9, U.19, U.20, U.23, U.24, U.56, U.57, U.59.
 
U.1, U.2, U.3, U.4 were positioned off southern Norway. On the 16th, U.1 departed Kiel for operations south of Lindesnes. On the 16th, U.2 departed Kiel for operations off Lister. On the 18th, U.3 departed Wilhelmshaven to operate in the North Sea against British submarines. On the 18th, U.4 departed Wilhelmshaven to operate in the Skagerrak.
 
On the 20th, U.22 departed Wilhelmshaven to operate off Pentland Firth. On the 20th, U.21 and U.22 were ordered to patrol south of Lindesnes. On the 21st, U.21 departed Wilhelmshaven to operate off Pentland Firth.

On the 22nd, U.1 was moved to a position outside the three mile limit off Egeroy. On the 22nd, U.2 sighted what was identified as either a heavy cruiser or an aircraft carrier with five destroyers in 57-46N, 07-18E. The submarine was unable to gain a firing position. On the 23rd, U.3 and 4 were ordered to area of Lindesnes and Revingen, respectively, to attack warships and transports. On the 27th, U.4 was moved to area of Lindesnes. U.1, U.2, U.3, U.4 returned to Wilhelmshaven on the 29th.
 
Ship movement – Minesweepers PANGBOURNE, ALBURY, and ROSS arrived at Gibraltar from Malta.
 
Ship damage, Indian waters – Aircraft carrier EAGLE in the Bay of Bengal near the Nicobar Islands was damaged at 0730 when a 250 pound bomb exploded in the bomb room in an operational mishap. One officer, Gunner R.R. Keech, MVO and twelve ratings were killed. Five crew were wounded, one dying of wounds at Singapore. EAGLE proceeded to Singapore for repairs and completed these and a refit on 4 May. She left Singapore on 9 May for the Mediterranean.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.24 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser CHESHIRE until 29 March. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 31st.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/16/2018 10:10:30 PM
March 15. Day 197
Saturday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
A year ago last night Hitler got Hacha, then President of what was left of Czechoslovakia after Munich and the Nazi-engineered “secession” of Slovakia, into his Chancellery and after threatening until four a.m. that he would destroy Prague and its million people with the Luftwaffe, forced the poor old man to “ask” for German “protection.” (Strange how few Germans know yet of what took place that night.) …
My good friend Z, a captain in the navy on duty with the High Command, has not appeared in uniform all week. Today he told me why. “I have no more white shirts. I have not been able to have my laundry done for eight weeks. I have no soap to wash my shirts myself, being in the same position as the laundry. I have only colored shirts left. So I wear civilian clothes.” A nice state for the navy to be in.
(Berlin Diary, pp 299-300)

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-1; -2) leave Kiel on patrol; no boats return from patrol. Total 21 U-boats at sea.
No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

No ships lost to U-boats, by torpedo, minelaying or deck gun. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=0. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Major ship movemen – Battlecruiser HOOD with destroyers HARDY (D.2), HOTSPUR and IMOGEN arrived in the Clyde from Scapa Flow.
 
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruisers DEVONSHIRE and NORFOLK ran several runs over the D.G. range in the Firth of Forth. The cruisers then departed Rosyth for Scapa Flow. The cruisers were designated for Northern Patrol duties. DEVONSHIRE proceeded directly to patrol in the Denmark Strait.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA arrived at Sullom Voe.
 
Destroyers HAVELOCK and HAVANT departed Portsmouth for the Clyde, and arrived on the 16th. They left again on the 16th escorting submarine TARPON to Portsmouth.
 
Destroyer MATABELE arrived in the Clyde after refitting at Devonport.
 
Light cruisers GALATEA and AURORA escorted by destroyers SOMALI, TARTAR and MATABELE departed the Clyde for Scapa Flow where they arrived at 0700/16th.
 
Destroyer MASHONA escorting tanker WAR BHARATA arrived at Scapa Flow.

Destroyers JERVIS and JANUS arrived at Rosyth.

RN-RAF joint training – Destroyer WOOLSTON departed Rosyth to act in conjunction with a Bomber Command exercise in the North Sea.
 
Submarine escort for East Coast convoy – Submarine CLYDE departed Portsmouth for Blyth, joined convoy FN.122 on the 16th, and detached when the convoy was abreast Blyth, arriving on the 18th.
 
French naval visit – French torpedo boats BOUCLIER, FLORE and MELPOMENE under the command of C.C. J.J.M.J. Fourniere arrived at Dover from Dunkirk for a courtesy visit. The torpedo boats were retained to assist in covering the 10th Minesweeping Flotilla operations between North Goodwin Light Vessel and Fairy Bank Buoy on 17 and 18 March. The torpedo boats then returned to Dunkirk.
 
Weather damage at Scapa Flow – Heavy weather again carried away a 500 to 600 foot section of the anti-submarine nets at Scapa Flow. Anti-submarine trawler COVENTRY CITY went ashore at Longhope. Destroyer KIMBERLEY commenced an anti-submarine patrol off Hoxa Boom south a line from Cantick Head to Sandwick Bay, South Ronaldsay. At 1900, KIMBERLEY was relieved by destroyer FORESIGHT. At 0800/16th, FORESIGHT was relieved by destroyer FEARLESS. The nets were repaired at 1100/16th and FEARLESS returned to Scapa Flow.
 
Mine damage – Anti-submarine trawler PERIDOT (550grt, Probationary Skipper W. H. Burgess RNR) was badly damaged on a mine off Dover in 51N, 1-35E, while on station LD 6. Anti-submarine trawler SAON (386grt) on station LD 7 took off the crew of the trawler. There were no casualties. Destroyer BRILLIANT took the trawler in the tow and transferred the tow at daylight at 0825 to tug LADY DUNCANNON (181grt). However, PERIDOT sank before arriving in harbour.
 
Destroyer BEAGLE was instructed to order Train Ferry No. 1 (2683grt), en route from Calais, to pass three miles southwest of the position where trawler PERIDOT was mined.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.20 of nine British, eighteen Norwegian, seven Swedish, two Danish, two Finnish, two Panamanian ships departed Methil escorted by destroyers ENCOUNTER, ESCORT, ELECTRA, ESCAPADE. The convoy was joined at sea by destroyers KASHMIR and KIMBERLEY which departed Kirkwall at 0715/16th with a detachment of twelve ships for the convoy. These ships are included in the Methil sailing breakdown. Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO, assigned to this convoy, sustained sea damage and arrived at Scapa Flow. On the 17th, CAIRO arrived at Sullom Voe to repair the damage. Light cruiser SHEFFIELD departed the Tyne on the 17th and provided close cover for the convoy. The convoy arrived safely at Bergen on the 18th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.31 of five ships departed Methil escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group, destroyer VEGA and sloop STORK. VEGA and STORK detached  at dark to escort convoy FS.122 which departed the Tyne at 2100. Convoy MT.31 arrived in the Tyne that night.
 
Convoy TM.27 departed the Tyne at 1700 escorted by the 3rd Anti-submarine Group and destroyer BRAZEN. Submarine SPEARFISH departed Blyth and joined the convoy on passage to Scapa Flow. Once the convoy was abeam Rosyth, BRAZEN took SPEARFISH on to Scapa Flow.
 
Convoy FN.121 departed Southend escorted by sloops LOWESTOFT, HASTINGS and destroyer VALOROUS. The convoy arrived at the Tyne on the 17th.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Seventeen miles south of Needles, a civilian aircraft reported a submarine. Destroyer ISIS and anti-submarine yacht ST MODWEN (237grt) were ordered into the area, later joined by destroyers HERO and WILD SWAN. Destroyer HERO, en route from Portsmouth to the Clyde, made an attack on a submarine contact off the Needles Channel in 50-36.2N, 1-40.4W. Destroyers ARROW, WILD SWAN and ANTHONY joined HERO in the search of Christchurch Bay and Poole Bay.
 
Blockade work – Anti-submarine trawler STELLA DORADO (416grt) stopped Belgian trawler IBIS (160grt) and brought her to the Downs for examination.
 
The Northern Patrol from 15 March to 31 March sighted sixty nine eastbound merchant ships of which thirteen were sent into Kirkwall for inspection. One German ship was intercepted in this period.
 
Far east waters – Australian armed merchant cruiser KANIMBLA seized Soviet steamer VLADIMIR MAIAKOVSKY (3972grt) in the Sea of Japan and took her into control because she was carrying a cargo of copper from the United States to Germany. On the 26th, near Hong Kong she was handed over to French light cruiser LAMOTTE PICQUET, and taken to Saigon, arriving on 1 April. KANIMBLA also captured Russian steamer SELENGA.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/17/2018 7:17:40 PM
March 16. Day 198
Saturday.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-334); launched=1 (U-120); commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-3; -4) leave from Kiel. 23 U-boats at sea.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

One ship, a neutral, lost to mines laid by U-boats. Total tonnage lost=4512:
Slava, a Yugoslavian steam merchantman of 4512 tons, carrying coal and coke from Cardiff to Buenos Aires. Complement=34; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
… the Slava struck a mine laid on 2 March by U-29 and sank 5 miles southwest of Nash Point in the Bristol Channel. One crew member was lost.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived at Scapa Flow from the Rosyth at 1020 in preparation for sailing on Northern Patrol duties.
 
Major ship movement – Battleship WARSPITE departed the Clyde at 1400 escorted by destroyers HARDY, HOTSPUR, HOSTILE and HUNTER, and arrived safely at Scapa Flow at 1600/17th.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers ESKIMO and PUNJABI arrived at Greenock at 2200 after being relieved of convoy NS 1 by destroyer WANDERER in North Channel.

Luftwaffe attack on Scapa – Destroyer KASHMIR, escorting convoy ON.20, reported the approach of a German air raid on Scapa Flow. In this air raid, by Ju.88's of KG30, heavy cruiser NORFOLK at anchor in Scapa Flow was damaged at 1959. The bomb striking NORFOLK struck the quarter deck near Y turret. The bomb passed through the upper, main, lower decks and exploded near Y shell room. This blew a hole in the starboard side below the water line. A fire was started and X and Y magazines were flooded. …
 
In the same air attack, old battleship IRON DUKE was near missed by three bombs. Two bombs exploded astern of battleship RODNEY causing no damage. Heavy cruiser NORFOLK was the only ship hit, but the Germans claimed hitting three battleships and one cruiser. Most of the Home Fleet was at Scapa Flow at this time and this prompted the Admiralty to order Forbes to take his fleet to sea during the next moonlight period between 19 and 26 March. Gutter Sound was closed due to the danger of magnetic mining from this air raid. Gutter Sound was reopened at 1116/17th.
 
Heavy cruiser NORFOLK departed Scapa Flow at 1630/19th, attended by tug BUCCANEER and escorted by destroyers GURKHA, COSSACK, IVANHOE, GALLANT. The tug was detached en route and returned to Scapa Flow. Destroyers ESKIMO and PUNJABI escorting Tender C (dummy aircraft carrier HERMES - special service vessel MAMARI) traded charges with Destroyers IVANHOE and GALLANT near Cape Wrath. Cruiser NORFOLK arrived in the Clyde at 2230/20th, escorted by destroyers COSSACK, GURKHA, ESKIMO, PUNJABI. The heavy cruiser entered the dockyard in the Clyde on the 27th, NORFOLK was repairing until 14 June 1940. After safely delivering the cruiser, destroyer GURKHA and COSSACK returned to Scapa Flow.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser WOLFE arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser FORFAR departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.

 
Ship movements – Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM and destroyer HERO departed Portsmouth for Scapa Flow and the Clyde, respectively. HERO arrived in the Clyde at 1430 after refitting at Portsmouth.
 
Destroyer HYPERION arrived in the Clyde.
 
