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 (1939-1945) WWII Battles
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Page 8 of 11 (Page: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8 9  10  11 ) 
brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/19/2017 7:52:56 PM
December 19. Day 110
Tuesday.


Finland
No notable activity.

Europe
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity

U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=1 (U-70). One boat left Kiel (U-46) and 2 U-boats (U-89; U-60) entered Kiel after 6 and 8 days respectively.. 4 U-boats at sea. One British ship sunk by U-boat mining. Total tonnage lost=4373. No U-boats lost.

City of Kobe, a British steam merchant of 4373 tons, was carrying general cargo and coal from Antwerp via Tyne and Hull to the Malabar coast. Complement=31; lost=1. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 03.35 hours … the City of Kobe … in convoy FS-56 struck a mine laid on 15 December by U-60 and sank near Cross Sand Buoy, Great Yarmouth. One crew member was lost. The master and 29 crew members were picked up by HMS Tumby (FY 850) … and the British coasters Corinia and Faxfleet. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
The German passenger liner Columbus was scuttled about 450 miles east of Cape May, New Jersey. The Columbus had been trailed by the American cruiser Tuscaloosa since leaving Vera Cruz, Mexico, with the U.s. ship constantly reporting the German’s position by radio for any and all ships to hear. The captain of the Columbus felt his position was untenable and he could not avoid seizure or sinking. He concluded scuttling was the only course of action. The Tuscaloosa’s action made the U.S. position of neutrality highly suspect, but Berlin never protested for fear of irritating the U.S. and pushing it into the war. (Goralski, p 102)

Quote:
Home Fleet operations – On 19 December at 1430 Admiral Forbes departed the Clyde with battleship BARHAM, battlecruiser REPULSE and destroyers INGLEFIELD, IMOGEN, ICARUS, ISIS and KHARTOUM to cover convoys HN.5 and NV.2 [Norwegian convoys.].
 
At 55-30N, 5-02W off Holy Island at 1700, KHARTOUM reported a torpedo was fired at her. ISIS attacked a submarine contact, and KHARTOUM made three attacks at 1700.
 
KHARTOUM, in company with anti-submarine trawler LORD SNOWDEN (444grt), made a submarine attack in 55‑30N, 05‑00W off Arran at 0725/20th. Patrol sloops MALLARD and PUFFIN assisted, but the attack was unsuccessful.
 
Destroyers IMPULSIVE, MATABELE, MASHONA, BEDOUIN and ESKIMO departed Greenock to assist in the submarine hunt. MATABELE joined ISIS and also made attacks. KHARTOUM rejoined the BARHAM screen.
 
The search continued until liners AQUITANIA and EMPRESS OF BRITAIN passed the area southbound.
 
IMOGEN and KHARTOUM refuelled at Sullom Voe on the 23rd, while MASHONA arrived at Loch Ewe on the 24th with defects.
 
ICARUS and ISIS refuelled at Sullom Voe on the 25th. During this time, the Germans launched another air raid against Sullom Voe and the destroyers assisted anti-aircraft cruiser COVENTRY in driving off the attack.
 
INGLEFIELD refuelled at Sullom Voe on the 27th.
 
MATABELE, BEDOUIN, ESKIMO returned to the Clyde in time for convoy TC.2 escort.
 
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, two cruisers were between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and four armed merchant cruisers between the Faroes and Iceland, and heavy cruiser BERWICK and one armed merchant cruiser in the Denmark Strait. Armed merchant cruisers ASTURIAS and WORCESTERSHIRE departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol duties.
 
East Coast waters – Submarine TRITON arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers WITHERINGTON and VIMY attacked a submarine contact in the Western Approaches. They rejoined their convoy the next morning when relieved by destroyer VOLUNTEER.
 
Destroyer DUNCAN attacked a submarine contact in 50-05N, 3-16W.
 
New construction – Destroyer HAVANT (Lt Cdr A F Burnell-Nugent DSC) was completed. After working up at Portland, she was the first unit of the 9th Destroyer Flotilla and operated with the Home Fleet.
 
Destroyer GRAFTON on patrol in 51-50N, 1-46E reported a large number of floating mines.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser CARDIFF arrived in the Clyde.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.56 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY. The convoy had been delayed 24 hours, and arrived in the Tyne on the 20th.
 
U-boat disposition – U.48 passed Fair Isle Channel and returned to Germany, leaving no U-boats operating in the Atlantic at this time.
 
Norwegian coastal waters – Finnish steamer UKO (757grt) was sunk by German bombing 80 miles south of Utsire; three crew and two passengers were wounded. Survivors were picked up by Swedish steamer SIR ERNEST CASSEL (7739grt) and landed at Kopervik.
 
U.K. outbound convoys – Convoy OA.56 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WHITEHALL and WIVERN from the 19th to 21st, and joined by destroyer VESPER on the 21st, when the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.56 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VIMY and WITHERINGTON to the 21st, when the convoy dispersed.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser EMERALD arrived at Halifax after escorting troop convoy TC.1.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.13 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA, which detached on the 20th. Light cruiser ENTERPRISE departed Halifax as the ocean escort on the 19th, detached on the 28th and arrived at Portsmouth on the 29th. Destroyer WREN escorted the convoy from the 28th to 30th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.13 departed Freetown escorted by sloop EGRET until 2 January when she was relieved by destroyers ARDENT and BROKE. The convoy arrived on the 3rd.
 
Far East waters –Submarine REGENT departed Singapore for patrol in the Java Sea off Saband and Mentawei. On the 24th, she bottomed off Pulo Simalar and was badly damaged with damage to her hydroplanes. She was ordered to return to Singapore on the 25th and arrived back, repairing until 28 February. REGENT then proceeded to Hong Kong, arriving on 18 March, for a refit completed on 19 June. (“naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/20/2017 4:08:27 PM
December 20. Day 111
Wednesday.

Finland
No notable activity

Europe
No notable activity.

USA
Quote:
The U.S. embargoed the delivery of plans, plants, and technical information required for the production of aviation gasoline to “certain countries’ engaged’n unprovoked bombing or machine-gunning of civilian populations from the air.” It was the first gesture in what was called a “moral embargo.” (Goralski, p 102)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Search

12 Blenheims were dispatched and bombed 11 German minesweepers whose location had been detected by Coastal command. Results of the bombing are not known. No Blenheims lost. (BC War Diaries, p 27)


U-boat activity
Commissioned U-boats ordered on this date=0; U-boats laid down=0. One U-boat (U-38) entered Kiel after 31 days. 3 U-boats at sea. One Swedish ship sunk from mining: total tonnage=1877. No U-boats lost.

Mars, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1877 tons, carrying wood pulp from Köpmanholmen via Helsingborg to London. Complement=22; lost=7. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 14.30 hours … the Mars struck a mine, laid earlier the same day by U-22 and sank about one mile east of St. Mary’s Lighthouse near Blyth. Nine of the survivors, four of them injured, were landed at North Shields a few hours later. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – On Northern Patrol, one cruiser was between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and six AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and one AMC in the Denmark Strait.

Vice Admiral Sir Max K Horton KCB, DSO was relieved by Vice Admiral R H T Raikes CB, CVO, DSO as Vice Admiral Northern Patrol. On 9 January 1940, Admiral Horton assumed command as Vice Admiral, submarines.

Repair work – Submarine SEAL reported she had engine defects requiring ten days to make good.
 
Sighting of the Deutschland – A German warship, identified as DEUTSCHLAND, was sighted northbound in the Belt.
 
Light cruiser GLASGOW returning from Northern Patrol was ordered to refuel and join light cruiser NEWCASTLE on Fair Island Channel Patrol.
 
Submarine H.34 on trials with destroyer ENCOUNTER in Pentland Firth was ordered to patrol in the Firth. This patrol was terminated on the 21st.
 
Submarines L.23 and STURGEON were 10 and 25 miles south of Rjyvingen Light, respectively.
 
Submarine THISTLE was 80 miles WSW of Ryvingen Light.
 
L.23, STURGEON, THISTLE then returned to their regular patrol stations.
 
If German warships were sighted in the North Sea, the Commander of the 2nd Cruiser Squadron with light cruisers EDINBURGH and SOUTHAMPTON was ordered to take battleship BARHAM, battlecruiser REPULSE, and light cruisers GLASGOW and NEWCASTLE under his command. Also, any available destroyers of the 12th Destroyer Flotilla were to join NEWCASTLE. The destroyers of the 8th Flotilla at Loch Ewe were put on one hour's notice.
 
On 21 December, DEUTSCHLAND was sighted steaming south back towards Germany.
 
GLASGOW arrived at Rosyth on the 22nd and NEWCASTLE at Scapa Flow with destroyer ESCAPADE on the 23rd.
 
Anti-U-boat activities –Destroyer ESCAPADE was sent to search for a submarine reported at the entrance to Kirkwall.

Anti-submarine trawler ARCTIC EXPLORER (501grt) attacked a submarine contact in Shapinsay Sound in the Orkneys. The same submarine was sighted again later and armed boarding vessel NORTHERN ISLES made another attack.
 
Sloop FOWEY attacked a submarine contact in 50-28N, 1-10W.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.57 departed Southend, escorted by sloops PELICAN, WESTON and HASTINGS, and arrived in the Tyne on the 22nd. There was no convoy FN.58.
 
Convoy FS.57 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloops STORK and FLAMINGO, and arrived at Southend on the 22nd.

Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK departed Clyde on Northern Patrol duties, and arrived back on the 29th.
 
Refitting – Light cruiser CARDIFF departed the Clyde for Portsmouth, and arrived on the 23rd for refitting, completed on 30 January.
 
Light cruiser DIOMEDE was refitting at Plymouth until 10 January.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.57 departed Southend escorted by destroyers WOLVERINE and ARDENT from the 20th to 21st. Destroyer WINDSOR was escort from the 21st to 23rd, when the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.57 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WANDERER and WALPOLE to the 23rd, when they detached to convoy HX.12.

Swedish steamer MARS (1877grt) was sunk one mile east of St Marys Light Vessel near Blyth on a mine laid by U.22 on the 15th; seven crew were lost, and 15 survivors rescued.

U-boat minelaying – U.22 laid mines off Blyth near Newcastle, on which one merchant ship was sunk.
 