Air-sea co-ordination – Destroyers IVANHOE, INTREPID, GALLANT departed Invergordon to patrol in Moray Firth. On the 17th, they were involved in operation HSM with air cooperation.
 
Submarine patrol – Submarines SALMON and STERLET arrived at Harwich on patrol.
 
Submarines SEAL and THISTLE on patrol in the Skagerrak were ordered to exercise contraband control.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.111 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer AMAZON from 16 to 18 March. The convoy dispersed on the 19th.
 
Convoy OB.111 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyer WHIRLWIND and sloop ROCHESTER from 16 to 19 March.

East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.122 departed Southend escorted by sloops LONDONDERRY and FLEETWOOD and destroyer VIMIERA. The convoy arrived at the Tyne on the 18th.
 
Convoy FS.122 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers VEGA and WOOLSTON and sloop STORK, from convoy MT.31. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 17th.
 
Convoy MT.32 departed Methil and arrived at the Tyne later that day.
 
Convoy TM.28 departed the Tyne escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group and destroyer VALOROUS.
 
U.K.-France inbound convoy – Convoy BC.29 of four steamers, including BARON KINNAIRD (Commodore) departed Loire escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS. The convoy arrived in Bristol Channel on the 18th.
 
Loss to mines – Minesweeping drifter MAIDA (107grt, Temporary Skipper R. M. Utting RNR) was sunk on a mine off Margate, ten miles east of North Foreland. Utting and five ratings were lost. Six crew were picked up by minesweeping drifter MARE (92grt) and taken to Dover.
 …
Mediterranean – Light cruiser DELHI arrived at Alexandria with CINCMED aboard.
 
Australian destroyer WATERHEN departed Gibraltar for Malta.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/18/2018 5:44:41 PM
March 17. Day 199
Sunday. First quarter moon.

Germany
Quote:
Much excitement on this Palm Sunday in official quarters over a war communiqué claiming that the Luftwaffe hit and damaged three British battleships in Scapa Flow last night. More important to me was that for the first time the Germans admitted that during the raid their planes also bombed British air bases at Stromness and Kirkwall. In this half-hearted war this is the first time that one side has purposely dropped bombs on the land of the other. It heralds, I suppose, the spring opening of the war in earnest. Editor Kircher of the Frankfurter Zeitung attempts to answer a question this morning that has bothered neutral military minds for a long time. Why haven’t the Germans used their acknowledged air superiority over the Allies? Why are they waiting while the Allies, with American help, catch up? Kircher’s answer is that the Allies have not been catching up, that Germany’s relative superiority has been greatly increased in the last several months.
(Berlin Diary, pp 300-01)

Britain
Quote:
German bombers flew across the North Sea to Scapa Flow… . It was March [15/17, 1940. The bombers dropped their bombs, and someone was killed – the first civilian to die from German bombs on Britih soil since the First World War.
“Was that deliberate?” asked Lord Strbolgi in the Course of Lords.
“No, I should think not,” replied Lord Halifax.
Yet it must be countered. Lord Boom Trenchard, the creator of the Royal Air Force, stood and said, “I do beg your Lordships to remember that the Air Force is an offensive and not a defensive weapon.”
(Human Smoke, p 167)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave from or return to harbour. 23 U-boats at sea.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

One ship, a neutral, lost to torpedo attack by U-boat. Tonnage lost to torpedoes=5375;
Argentina, a Danish motor merchantman of 5375 tons, carrying 700 tons of general cargo from Copenhagen via Las Palmas to South America. Complement=33; lost=33.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
On 13 March 1940 the neutral Argentina left Copenhagen and was reported missing in the North Sea, after sending her last radio message on 17 March.
At 23.25 hours on 17 March 1940 U-38 fired a spread of two torpedoes at an illuminated steamer of about 5000 grt east of Unst, Shetlands. The ship sank 10 minutes after being hit by one torpedo. The victim must have been the Argentina.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Destroyers HERO and HYPERION departed the Clyde at 2015 with RFA tanker PETROBUS (475grt) for Scapa Flow. En route, the tanker was sent into Stornoway and HERO and HYPERION were ordered to Scapa Flow with dispatch, arriving at 0724/19th.
 
Ship collision – Destroyer INTREPID in an accidental collision in the Pentland Firth 50 miles northeast of Kinnaird Head sank trawler OCEAN DRIFT (227grt). Eight survivors were picked up and INTREPID proceeded to Invergordon with a damaged stem for emergency repairs, escorted by destroyers IVANHOE and GALLANT. She departed on the 18th for Southbank near Middlesbrough where repairs were completed on 28 April.
 
At 1750, steamer BELLWYN (1670grt) collided with heavy cruiser SUFFOLK in Princess Dock at Govan. The cruiser required docking, but there was no delay in the ultimate completion date for the cruiser's repair.
 
Ship repairs – Light cruiser EDINBURGH arrived in the Tyne for repairs.
 
Ship movements – Destroyer BRAZEN arrived at Scapa Flow at 0700 with Submarine SPEARFISH.
 
Destroyer IMOGEN departed the Clyde at 0800 for Portsmouth for escort duties.
 
Anti-U-boat duties – Destroyers INGLEFIELD (D.3) and ILEX departed Scapa Flow at 0017 to join destroyers IVANHOE and GALLANT on Moray Firth anti-submarine striking force duties. After this, INGLEFIELD and ILEX arrived at Scapa Flow at 2000/18th.
 
At this time, the Moray Firth Anti-submarine Striking Force was no longer operating. IVANHOE and GALLANT joined the Home Fleet from the Orkneys and Shetlands Command at 0730 and 0830/19th, respectively.
 
Minelaying – Minelayers PRINCESS VICTORIA and TEVIOTBANK, escorted by minelaying destroyers ESK, EXPRESS, ICARUS, IMPULSIVE, departed the Humber for Invergordon for minelaying mission PA 4. The ships arrived at Invergordon on the 19th.
 
Flotilla reassignment – The 7th Destroyer Flotilla was assigned to the Commander in Chief, Home Fleet at midnight.
 
Submarine activities – Submarine TRIDENT and Polish submarine ORZEL arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarine SUNFISH on patrol in the North Sea sighted two large unescorted trawlers, but was unable to attack.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.123, delayed twenty four hours by fog, departed the Tyne escorted by destroyer WALLACE and sloop FLAMINGO. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 19th.
 
Luftwaffe ship attack – Netlayer GUARDIAN departed Scapa Flow on the 16th for Rosyth. On the 17th off Bell Rock, she was attacked by German bombers of KG2, but was not damaged, and arrived at Rosyth later on the 17th.
 
Anti-submarine trawler STOKE CITY (422grt) was attacked by German bombers of KG26 off Girdleness, but was not damaged.
 
Italian merchant breakdown – Italian steamer VERBANIA (6640grt) broke down in 60-54N, 08-52W. Armed boarding vessel NORTHERN DUKE (655grt) stood by and tug WATERMEYER was dispatched to take her in tow. Steamer CARIBOU (2222grt) sighted the ship on the 21st and NORTHERN DUKE located her on the 22nd. Tug ST MELLONS was ordered to replace WATERMEYER on the 23rd, while tug BRIGAND was also ordered to proceed. On the 27th, the Italian steamer in tow of BRIGAND and escorted by armed boarding vessels NORTHERN WAVE (655grt) and NORTHERN GEM (655grt) arrived at Stornoway.
 
Ship grounding – Norwegian steamer VESPASIAN (1570grt) grounded on west side of Copt Point near Folkestone, but was refloated by tugs LADY BRASSEY and GANDIA with no apparent damage.
 
U-boat placement after Scapa attack – German submarines were ordered to positions to attack damaged British ships leaving Scapa Flow after the 16 March air raid. U.57 and U.19 in the North Sea were ordered to the west side of Pentland Firth. U.21 and U.22 were ordered to the east side of Pentland Firth.U.22 departed Wilhelmshaven on the 20th and U.21 departed Wilhelmshaven on the 21st. On the 22nd, U.22 was ordered to assist a German ship grounded on the southern coast of Norway. On the 26th, U.22 was ordered to Moray Firth. On the 27th, U.22 was ordered to assist U.21 which had run aground. U.22 acknowledged none of the changes of orders, and was apparently lost soon after her departure from Wilhelmshaven around 23 March. The submarine was lost with all twenty seven crew on the 27th.
[Ed. note: I assume this means U-22 was lost on or about 23 March and reported/acknowledged lost on 27 March.]
Quote:
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.23F departed Gibraltar with thirty ships, escorted by destroyer BULLDOG, as local escort. French destroyer PANTHERE and auxiliary patrol vessel MINERVE escorted the convoy from 17 to 23 March. Destroyers WINCHELSEA and WAKEFUL came from convoy OG.23F and escorted the convoy from 23 to 26 March. Destroyer WHITEHALL joined the convoy on the 23rd and escorted the convoy until 26 March when the convoy arrived at Liverpool.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/19/2018 5:45:04 PM
March 18. Day 200
Monday.

Germany/Italy
Three views of the Hitler/Mussolini meeting:
Quote:
Hitler and Mussolini conferred at the Brenner Pass. The Duce agreed to joint in the war. Italy’s choice was to attack either France or Yugoslavia, and Mussolini chose the former because its share of the plunder would be greater.
(Goralski, p 108)
Quote:
Hitler and Mussolini meet at Brennero, on the Brenner Pass. The Italian dictator declares that Italy is ready to join in the war against Britain and France.
(2194 Days, p 45)
Quote:
For two and a half hours this morning while a snowstorm raged, Hitler and Mussolini conferred at the Brenner. We opine Hitler wanted to make sure of the Duce before embarking on his spring plans, whatever they are. The Wilhelmstrasse plant tonight was that Hitler had won over Musso to the idea of joining a tripartite bloc with German and Soviet Russia which will establish a new order in Europe. Maybe so.
(Berlin Diary, p 301)

Britain
No notable activity

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-202); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave from or return to harbour. 23 U-boats at sea.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

No ships lost to attack by U-boat. Tonnage lost to torpedoes=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser MANCHESTER departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol.
 
New ship – Destroyer HIGHLANDER (Cdr W. A. Dallmeyer) was completed. Following working up, destroyer HIGHLANDER was assigned to the 9th Destroyer Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet.
 
Destroyer activities – Destroyers IVANHOE and GRIFFIN departed Invergordon. Destroyer IVANHOE arrived at Scapa Flow later the same day. Destroyer GRIFFIN arrived at Aberdeen later the same day.
 
Destroyers JERVIS, JAVELIN, JANUS departed the Humber for Scapa Flow. En route, the destroyers were diverted to pick up convoy ON.21 off Rosyth and escort the convoy to Norway.
 
Destroyers COSSACK and GURKHA departed Rosyth at 1800 for Scapa Flow where they arrived at 0930/19th.
 
Destroyers ESKIMO and PUNJABI departed the Clyde at 1000 for Scapa Flow escorting Tender C (dummy aircraft carrier HERMES - special service vessel MAMARI). On the 19th, destroyers ESKIMO and PUNJABI joined the escort of damaged heavy cruiser NORFOLK. Destroyers IVANHOE and GALLANT were detached from cruiser NORFOLK and took Tender C to Scapa Flow, arriving on the 20th.
 
Destroyer BEDOUIN arrived at Scapa Flow during the morning after refitting at Newcastle.
 
Destroyer IMOGEN reported a defective anti-submarine transmitter.
 
Submarine activities – Submarines TRITON and NARWHAL arrived at Rosyth after patrol. On the 19th, submarine NARWHAL was docked at Rosyth for repairs to the muffler valves.
 
Anti-U-boat patrol – Patrol sloops PINTAIL and SHEARWATER departed Harwich to establish an anti-submarine patrol between Kentish Knock and a position 15 miles 130° from Kentish Knock.
 