North Atlantic incoming convoy – Convoy HX.13 departed Halifax at 1000 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT. Off Halifax, Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA took over the escort and were detached on the 22nd. The convoy was turned over to light cruiser EMERALD which departed Halifax with the convoy for ocean escort; she detached on 3 January. The Canadian destroyers arrived back at Halifax the morning of the 23rd. Destroyers MACKAY and WARWICK from convoy OB.62, together with WOLVERINE and VERITY escorted the convoy from 2 to 4 January, when it arrived at Liverpool. EMERALD arrived at Portsmouth on 4 January to repair defects, completed on the 11th. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/21/2017 4:38:15 PM
December 21. Day 112
Thursday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
Rumania signed a new economic agreement with Germany. (Goralski, p 102)


Germany
Quote:
A curious communique from the German navy today: “The High Command of the Navy announces: The commander of the Graf Spee, Captain Hans Langsdorff, did not want to survive the sin kinging of his ship. True to old traditions and the the spirit of the training of the Officers Corps of which he was a member for thirty years, he made this decision. Having brought his crew to safety he considered his duty fulfilled, and followed his ship. … Captain Langsdorff has in this way fulfilled like a fighter and a hero the expectations of his Führer, the German people, and the navy.”
The wretched German people, deprived of all truth from outside, will not be told that Captain Langsdorff did not follow his ship to the bottom, but committedsuicide by putting a revolver-shot through his head in a lonely hotel room in Buenos Aires. …
Eleven admitted executions here in the last two days. About half for espionage and the rest for “damaging the interests of the people in war-time” – the sentences in all but one case being passed by the “People’s Court” whose proceedings are never published. …
Many long prison sentences being meted out to Germans who listen to foreign radio stations, and yet many continue to listen to them. … I passed an afternoon with a German family the other day, mother, two daughters, one son. They were a little apprehensive when they turned on the six p.m. BBC news. The mother said that besides the porter, who is the official Nazi spy for the apartment house, they had just learned that a Jewish tenant in return for receiving clothing ration cards (Jews get food cards, but no clothing cards) had turned informer for the house, and they had to be very careful. (Berlin Diary, pp 261-63)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Search

24 Hampden and 18 Wellingtons failed to locate any targets. Part of the Hampden force was mistakenly attacked by R.A.F. Spifires of 602 Squadron when returning to land in Scotland; 2 of the Hampdens were shot down in the sea; it is believed that one man died, the remaining crew members being rescued. (BC War Diaries, p 27)


U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-71); launched=0; commissioned=1 (U-62). No U-boats sailed or returned to base. 3 U-boats at sea. 2 Swedish ship, 1 Norwegian sunk: total tonnage=3751. No U-boats lost.

Mars, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1475 tons, carrying coal from Leith via Vinga and Malmöto Stockholm. Complement=19; lost=18.
Carl Henckel, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1352 tons, carrying coal from Leith via Malmö to Stockholm. Complement=17; lost=7.
Rudolf, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 924 tons, in ballast from Gotherburg to the UK. Complement=15; lost=7. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 06.50 hours … U-21 spotted two steamers with lights set but saw no national markings. At 07.25 hours, the first ship, the Mars …, was hit by one torpedo and sank within 90 seconds east-northeast of May Island. At 07.42 hours, the second ship … was hit by one torpedo and stopped, but remained afloat and sank immediately following a coup de grâce at 10.16 hours. One survivor from the first and seven survivors from the second ship were picked up the next day by the Hop and taken to Kristiansand.

At 04.40 hours … the Rudolf … was hit in the aft part by one torpedo from U-46 about 110 miles east-northeast of Rattray Head and settled quickly by the stern while the survivors abandoned ship in two lifeboats. The ship had been hit by a dud about 10 minutes earlier. Six men in one boat were picked up by Biarritz after sailing 150 miles and landed at Antwerp. Nine survivors in the other boat were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Bjerka … and taken to Kopervik. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – [T]wo cruisers were between the Orkneys and Faroes, one cruiser and five AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and one AMC in the Denmark Strait.
 
East Coast convoy – Destroyers EXMOUTH, ELECTRA and new sloop FLEETWOOD departed Rosyth escorting a convoy from Methil to the Tyne.
 
Patrol activities – Submarine UNITY departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Ship movement – Submarine TAKU escorted by anti-submarine yacht CUTTY SARK departed Liverpool for the Clyde.
 
UK-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoys OA.55G and OB.55G merged as OG.11 with 46 ships. Destroyers ACASTA and WINDSOR escorted OA.55G from the 18th to 21st, and VANESSA and AMAZON escorted the convoy on the 21st. Destroyers MACKAY and WARWICK of OB.55G, which departed Liverpool on the 18th, escorted the convoy on the 21st. French destroyers GUÉPARD and VERDUN, which departed Brest on the 20th, escorted the convoy from the 21st to 26th. Destroyer VORTIGERN escorted the convoy on the 25th and 26th, when it arrived at Gibraltar.

Anti-U-boat activities – Anti-submarine trawler CAPE WARWICK (516grt) reported a submarine seven miles 52° from North Foreland in 51-27N, 1-36E, and made an attack on the contact.
 
Sloop ABERDEEN attacked a submarine contact 50-06N, 1-54W.

Destroyer WOLVERINE attacked a submarine contact 20 miles 90° from Start Point. Destroyer ARDENT joined her in the search.
 
Ship transfer – Light cruiser CALEDON departed Plymouth and arrived at Gibraltar on the 24th for duty with the Mediterranean Fleet. She left on the 26th for Malta.
 
Light cruiser CALYPSO departed the Tyne for Plymouth in preparation for transfer to the Mediterranean Fleet.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol duties, and arrived back on the 22nd.
 
Light cruiser COLOMBO departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol duties, and arrived back on the 28th.
 
New ship – Destroyer KIMBERLEY … was completed. She departed Portsmouth on the 27th for 14 days working up at Portland, after which she joined the 5th Destroyer Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet on 21 January.

North Sea – Italian steamer COMITAS (3482grt) was badly damaged on a mine in the Wielingen Fairway off Flushing. She was towed by a Dutch tug to Flushing, but sank in the port off Rammekens on the 22nd. No crew were lost.

Minesweeping trawler DROMIO (380grt, Lt Cdr G. Dibley RNR) was sunk in a collision with Italian steamer VALDARNO (5696grt) four miles due north of Whitby. There were no casualties on either ship.
 
UK-Norwegian inbound convoy – After being delayed 48 hours, convoy HN.5 with eight British, five Norwegian, two Swedish, six Finnish, three Estonian and one Latvian ship departed Bergen escorted by destroyers AFRIDI, MAORI, NUBIAN, MOHAWK with destroyer ESCAPADE joining at sea while the convoy was en route. NUBIAN and MOHAWK were detached to escort the six ships of the west coast section of the convoy and arrived at Greenock on the 24th. HN.5 arrived at Methil without event on the 24th with MAORI, AFRIDI and ESCAPADE. On the 25th, MAORI and AFRIDI departed Rosyth and arrived in the Clyde on the 27th.
 
Ships’ collision – Steamer SOUTHERN PRINCE (10917grt) sank tug DANUBE IV (239grt) in an accidental collision in the Clyde. SOUTHERN PRINCE was run ashore to prevent her sinking, refloated on the 23rd and repaired at Dalmuir.
 
Ship transfer – Battleship MALAYA, escorted by destroyers DIANA and DELIGHT, departed Malta for Gibraltar with destroyer WATCHMAN as local escort. She was en route to Halifax, and the destroyers for service in Home Waters.
 
French naval activity – French heavy cruisers TOURVILLE and COLBERT patrolled in the Greek Islands for two days on passage from Beirut to Bizerte. On the 25th, they arrived at Malta.
 
French heavy cruiser SUFFREN arrived at Trincomalee.

Far East waters – Light cruiser DURBAN arrived at Singapore.
 
Ship transfer – Sloop FOLKESTONE, which completed her long refit on the 13th, departed Hong Kong on the 21st. She left Singapore on the 28th for patrol in the Malacca Strait, departed Penang on 3 January and Colombo on the 8th arriving at Aden on the 14th. FOLKESTONE left Aden on 19 January, Port Said on the 24th, and boiler cleaned at Malta beginning on the 27th. She arrived at Gibraltar on 5 February and departed the same day, escorting convoy HG.16, and reaching Portsmouth on the 14th for duty in the Western Approaches. («naval-history.net»)
[Editor’s comment: minutiae. I have been generating sub-heads in bold to help place sea-related incidents. These are not official labels, but are only descriptors to aid the reader in locating where in the world an incident might be taking place.]
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/22/2017 6:06:41 PM
December 22. Day 113
Friday.

Finland
Quote:
The Finns launched an unexpected major counterattack against the Russians. (Goralski, p 102)

Quote:
Despite repeated Russian attacks, the Finnish positions remain firm. This first battle has ended in a serious defeat for the Red Army. (2194 Days, p 38)


Europe
No notable activity.

USA
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats sailing from or entering harbour. 3 U-boats at sea. One British steamer damaged by mining: total tonnage lost=n.a. No U-boats lost.

Gryfevale, a British steam merchantman of 4434 tons, carrying cotton seed, oil cake and rice from Alexandrea via Gibraltar to Leith. Complement=35; lost=0. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 13.40 hours … the Gryfevale was damaged by a mine laid on 1 December by U-61 three miles east of the Tyne Piers.
Gryfevale made it back to the Tyne under her own power and was repaired until June 1940. She was taken over by the Admiralty and used as water distilling ship in Freetown and Bathurst until April 1944 when the ship returned to trade by Anglo-Danubian Transport Co Ltd, London. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – [T]wo cruisers were between the Orkneys and Faroes, one cruiser and five AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and two cruisers and one AMC in the Denmark Strait. In addition, one additional cruiser and two AMCs were en route for the patrol line between the Faroes and Iceland.
 
Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE arrived at Scapa Flow from Northern Patrol, refuelled, and left again that same day for the Patrol.
 
The Northern Patrol from 22 December to 4 January 1940 sighted 43 eastbound ships of which 35 were sent into Kirkwall for inspection.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser GLASGOW arrived at Rosyth from Fair Isle Patrol.
 
Light cruiser MANCHESTER departed Portsmouth for the Scapa Flow, arriving on the 24th.
 
Destroyers FOXHOUND, FIREDRAKE, FAME and FEARLESS with the 1st Minesweeping Flotilla arrived at Loch Ewe.
 
Ship completion – Destroyer KIPLING … was completed. Following working up, she joined the 5th Destroyer Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet, on 18 January 1940. KIPLING was to have been completed in September, but turbine problems required the gears to be re-cut.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.58 departed Southend escorted by destroyer BROKE and sloop ABERDEEN. The destroyer was detached on the 24th, and the sloop on the 25th, when the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.58 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyer WINCHELSEA and sloop DEPTFORD to the 25th, when the convoy dispersed.
 
U-boat minelaying – U.22 laid mines off Blyth, on which one merchant ship and one trawler were sunk.
 
Steamer GRYFEVALE (4434grt) was badly damaged three miles east of the Tyne Piers, off Whitby Bay on a mine laid by U.61 on the 2nd. She was towed into the Tyne and beached to prevent her sinking.
 
Canadian troop convoy – TC.2 departed Halifax with troopships BATORY (14,287grt), ANDES (25,689grt), ORMONDE (14,982grt), ALMANZORA (15,510grt), ORAMA (19,840grt), CHROBRY (11,442grt) and REINA DEL PACIFICO (17,702grt) carrying 806, 1358, 1269, 1284, 935, 1045 and 1455 troops, respectively. The convoy was escorted from Halifax by Canadian destroyers OTTAWA, FRASER, RESTIGOUCHE, ST LAURENT and the British HUNTER. Battleship REVENGE (Vice Admiral Holland aboard returning to England to assume post on Admiralty-Air Ministry staff), French battleship DUNKERQUE and light cruiser GLOIRE were ocean escort.
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser CORNWALL and light cruiser GLOUCESTER departed Durban. CORNWALL arrived at Simonstown on the 26th, while GLOUCESTER proceeded to Mauritius. («naval-history.net»)
[Editorial comment: TC.2 total tonnage=119,400+; troops carried=8150+.]
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/23/2017 5:42:18 PM
December 23. Day 114
Saturday. Waxing gibbous moon.

Finland
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
Protests were filed with Britain, France, and Germany by 21 Latin American republics over the Graf Spee incident, which they claimed violated the neutrality of American waters. British detention and destruction of German merchantmen by British warships were also noted. (Goralski, p 102)


USA
Quote:
Two German merchantmen are intercepted by British ships near the United States coast. One of them, the Columbus, is sunk, while the other takes refuge in territorial waters off Florida. In an explanatory letter to Roosevelt, Churchill argues that police action by Allied fleets in the Atlantic also serves to protect US and South American merchant traffic, since German raiders have the right, after taking off the crews, to capture of sink neutral ships if they are carrying goods for the Allies. (2194 Days, p 38)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Search

2 Whitleys failed to locate any targets. (BC War Diaries, p 27)


U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=14; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-30) sails from Wilhelmshaven. 4 U-boats at sea. Three RN ships sunk by mining: total tonnage lost=3259. No U-boats lost.

HMS Dolphin, a floating RN workshop of 3099 tons, being prepped for use as a block ship. Complement=7; lost=0.
HMS Glen Albyn, a minesweeping trawler of 82 tons. Complement unrecorded; lost unrecorded.
HMS Promotive, a minesweeping trawler of 78 tons. Complement unrecorded; lost unrecorded. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
…HMS Dolphin struck a mine laid on 20 December by U-22 and sank 1.5 miles south-southeast of Blyth. The ship had been used as floating workshop in Portsmouth Dockyard and was being towed to Hughes Bolckow at Cambois to be stripped of all machinery prior to being sunk as blockship at Scapa Flow.

… M/S trawlers HMS Glen Albyn and HMS Promotive sank after striking mines that were laid on 27 October by U-31 at the entrance to Loch Ewe. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Coverage of incoming troop convoy Battleship RESOLUTION and destroyers ILEX, KINGSTON, KASHMIR departed the Clyde to cover convoy TC.2.
 
Refit – Light cruiser EDINBURGH arrived at Rosyth to boiler clean and refit, and was under repair from 29 December to 30 January when she was able to depart for escort duty.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser CALIFORNIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Last ships of flotilla transfer – Destroyer SIKH, which departed Malta on the 17th and Gibraltar on the 20th, arrived at Dover completing the transfer of the 4th Destroyer Flotilla from the Mediterranean. She moved on to Chatham arriving on the 26th for refitting and repairs until 10 January 1940.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer ESCORT with minelayer PLOVER and submarine H.34 arrived at Dundee from Scapa Flow, en route to Rosyth.
 
Destroyers EXMOUTH and ELECTRA arrived at Rosyth after Tyne-Methil convoy escort duty.
 
Minesweeper HAZARD departed Loch Ewe for the Clyde, and was joined by destroyer FORESTER for escort.
 
Honours gazetted – On 23 December, the first list of British naval awards and honours of the war was gazetted:
 
Harwood and the three cruiser captains of the River Plate Battle, Bickford and crew members of the submarine SALMON for the sinking of submarine U.36, Gregory of the submarine STURGEON for his "successful action" against a U-boat were listed.
 
Certain officers and ratings of submarine SPEARFISH and destroyer MOHAWK were listed for the incidents in which their ships were damaged.
 
Commanding officers of the following destroyers were awarded DSO's for "successful action" against U-boats - AFRIDI, BROKE, ECLIPSE, ECHO, EXMOUTH, FAULKNOR, FORTUNE, INGLEFIELD, KINGSTON and SOMALI.
 
Commanding officers of the following warships were awarded DSC's for "successful action" against U-boats - destroyers EXPRESS, FIREDRAKE, FORESTER, ILEX, IMOGEN, INTREPID, IVANHOE, VESPER, WALPOLE, WINCHELSEA, sloop PUFFIN, and anti-submarine trawlers CAYTON WYKE and LOCH TULLA.
 
Commanding officers of the following destroyers were mentioned in dispatches for "successful action" against U-boats - ESK, FAME, FOXHOUND, KASHMIR, VOLUNTEER, WHIRLWIND and WOOLSTON.
 
Also, two officers and two ratings of VERNON were decorated for their work on magnetic mines.
 
Steamer PANDORA (ex-HMS DOLPHIN, 5670grt) was being towed by tugs for breaking up, when she struck a mine one mile to eastward of Blyth Pier. She sank rapidly 12.6 cables 131° from Blyth East Pier, but the crew of seven was rescued. [Editorial note: despite the change of name and the difference in tonnage, this appears to be the same ship as described under “U-boat activity”, above.]
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.20 of steamer BARON KINNAIRD departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer VIVACIOUS. They arrived in the Loire on the 25th, and returned, departing on 4 January and reaching Barry on the 6th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.58 departed Southend at 1500, but was ordered to anchor in the Downs for the night. The escort was sloops FLAMINGO and STORK, joined by destroyer VEGA. The convoy was cancelled on the 24th, and FLAMINGO and STORK ordered to proceed to Rosyth if weather permitted.

Convoy FS.58 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloops FLEETWOOD and GRIMSBY, and arrived at Southend on the 24th.
 
Change of station? – Heavy cruiser SHROPSHIRE had departed Capetown on the 15th for Montevideo, but was diverted en route and on the 23rd arrived at Rio de Janeiro.
 
Indian Ocean – French heavy cruiser SUFFREN and British armed merchant cruiser CATHAY departed Trincomalee. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/24/2017 6:57:49 PM
December 24. Day 115
Sunday.

Finland
No notable activity

Europe
Quote:
Pope Pius XII makes a Christmas Eve appeal for peace. (2194 Days, p 38)

Quote:
BERLIN, December 24-5, three a.m.
Christmas Eve. Raining out, but it will turn to snow. The first war Christmas somehow has brought the war home to the people more than anything else. It was always the high point of the year for Germans but this year it’s a bleak Christmas, with few presents, Spartan food, the men folk away, the streets blacked out, the shutters and curtains drawn tight in accordance with police regulations. … The Germans feel the difference tonight. … Hitler has gone to the western front, though we have not been allowed to say so. He pulled out on the 21st in a huff, skipping his traditional Christmas party for the Chancellery staff and his old party cronies, though it had been all planned. (Berlin Diary, p 263)


USA
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity, though William Shirer notes Hitler is on the western front at Christmas.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Search

17 Wellingtons attacked shipping but no results were seen. 2 Blenheims made photographic reconnaissance flights to Wilhelmshaven. No losses. (BC War Diaries, p 27)


U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-21, U-22) enter Kiel after 8 and 12 days respectively. Only 2 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by mining or torpedo: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – [T]wo cruisers were between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and seven AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and one AMC in the Denmark Strait.
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK departed Belfast and arrived in the Clyde on 1 January.
 
Ships needing repair – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON arrived in the Tyne for repairs from 28 December until 23 January 1940.
 
Destroyer WALLACE departed Rosyth in the tow of two tugs for Leith.
 
Escort duties – Destroyers ECHO and ELECTRA departed Inchkeith escorting tankers to Loch Ewe.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers FURY and FIREDRAKE departed Loch Ewe and joined destroyers FEARLESS, KASHMIR, KINGSTON, ILEX, NUBIAN and MOHAWK in the Clyde.
 
Submarine TRIAD arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers GREYHOUND and GRENVILLE attacked a submarine contact in 52-25N, 1-52E.
 
Station transfer – Light cruiser CALYPSO departed Plymouth for Gibraltar where she arrived on the 27th for duty with the Mediterranean Fleet.
 
U.K. outbound convoy – Convoy OB.59 departed Liverpool, escorted by destroyers VOLUNTEER and VENETIA to the 27th when they detached to SL.14. Convoy OA.59 did not sail.
 
Ship movement – Battleship MALAYA and destroyers DELIGHT and DIANA arrived at Gibraltar, and left the same day with destroyer WATCHMAN. MALAYA proceeded to Halifax, and DELIGHT and DIANA to Portsmouth and Dover respectively, arriving on the 30th. DIANA carried on to Chatham, arriving for refit on the 31st.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.12 of 48 ships departed Gibraltar, escorted by French large destroyers JAGUAR and LÉOPARD, from the 24th until the destroyers arrived at Brest on 1 January, and also by destroyer KEPPEL. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on 2 January.
 
Aftermath of Battle of the River Plate – Heavy cruiser DORSETSHIRE had departed Simonstown on the 13th for Montevideo to join light cruisers AJAX and the New Zealand ACHILLES. En route, DORSETSHIRE was diverted on the 18th to the Falklands. She arrived, refuelled from tanker OLYNTHUS on the 22nd in San Boroban Bay and on the 24th arrived in the Falklands to embark the prisoners from German steamers KARL FRITZEN and USSUKUMA. Off the Plate, ACHILLES departed on the 18th for the Falklands where she arrived on the 21st to land her wounded, and after refuelling, left to arrive back off the Plate on the 24th.
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser CUMBERLAND arrived in the Falklands on the 24th. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/25/2017 6:08:17 PM
December 25. Day 116
Monday. Christmas Day.