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.20 departed Bergen with eight British, twenty one Norwegian, nine Swedish, two Danish, three Finnish ships escorted by destroyers ENCOUNTER, ESCORT, ELECTRA, ESCAPADE, KASHMIR, KIMBERLEY. Despite the protection of anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO, on the 20th, German bombers attacked convoys HN.20 and ON.21. When the convoy split into sections, destroyers ELECTRA and ENCOUNTER left the convoy with the seven ships of the west coast section. The west coast section dispersed off Cape Wrath. On the 20th, anti-submarine trawlers SCOTTISH (558grt) and IMPERIALIST (520grt) departed Kirkwall with three steamers for the convoy. They were ordered that if the convoy was not encountered to proceed independently to Methil. Destroyers ELECTRA and ENCOUNTER arrived at Scapa Flow at 1500/21st. Convoy HN.20 arrived at Methil the morning of 22 March escorted by destroyers KASHMIR (SO), KIMBERLEY, ESCORT, ESCAPADE.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.112 departed Southend escorted by destroyer WOLVERINE from 18 to 20 March and destroyer VANSITTART from 19 to 20 March. The convoy dispersed on the 21st.
 
Convoy OB.112 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VIMY and VENETIA from 18 to 20 March. The convoy dispersed on the 23rd.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.123 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WOOLSTON and VIVIEN and sloops VEGA and PELICAN.This convoy contained 14 ships of cancelled convoy FN.124. The convoy arrived at the Tyne on the 20th.
 
Ship collision – Escort vessel VIMIERA was damaged in a collision with steamer CLERMISTON (1448grt) off Rosyth. There was only minor damage to both vessels. Escort vessel VIMIERA was repaired at Rosyth from 25 to 30 March.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OG.22 was formed with forty nine ships from convoy OA.110G, which departed Southend on the 15th, escorted by destroyer WINDSOR on 15 and 16 March, destroyer WILD SWAN joining on the 26th, destroyer BROKE joining on the 17th, OB.110G, which departed Liverpool on the 15th, escorted by destroyer VANQUISHER and sloop FOLKESTONE. The convoy was escorted by destroyers BROKE and WILD SWAN from 18 to 20 March.French destroyer CHACAL and patrol vessel CAPITAINE ARMANDE escorted the convoy from 18 to 24 March. Destroyer WISHART joined on the 21st and destroyer WRESTLER on the 23rd and both continued to Gibraltar. The convoy arrived at Gibraltar on the 24th.
 
East coast convoys – Convoy MT.33 of twenty five ships departed Methil escorted by the 3rd Anti-submarine Group and supported by sloops LOWESTOFT and HASTINGS and destroyer VALOROUS. On arrival off the Tyne, the sloops and the destroyer escorted convoy FS.124 from the Tyne.
 
Convoy TM.29 departed the Tyne escorted by the 1st Anti-submarine Group and destroyer JUPITER. Destroyer BRAZEN, which had departed Scapa Flow on the 17th for Rosyth, was ordered to relieve destroyer JUPITER which was required at Scapa Flow. After being relieved, en route to Scapa Flow, destroyer JUPITER was diverted to Rosyth to escort convoy ON.21.
 
Anti-U-boat action near Gibraltar – Sloop BIDEFORD, escorting convoy OG.22F, attacked a submarine contact south of Cape St Vincent in 35-58N, 8-55W. Sloop FOWEY was in company escorting this convoy.
 
Luftwaffe shipping attacks – Dutch trawler PROTINUS (202grt) was sunk by German bombers of KG26 off Ijmuiden near Middle Rough Bank. Four crew were lost and submarine UNITY (Lt J F B Brown) rescued seven crew members on the 25th.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.28 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY, SKEENA, OTTAWA. Destroyer OTTAWA returned to Halifax after dark. The destroyers turned over the convoy to ocean escort Battleship ROYAL SOVEREIGN at 1800/19th. The battleship was detached on the 27th. Destroyers ANTELOPE and WARWICK joined the convoy on the 27th, destroyers HAVOCK and VANESSA on the 28th, destroyer VIMY on the 29th. Destroyers HAVOCK and WARWICK were detached on the 28th, destroyer VIMY and VANESSA on the 28th, destroyer ANTELOPE on 2 April, when the convoy arrived at Liverpool.
 
Ship repair needed – Light cruiser DAUNTLESS reported main condenser problems.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruisers CERES and COLOMBO arrived at Port Said.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/20/2018 5:43:09 PM
March 19. Day 201
Tuesday.

Germany
Quote:
A talk today with General von Schell, a wizard who is responsible for oil and automobiles. He claimed he would have enough oil for a ten-year war. He said his factories are now producing only 20 types of trucks as compared with 120 last year.
Beginning April 20, all German youths between ten and eighteen will be compelled to join the Hitler Youth. Conscription of youth was laid down in a law dated 1936, but only goes into effect now. Boys between seventeen and eighteen will receive preliminary military training
(Berlin Diary, p 297)

Britain
Quote:
Chamberlain defended Britain’s lack of assistance to Finland. He said only once did Field Marshal Mannerheim request troop assistance, in January, for 30,000 men to arrive in May. But Chamberlain claimed that while “Germany publicly professed her neutrality,: it “made ever effort to prevent others from saving Finland.: According to Chamberlain, “It was fear of Germany which prevented Norway and Sweden from giving us permission to pass our troops through their countries; the fear of Germany which prevented her (Finland) from making her appeal to us for help.”
(Goralski, p 108)

France
No notable activity.

U.S.A.
Quote:
The first strong condemnation of Nazism from an official representative of the US government. The US ambassador in Canada, James Cromwell, declares that Hitler’s Germany is openly trying to destroy the social and economic order on which the government of the USA is based.
(2194 Days, p 45)

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

[Ed. commentary: of major significance is the RAF attack on Hörnum. In conjunction with the Luftwaffe attack on Scapa Flow two nights previously, this raid signalled at least a potential increase in the introduction of civilian bombing. Action and impact are worth separating:]
Quote:
Fifty RAF bombers struck Hörnum, the German seaplane base on the island of Sylt.
(Goralski, p 108)
Quote:
As a reprisal for the German attack on Scapa Flow on 14 October 1939, 50 RAF bombers raid the German seaplane base at Hörnum on the island of Sylt.
(2194 Days, p 45)[ Ed. note: I do not believe the comment from 2194 Days is correct.]
Quote:
30 Whitleys and 20 Hampdens were dispatched. The Whitleys bombed first, being allocated a 4-hour bombing period; 26 Whitleys claimed to have found the target in clear visibility and to have bombed accurately. The Hampdens followed with a 2-hour bombing period and 15 crews claimed to have bombed accurately. This was the first real bombing operation for both types of aircraft after more than six months of war. 20 tons of high explosives and 1,200 incendiary bombs were dropped. Only 1 Whitley was lost.
This was the biggest operation of the war so far and the first raid on a German land target.
(BC War Diaries, p 30)

[Ed. comment: motivation and evaluation of this raid are perhaps more important than the raid itself.]
Quote:
The British Government ordered Bomber Command to carry out a reprisal raid on one of the German seaplane bases but one where there was no nearby civilian housing.
(BC War Diaries, p 30)
Quote:
Photo reconnaissance found no evidence of any damage inflicted.
(Goralski, p 108)
Quote:
Proper photographic reconnaissance was not carried out until 6 April when photographs of poor quality were brought back; no damage could be seen but some repairs could have been carried out by the Germans in the interval.
(BC War Diaries, p 30)[Ed. comment: RAF Bomber Command bombing accuracy and post-raid reconnaissance were serious weaknesses for some years, and were not really even identified until the Butt Report of 18 Aug 1941. This was an unhappy time for Bomber Command.]

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave Wilhelmshaven on patrol; one boat (U-7) returns to harbour at Wilhelmshaven after 6 days on patrol. U-boats at sea, this date=22.

No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

Two neutral ships lost after being struck by torpedos. Total tonnage lost=2255:
Minsk, a Danish steam merchant of 1229 tons, in ballast from Manchester via Kirkwall to Esbjerg. Complement=20; lost=11.
Charkow, a Danis steam merchant of 1026 tons, in ballast from Manchester via Kirkwall and Methil to Esbjerg. Complement=20; lost=20.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 21.35 hours on 19 March 1940, U-19 spotted two steamers and attacked the first at 22.21 hours with one torpedo, which struck in the engine room and caused the Minsk to sink within six minutes. At 22.37 hours, a second torpedo was fired, which struck the Charkow and caused her to sink by the stern within four minutes.

Nine survivors from Minsk were picked up by HMS Esk (H 15) … and landed at Invergordon on 19 March.

There were no survivors from Charkow, only a body on a raft was found off Peterhead on 26 March and wreckage drifted ashore near Fraserburgh.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Elements of Home Fleet covering operations, convoys – Battleships RODNEY, VALIANT and WARSPITE and destroyers HARDY (D.2), HERO, HUNTER, HASTY, HOTSPUR, HYPERION, HOSTILE of the 2nd Destroyer Flotilla, FORESTER and FEARLESS of the 8th Destroyer Flotilla departed Scapa Flow at 1500. Battlecruisers REPULSE and RENOWN and destroyers INGLEFIELD (D.3), ILEX, DIANA, DELIGHT of the 3rd Destroyer Flotilla, BEDOUIN of the 6th Destroyer Flotilla, destroyer FORTUNE of the 8th Destroyer Flotilla departed Scapa Flow at 1500. While at sea, the Home Fleet would cover the movement of convoys HN.20 and ON.21 and the Operation DU activities.
 
Anti-U-boat action – A German submarine was sighted near Holm Sound between 1730 and 1800 about 250 yards seaward of the blockships. Destroyers departed Scapa Flow between 2030 and 2100 to search. Destroyers FOXHOUND and FIREDRAKE searched the area to seaward. Destroyer FOXHOUND attacked a submarine contact at 2135 off Grimness in 58‑49N, 2‑46W. Destroyers SOMALI (D.6), MASHONA, MATABELE, SIKH, FORESIGHT searched Scapa Flow with anti-submarine trawlers. Destroyer FAME patrolled the north end of Gutter Sound. The search was abandoned at 0030/20th. Destroyer SIKH proceeded to the anchorage to cover ships anchored in Scapa Flow. Destroyer FAME assigned a station to cover the entrance to Gutter Sound.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE arrived at Scapa Flow from Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM arrived at Scapa Flow from refitting. The light cruiser soon departed on Northern Patrol.
 
Ship collision – At 0300, destroyer JERVIS was involved in a collision with Swedish steamer TOR (1052grt) northeast of Blyth, in 55‑35N, 01‑26E. Destroyer JERVIS suffered extensive damage to her hull, both above and below the water line. Two crew were killed in the collision and fifteen crew were missing. Destroyers JAVELIN and JANUS stood by until destroyer JERVIS reached Newcastle. Destroyer JERVIS was able to steam stern first under her own power to the Tyne. Tugs MALTA and WASHINGTON took her in tow when she arrived off South Shields. Steamer TOR was slightly damaged. Destroyer JERVIS was repairing into the third week of June.
 
Weather damaga – Destroyer MACKAY reported minor upper deck damage due to heavy weather.

Submarine refitting – Submarine SALMON departed Harwich and arrived that day at Sheerness. The submarine was refitting at Chatham from 21 March to 7 May.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.21 of six British, twenty one Norwegian, seven Swedish, two Danish, three Finnish, two Estonian ship departed Methil at 1700 escorted by destroyers JAVELIN (SO), JUPITER, JUNO, ECLIPSE and were joined by destroyer JANUS which left Scapa Flow. Submarine PORPOISE departed Rosyth to sail with the convoy. Three more merchant ships were detached prior to crossing the North Sea;one was detached at Dundee and two at Aberdeen. British tanker BRITISH TOMMY (1411grt) was to have proceeded in this convoy to salve oil from the grounded tanker GRETAFIELD at Dunbeath. Anti-submarine trawler ALOUETTE (520grt) was to meet the tanker at sea for escort. However, on the 19th, the tanker broke up and the attempt was cancelled. Destroyer IVANHOE escorted base ship MANCHESTER CITY from Scapa Flow to Kirkwall. Destroyer IVANHOE then left Kirkwall with fifteen ships for convoy ON.21. The group joined the convoy at 1900. These ships are included in the sailing breakdown from Methil. It was this portion of convoy ON.21 that was attacked by German bombers on the 20th. Despite the protection of anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO, on the 20th, German bombers of KG26 attacked convoys HN.20 and ON.21. The convoy arrived at Bergen on the 23rd.
 
Ship movement – Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL escorted by destroyers ARROW, ISIS, SHIKARI departed Portsmouth for Portland.
 
Mine-sweeping – Destroyer BRILLIANT covered the minesweepers of the 10th Mine Sweeping Flotilla in operations between North Goodwin Light Vessel and Fairy Bank Buoy.
 
Return from refit – Destroyer AFRIDI completed her refit began on 17 January at Hartlepool.
 
Submarine patrol – Submarine STERLET departed Harwich for patrol.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.124 departed the Tyne escorted by sloop LOWESTOFT, destroyer VALOROUS, sloop HASTINGS. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 21st.
 
Convoy TM.30 of nine ships departed the Tyne escorted by the 3rd Anti-submarine Group and destroyer VIVIEN.
 
Anti-U-boat attack – At 59-05.24N, 5-56.30W off North Rona at 0930, anti-submarine trawlers ASTON VILLA (546grt) and GAUL (550grt) attacked a submarine contact. Anti-submarine trawler CAPE PASSARO (510grt) later attacked a contact at this location. At 1700, anti-submarine trawler ANGLE (531grt) attacked a submarine contact off North Rona in 59-05N, 05-55.6W.
 
Outbound convoys merging for Gibraltar – Convoy OB.113GF departed Liverpool, escorted by destroyers WAKEFUL and WINCHELSEA, merged with convoy OA.113GF, escorted by sloop LEITH, to form OG.23F of forty ships on the 22nd.
 
Destroyer WAKEFUL and WINCHELSEA were detached to convoy HG.23 F. Sloop LEITH escorted the convoy to 23 March. The convoy was joined by armed boarding vessel SAGITTA from 22 to 25 March and destroyers VELOX and VIDETTE Portsmouth and Devonport, respectively, from 22 to 28 March when the convoy arrived at Gibraltar.
 
U-Boat successes – U.19 sank Danish steamers MINSK … in 58‑07N, 02‑39W, CHARKOW … in 58‑07N, 02‑39W, VIKING … in 58‑08N, 02‑38W, and BOTHAL … in 58‑08N, 02‑38W.
[Ed. note: «uboat.net» places loss of Viking and Bothal on 20 March.]
Quote:
Change of station – Minesweepers PANGBOURNE and ROSS departed Gibraltar for England for duty in Home Waters.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

John R. Price
Wilkes-Barre, PA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant
Posts: 811

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/20/2018 9:52:57 PM
Hey Brian enjoy the world according to George I've had enough.
---------------
A battle long forgotten by our country in a war never understood by our country.
"to satisfy our endless needs and justify our bloody deeds, in the name of destiny and in the name of God"


brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/21/2018 7:49:39 PM
March 20. Day 202
Wednesday. Waxing gibbous moon.

Germany
Quote:
Last night the British answered for the bombing of Scapa Flow by strafing the German seaplane bases on the island of Sylt for nearly seven hours. As usual, the [German] High Command claims no damage was done. The British, according to the BBC, did a lot. At noon, the government offered to fly us up to see for ourselves, then called it off. …
All Berlin papers on orders from Goebbels headline the attack on the German base at Sylt: “BRITISH BOMB DENMARK!” it seems that a couple bombs did fall on Danish territory. But it’s a typical falsification.
(Berlin Diary, pp 300-01)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
Quote:
Daladier resigned as French premier and was succeeded by Paul Reynaud, who promised a vigorous prosecution of the war.
(Goralski, p 108)
Quote:
Daladier’s cabinet in Paris resigns. Paul Reynaud forms a war government.
(2194 Days, p 45)

USSR
Quote:
Moscow stated its strong opposition to a proposed Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish alliance because it would “be directed against the Soviet Union” and run counter to the Russo-Finnish peace treaty.
(Goralski, p 108)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-66); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-22) leaves Wilhelmshaven; 5 boats (U-9; -20; -24; -56; -59) return to Wilhelmshaven, all after 7 days on patrol. 18 U-boats at sea.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

Two ships, both neutral, lost to torpedo attack by U-boat. Tonnage lost to torpedoes=3262:
Viking, a Danish steam merchantman of 1153 tons, in ballast from Frederikshavn to Blyth. Complement=17; lost=15.
Bothal, a Danish steam merchantman of 2109 tons, in ballast from Frederikshavn to Blyth. Complement=20; lost=15.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 04.15 hours … U-19 spotted two steamers northeast of the Moray Firth and 20 minutes later fired a G7a torpedo that missed the first ship. At 04.57 hours, a G7e torpedo was fired that struck Viking in the engine room and caused the ship to sink immediately. The second steamer was Bothal, which was hit amidships by a G7e torpedo at 05.15 hours and sank after breaking in two.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Major refit – Light cruiser EDINBURGH entered the dockyard at South Shields, Tyne, started an extensive refit for structural defects which was not completed until 20 October 1940.
 
Return after refit – Light cruiser GLASGOW completed repairs at Glasgow begun on 24 February. Light cruiser GLASGOW departed Glasgow on the 22nd for the Clyde.
 
Ships’ collision – At 0130, armed merchant cruisers CILICIA, departing the Clyde, and CARINTHIA, arriving in the Clyde, collided in 56‑11N, 08‑20W. CILICIA had serious damage to her stem and had trouble steering. Tugs ENGLISHMAN, diverted en route to assist Norwegian steamer ASTRA (2164grt) whose engines had broken down, MARAUDER, ST MELLONS, and destroyer GALLANT, which was detached from Tender C escort, were sent to assist her. 20th Anti-submarine Group and and two ships of 29th Anti-submarine Group also proceeded to the area. CILICIA was taken to Belfast for repairs, arriving on the 21st. CARINTHIA arrived in the Clyde on the 21st and was taken to Birkenhead on the 24th for repairs, escorted by destroyer WARWICK.
 
Luftwaffe maritime action – Despite the protection of anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO, on the 20th, German bombers attacked convoy HN.20 and the Kirkwall section of convoy ON.21 between 1840 and 1952. They damaged steamer NORTHERN COAST (1211grt) 18 miles east of Copinsay in 58‑53N, 02‑00W, steamer THISTLEBRAE (4747grt), tanker DAGHESTAN (5742grt), Norwegian steamers ERLING LINDOE (1281grt) and TORA ELISE (721grt) 53 miles off Noss Head, Norwegian steamer SVINTA (1267grt) in 59N, 2W, and Swedish steamer UTKLIPPAN (1599grt) 59 miles east of Scapa Flow in the North Sea. UTKLIPPAN was hit by an incendiary bomb and the crew abandoned ship, but she was later reboarded and continued with the convoy. She was the only unit of the Methil section damaged.
 
THISTLEBRAE and DAGHESTAN were in convoy HN.20. The remainder of the damaged ships were in the Kirkwall section of convoy ON.21. TORA ELISE returned to Kirkwall. Norwegian steamer CYGNUS (1333grt) stood by SVINTA until tug ST MELLONS arrived and took her in tow. The damaged ships of the Kirkwall section of convoy ON.21 returned to Kirkwall.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON arrived at Scapa Flow from Northern Patrol.
 
British aircraft maritime action – German Sperrbrecher 12 (steamer ALTENFELS: 8132grt) was sunk by British bombing off Ameland.
 
U-boat activity – German Naval Attache personnel in Oslo reported sixty British warships had been sighted off Egersund. All German submarines proceeding to sea were ordered to positions off the Norwegian coast. U.21 and U.22, en route to Pentland Firth, were ordered to patrol areas off Lindesnes.
 
Anti-U-boat action – Destroyer FORTUNE of battlecruiser REPULSE's screen dropped three depth charges on a submarine contact northeast of Muckle Flugga in 63‑27N, 00‑36E at 1822. U.44 generally credited to the destroyer's attack had already been lost.
 
Off Norway – Light cruisers ARETHUSA, AURORA, PENELOPE, GALATEA of the 2nd Cruiser Squadron with destroyers SOMALI (D.6), MASHONA, MATABELE, SIKH, FAME, FIREDRAKE, FOXHOUND, FORESIGHT departed Scapa Flow at 2330 on Operation DU. Destroyer FIREDRAKE attacked a submarine contact east of Duncansby Head in 58-48N, 1-07W. The contact was later evaluated to be non submarine. The force was divided into two groups. Force B of light cruisers AURORA and GALATEA and destroyers SOMALI, SIKH, FIREDRAKE, FOXHOUND patrolled between Lister and Osko Light during the night of 21/22 March. Force C of light cruisers ARETHUSA and PENELOPE with destroyers MASHONA, MATABELE, FAME, FORESIGHT patrolled the Danish coast between Tyboron and Hantsholm Lights during the night of 21/22 March. On the 22nd, both Force B and C swept together off the Norwegian coast northward. The only contact of the operation was at 0922/22nd when destroyer SOMALI encountered small German steamer BUTT (736grt) near Obrestad. However, BUTT was able to escape into Norwegian waters.
 
Return to duty – Destroyer ZULU departed Leith after repairs for Rosyth, where she arrived that day.
 
Luftwaffe attack – Naval whaler WINDERMERE (560grt) of the 10th Anti-submarine Striking Force was damaged at 1944 by German bombers of KG26 in Moray Firth, north of Kinnaird Head. She was towed by whaler THIRLMERE (560grt) to Aberdeen escorted by destroyer IVANHOE.
 
Minelaying – Minelayers PRINCESS VICTORIA and TEVIOTBANK, escorted by minelaying destroyers ESK, EXPRESS, ICARUS, IMPULSIVE, departed Invergordon on minelaying mission PA 4 in Moray Firth. This operation was completed during the night of 20/21 March. After the operation, the minelayers, escorted by destroyers ICARUS and IMPULSIVE returned to Rosyth. Destroyers ESK and EXPRESS were sent to hunt submarines in Moray Firth.
 
Ships’ collision – Anti-submarine trawler LADY PHILOMENA (417grt) collided with trawler LOWDOCK (276grt) five miles east of Todd Head. LOWDOCK sank immediately and the anti-submarine trawler was able to rescue only one survivor.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.34 departed Methil escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group, sloop LONDONDERRY, destroyer VIMIERA. On arrival off the Tyne, sloop LONDONDERRY and destroyer VIMIERA escorted convoy FS.125.
 
Convoy FN.125 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WALLACE and sloop FLAMINGO. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 22nd.
 
Convoy FS.125 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VIMIERA and sloop LONDONDERRY from convoy MT.34. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 22nd.
 
Destroyer coverage – Destroyer BEAGLE was covering the operations of the 10th Mine Sweeping Flotilla between the North Goodwin Light Vessel and Fairy Ban Buoy. Destroyer BEAGLE also covered the operations on the 21st.
 
Return to duty – Destroyer KEITH arrived at Dover at 1252 after repairs at Chatham.
 
Submarine patrol – Submarine SUNFISH in the North Sea sighted a darkened ship, identified possibly as German training ship BREMSE. Attack was not possible.
 
Mine sweeping reassignment – The 5th Mine Sweeping Flotilla composed of minesweepers GOSSAMER, LEDA, HARRIER, SPEEDWELL, SALAMANDER, NIGER arrived at Dover from the Humber. Minesweeper SKIPJACK followed later and joined the Flotilla.
 