[Editor’s note: this first Christmas of the war brings human stories to the fore, even in chroniclers. I have offered rather softer assessments than normal because that is what is offered.
I have indulged in offering lengthy passages from William Shirer, from his diary entry of Dec. 27, which covers his tour of Kriegsmarine facilities on Dec 25 and Dec 26. The diary entry is some six pages in length, and well worth reading in full. Shirer is insightful, and never loses his focus as an observer/reporter. I’ve kept the entry as short as possible, and have included it under “Germany”.
I’ve truncated where possible, but hope I’ve retained Shirer’s wit and insight. And I do apologize for how lengthy the entry is. ]

Finland
Quote:
The Finns have more to celebrate than the Russians, for they still manage to resist the invaders. Using intelligent and courageous guerrilla tactics in the severest conditions (they are fighting in temperatures of minus 30°C), the Finnish David has so far compelled the Soviet Goliath to mark time, which promises well for the months to come. (2194 Days, p 39)


Germany
Quote:
BERLIN, December 27

This has been quite a Christmas holiday. Two days with the German fleet, the first foreigner given the opportunity.
… [I]t took us two hours to find my guide, Oberleutnant X from the High Command. A typical World War type of officer, monocle and all, he was so angry he could hardly speak. He fumed that he had been standing on a darkened corner for two hours in the pouring rain and that we had passed him several times.
At Hamburg the rain was still coming down in sheets… . The city reminded me very much of Liverpool. … I spend an hour going through the new 10,000-ton cruiser Admiral Hipper… . Much debris on … and beneath its decks, but the officers explained it was merely undergoing the usual overhaul which every new vessel needs. They swore the ship had not been damaged by enemy action. …I get along with German naval people, and when over our port and sandwiches I reminded them that the British Admiralty had recently reported the torpedoing of a cruiser by a British U-boat the commander winked and beckoned me to follow him. We climbed and climbed … until … we emerged on the battle tower.
“Look over there,” he said slyly. A hundred yards away, a somewhat smaller cruiser was propped up in dry-dock, a huge hole … torn in its side. … It was the cruiser Leipzig and the officer said they had been lucky to get it back into port afloat after a British torpedo had hit it squarely. The BBC, he said, had claimed the ship had been sunk. … A little way down the river, returning to our car, I noticed the 35,000-ton Bismarck. It looked very near completion.
[Shirer was then driven to Kiel, where he was harangued by a Nazi propagandist. A great exchange and very insightful, IMHO. Then,] … out in Kiel harbour I was surprised to see that almost the entire German fleet was concentrated here for Christmas. I noticed the pocket-battleship Deutschland, two cruisers of the Cologne class…, both 26,000-ton battleships, and about fifteen submarines, not including three in dry-dock. If the British only know, I could not help thinking, they could come over this night, which will see almost a full moon, and wipe out the whole German fleet. Just one real big bombing attack. …
Our launch finally stopped next to an immense dry-dock. On of the 26,000-ton battleships was in it, the Gneisenau. My hosts decided to show me over it. … I was surprised at the spirit of camaraderie between officers and men on the ship and so was – I soon noticed – my monocled Oberleutnant from the World War. … The captain must have noticed our surprise.
“That’s the new spirit of our navy,” he said proudly. (Berlin Diary, p 265-7)


Britain
Quote:
King George VI broadcasts a Christmas message to the Empire: ‘A New Year is at hand. We cannot tell what it will bring. If it brings peace, how thankful we shall all be. If it brings us continued struggle, we shall remain undaunted.’ (2194 Days, p 39)

Quote:
Morning received a pair of gloves from a lady friend also a box of Black Magic from another. Jenny bought me a Penguin book and bar of chocolate, could not afford any more. …
Christmas Day tea we all went to a lady friend’s and stayed to supper (turkey). The party consisted of seven women.. (from Muriel Green’s MO diary, Wartime Women, Dorothy Sheridan, ed., Phoenix Press, London (1990), p 60)


Western Front
Quote:
Within the concrete and under the turrets of the Maginot and Siegfried Lines the armies celebrate the first Christmas of the war. The Western Front is quiet and the ‘phoney war’ goes on. But the Führer has prepared new plans for the coming months. (2194 Days, pp 38-9)


In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Search

12 Hampdens located one or more submarines but were not able to attack. (BC War Diaries, p 27)
[Editor’s comment: this is a bit of a puzzle, one of many that may only reflect choice of language. With 12 a/c and with one or more targets, why were the RAF “not able” to attack?]

U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats entering or leaving port. Only 2 U-boats at sea. Two British ships sunk by mining: total tonnage lost=3007. No U-boats lost.

HMS Loch Doon, an RN trawler of 534 tons. Complement=16; lost=16.
Stanhope, a British steam merchantman of 2473 tons, was laden with 4500 tones of coal bound from Cardiff to London. Complement=25; lost=13.(Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
… HMS Loch Doon (FY 127) … struck a mine laid on 20 December by U-22 east of Blyth and sank with all hands
….
At 08.45 hours … 1939 the Stanholme … struck a mine laid on 9 November by U-33 and sank off Foreland Point in the Bristol Channel. 13 crew members were lost. The master and eleven crew members were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Liv and landed at Cardiff. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – [O]ne cruiser was between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and seven AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and one AMC in the Denmark Strait.
 
Of the ships engaged on Northern Patrol, heavy cruiser BERWICK arrived in the Clyde for a period of rest and refit; light cruiser CERES arrived at Scapa Flow after patrol; light cruiser DUNEDIN arrived at Scapa Flow after her refit in the Clyde, and left for Northern Patrol; and armed merchant cruiser JERVIS BAY arrived at Portsmouth.

Ship movement – Destroyers MAORI and AFRIDI departed Rosyth for the Clyde.
 
Handling mishaps – Armed merchant cruiser DERBYSHIRE was in a collision with collier EDENWOOD (1167grt) two miles ENE of the Nab. The collier sank, but no crew were lost. DERBYSHIRE was undamaged.
 
Return from patrol – Submarine TRIDENT arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
North Atlantic incbound troop convoy – Canadian convoy TC.2 was in mid-Atlantic when Admiral Forbes ordered the sortie of twelve Home Fleet destroyers to escort it through the Western Approaches and into the Clyde.
 
Destroyers SOMALI, BEDOUIN, ESKIMO, MATABELE, MOHAWK, FEARLESS, FIREDRAKE, FURY, IMPERIAL and IMPULSIVE departed on the 25th and KINGSTON and KASHMIR on the 26th, all from Greenock and joined the convoy at sea on the 28th.
 
On the 29th, destroyers FAME and FORESIGHT conducted an anti-submarine sweep off Ailsa Craig, after which, FAME arrived back in the Clyde on the 30th and FORESIGHT went to Loch Ewe.
 
Also on the 29th, the French ships (battleship DUNKERQUE and light cruiser GLOIRE) were detached, escorted by destroyers FEARLESS, FURY, FIREDRAKE and joined later in the morning by destroyers MOGADOR, VOLTA, LE TRIOMPHANT, LE FANTASQUE, and LE TERRIBLE, which had departed Brest on the 26th. The destroyers were detached before the French ships arrived at Brest on the 30th.
 
On the 29th and 30th, convoy escort was supplemented by escort vessels PUFFIN, JASON, GLEANER and SHEARWATER.
 
At 0900/30th, TC.2 arrived safely in the Clyde escorted by battleship REVENGE and destroyers SOMALI, IMPERIAL, MOHAWK, KINGSTON, KASHMIR, MATABELE, BEDOUIN, FEARLESS, FURY, FAME and FIREDRAKE.
 
REVENGE, escorted by destroyers MOHAWK, MASHONA, KHARTOUM and KINGSTON, departed the Clyde at 0800/31st, and proceeded to Plymouth arriving at 1200 on 1 January for refitting, completed on 23 January.
 
The destroyers, less MASHONA, returned to the Clyde. MASHONA sailed to Chatham for repairs.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyers ECHO and ELECTRA were hunting off Rattray Head in 57-36N, 1-35W.
 
Sloop FLAMINGO attacked a submarine contact in the Knock Deep off the mouth of the Thames.
 
RN submarine activity – On Christmas Day 1939, the following submarines were on patrol in the Heligoland Bight and the North Sea: STURGEON which had departed from Blyth on the 17th and whose patrol ended on the 29th when she left the area to return, THISTLE which had departed from Rosyth on the 20th and was on patrol at entrance to Oslofjord, TRIUMPH from Rosyth on the 23rd, TRUANT from Rosyth on the 25th, SEALION from Harwich on the 12th, SNAPPER from Harwich on the 19th, UNITY from Blyth on the 21st, and L.23 from Blyth on the 17th to patrol in the area of Kristiansandfjord.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.59 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers VALOROUS, VIVIEN and sloop BITTERN. After a submarine was sighted by aircraft close to Spurn Point on the 25th, the three escorts were sent to investigate, and VALOROUS attacked a contact; two anti-submarine trawlers were also searching in the area. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 27th.

Neutral shipping – Norwegian steamer LAPPEN (563grt), en route Oslo to the Tyne, was lost after an internal explosion ten miles outside Brandasund, west of Bergen. The loss was later attributed to barratry (maritime fraud). The crew was landed at Bergen.
 
Ship transit – Sloop BIDEFORD arrived at Suez on her passage from the China Station to the UK. She left Port Said on the 30th for Malta escorting steamer ETTRICK. Off Malta on 1 January, destroyer VOYAGER relieved her and the steamer was taken to Marseilles. BIDEFORD arrived at Malta that day.
 
Escort duties – French heavy cruiser SUFFREN and sloop SAVORGNAN DE BRAZZA began escorting three French troopships from Achin Head. British aircraft carrier GLORIOUS, destroyer BULLDOG and Australian light cruiser HOBART departed Colombo on the 29th. They joined the convoy and escorted it to Cape Guardafui. GLORIOUS and BULLDOG proceeded on to Suez arriving on 9 January, while HOBART arrived back at Colombo on 10 January 1940.
 
German merchant losses – German steamer TANGER (1742grt) was sunk in a collision at Brunsbüttel. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/26/2017 5:58:14 PM
December 26. Day 117
Tuesday. Full moon.

Finland
No notable activity.

Europe
No notable activity.

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
Quote:
At noon Fred, just conscripted to Navy, came to see us. He has grown about 2 inches in 4 weeks and attributes it to drilling. Says they have good food, finds the discipline very strict and the camp very damp. He had a bad cold. …
There was only 4 soldiers and 1 RAF man at the dance. Out of 200 people. More girls than men. (Wartime Women, pp 60-1)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
North Sea Shipping Searches, 26 December 1939 to 1 February 1940.

Despite the recent heavy losses, the attempts to find and bomb German warships continued regularly, but the bomber forces involved were ordered not to fly as close to the mainland as on previous raids unless there was good cloud cover. These operations were carried out on 13 days in this period and 186 sorties were flown: 87 by Blenheims, 73 by Wellingtons, 18 by Hampdens and 8 by Whitleys. German fighters were encountered on two occasions. 2 Wellingtons were lost and 1 Me 109 was claimed shot down on 2 January; 1 Blenheim was lost and 2 Me110s were claimed on 10 January. No German ships were seen on any of these raids and no bombs were dropped. (BC War Diaries, pp 27-8)
[Editor’s comment: It is interesting to note the discrepancy between official orders (stay clear of the mainland “unless there was good cloud cover”) and Shirer’s assessment noted in his diary on 1939.12.25 above. 1939.12.26 is a Full Moon – the “bombers’ moon” Shirer had noted.]

U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving or entering port. 2 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by attack or mining: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
The British began mining the east coast from the Moray Firth to the Thames estuary. (Goralski, p 102)

Quote:
Northern Patrol – [O]ne cruiser and one armed merchant cruiser were in the Denmark Strait, two cruisers and eight AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and two cruisers between the Faroes and the Orkneys. Armed merchant cruiser CANTON departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Submarine damaged by mining – Submarine TRIUMPH … departed Rosyth on patrol on the 26th. In the Skagerrak 250 miles east of Rosyth in 56‑44N, 5‑00E, she struck a mine which left her badly damaged, unable to submerge and with 18 feet of her bow blown away. There were no casualties. Submarine TRUANT joined TRIUMPH to assist, while destroyers EXMOUTH, ELECTRA, ESCAPADE, ENCOUNTER and ECHO were dispatched from Rosyth and joined TRIUMPH on the 27th. TRIUMPH and her escorts arrived safely off May Island in the Firth of Forth at 0700/28th. She was taken to Chatham for repairs lasting until 27 September 1940. On arrival at Rosyth, ELECTRA entered the dock at Rosyth for repairs and refit.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer JACKAL arrived in the Humber.
 
Submarine SEAHORSE departed Blyth on patrol.
 
Polish submarine WILK departed Rosyth on patrol.

Anti-U-boat activities – After a submarine was reported in the English Channel, destroyer MALCOLM and sloop FOXGLOVE commenced to search.
 
A submarine was sighted on the surface in 49-46N, 13-11W by destroyer VENETIA, escorting an outward bound convoy with destroyer VOLUNTEER. VENETIA made an attack on the contact 180 miles SW of Berehaven. Destroyers WREN and WITCH in the area were advised of the sighting.
 
Mining damage – Tanker ADELLEN (7984grt) was badly damaged on a mine 16 miles NE of North Foreland in 51‑30N, 01‑43E. She entered the Thames next morning for repair.
 
U.K.-France convoy – Convoy SA.23 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by sloops FOXGLOVE and ROSEMARY, and arrived at Brest on the 27th.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.59 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloops FLEETWOOD and GRIMSBY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 28th.
 
German blockade losses – German steamer GLUCKSBURG (2680grt), which had departed Cadiz on the 25th, was intercepted by destroyer WISHART off Chipiona Light, Spain. She turned into Spanish waters pursued by WISHART which was warned off by Spanish gunboat LAURIA. However GLUCKSBURG went aground at San Luca de Barrameda and was lost; her hull broke up in the surf on 4 January 1940. The crew was picked up by Spanish fishing boat CUIDAD DE MELILLA.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.14 departed Freetown escorted by sloop LEITH until 12 January. On 28 December, aircraft carrier HERMES, French heavy cruisers FOCH and DUPLEIX, and French destroyers MILAN and CASSARD departed Freetown and joined on the 30th. On 10 January, convoy HG.14F [Editors note: U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy] was merged with SL.14. Sloop BIDEFORD joined on 10 January, and on the 11th, the convoys split with the northbound portion becoming SG.14B. On the same day, destroyers WANDERER, WITCH and WARWICK joined SG.14B. LEITH arrived at Penarth for refitting on the 13th, while the convoy arrived on the 15th.
 
Ship transfer – Sloop SCARBOROUGH departed Malta for UK for duty in Home Waters.
 
Indian Ocean – Light cruiser GLOUCESTER departed Mauritius and arrived at Port Victoria, Seychilles, on the 29th. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/27/2017 4:49:17 PM
December 27. Day 118
Wednesday.

Poland
Quote:
Two German army noncommissioned officers were killed by Poles in a Warsaw suburb bar. The bar owner was immediately hanged and 120 Poles selected at random were shot and killed. (Goralski, p 102)


Europe
Quote:
• France and Britain began seeing permission from Sweden for the shipment of “unofficial” aid to Finland through Sweden.
• Indian troops began arriving in France to join the British Expeditionary Force. (Goralski, p 102)


USA
Quote:
Washington protested the British seizure of U.S. mail en route to Europe. (Goralski, p 102)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
Reconnaissance Flights, December 1939 to 12 January 1940.

Blenheims flew photographic reconnaissance flights on 4 days in this period. 8 sorties were flown from England to the German coast; 1 Blenheim was lost on 27 December. 7 sorties were flown on 2 January from French airfields to locations ‘behind the Grman lines’; there were no casualties on this day. (BC War Diaries, p 28)


U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=01 (U-108); launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-56, U-58) sailed from Kiel. Four U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by mining or torpedo: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – One cruiser and one AMC were in the Denmark Strait, two cruisers and AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser between the Orkneys and the Faroes.
 
Light cruiser MANCHESTER relieved sister ship SHEFFIELD on Northern Patrol.
 
Northern waters – Battlecruiser HOOD and destroyers MAORI, NUBIAN and AFRIDI departed the Clyde to relieve battleship BARHAM and battlecruiser REPULSE on patrol NE of the Shetlands. AFRIDI and MAORI had just arrived in the Clyde that morning. Destroyer ILEX was to join after she refuelled at Scapa Flow.
 
Escort duty – Destroyer JACKAL escorted tanker BEDALE H (493grt) from Killingholm to Middlesborough, and sister ship JUNO joined at sunset.
 
Submarine patrol – Submarine TRIDENT departed Rosyth to establish a patrol off Murmansk to observe German activities from that port.
 
Outbound/inbound convoys – Convoy OA.61 departed Southend escorted by destroyers VESPER and VISCOUNT from the 27th to 29th, when they detached to join SL.14. Destroyers BROKE and ARDENT escorted the convoy from the 29th to 30th, when the convoy dispersed. Convoy OB.61 did not sail.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer WREN and WITCH were ordered to attack a submarine contact reported in the English Channel.
 
Destroyers VENETIA and VOLUNTEER attacked a submarine contact in 49-58N, 12-56W.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoys – Convoy HXF.14 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA, which detached on the 29th. The ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA, which left on 5 January. Destroyer VERSATILE and sloop DEPTFORD from convoy OB.64 joined HXF.14 from 5 to 8 January, when the convoy arrived at Liverpool.
 
Termporary reprieve – Force K arrived at Montevideo. Since 18 November, the Force had been at sea almost constantly and ARK ROYAL had spent only 36 hours in port.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.14 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser CARNARVON CASTLE until the 8 January. Aircraft carrier HERMES accompanied the convoy on the 1st, and destroyers ACASTA from the 4th to 8th, VESPER from the 8th to 9th, and WINDSOR from the 9th. The convoy arrived on the 11th.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser ORION departed Kingston on patrol.
 
Far East – Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM arrived at Hong Kong for repairs to her 17 December collision damage and to replace a propeller. She was undocked two days later and was able to depart on 3 January for her return to UK. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/27/2017 5:43:09 PM
December 27. Day 118

The first Royal Australian Air Force personnel arrive by boat at Pembroke, Wales, United Kingdom for anti-submarine duty in Sunderland flying boats with No. 10 Squadron.
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/27/2017 11:47:36 PM
Thanks for the note, Trevor. My knowledge of Coastal, Fighter and Training commands of the RAF is little more than passing. I'm hoping somebody will want to deal with other aspects of the RAF as the war heats up.

The Short Sunderland, a military version of the Short Empire IIRC, lived a long life both militarily and commercially, still being flown as late as 1967. Largely a reconnaissance a/c in the early years of the war, it played an increasingly aggressive role against the U-boat threat. For such a large a/c, it was surprisingly well-armed and aggressive.

When Annette, my late partner-in-crime, and I moved in 1996, our next-door neighbour Frank was in the early stages of Alzheimer's. But he flew Sunderlands, and had the distinction of sinking a U-boat early in his RAF career. I didn't know this at first, but when we were watching a fly-by of Mars bombers he suddenly started suggesting he was flying them and his wife Isobel explained what was going on. He was a great guy and a great neighbour. He just fell to the illness six months before I met him. But aah, the stories Frank would have been able to tell!

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/28/2017 4:45:41 PM
December 28. Day 119
Thusday.

Finland
No notable activity

Germany
Quote:
BERLIN, December 28.

I must record Dr Ley’s Christmas proclamation, “The Führer is always right. Obey the Führer. The mother is the highest expression of womanhood. The soldier is the highest expression of manhood. God is not punishing us by the war, he is giving us the opportunity to prove whether we are worthy of our freedom.”
Himmler has suddenly decided to revoke the permission for cafés and bars to stay open all night on New Year’s Eve and warns the public against excessive drinking on that night. Is he afraid the people of this land may go out on a binge, get drunk (which Germans rarely do, normally), and express their feelings about this war? At any rate, everyone must shut up shop at one a.m. on New Year’s.(Berlin Diary, p 270)


Britain
Quote:
Meat rationing is introduced in Britain. (2194 Days, p 39)

Quote:
Learnt today with horror that the new M-O news sheet costs £1 per year. Neither Jenny or I could possibly afford all that now the war is on. We are genuinely hard up. Everyone in the motor business is. (Wartime Women, p 62)
[Editor’s note: M-O stands for Mass-Observation, a privately run research agency which began in Great Britain in 1937. Scores of ordinary people contributed commentary (often but not always in diary form) to M-O, often but not always anonymously. Their collective observations were often used towards specific subjects (e.g., what movies folks are going to see), but particularly with the war their observations became often vital indicators of British civilian strength. When available to me, I will use M-O diarists/reporters/observers to report on the British home front. I will identify such use by identifying a publication as “an M-O document”.
Muriel, writer of the recent entries from Wartime Women, was 18 in 1939, and worked with her older sister Jenny and her mother in a small village garage and sweet shop. The loss of the M-O news sheet would have been devastating, but I felt reflected a true aspect of wartime Britain, and the everyday losses civilians faced. Meat rationing and M-O “out-pricing” in a single day!]

In the air
No changes of military activity.

U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=1 (U-41); commissioned=0. No U-boats entering or leaving port. No U-boats listed as being at sea, but no record of 4 U-boats at sea returning to base. No ships sunk: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost. (data collected from «uboat.net»)[Editor’s note: it is possible that «uboat.net» has not covered these days, since the torpedoing of HMS Barham (see below) and records of U-boat movement are not recorded.]

At sea
Quote:
Outer Hebrides – Battleship BARHAM, battlecruiser REPULSE, and destroyers NUBIAN and ISIS were NW of Flannan Island in 58‑47N, 08‑05W when U.30 attacked. BARHAM was torpedoed at 1449 hours, and U.30 was able to escape counterattacks by the destroyers. A and B shell rooms and magazines, and the pom-pom magazine were flooded and the forward bulkhead of the 6 inch magazine was leaking. Four ratings were killed.
 