Damage from mines – Dutch tanker PHOBOS (7412grt) was damaged on a mine five miles east of north of North Goodwins Light Vessel. Destroyer BRILLIANT assisted PHOBOS. The survivors of the tanker were rescued by steamer SERULA (1600grt) and the Greek TASSIA (3034grt). Tugs LADY BRASSEY from Dover and FABIA and VINCIA from Ramsgate towed the tanker to Little Downs arriving at 2020. On the 21st, she was taken to Shellhaven.
 
Luftwaffe maritime bombinng – Steamer BARN HILL (5439grt), formerly of convoy HX.25A, was badly damaged by German bombers of KG26, three miles SSW of Beachy Head, in 50-34N, 0-02W. Destroyer BRILLIANT was on patrol nearby. Five crew were lost, and the steamer was towed towards shore and beached three hundred yards southeast of Langney Point on the 21st. Tug LADY BRASSEY departed Dover at 0126/24th to attempt to salvage the steamer, but returned to Dover shortly before midnight. Salvage vessel DAPPER proceeded to the scene at daylight on the 25th and remained there until the fire was extinguished. The steamer's back broke on the 26th and she was declared a total loss.
 
Ship reassignment – Minesweepers ALBURY and SALTASH departed Gibraltar for England for duty in Home Waters. SALTASH had arrived at Gibraltar on the 19th.
 
French naval activity – French destroyer FOUGUEUX, sloop CHEVREUIL, anti-submarine trawlers AJACIENE and TOULONNAISE attacked a submarine contact north, northwest of Cape Ortegal, 44-10N, 8-34W. The French ships were joined by British warships, but nothing came of the search.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/22/2018 6:01:03 PM
March 21. Day 203
Thursday.

Germany
Quote:
The [ed.: Nazi authorities] took the American correspondents up to Sylt after all today, but I was not invited. They telephoned Berlin tonight that they had not seen much damage at the chief seaplane base at Hoernum [sic], which was the only one they were shown – a fact I pointed out in my broadcast tonight. The Nazi press has been ordered to make a terrific play tomorrow morning of the reports of these American correspondents.
Three more Poles sentenced to death at Posen today for allegedly slaying a German during the war. I hear sixteen Polish women are in a Berlin jail waiting to have their heads lopped off, all of them having been sentenced to death.
(Berlin Diary, p 304)

Britain
Quote:
A British delegation has a secret meeting with representatives of the Turkish government at Aleppo.
(2194 Days, p 46)

France
Quote:
The French government orders a consignment of “heavy water” from Norway for atomic research.
(2194 Days, pp 45-6)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=1 (U-102); commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-20; -21) leave Wilhelmsshven on patrol; no boats return to harbour. 20 U-boats at sea by my count; «uboat.net» count=19.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

Two ships, both neutral, lost to torpedo attack by U-boat. Tonnage lost to torpedoes=4924:
Algier, a Danish motor merchant of 1654 tons, carrying general cargo including copper, tin, mercury and Studebakers from New York via Oslo to Copenhagen. Complement, including some passengers=23; lost=4 new + i passenger.
Christiansborg, a Danish steam merchantman of 3270 tons, carrying 4107 tons of maize from Philadelphia via Frederikhavn to Copenhagen. Complement=25; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 01.05 hours … the neutral Algier was hit by a stern torpedo from U-38 and sank by the stern with a list to port after 10 minutes about 15 miles north-northwest of Foula, Shetlands. The ship had been missed with a first torpedo at 23.24 hours the day before. Four crew members and a passenger were lost. The survivors abandoned ship in a lifeboat, were picked up by the British trawler Manx King and landed at Scalloway the same day.

At 03.26 hours … the neutral Christiansborg was hit in the foreship by one torpedo from U-38 and broke in two. The ship had been missed by a stern torpedo at 02.56 hours. The forepart sank in 60°15N/02°40W and the afterpart was shelled and sunk by the British armed boarding vessel HMS Discovery II later the same day. The survivors were picked up by the British vessel and taken to Kirkwall.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship’s fire – Base ship DUNLUCE CASTLE caught fire at Scapa Flow, and was beached in Ore Bay until the fire was brought under control.
 
Ship movements, northern home waters – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO and destroyers HOSTILE, DIANA, FORESTER arrived at Sullom Voe at 0700 to refuel. The destroyers departed at 1835 to rejoin the Fleet.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed Sullom Voe for duty as the anti-aircraft ship for the Norwegian convoys.
 
Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
At 1100, destroyer JUPITER, detached from convoy ON.21, arrived at Scapa Flow at 1200 with condenser trouble. Repairs were carried out by destroyer depot ship WOOLWICH.
 
Destroyer JUNO arrived at Scapa Flow after repairs. She was dispatched to replace destroyer JUPITER in convoy ON.21.
 
Damaged gear – Destroyer DIANA reported her asdic gear was damaged.
 
Destroyer assignment – Destroyers ELECTRA and ENCOUNTER departed Scapa Flow at 2316/20th to Skerry Sound to guard the harbour entrance to Scapa Flow after the Tower of Cliff battery fired on a U-boat in Holm Sound. The destroyers took up patrol in Skerry Sound to guard the eastern entrance to Scapa Flow. ENCOUNTER attacked a submarine contact in Stronsay Firth in 58‑57N, 2‑37W. The contact proved to be a wreck.

Destroyers WOLVERINE, VANSITTART, VIMY, VENETIA departed Plymouth to sweep prior to meeting convoy HX.26 at 0745/24th.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.114 departed Southend escorted by destroyer ANTELOPE from 21 to 23 March, destroyer AMAZON from 22 to 23 March, destroyer WINDSOR on the 23rd. The convoy dispersed on the 24th.
 
Convoy OB.114 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANOC and VERSATILE from 21 to 24 March. The convoy dispersed on the 25th.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy SA.33 of one steamer departed Southampton, escorted by sloops FOXGLOVE and ROSEMARY. The convoy arrived at Brest on the 23rd.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.35 of eight ships departed Methil escorted by the 1st Anti-submarine Groups and sloops FLEETWOOD and STORK. The convoy arrived in the Tyne later that day.
 
Convoy FS.126 of twenty one ships from the Tyne, four additional from Middlesbrough, seven from the Humber departed the Tyne escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD and STORK from convoy MT.35 and anti-submarine trawler LADY PHILOMENA (417grt). The convoy arrived at Southend on the 23rd.
 
Increased destroyer presence – Due to increased U-boat activity in Moray Firth, destroyer IVANHOE and three trawlers on patrol in the Firth were placed under the control of Vice Admiral, Orkneys and Shetlands. Destroyers ESK, EXPRESS, IMPULSIVE, ICARUS of the 20th Destroyer Flotilla were placed under the orders of Vice Admiral Orkneys and Shetlands to patrol within twenty miles of 58-08N, 2-28W between sunrise and sunset. The next day, these destroyers patrolled within forty miles of 58-45N, 00-00E between sunrise and sunset.
 
Norwegian waters– Off Fro Havet near Trondheim in 63N, 7E, destroyers FEARLESS and HASTY entered Norwegian territorial waters to challenge German steamer NORDLAND (1902grt), (or German liner ANTONIO DELFINO (13,589grt)) which was travelling under the protection of Norwegian torpedo boat TRYGG. FEARLESS was ordered away, but attempted again at Hustad, again unsuccessfully, to intercept the German ship. This search continued from 0645 to 1415. Wartime press reports and some postwar accounts identify this German ship as liner EUROPA (49,746grt) which remained anchored at Bremerhaven from pre war days throughout the war. German steamer NEUENFELS (8096grt) was challenged by two Destroyers of Operation DU near Lindesnes on the 22nd and escaped into Rosfjord.
 
Submarine activities – Submarine CLYDE departed Blyth for Scapa Flow. Submarine CLYDE was joined off Scapa Flow by anti-submarine whaler BUTTERMERE (560grt) on the 23rd.Both ships arrived later that day.
 
Submarines SNAPPER and SUNFISH were ordered to intercept German steamer CHARLOTTE CORDS (1779grt), which was reported preparing to depart Rotterdam for Germany. Submarine SEAL was ordered to intercept German steamer JOHANN BLUMENTHAL (1626grt) off Arendal on the 23rd. Neither German ship was intercepted.
 
Submarine URSULA in the eastern Skagerrak stopped Norwegian steamer OTTAR JARL (1459grt) for inspection, but she was allowed to continue. Shortly after at 2146, eight miles ENE of Skagen, URSULA encountered German steamer HEDDERNHEIM (4947grt) which had departed Haugesand on the 18th. She fired three torpedoes, one of them hitting the German steamer, which sank in 57-48-40N, 10-53-30E. This was the first sinking of a German merchant ship by a British submarine in the war. Submarine URSULA was damaged by ice on this date.
 
VIP movement – Destroyer BOADICEA took the Chief of the General Staff (CIGS) to Boulogne. The CIGS returned to Dover on the 25th on destroyer KEITH.
… 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.29 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers OTTAWA and ST LAURENT. The destroyers turned over the convoy to Armed merchant cruiser AUSONIA and French submarine SIDI FERRUCH at 1745/22nd. The armed merchant cruiser was detached on 2 April. Destroyers VERSATILE and WINCHELSEA escorted the convoy from 2 to 4 April, when the convoy arrived at Liverpool.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.23 with thirty six ships departed Gibraltar and was given ocean escort by sloops SCARBOROUGH and WELLINGTON from 21 to 30 March. In Home Waters, the convoy split and convoy HG.23A was escorted by the sloops. In Home Waters, convoy HG.23 was joined by destroyers CAMPBELL and WALKER from convoy OG.23 and destroyer VOLUNTEER from 27 to 30 March. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 30th.
 
French naval movement – French destroyer SIMOUN arrived at Gibraltar from Casablanca and sailed for Toulon.
 
Far East – Light cruiser DANAE departed Singapore on patrol duties.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/23/2018 7:44:08 PM
March 22. Day 204
Friday.

Finland
Quote:
Russian forces assumed control over Hangö.
(Goralski, p 108)
[Ed. note: Control of Hongö was an initial aim of Russia in prewar demands from the Finns. It is located at the entrance to the Gulf of Finland, some 280 miles west of Leningrad.]

Germany
Quote:
Induced Irwin, of NBC, also to point out that the American correspondents were not shown all of Sylt. This afternoon the High Command was very angry with me for having mentioned this. …
LATER. — Radio people called up. They will fly Irwin and me to Sylt tomorrow to inspect the northern part of the island.
(Berlin Diary, p 297)

Britain
This recorded anecdote must have taken place before 28 March:
Quote:
Winston Churchill, lord of the admiralty, wrote a memo about mining Norwegian waters. Iron ore, which made steel, which made the tools of war, was getting through to Germany from Norwegian points of entry. Stopping the influx of iron ore through the remote port of Narvik, above the Arctic Circle, would cripple the enemy’s industry, Churchill contended—and it also might “succeed in provoking Germany into an imprudent action which would open the door for us.” The plan, code-named Wilfrid, was “minor and innocent,” he told his admirals.
Hints of Churchill’s plan appeared in the press, alerting the German high command, which made counterplans. Prime Minister Chamberlain didn’t like the Narvik idea, partly because it was illegal. Norway was a neutral country, and sowing mines in neutral harbors was contrary to international law. It was also a war-widening provocation.
(Human Smoke, p 168)

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
The phoney war continues with a few exchanges of artillery and a little patrol action. German air force action over the North Sea and Orkneys.
(2194 Days, p 44)

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave Wilhelmshaven on patrol; one boat (U-20) returns to harbour at Kiel after 2 days on patrol. U-boats at sea, this date=19.

No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

No ships lost from U-boat activity. Total tonnage lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Major ship to sea – Battleship BARHAM was undocked at Liverpool.
 
Major ship reassignment – Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL, after deplaning at Portland, sailed from Plymouth for the Mediterranean the afternoon of 22 March escorted by destroyers IMOGEN and ISIS which returned to Portsmouth the next day. On the 25th, ARK ROYAL was joined by destroyers ACTIVE and BULLDOG, which departed Gibraltar on the 24th. Australian destroyer VOYAGER departed on the 25th and relieved destroyer ACTIVE in 36N, 7-30W. ARK ROYAL, BULLDOG and VOYAGER passed Gibraltar on the 25th and arrived at Malta on the 28th. She soon joined Aircraft carrier GLORIOUS for flying off exercises for their air crews.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers MALOJA and DERBYSHIRE arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser TRANSYLVANIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movements Light cruiser GLASGOW departed Belfast for the Clyde where she arrived later that day.
 
Destroyers HAVELOCK and HAVANT arrived at Plymouth.
 
Destroyer ZULU after conducting a full calibre shoot in the Firth arrived at Rosyth.
 
Anti-U-boat action – Destroyer WHITSHED, escorting convoy SL.23, dropped depth charges on a submarine contact ten miles south of Portland Bill. Destroyer HIGHLANDER, which had arrived at Portland that day to work up, departed Portland to assist. However, with defective anti-submarine gear, destroyer HIGHLANDER was recalled. Motor Anti-submarine Boats 2 and 6 also departed Portland to assist WHITSHED.
 
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.21 with seven British, eighteen Norwegian, five Swedish, four Danish, four Finnish, one Estonian ship departed Bergen escorted by destroyers JAVELIN, JANUS, ECLIPSE and submarine PORPOISE. Destroyer JUNO rendezvoused with the convoy later that same day. Cover for the convoy was supplied by light cruiser SHEFFIELD. Antiaircraft support was supplied by anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA. At 2158/22nd, SHEFFIELD attacked a submarine contact west of Utvaer in 61-05N, 3-35E, and at 0215/23rd, a contact east of Muckle Flugga in 60-55N, 1-40E. The nine ships of the west coast ships were joined by destroyers COSSACK (D.4) and GURKHA, which departed the Clyde at 1200/21st, at daylight on the 22nd. COSSACK and GURKHA arrived at Scapa Flow at 1730/24th after the west coast section of the convoy had been dispersed off Cape Wrath. ECLIPSE, which had been separated in heavy weather, patrolled off Buchanness until she could rejoin the convoy.
 
Convoy HN.21 arrived at Methil at 1100/25th with JAVELIN, JANUS, JUNO, ECLIPSE and PORPOISE.
 
Anti-U-boat action – Destroyers ELECTRA and ESCAPADE at 1050 were ordered to hunt a U-boat reported by air near Sule Skerry in 59-12N, 4-36W. At 1830, another aircraft sighted a U-boat in 59-26N, 3-54W. ELECTRA and ESCAPADE were ordered to this position and arrived on station at 2000.
 
Escort duties – Destroyers ESKIMO and PUNJABI departed the Clyde at 2200 escorting tankers WAR PINDARI (5559grt) and BELGOL (2648grt) to Scapa Flow. Tanker PETROBUS joined the convoy from Stornoway. She had been at Stornoway since 17 March when her escort was ordered post haste to Scapa Flow.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers DELIGHT, HUNTER, ILEX, FEARLESS arrived at Sullom Voe at 1630 for refuelling. They put to sea at 0740/23rd.
 
Submarine activities – Submarine SWORDFISH departed Blyth on patrol.
 
Submarine SEAWOLF departed Harwich on patrol.
 
Submarine TRIBUNE departed Rosyth for trials and exercises, and returned later in the day. Her engine trials were not satisfactory and she was ordered to the Clyde for repairs.
 
French naval activity – After departing Brest on the 17th and calling at Cherbourg, French submarine depot ship JULES VERNE arrived at Harwich with 600 ton submarines SYBILLE, ANTIOPE, AMAZONE of the 16th Submarine Division, escorted by French destroyer FOUDROYANT and sloop AMIRAL MOUCHEZ. In the Downs, the French escort was relieved by British destroyer CODRINGTON and Polish destroyers BLYSKAWICA, GROM, BURZA of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla. These ships were formed as the 10th Submarine Flotilla to aid the British in the patrol of the North Sea.
 
Minesweeping activities – Destroyer BOADICEA was covering the operations of the 10th Minesweeping Flotilla between North Goodwin Bank and Fairy Bank Buoy.
 
Minesweeper LEDA of the 5th Mine Sweeping Flotilla with Trinity House Vessel ARGUS laid three light buoys along the North Goodwins-Wandelaar searched channel.
 
Ship damage – Anti-submarine trawler LE TIGER (516grt) was damaged when she struck wreckage in 58-12N, 02-28W. Another trawler of the 10th Anti-submarine Group was sent to assist and she safely arrived at Aberdeen later that day.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy TM.31 departed the Tyne escorted by the 19th Anti-submarine Group and sloop HASTINGS.
 
Convoy FN.126 departed Southend escorted by sloop LOWESTOFT and destroyer VALOROUS. The convoy arrived on the 23rd.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.31 of steamers BARON CARNEGIE, KERMA, LOCHEE, PEMBROKE COAST, SCHOLAR (Commodore) departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS. The convoy arrived at Loire on the 24th.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.25 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser ESPERANCE BAY until 5 April. On 5 April destroyers HAVANT, VANQUISHER, WALKER, WINDSOR joined the convoy and escorted it to its arrival on 8 April.
 
Indian waters – Heavy cruiser KENT completed her refit at Colombo.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/24/2018 5:51:38 PM
March 23. Day 205
Saturday. Full moon.

Germany
Quote:
At midnight last night the RRG [Ed.: Reichsrundfunkgesell, or Reich Broadcasting Company] phoned to say our trip to Sylt could not be arranged after all. What did the British do on the northern end of the island that the Luftwaffe does not want Irwin and me to see? …
It is announced today that all church bells made of bronze are to come down and be melted up for cannon. Next week begins a nation-wide house-to-house collection of every available scrap of tin, nickel, copper, bronze, and similar metals of which the Germans are so short. Today the army ordered all car-owners whose automobiles are laid up by the war-time ban – which means ninety per cent of them – to surrender their batteries.
(Berlin Diary, p 305)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=1 (U-161); commissioned=0. No U-boats leave port on patrol; three boats (U-19; -28; -32)) enter Wilhelmshaven after 10, 35, and 27 days’ patrol respectively. 16 U-boats at sea on this date.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

One ship, a neutral, attacked unsuccessfully by U-boat. Tonnage lost=0:
ASiremalm, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 2468 tons, carrying general cargo from Reykjavik to Halifax. Complement=25; lost=0.
One ship sunk by U-boat torpedo. Tonnage lost to torpedoes=8077:
Chama, a British motor tanker of 8077 tons, in ballast from Ardrossan to New York. Complement=55 + 4 gunners; lost=59.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 04.27 hours … the unescorted Siremalm … was hit on the port side amidships by a dud torpedo from U-110 (Lemp) en route from Reykjavik (left on 21 March) to Halifax with general cargo and mail in 60°35N/28°25W. The torpedo left a big indent in the vicinity of the boiler room. The ship had been spotted at 12.00 hours the day before and the U-boat had lost contact temporarily due to aircraft that forced her to submerge. After spotting the ship again, a stern torpedo missed at 03.14 hours and three minutes later a bow torpedo. 15 minutes after hitting the ship with the dud torpedo, Lemp attacked with all guns, but the barrel of the deck gun exploded on the first shot because the gun crew forgot to remove the water plug. The U-boat opened fire only with the 37mm and 20mm AA guns, scoring two hits in the hull on the port side of the ship, which was armed with one 4in gun and three machine guns. The Siremalm escaped zigzagging at full speed while the radio operator sent distress signals that were not answered and the crew manned the gun, but did not fire because they feared that this would give away their position and making the ship a target. No casualties among the crew of 25 Norwegians.
When U-110 tried to chase the ship, they suddenly begun to dive and had to stop. An examination of the deck showed that splinters of the exploded barrel had damaged some pipelines, which led to the unintentional diving and the damage forced the U-boat to abort the patrol.
…At 23.26 hours … the Chama …, a straggler from convoy OG-56, was torpedoed and sunk by U-97 west-southwest of Fastnet. …
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers CIRCASSIA and LETITIA arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Ships’ damage – Destroyer EXPRESS was damaged in a collision with trawler MANX ADMIRAL (219grt) ten miles due north of Kinnaird Head. EXPRESS was taken to Hartlepool for repairs arriving on the 28th.
 
Loss to friendly mine – At 1430, lookout trawler LOCH ASSATER (210grt, Temporary Skipper G.D. Greening RNR) was sunk on a British defensive minefield 61 miles north east of Kinnaird Head. The entire crew was picked up by trawler STRATHTUMMEL (210grt). LOCH ASSATER had only been hired on 24 February 1940.

Submarine blockade duty – German merchant ship EDMUND HUGO STINNES IV  …, en route to Copenhagen, was intercepted by submarine TRUANT (TRIDENT - Seekrieg) at 2330 in the Skagerrak six miles 306° from Bovbjerg. The submarine fired five warning shots, but the German steamer entered territorial waters, scuttled herself and was finished off by TRUANT with two torpedoes two miles 294° from Thors Minde Light House. The Master was taken prisoner.
 
Return from Operation DU – Light cruisers GALATEA, ARETHUSA, PENELOPE arrived at Rosyth after DU. Light cruiser AURORA and destroyers SOMALI, MASHONA, MATABELE, SIKH arrived off Scapa Flow, but were unable to enter due to low visibility until early on the 24th. SOMALI, MATABELE, MASHONA, SIKH carried out an independent anti-submarine sweep and entered Scapa Flow at 0900/24th. AURORA and destroyers FAME, FORESIGHT, FOXHOUND, FIREDRAKE of operation DU arrived at Scapa Flow at 1100.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer NUBIAN departed Rosyth for Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyer ESK arrived at Invergordon.
 
Sloop AUCKLAND arrived at Rosyth.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine SPEARFISH and destroyer FAULKNOR were engaged in anti-submarine exercises from Scapa Flow.
 
Submarines SUNFISH and SNAPPER arrived at Harwich after patrol.

First Hunt-class destroyer arrives – Hunt-class destroyer ATHERSTONE was completed, the first of a large class of escort destroyers. Following working up at Portland, she was attached to the Home Fleet.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.36 of thirty three ships departed Methil escorted by destroyers WHITLEY and WESTMINSTER. Destroyer WESTMINSTER attacked a submarine contact 6½ miles 135° from May Island. The contact was later found to be a wreck. After MT.36 arrived off the Tyne, destroyers WHITLEY and WESTMINSTER escorted convoy FS.127.
 
Convoy FN.127 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VIMIERIA and sloop LONDONDERRY. The convoy arrived at the Tyne on the 24th.
 
Convoy FS.127 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers WHITLEY and WESTMINSTER. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 25th.
 
Anti-U-boat attacks – At 1144, armed boarding vessel NORTHERN REWARD sighted a submarine near wreckage and empty rafts and attacked the submarine west of Foula Island in 60‑12N, 3‑50W. No damage was done to U.38. Contact was later lost in rain squalls. Destroyers ELECTRA, ENCOUNTER and armed boarding vessel DISCOVERY II joined to assist in the hunt. Destroyer FAULKNOR (D.8) departed Scapa Flow at 1500 to join the search. At 1705, a British flying boat dropped bombs on a submarine contact in this area in 60-16N, 3-22W. At 0600/24th, FAULKNOR departed the search area for Kirkwall.
 