REPULSE left her escort and proceeded at high speed, unaccompanied, into the Clyde arriving early on the 29th. Destroyers FAULKNOR and MASHONA departed Loch Ewe at 2300 to join the damaged BARHAM. Additionally, destroyer FOXHOUND departed Loch Ewe several hours later. After the submarine hunt FOXHOUND, FAULKNOR and ISIS were sent into Loch Ewe and destroyer NUBIAN joined the screen of battlecruiser HOOD.
 
The patrol sloops of the 1st and 2nd Anti-Submarine Striking Forces departed the Clyde to assist.
 
At 1404/29th, destroyers INGLEFIELD and ICARUS attacked a submarine contact near BARHAM.
 
Escorted by destroyers FAME, ICARUS and IMOGEN, the damaged BARHAM was brought at 12 knots into the port of Liverpool at 2335/29th. She entered Gladstone Dock at 0245/30th for repairs which lasted until 1 July when she left for Scapa Flow.
 
Northern Patrol – [O]ne cruiser and one armed merchant cruiser were in the Denmark Strait, two cruisers and seven AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser between the Orkneys and the Faroes. Armed merchant cruiser MONTCLARE arrived in the Clyde and light cruiser COLOMBO reached Scapa Flow.
 
Light cruiser CERES departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol duties, and arrived back on 3 January.
 
East coast escort duty – Sloops PELICAN, WESTON, HASTINGS after exercising in the Firth of Forth, escorted steamer CORDELIA (8190grt) to the Tyne.
 
RN minelaying – Destroyers INTREPID and IVANHOE of the 20th Destroyer Flotilla departed Portsmouth at 2330, and early on the 30th, laid minefield LA east of the Farne Islands in the North Sea. They were given close escort by six MTBs.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OG.12 was formed from convoys OA.60G and OB.60G totalling 44 ships. Destroyers VANESSA and AMAZON escorted OA.60G from the 26th to 28th, while WHITEHALL, WIVERN, VANOC and WHIRLWIND from OB.60G escorted OG.12 from the 28th to 29th. French destroyers VALMY and CHEVALIER PAUL, which departed Brest on the 28th, escorted the convoy from 29 December to 4 January when it reached Gibraltar.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.62 departed Southend escorted by sloop ENCHANTRESS and destroyer WINDSOR from the 28th to 30th. The convoy was then escorted by destroyers WOLVERINE and VERITY from the 30th to 31st, when it dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.62 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers MACKAY, WARWICK and VIMY to the 31st, when they detached to convoy HX.13.

 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.60 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers VALOROUS, VIVIEN, BITTERN, and arrived in the Tyne on the 29th.
 
Convoy FS.60 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VEGA and sloops HASTINGS and PELICAN, which had departed Rosyth on the 27th to join. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 29th.
 
Losses from U-boat minelaying – Danish steamer HANNE (1080grt) was sunk one mile east of Blyth Pier on a mine laid by U.22 on the 22nd; fifteen crew were lost and there were 25 survivors.
 
Loses to mines and U-boats – Trawler RESEARCHO (258grt) was lost in a minefield laid six miles SE by E of Flamborough Head by U.15 on 17 November. The entire crew was rescued. Destroyer JACKAL later reported the trawler abandoned and still afloat 7½ miles east of Flamborough Head.
 
U.30 sank armed patrol trawler BARBARA ROBERTSON (325grt, T/Skipper G. W. Edgar RNR) with gunfire, 35 miles NW of the Butt of Lewis in 58-54N, 6-30W; one rating was lost. Destroyer ISIS was dispatched to assist, and guided to the area by British seaplanes. rescued the 16 survivors. She then went on to assist damaged battleship BARHAM.
 
Anti-Uboat activity – Anti-submarine trawler CAPE ARGONA (494grt) attacked a submarine contact 21 miles 114° from Flamborough Head.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser CALYPSO departed Gibraltar and arrived at Malta on the 31st for duty with the 3rd Cruiser Squadron.
 
Submarine sighting – Armed merchant cruiser MALOJA sighted a submarine in 44-28N, 13-00W. Destroyer DELIGHT was advised.
 
Ship repairs – Submarine SEVERN was at Freetown with a defect to the engine exhaust pipe. Repairs took 14 days.
 
Baltic Sea – Soviet submarine SC.311 sank Finnish steamer WILPAS (775grt) off Vasa.(«naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/29/2017 5:49:26 PM
December 29. Day 120
Friday. Waning gibbous moon.

Finland
Quote:
Finnish forces administered a resounding defeat to the Russians at Suommusalmi. (Goralski, p 102)

Quote:
The Finns succeed in their third attempt to drive the Russians back from the north bank of Lake Ladoga; the survivors of the Russian 163rd Division are driven back in a desperate retreat. The finns capture 11 tanks, 25 guns, and 150 trucks. (2194 Days, p 39)


Europe
No notable activity.

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving or entering port. 5 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by attack or mining: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – [O]ne cruiser and one AMCs were in the Denmark Strait, two cruisers and seven AMCs between Iceland the Faroes, and one cruiser between the Faroes and the Orkneys. Armed merchant cruiser DERBYSHIRE arrived in the Clyde.
 
Ship movement – Submarine L.23 arrived at Rosyth after patrol. She was supposed to go to Blyth, but that port was closed due to mining. She was able to proceed to Blyth next day and arrived on the 31st.
 
Official enigma – Some sources suggest submarine SEAHORSE, which departed Blyth on patrol on the 26th, was sunk on a mine on this date in 55‑26N, 07‑02E. However, it appears that the 7 January attack on a submarine was more likely the cause of SEAHORSE's loss (see entry for 7 January).
 
U.K.-Norwegian outbound convoy – Convoy ON.6 of three British and three Finnish ships was due to depart Methil, but was held up until the next day. The convoy departed Methil on the 29th escorted by destroyers EXMOUTH, ECLIPSE, ENCOUNTER, ESCAPADE and Polish submarine ORZEL.
 
On the 29th, minelayer RINGDOVE and British steamer HIGHLANDER (1216grt) left the convoy near Aberdeen and proceeded to Scapa Flow. Destroyer ECLIPSE and anti-submarine trawler ARCTIC EXPLORER (501grt) also detached on the 29th.
 
Close cover was provided by light cruisers EDINBURGH and GLASGOW which departed Rosyth on the 30th.
 
Heavy support was supplied by battlecruiser HOOD and destroyers MAORI, NUBIAN and AFRIDI operating southeast of the Faroes. Destroyer ILEX after refuelling at Scapa Flow joined the HOOD screen.
 
ON.6 arrived safely at Bergen on 1 January.
 
Friendly fire – Steamer HIGHLAND PATRIOT (14,172grt) was attacked by French submarine FRESNEL off the Canary Islands, believing her to be a German blockade runner. FRESNEL was driven off by gunfire and neither vessels was damaged.
 
South American Station – Light cruiser AJAX and heavy cruiser DORSETSHIRE departed the Falklands for patrol off Rio de la Plata. DORSETSHIRE set off for Simonstown searching for German tanker ALTMARK en route, and arrived back at the Falklands on 18 January. Sister ship CUMBERLAND departed Port William, Falklands on the 29th for Simonstown, via Tristan da Cunha. She arrived at Simonstown on 11 January for docking and refit completed on 10 February, and was ready for sea on the 13th.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.14 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA, which detached on the 30th. The destroyers arrived back at Halifax on the 31st. Light cruiser EFFINGHAM and submarine CACHALOT departed Halifax with HX.14 as the ocean escort, EFFINGHAM detaching on 9 January. Destroyers WHITSHED, WALKER, VIMY and ANTELOPE escorted the convoy from 9 to 12 January, when it arrived at Liverpool. On the convoy’s arrival, the use of submarine escorts with HX convoys was suspended. EFFINGHAM reached Portsmouth on the 10th to refit, completed on 13 April 1940.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HGF.13 departed Gibraltar with ten ships, escorted by destroyers WISHART and ACTIVE from 29 December to 3 January, and WANDERER and VETERAN from convoy OGF.13 on 3 January. VETERAN was detached the same day, but WANDERER remained until the 5th when the convoy arrived.
 
Indian Ocean – French heavy cruiser SUFFREN arrived at Trincomalee at 0200, and at 0950, departed with British aircraft carrier GLORIOUS and armed merchant cruiser CATHAY.
 
Baltic Sea – Latvian steamer VENTA (1886grt) was seized in the Baltic by a German warship, and later renamed UNDINE for German use.
_____
 
German steamer NEPTUN (727grt) was lost by stranding on the Swedish coast near Varberg in the Kattegat. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 3895

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/29/2017 7:19:04 PM
Thanks again Brian,

It takes a lot of work to keep a thread of this nature going!?

Cheers,
Dave

For all you do, this pints for you!!

---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/30/2017 10:24:47 PM
December 30. Day 121
Saturday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
Hitler vowed to continue the war: “… the Jewish reactionary warmongers have awaited this hour for years. They had prepared and were unwilling to cancel their plans for the destruction of Germany. Those warmongers want war. They shall have it.” (Goralski, p 102)

Quote:
Hitler gives a New Year message to the German people: ’The Jewish-capitalistic world will not survive the twentieth century.’ (2194 Days, p 39)

Quote:
Goering became vocally impatient with the British hunger blockade and wanted to attack London. His planes were ready, he told reporters – they had been photographing England’s war preparations. “All thetas needed is the Führer’s command,” he said, “for them to carry over their load of bombs instead of an insignificant load of cameras.” It would be an attack “the like of which the world has never known.” It was December 30, 1939. (Human Smoke, p 160)


USA
No notable activity

China
Quote:
China’s revivified air force was dealt a crushing defeat over Liuchow. Forty Chinese fighters challenged 13 Japanese Type-96 planes. In the ensuring air battle 14 of the Chinese planes were shot down without a Japanese loss. (Goralski, p 102)
[Editor’s note: probably, at this point in the war, The Type-96 A5M4 “Claude”.]

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
Reconnaissance Flights, December 1939 to 12 January 1940.(BC War Diaries, p 28)
No additional activity.

U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats sailed from or returned to base. Five U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by mining or torpedo: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – [T]wo cruisers were between the Orkneys and Faroes, two cruisers and eight AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser and one AMC in the Denmark Strait. Armed merchant cruiser CORFU departed Portsmouth for the Clyde, while heavy cruiser BERWICK, escorted by destroyer FORESIGHT, departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol, returning to Rosyth on 10 January.
 
Light cruiser COLOMBO departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol and arrived back on 6 January.
 
Escort duty – Destroyers ESCORT and ELECTRA departed Rosyth escorting base ship MANCHESTER CITY and steamer ASTRONOMER (8401grt) to Scapa Flow.

Destroyers FEARLESS and FURY took tanker ATHELEMPRESS (8941grt) to the Clyde. On the 31st, they were ordered to return to Scapa Flow taking with them tanker ARNDALE (8296grt) which departed the Clyde the same day.
 
Ship repairs – Destroyer MASHONA arrived at Belfast with defects.
 
Return to port – Submarine STURGEON arrived in the Blyth from patrol.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.61 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VEGA and slops FLAMINGO and STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 31st.
 
Convoy FS.61 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops PELICAN, WESTON, HASTINGS, and arrived at Southend on the 31st.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Anti-submarine yacht CUTTY SARK attacked a submarine contact 14 miles NW of Liverpool. Destroyer WESSEX was sent to assist.
 
Anti-submarine trawler ARSENAL (389grt) attacked a submarine contact 28 miles SSW of Calf of Man in 53-40N, 5-02W.
 
South America Station – New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES departed the Falklands and joined light cruiser AJAX. On 3 January, they parted company and ACHILLES went to Buenos Aires and AJAX to Montevideo. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 12/31/2017 7:30:51 PM
December 31. Day 122
Sunday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
BERLIN, December 31
A flood of New Year’s proclamations from all and sundry – Hitler, Göring, Himmler, etc. Hitler holds out hope of victory to the people in 1940. …
Curious how the Germans, who should know better by this time, try to scare the English by blustering threats. Göring has a piece in tomorrow’s V.B.: “… No country in the world is so open to air attack as the British Isles. … When the German air force really gets started, it will make an attack such as world history has never seen.”
… Cold, and a coal shortage. The office boy said tonight we were out of coal at the office and that there was no more coal to be had. (Berlin Diary, pp 270-71)
[Editor’s note: I assume “B.V.” refers to Völkischer Beobachter, the daily paper of the Nazi party.]

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
Reconnaissance Flights, December 1939 to 12 January 1940.(BC War Diaries, p 28)
No additional activity.

U-boat activity
For this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving or entering port. 5 U-boats at sea. One ship sunk: total tonnage lost=959. No U-boats lost.

Luna, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 959 tons, was laden with general cargo bound from London to Trondheim. Complement unrecorded; lost=0. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 19.47 hours … the neutral and unescorted Luna was hit aft by one torpedo from U-32 and sank slowly by the stern. The Germans reported that the nationality markings were not visible in the dark. The crew was picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Colombia and taken to Kopervik. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Attacks by U-boats and surface warships, magnetic mines and air action have cost the Allies 746,000 tons of merchant shipping, one aircraft carrier, one auxiliary cruiser, and the battleship Royal Oak, since the opening of hostilities. On their side, the Germans have lost only about two U-boats, the Admiral Graf Spee and a few tens of thousands of tons of merchant shipping. The balance is clearly in favour of the Kriegsmarine. (2194 Days, p 39)

Quote:
Northern Patrol – [O]ne cruiser was between the Orkneys and the Faroes, two cruisers and five AMCs between the Faroes and Iceland, and one cruiser was in the Denmark Strait. Light cruiser COLOMBO departed Scapa Flow and armed merchant cruiser DERBYSHIRE the Clyde, both for Northern Patrol, while light cruiser DUNEDIN returned to Scapa Flow.

Ship movement – Battleship RODNEY, after repairing her rudder defect at Liverpool, departed at 1230/30th with destroyers ICARUS and IMOGEN and rejoined the Home Fleet at Greenock at 0140/31st. Admiral Forbes re-hoisted his flag on her on 1 January 1940.
 
East Coast convoy – Destroyer VIVIEN and sloops FLEETWOOD and BITTERN departed Rosyth for the Tyne to escort convoy FS.62, which had been due to leave the evening of the 31st, but was postponed until next day.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer WALKER attacked a submarine contact 70 miles SW of Scillies in 49-18N, 8-11W. Destroyer VIMY assisted in the search.
 
Anti-submarine trawler LORD NUFFIELD (466grt) attacked a submarine contact 65° from Sauds Island. Minesweeper/escort vessels GLEANER and JASON were sent to assist her.
 
After British aircraft reported a submarine seven miles south of Dover, destroyer BRAZEN proceeded to investigate.
 
On patrol – Submarines TRUANT departed from Rosyth and UNDINE from Blyth on patrol.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser CALEDON departed Malta on patrol duties.
 
Indian Ocean – Light cruiser GLOUCESTER departed Port Victoria, Seychelles, for Colombo, arriving on 8 January for refitting, completed on the 22nd.
 
Escort duties – Destroyer DARING departed Malta on the 27th and arrived at Gibraltar on the 30th. On the 31st, sloop SCARBOROUGH (Cdr J H Ruck-Keene), which had arrived from Malta on the 29th, departed Gibraltar escorting armed merchant cruiser DUNOTTAR CASTLE to Belfast with DARING in company. On 2 January off Cape Roca in 38‑40N, 10‑04W, DARING attacked a submarine contact. She reached Belfast on 7 January and Portsmouth on the 10th.
 
Change of station – Light cruiser ARETHUSA departed Malta. Calling at Gibraltar on 3 January, she arrived at Portsmouth on the 6th, left again on the 26th and arrived at Scapa Flow on the 29th for duty with the Home Fleet. ARETHUSA and sister ship PENELOPE (which was at Malta and departed station on 5 January) in the Mediterranean, were relieved by light cruiser CALEDON and CALYPSO which arrived at Malta from Home Waters on 28 and 31 December, respectively.
 
Destroyer DAINTY departed Malta for Gibraltar for duty in the South Atlantic. Sister ships DIAMOND departed Malta on 7 January on the same duty, DEFENDER was prevented from sailing for the South Atlantic due to a perforated superheater on the 13th, and DECOY and DEFENDER were able to depart Malta after repairs on the 27th.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.13 of 30 ships departed Gibraltar escorted by anti-submarine trawler ARCTIC RANGER (493grt) as local escort and French large destroyers GUÉPARD and VERDUN from 31 December to 7 January. The French destroyers arrived at Brest on the 9th. Destroyers VANOC and VISCOUNT were with the convoy from the 7th to 10th, and VENETIA from convoy OG.13 and VOLUNTEER from SL.14 from the 8th to 10th, when the convoy arrived. …
 
 
December, miscellaneous – Shortly after the loss of German pocket battleship ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE, submarine SEVERN was ordered to patrol in the South Atlantic around Trinidade Island for German supply ship ALTMARK.
 
Armed merchant cruisers RANPURA and ANTENOR were attached to the Mediterranean Fleet as replacements for ships transferred away. RANPURA was ordered in early January to the South Atlantic, and was relieved by AMC VOLTAIRE which departed the Tyne on 9 January. However, their presence in the Mediterranean was not judged worthwhile and by April, they had been transferred to other commands. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/2/2018 6:32:00 PM
January 2. Day 124
Tuesday. Last quarter.

Finland
Quote:
Soviet forces launched major offensive actions against Finnish positions on the Karelian Isthmus. (Goralski, p 104)


Europe
No notable activity.

USA
Quote:
Washington again protested Britain’s interference with the U.S. mail, specifically the inspection of postal material on American and other neutral ships and the censorship of mail on ships involuntarily in British ports. (Goralski, p 104)

Quote:
A report came in from the Jewish Telegraphic Agency about the Polish Jews in Lublin; it was reprinted in the New York Herald Tribune. “For more than three months, the city’s Jews were the target of pogroms, systematic plunder, torture and expulsion,” the report said.

Another cable, also printed in the Herald Tribune, described freight cars filled with deported Jews. “Cars are sealed, unheated, windowless and without food. In one car, opened at a Warsaw station, eight infants were found dead from cold and starvations,” the cable said.

It was January 2, 1940.(Human Smoke. pp 160-61)


Britain
No notable activity

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=3 (U-555, -556, -751); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving or entering harbour. 6 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by torpedo or U-boat mining: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost.

Lars Magnus Trozelli, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1,951 tons, was in ballast bound from Norrköping via Köenhamn to Blyth. Complement=22; lost=7. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol. Shortly after leaving, she reported a submarine contact in 59-13N, 3-59W, which destroyers FURY and FEARLESS, aided by Walrus aircraft, searched for. Destroyers ISIS and IMPULSIVE also joined in, while destroyer FAME kept watch on the outer patrol. The search was discontinued on the 3rd when FEARLESS returned to Scapa Flow to refuel and FURY was ordered to the Clyde.
 
Armed merchant cruiser CHITRAL arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser CORFU departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser DUNEDIN departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol, and arrived back on the 9th.
 
Ship re-assignment – Cruiser HAWKINS completed her refit and ran trials on 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th from Portland. She left on the 9th for Freetown, arriving on the 16th, left  on the 17th, arrived off Rio de la Plata on the 29th and then spent February in the Falklands carrying out further refitting.

Counter-mining activites – Destroyers IVANHOE and INTREPID departed Immingham to countermine a German minefield in the Heligoland Bight in operation EW. Seven destroyers of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla from Harwich were nearby in support.
 
Ship movement, escort duties – Destroyers ESCORT and ELECTRA arrived at Invergordon.
 
Destroyer ECHO departed Rosyth for escort duties between Invergordon and the Tyne.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy BC.21 of steamer BARON GRAHAM departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer MONTROSE, and arrived in the Loire on the 4th. The convoy returned with BARON GRAHAM, departing on the 12th and arriving in Bristol Channel on the 14th.
 
Winter War – Soviet submarine S.2 was lost on a mine laid by Finnish minelayer LOUHI off Market Island in the Sodra-Kvarken Passage into the Gulf of Bothnia.
 
Ship movement – Submarine OTWAY, escorted by anti-submarine trawlers AMBER and JADE, departed Malta for Gibraltar. After anti-submarine practice and docking, she was to proceed to the UK in February.
 
African waters – Heavy cruiser CORNWALL departed Simonstown on patrol, and arrived back at Capetown on the 11th.
 
Caribbean – Light cruiser ORION departed Kingston for Bermuda where she arrived on the 5th for docking and refit, completed on 3 February. 9«naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/3/2018 1:50:35 PM
January 3. Day 125
Wednesday.