Anti-submarine trawler ST KENAN (565grt) made an attack on a submarine contact in 59-04.20N, 06-00.04W of Salisker. Anti-submarine trawler ASTON VILLA (546grt) was also in the area. Off the Butt of Lewis in 58-41.5N, 6-14W, anti-submarine trawler ANGLE (531grt) made an attack on a submarine contact.
 
Armed yacht ALICE (527grt) made an attack on a submarine contact in Liverpool Bay in 53-29.5N, 0-39W.
 
German merchants in eastern waters – The British Malaya Force was formed to watch German merchant ships in Dutch East Indies harbours. Destroyers STRONGHOLD and TENEDOS departed Singapore on the 26th and were stationed off Sabang to watch 17 German merchantmen in the general area.

Submarines PERSEUS departed Singapore on the 27th and RAINBOW departed Singapore on the 25th, and were stationed in the Sunda Strait to guard the German ships' escape route. These patrols were maintained until mid April.

Some six weeks later when Germany invaded Holland, all the merchant ships, except SOPHIE RICKMERS which scuttled herself in harbour, were seized by Holland for service under the Dutch flag. Steamers BITTERFELD, WUPPTERTAL, RHEINLAND were captured by boarding parties from Dutch cruiser JAVA in Padang.

In addition, German steamer SCHEER (8298grt) at Makassar and German steamer FRIDERUN (2464grt) at Menado were taken over as MANGKAI and MEROENDOENG, respectively.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/25/2018 6:59:10 PM
March 24. Day 206
Sunday.

Germany
Quote:
Easter Sunday, grey and cold, but the rain has held off. …
In the afternoon, a stroll. Under den Linden thronged with people. … Comparatively few soldiers in the street. Few leaves granted? Meaning? Offensive soon?
(Berlin Diary, p 306)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats sail on patrol or enter harbour from patrol. 16 U-boats at sea.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

No ships lost to U-boat mining, gunnery or torpedoes. Total tonnage lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Anti-U-boat activity – Steamer BECHEVILLE (4228grt) reported she was attacked by a German submarine in 59-21.2N, 2-27W, northwest of the Orkneys. Destroyer FIREDRAKE made an attack on a submarine contact in the Pentland Skerries in 58-42N, 2-45W. This contact was later assessed as non submarine. Destroyers SOMALI (D.6), MATABELE, SIKH departed Scapa Flow at 1330. At 1550, MATABELE attacked a submarine contact. Destroyers FOXHOUND, FAME, FORESIGHT later departed Scapa Flow to hunt for the U-boat. FAME attacked a submarine contact at 1900 east, southeast of Copinsay in 58-20N, 2-15W. Destroyers ELECTRA and ENCOUNTER were searching for a submarine west of the Orkneys. They were ordered to search for the submarine reported. Destroyers IVANHOE, ESK, ICARUS from Moray Firth Patrol were also ordered into the area. MATABELE, SIKH, SOMALI, FAME, FOXHOUND attacked contacts off Auskerry in 58-58.5N, 2-17W. MATABELE remained on the location of this attack. ICARUS and IVANHOE patrolled the approaches to Stromsay Firth. FORESIGHT attacked a contact at 1930 in 58-50N, 1-51W, east, southeast of Copinsay, but this was later found to be a wreck. SOMALI, SIKH, FAME, FORESIGHT, FOXHOUND searched the area 17° of 58-57N, 2-12W during the night.
 
Destroyer activity – At 0600, destroyer FAULKNOR departed her anti-submarine patrol northwest of the Orkneys to proceed to Kirkwall to escort the Kirkwall section of convoy ON.22.

Destroyer PUNJABI arrived at Scapa Flow escorting tanker PETROBUS from Stornoway.
 
Destroyer NUBIAN rendezvoused off Rosyth at 1900 to escort submarine TRIBUNE as far as Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyers HERO and HOTSPUR arrived at Sullom Voe to refuel at 0900, and departed at 1900 for anti-submarine patrol west of Fair Island Channel.
 
Destroyer IMPULSIVE arrived at Invergordon.
 
submarine patrol – Submarine UNITY departed Blyth on patrol.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.22 of five British, nineteen Norwegian, three Swedish, four Finnish ships (leader Norwegian steamer BREDA (1260grt)) departed Methil at 1500 escorted by destroyers KIMBERLEY, KASHMIR, ESCAPADE, ZULU. Three ships were detached prior to the convoy crossing the North Sea; British steamers STRAIT FISHER (573grt) were detached for Scapa Flow and HARLAW (1141grt) for Invergordon. The convoy was joined the next day by destroyers FAULKNOR and TARTAR with a contingent of eight ships from Kirkwall. Light cruisers AURORA and SHEFFIELD and anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO provided close support for the convoy. At 1655/23rd, SHEFFIELD attacked a submarine contact west of Foula Island in 60-16N, 3-22W. Convoy ON.22 arrived without event on the 27th at Bergen. On the 29th SHEFFIELD arrived at Scapa Flow, AURORA at Rosyth, and CAIRO at Sullom Voe.
 
German merchant grounding – German steamer OSTPREUSSEN (3030grt) ran aground five miles 224° from Hirsthals Light. Submarine TRIAD was sent to investigate, but was not able to attack. The German steamer was refloated on the 30th.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser AURANIA departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser SCOTSTOUN arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Shipp movement – Netlayer PROTECTOR arrived at Rosyth from Plymouth.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.116 departed Southend escorted by destroyers WHITSHED from 24 to 26 March and MONTROSE from 25 to 26 March. The convoy dispersed on the 28th.
 
Convoy OB.126 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WITHERINGTON from 24 to 27 March, VANQUISHER from 24 to 26 March, WHIRLWIND on the 25th. The convoy dispersed on the 27th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.128 of eighteen ships departed Southend escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD and STORK and destroyer JUNO. The convoy arrived at the Tyne on the 26th.
 
Convoy MT.37 of eleven ships departed Methil escorted by sloops AUCKLAND and HASTINGS and trawlers of the 19th Anti-submarine Group. At 1237, AUCKLAND off Berwick in 55-49N, 1-55W attacked a submarine contact. HASTINGS was detached to stand by the contact and AUCKLAND rejoined the convoy. Two trawlers were detached to assist HASTINGS in her search which lasted until 1630 before rejoining the convoy. The contact was later assessed as non submarine. After convoy MT.37's arrival in the Tyne, AUCKLAND and HASTINGS escorted convoy FS.128 from the Tyne.
 
Convoy FS.128 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloop AUCKLAND and HASTINGS. The convoy became separated in fog. AUCKLAND with 15 ships was able to proceed, but HASTINGS with 25 ships anchored off Cromer Knoll. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 26th.
 
Convoy TM.32 departed the Tyne escorted by 23rd Anti-submarine Group, sloop LOWESTOFT, destroyer VALOROUS.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.30 of seven steamers, including BARON GRAHAM (Commodore) and MARSLEW departed Loire escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS. The convoy arrived In Bristol Channel on the 25th.
… 
Gibraltar – Australian destroyer VOYAGER arrived at Gibraltar for escort duties with aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL.
 
French naval and troop activity – Mid afternoon on the 24th, French destroyer LA RAILLEUSE of the 5th Destroyer Division departed Casablanca on patrol. In the channel, LA RAILLEUSE was blown in two in an accidental explosion of one of her torpedoes. Twenty eight crew were killed and twenty four were wounded.
 
After the cancelled Finland operations, armed merchant cruiser VILLE D'ALGER and troopship DJENNE departed Cherbourg, escorted by destroyer CYCLONE, arriving at Brest on the 22nd. The cruiser and troopship departed on the 24th with troopships PRESIDENT DOUMER and CHAMPOLLION, escorted by light cruiser EMILE BERTIN and large destroyers VAUTOUR, ALBATROS, BISON, CHEVALIER PAUL. Troopship DJENNE and destroyer CHEVALIER PAUL arrived at Casablanca on the 27th. The other three liners and the remaining escort ships passed Gibraltar on the 27th and arrived at Oran on the 28th. The troopship and destroyer departed Casablanca on the 30th to return to Brest for Norwegian operations. They arrived on 1 April.
 
French armed merchant cruiser COLOMBIE departed Brest, escorted by large destroyer TARTU. The destroyer was detached off Gibraltar and the cruiser proceeded to Oran. TARTU arrived at Casablanca on the 27th. The cruiser arrived at Oran on the 28th. The destroyer departed Casablanca on the 31st to return to Brest for Norwegian operations. TARTU arrived at Brest on 2 April.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/26/2018 5:27:27 PM
March 25. Day 207
Monday.

Germany
[Ed. note: DNB = Deutsche(s) Nachrichtenbüro = German News Agency]
Quote:
The DNB today: “At some places along the Upper Rhine front Easter Sunday, there were on the French side demonstrations against the English war, which clearly showed how foolish the French troops consider it to be that Germany and France have become enemies as a result of British connivance.”
(Berlin Diary, p 306)

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

USSR
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=o; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-24) leaves Wilhelmshaven and one boat (U-13) leaves Kiel; no U-boats return from patrol. I count 18 U-boats at sea; «uboat.net» counts 16.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

Two ships, including one neutral, lost to torpedo attack by U-boats. Tonnage lost to torpedoes=6888:
Britta, a Danish steam merchantman of 1146 tons, in ballast from Kalundborg, Denmark to Liverpool. Complement=18; lost=13.
Daghestan, a British steam tanker of 5742 tons, in ballast from Frederikshavn to Blyth. Complement, including an unspecified number of gunners=29; lost=4, including one gunner. [Ed. note: Daghestan was attacked from the air 5 days earlier. See notes below.]
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 05.40 hours … the neutral Britta was hit in the forepart by one torpedo from U-47 and sank slowly about 40 miles northwest of Sule Skerry. The ship had been spotted at 04.30 hours and missed by a first torpedo at 05.19 hours. The survivors were picked up by the Danish steam merchant Nancy of the same company that sailed together with the ship and were taken to Swansea.
… On 20 March 1940 the Daghestan … in convoy HN-20 was bombed and lightly damaged by a German aircraft off Noss Head.
At 20.11 hours on 25 March, the Daghestan was hit amidships by one G7e torpedo from U-57 nine miles east of Copinsay, Orkneys. The ship caught fire, was abandoned by the crew and later sank. The master, two crew members and one gunner were lost. 25 crew members were picked up by the HMS Northern Wave (FY 153) … and HMS Brontes (FY 118) … and landed at Lyness, Orkneys.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser GLASGOW departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Heavy cruiser YORK departed Rosyth for Scapa Flow, where she arrived on the 26th in preparation of setting out on Northern Patrol.
 
Major ship movement – Aircraft carrier FURIOUS departed Plymouth at 1600/25th escorted by destroyers ISIS, HAVOCK, IMOGEN arrived in the Clyde at 1800/26th. The destroyers, joined by destroyer MOHAWK, went on to Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyer activities – Destroyer ESK arrived at Scapa Flow at 0015 for repair to her bow protection gear.
 
Destroyer ESKIMO arrived at 1700 at Scapa Flow with tankers BELGOL and WAR PINDARI.
 
Destroyer IMPULSIVE departed Invergordon to relieve destroyer IVANHOE on Moray Firth Patrol.
 
Destroyer BRAZEN departed Rosyth for exercises, and returned later in the day.
 
Submarine activity – Submarines THISTLE and SEAL arrived at Rosyth from patrol.
 
Submarine TRIDENT departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Submarines URSULA and L.23 arrived at Blyth after patrol.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OG.23 was formed with fifty one ships from convoys OA.115G, which departed Southend on the 23rd, and OB.115G, which departed Liverpool on the 23rd escorted by destroyers WALKER, WANDERER, VOLUNTEER. Destroyers WAKEFUL and VOLUNTEER escorted the convoy from 25 to 26 March and were then detached to convoy HG.23. WANDERER also escorted the convoy from 25 to 26 March. Sloop ABERDEEN escorted the convoy from 25 to 27 March. Destroyer CAMPBELL escorted the convoy from 25 to 27 March. French destroyer TIGRE and patrol vessel VIKINGS escorted the convoy from 26 to 31 March. Destroyer DOUGLAS joined the convoy on the 31st. The convoy arrived at Gibraltar later on the 31st.
 
Anti-U-boat actions and response to sinking of Britta – U.47 at 0600 sank Danish steamer BRITTA (1146grt) in 60‑00N, 04‑19W, off Sule Skerry. Five survivors were picked up by Danish steamer NANCY (1153grt) which was in company, but thirteen crew went missing.
 
Destroyers ELECTRA and ENCOUNTER, returning to Scapa Flow, proceeded to the location and ELECTRA stood by the rescue area. At 1241, ELECTRA and ENCOUNTER were ordered to return to Scapa Flow where they arrived at 1830. Destroyers HOTSPUR and HERO from Sullom Voe and SOMALI, MATABELE, FAME, FORESIGHT, SIKH, FOXHOUND from anti-submarine operations east of the Orkneys were sent to the area. Destroyers COSSACK (D.4), ESKIMO, PUNJABI departed Scapa Flow at 0700. The wreckage of BRITTA was later found eighteen miles from the reported position.
 
In anti-submarine operations on 25 and 26 March, COSSACK, SIKH, FOXHOUND, HOTSPUR, HERO were searching in the area 61N to 60N, 2W to 4W. They were joined by destroyer NUBIAN after escorting submarine TRIBUNE and destroyer FIREDRAKE after repairs from destroyer depot ship WOOLWICH. Destroyer FIREDRAKE was then ordered to join destroyers ICARUS and IVANHOE and the anti-submarine trawlers on the Moray Firth patrol. In anti-submarine operations on 25 and 26 March, destroyers SOMALI (D.6), ESKIMO, PUNJABI searched the eastern half of a patrol area from 60N to 59N, 3W to 5W. MATABELE, FAME, FORESIGHT searched the western half of this area.
 
Destroyer NUBIAN, which had completed refitting and degaussing at Rosyth on the 24th, rendezvoused off Rosyth at 1900/24th escorting submarine TRIBUNE. Both ships arrived safely at Scapa Flow at 1400/25th. NUBIAN departed Scapa Flow and joined the destroyers searching for the U.47 which had sunk Danish steamer BRITTA. The hunt was unsuccessful and NUBIAN damaged her asdic dome. TRIBUNE departed Scapa Flow on the 28th and was joined off Switha Gate at 1400 by destroyer FIREDRAKE which departed Invergordon at 0900/27th. FIREDRAKE escorted TRIBUNE to Greenock for the repair of further defects, arriving on the 30th, and completing on 10 May. FIREDRAKE then went on to Cardiff for repairs and refit. Returning to Scapa Flow, NUBIAN brushed destroyer MASHONA while changing berths requiring that NUBIAN go back into the dockyard for repairs. NUBIAN departed Scapa Flow on the 30th for the Tyne, and left the dockyard there on 11 April for duty with the Home Fleet.
 
Minelayer repairs – Minelayers PRINCESS VICTORIA and TEVIOTBANK departed Rosyth for the Tyne, escorted by sloop FLAMINGO and destroyer WALLACE. The ships arrived in the Tyne on the 26th and joined convoy FS.130 for passage to Immingham. PRINCESS VICTORIA had some damage to her mine chutes to be repaired at Immingham.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.129 departed the Tyne at 2100 escorted by sloop FLAMINGO and destroyers WALLACE and JUNO. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 27th.
 
Anti-U-boat actions and response to sinking of Daghestan – U.57 sank tanker DAGHESTAN …, en route from Scapa Flow to Sullom Voe escorted by armed boarding vessel NORTHERN DAWN and anti-submarine trawler BRONTES …, nine miles 212° from Copinsay. She had been lightly damaged on the 20th in the German air attacks on convoy HN.20.
 
Destroyers ICARUS, IMPULSIVE, FIREDRAKE and the 19th and 21st Anti-submarine Striking Forces were sent to search for the submarine. Tugs BUCCANEER and KROOMAN were sent to assist the tanker, which lost three crew and one gunner. Nineteen survivors rescued by anti-submarine trawler NORTHERN DAWN and six by anti-submarine trawler BRONTES.
 
General anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer ACASTA left her convoy at 0800/25th to search for a submarine off Bude, and met VIVACIOUS at noon on the 26th. ACASTA attacked a submarine contact off Bull Point in 51‑20N, 4‑55W.
 
Anti-submarine trawler KIRKELLA (436grt) attacked a submarine contact at 1420/25th off Bull Point in 51-19-48N, 04-20-20W. Anti-submarine trawler BANDOLERO (440grt) was in company, and ACASTA and VIVACIOUS joined the trawlers at this location. On 1 April, destroyer HAVANT searched a wreck at this location.
 
Senior military personnel movement – Destroyer KEITH brought the British Chief of the General Staff (CIGS) back from Boulogne.
 
Merchant grounding – Dutch steamer DRECHTDIJK (9338grt) went ashore on the Varne, and anti-submarine trawler KINGSTON CRYSTAL (433grt) was sent to investigate. The steamer was refloated under her own power before midnight, and tug LADY BRASSEY escorted her to one mile northeast of Folkestone Gate to anchor.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.24F departed Gibraltar with twenty seven ships. French destroyer CHACAL and auxiliary patrol vessel CAPITAINE ARMAND escorted the convoy from 25 to 31 March. Destroyers BROKE and VANSITTART escorted the convoy from 31 March to 3 April when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.30 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY, RESTIGOUCHE, SKEENA, which were detached on the 26th. Ocean escort for the convoy was battleship REVENGE. At 0950/26th, SKEENA was detached to join battleship MALAYA at 0750/27th. The battleship was returning to Halifax after escorting convoy HX.26. REVENGE was detached on 3 April while destroyers ACASTA, VISCOUNT, WHITEHALL, WITCH escorted the convoy from 6 to 9 April, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
French naval activity –French destroyer FORBIN stopped Portuguese steamer LIMA (3881grt) off Lisbon. A German citizen, accused of espionage, was taken off the steamer and taken into custody.
(«naval-history.net»)
[Ed. comment: the response to the loss of Britta and Daghestan seems disproportionate to their value. Thirteen destroyers were involved in the search for U-47, which sank a ballasted ship of 1100 tons. A host of other ships joined in the search for U-57 who sank a more valuable tanker of 5742 tons. This suggests preparation for ship movement in support of Allied Norwegian operations, and a desire to sweep clean a large part of the North Sea.]
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 3/27/2018 7:47:45 PM
March 26. Day 208
Tuesday.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

France
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April. (Compiled from BC War Diaries, pp 28-9.)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leave port on patrol; one boat (U-24) enters Kiel and one (U-13) enters Wilhelmshaven, each after 2 days on patrol. 16 U-boats at sea on this date.

No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=9. Total lost=18.

One ship, a neutral, lost to torpedo attack by U-boat. Tonnage lost to torpedoes=3794:
Cometa, a Norwegian motor merchant of 3794 tons, carrying 3250 tons of general cargo and paper from Oslo via Brevik, Kirkwall and Santos to Buenos Aires. Complement (31 regular + 6 Swedish passengers = 5 RN prize crew)=42; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 23.40 hours … the neutral and illuminated Cometa was spotted by U-38 and missed with a torpedo because the vessel stopped about 65 miles northwest of Noup Head, Orkneys. The Germans then asked by flashlight for the papers which were brought by the first mate, a difficult task due to the high seas and the darkness. He told Liebe that the ship had been ordered by the British authorities to go to Kirkwall for examination - she had been stopped by HMS Kingston Peridot (4.69) and one officer and four ratings were placed aboard. The Germans ordered the crew to abandon ship within one hour and then fired one torpedo at 02.20 hours on 26 March. She was struck amidships and broke in two. The stern sank immediately and the forepart was sunk by a coup de grâce at 02.57 hours. The 31 crewmembers, six Swedish passengers and five British sailors left the ship in one motorboat and two lifeboats and were picked up by HMS Northern Sky (4.41) on 26 March.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Refitting – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE departed Scapa Flow for refitting in the Tyne.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruisers DERBYSHIRE, WOLFE, LETITIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol, and were given air escort from the Clyde.
 
Destroyer assignment – Destroyer IVANHOE departed Invergordon to relieve destroyer ICARUS on Moray Firth patrol.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine TRUANT arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarine URSULA was docked at Blyth for repairs of ice damage sustained on her patrol.
 
Anti-U-boat action – Destroyer BEDOUIN, escorting the Home Fleet, attacked a submarine contact at 0959 ENE of the Faroes in 63-33N, 4-56W. This contact was later assessed as probably a wreck.
 
At 1400, destroyers HERO and HOTSPUR, after a search for a German submarine, joined the Home Fleet in 63-00N, 4-00W.

Destroyer FIREDRAKE attacked a submarine contact ESE of Copinsay in 58-49N, 2-16W. The contact was found to be non submarine.
 
Destroyer movements – Destroyer ELECTRA departed Scapa Flow at 1500 for a full calibre shoot southwest of the Orkneys, and then proceeded to Rosyth.
 
Destroyer ESK, after repairs, departed Scapa Flow at 1945 for a patrol station between Copinsay and Brough Head, before joining the Moray Firth Patrol at 0800/27th.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.117 departed Southend escorted by destroyer WHITEHALL on 26 and 27 March and destroyer VANESSA on the 27th. The convoy dispersed on the 29th.
 
Convoy OB.117 did not sail. OB 118GF departed Liverpool on the 26th and merged as OG.24F (q.v.)
 
Convoy OB.119 departed Liverpool on the 26th escorted by destroyers VERSATILE and WINCHELSEA.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.129 of 21 ships departed Southend escorted by destroyers WHITLEY and WESTMINSTER. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 28th.
 
Convoy MT.38 departed Methil escorted by the 1st Anti-submarine Group, sloop LOWESTOFT, and destroyer VALOROUS. On convoy MT.38's arrival off the Tyne, convoy FS.130, which included minelayers TEVIOTBANK and PRINCESS VICTORIA, departed the Tyne escorted by LOWESTOFT and VALOROUS. The minelayers arrived at the Humber on the 27th. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 28th.
 
Anti-U-boat actions – Anti-submarine trawler LADY ELSA (518grt) at 1550 attacked a submarine contact off Grimness, South Ronaldsay in 58-47-24N, 2-46-12W. The contact was non submarine.
 
Anti-submarine trawler DANEMAN (516grt) attacked a submarine contact at 2359/25th east of Halero Head, South Ronaldsay in 58-45-30N, 2-48-42W. Anti-submarine trawler MAN O' WAR (517grt) also attacked the contact. At 1440, anti-submarine trawler MAN O' WAR attacked a submarine contact off Burray Ness in 58-51N, 2-52W.
 
U-boat grounding – U.21 ran aground off Oddknuppen Island in 58‑28N, 07‑20E, near Ryvinga, southeast of Mandel. U.1 was ordered to assist, but was unable to locate her. U.22 was also ordered to assist, but had already been lost. U.21 was refloated by a German trawler and taken to Evjemoen in Mandalsfjord where she arrived on the 27th. She was interned on the 31st, but was only in Norwegian hands for a short time as she returned to German control on 9 April when Kristiansand fell.
[Ed. note: for a different account of this event, see “U-boat activity, March 27]
Quote:
 …
Ship movement – Light cruiser DUNEDIN arrived at Kingston.
 
Destroyer duties – Destroyer ACTIVE arrived at Gibraltar escorting steamer SEVILLA, carrying whale oil from Freetown.
 
Destroyer DIAMOND covered cable ship MIRROR repairing the St Vincent to Bathurst cable five to nine miles south of St Vincent Verde Island.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

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