Finland
Quote:
Soviet forces launched major offensive actions against Finnish positions on the Karelian Isthmus. (Goralski, p 104)


Europe
Quote:
Mussolini sent a placating letter to Hitler to help offset Italy’s condemnations of Germany’s pact with Russia, but the Duce continued to undercut the German move: “the solution of your Lebensraum is in Russia and not elsewhere.” (Goralski, p 104)

Quote:
I learned today what the Russians have promised to deliver to Germany this year:
• 1,000,000 tons of fodder and grain;
• 500,000 tons of oil seeds;
• 900,000 tons of petroleum;
• 150,000 tons of cotton (this is more cotton than Russia had to export to the whole world last year);
• Three million gold marks’ worth of leather and hides.
This looks good on paper, but I would bet a lot the Russians deliver no more than a fraction of what they have promised.
…The press is beginning to harp about “Britain’s aggressive designs in Scandinavia.” Hitler, we hear, has told the army, navy, and air force to rush plans for heading off the Allies in Scandinavia should they go in there to help Finland against Russia. The army and navy are very pro-Finnish, but realize they must protect their trade routes to the Swedish iron-ore fields. If Germany loses these, she is sunk. (Berlin Diary, p 273)


USA
Quote:
Roosevelt requested $1.8 billion for national defense in his annual budget request to Congress. (Goralski, p 104)


Britain
No notable activity

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=2 (U-143, -753); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving or entering harbour. 6 U-boats at sea. One ship sunk by torpedo or U-boat mining: total tonnage lost=2475.
Svartön, a Swedish steam merchantman of 2,475 tons, was carrying iron ore bound from Narvik to Middlesbrough. Complement=31; lost=20 (+ 1 Norwegian pilot, not a part of the complement).

No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 09.11 hours o… the Svartön …, a romper from convoy HN-6, was hit amidships by a G7e torpedo from U-58, broke in two and sank quickly off Kinnaird Head. … The survivors were picked up by HMS Oak (T 54). («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol, and arrived back on the 10th.
 
Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK and light cruiser CERES arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol.
 
US issues – American steamer MORMACSUN (4996grt) was taken into Kirkwall for contraband inspection. The United States protested so strongly about a neutral ship being sent into a war zone that the British government ordered the Admiralty to cease taking suspect American ships into contraband control stations.
 
Escort duties – Light cruisers EDINBURGH and GLASGOW arrived at Rosyth ahead of convoy HN.6.
 
Destroyers ESCORT and ELECTRA departed Invergordon with tanker BEACONSTREET (7467grt) for Liverpool. After delivering her, the destroyers went on to Plymouth for refitting.
 
Sloop AUCKLAND arrived at Rosyth from Portsmouth for duty in Convoy C.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.65G departed Southend escorted by destroyers WHITEHALL and WIVERN from the 3rd to 5th when they detached off the Lizard. (Sister ships VESPER and VISCOUNT escorted a coastal portion to Liverpool from the 5th to 7th.) By then, convoy OB.65G had departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VENETIA and WINCHELSEA, and then merged with OA.65G to form convoy OG.13 on the 6th. VENETIA and WINCHELSEA continued the escort until the 8th. Finally French destroyers TARTU and VAUQUELIN provided escort from the 6th to 11th, when the convoy arrived at Gibraltar.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.63 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON, and arrived at Southend on the 5th.
 …
Minor dockyard collision – Paddle minesweeper BRIGHTON QUEEN was in collision with tug GANNET in the Imperial Dock at Rosyth at 0855/3rd.
 
Unexplained loss – Swedish steamer KIRUNA (5484grt) was lost to unknown cause in 45‑20N, 25‑10W.
 
Ship seizure – Latvian steamer IRIS FAULBAUMS (1675grt) was seized in a German port, and renamed WALLY FAULBAUM in German service.
 
Ship transfer – Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM departed Hong Kong on the 3rd. Calling at Singapore on the 8th and Colombo on the 11th, she arrived at Aden on the 16th. Reaching Suez on the 19th, she was attached to the Mediterranean Fleet as the Commander in Chief's Flagship. She arrived at Malta on the 21st, and refitted from 22 January to 5 February, on which day she left for Alexandria. At Alexandria from 6 to 11 February, BIRMINGHAM then patrolled in the Mediterranean before departing Malta on the 19th for the Home Fleet. Admiral Cunningham hauled down his flag and BIRMINGHAM left the Mediterranean, passing Gibraltar on 21 February and arriving at Portsmouth on the 24th. On 6 March, she was attached to the Portsmouth Command while refitting there.
 
Mediterranean convoy work – Australian destroyers VENDETTA and WATERHEN departed Marseilles escorting convoy K.6 consisting of  troopships ROHNA (8602grt), TAIREA (7933grt), DEVONSHIRE (11,275grt), DILWARA (11,080grt), RAJULA (8478grt) and TALAMBA (8018grt).  They were relieved on the 5th by Australian destroyers STUART and VAMPIRE, and proceeded to Malta. The convoy, less VAMPIRE detached to Port Said on the 7th, arrived at Haifa on the 9th, and departed on the 12th, escorted by STUART. Destroyer VOYAGER, with repair ship RESOURCE from Alexandria joined the convoy at sea, and arrived at Malta on the 15th.
 
U.K.-Africa convoy protection – Sloop WELLINGTON, escorting a homeward bound Sierra Leone convoy, attacked a submarine contact 350 miles west of Ushant in 47-32N, 12-34W.
 
German merchant ship movement – German steamer BOGOTA (1230grt) departed Guayaquil, Ecuador, and arrived at Coquimbo, Chile on the 11th. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/3/2018 2:26:32 PM
January 3. Day 125

Secret meeting at the house of General Beck in Berlin-Lichterfelde. General Franz Halder, General Walther von Brauschitsch, General Hans Oster, retired General Hans von Haefton are present. The massive increase in security surrounding Hitler following the bomb attentat by Georg Elser, and the unlimited powers the SS have acquired following the declaration of war, brings the conspiraters to the conclusion that an atempt can only be successful by a single or pair of conspirators that can get close simultaneously to both Hitler and Himmler smuggling a device through the security cordon.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/4/2018 4:42:55 PM
January 4. Day 126
Thursday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
Göring was given total authority over all German industries involved in the production of war materials. (Goralski, p 104)


USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
Leaflet Raids, 4/5 January to 19/20 January 1940

After a gap of 10 nights without any operations, leaflet raids recommenced on 4/5 January and were carried out on 7 nights during this period. Only 25 sorties were flown: 10 by Whitleys, 9 by Wellingtons and 6 by Hampdens. The first leaflet flights by Wellingtons – to Hamburg on the 11/12th – and by Hampdens – to Kiel on the following night – were the first night sorties of the war for these 2 types of aircraft and represent a tentative but significant move to night operations by 2 of the 3 bomber groups previously intended only for day operations. Of the Whitley flights in this period, the new distant targets of Prague and Vienna were reached, from forward airfields in France, on 12/13 January.
There were no losses from any of the above operations.

Because of severe winter weather at the English airfields, with heavy snowfalls, there were no night operations between 20 January and the night of 17/18 February and no day operations from 2 February to 17 February. (BC War Diaries, P 28)


U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=2 (U-431, -433); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-19) leaving Kiel. 7 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by torpedo or U-boat mining: total tonnage lost=o. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers WORCESTERSHIRE and ANDANIA arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Major ship repair, with attendant impact – Battleship NELSON departed Loch Ewe.  Old German steamer ILSENSTEIN sailed from Loch Ewe ahead of her to detonate any remaining mines. Escorted by destroyers FAULKNOR, FOXHOUND and IMPULSIVE, NELSON proceeded to Portsmouth, arriving on the 7th for repairs which began on the 14th.  FAULKNOR, FOXHOUND and IMPULSIVE were ordered to remain at Portsmouth for two days, then return to the Clyde. Destroyers ISIS, FAME and FORESIGHT proceeded independently at the same time to Devonport and returned to the Clyde with FAULKNOR, FOXHOUND, and IMPULSIVE. NELSON was repairing until early June 1940 at Portsmouth, arrived at Greenock on 8 June for refitting and departed on the 29th to rejoin the Home Fleet at Scapa Flow.
 
Anti-aircraft cruisers CAIRO and CALCUTTA completed their anti-aircraft guard duty at Loch Ewe and departed, arriving at Sheerness on the 6th.
 
Patrol movements – Battleship RODNEY, battlecruiser REPULSE and destroyers INGLEFIELD, IMOGEN, ICARUS, MOHAWK, BEDOUIN, KINGSTON, FIREDRAKE and  MATABELE departed Greenock on patrol. Destroyer FEARLESS departed Scapa Flow to relieve MOHAWK, which was sent to Portsmouth for repairs. Destroyers FORESIGHT and SOMALI also departed Greenock on the 4th for repairs at Plymouth and Middlesbrough respectively. After the patrol, MATABELE went to Plymouth for refitting.
 
Ship movements – Light cruiser AURORA departed the Clyde after refitting, and arrived at Scapa Flow on the 5th.
 
Light cruiser ENTERPRISE departed Portsmouth, and arrived at Halifax on the 10th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.63 departed Southend, escorted by sloops BITTERN and FLEETWOOD. Southeast of Shipwash Light Vessel in 51-57N, 01-48. 7E, BITTERN attacked a submarine contact. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 5th.
 
Convoy FS.64 departed Rosyth with tankers BRITISH UNION and BRITISH CONSOL for the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN. Sloop BITTERN replaced VIVIEN on the 5th, and the convoy arrived at Southend on the 6th.
 
Small boat loss – Tug SWARTHY sank at Portsmouth, but was later salved. Minesweeper SALTBURN alongside was damaged at the time.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine THISTLE arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarine H.34 departed Dundee for Rosyth escorted by minesweeping trawler CRANEFLY (312grt).
 
Ship collision – Sloop EGRET was in a collision  with steamer SEA VALOUR (1950grt) at 0808/4th. The steamer only received minor damage, while EGRET’s was repaired at Cardiff in three weeks.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.65 departed Southend escorted by destroyer BROKE from the 4th to 6th. Destroyer AMAZON escorted the convoy from the 5th to 6th, when it dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.66 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANOC and VOLUNTEER, and after it dispersed, the two destroyers joined HG.13 on the 6th.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.15 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and RESTIGOUCHE, which detached on the 6th. Ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser LETITIA, which detached on the 13th. The convoy was joined in Home Waters by destroyer WHITEHALL from the 12th to 15th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
African coastal patrol – Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL arrived at Dakar and battlecruiser RENOWN at Freetown for refuelling. Departing on the 7th, ARK ROYAL joined RENOWN off Sierra Leone on the 8th after she had left earlier that day with destroyers HERO and HASTY. They searched unsuccessfully for German supply ship ALTMARK in the South Atlantic until arriving at Freetown on the 19th. Destroyer DAINTY departed Gibraltar for Freetown and briefly joined RENOWN  for transfer of mail before arriving on the 10th at Freetown for escort duties.
 
German mercantile movements – German steamer QUITO (1230grt) departed Guayaquil, Ecuador, and arrived at Coquimbo, Chile on the 12th. The only German ship remaining at Guayaquil was steamer CERIGO (1120grt) which was later scuttled on 1 April 1941 and salved as 29 DE MAYO for Ecuadorian use. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/4/2018 9:22:03 PM
Trevor, your post has my mind racing, to some extent with trivial but significant matters (can one say such a thing and still make sense?):
• what were the jurisdictional distinctions between SS and Gestapo power? I.e., was the investigation of the Elser bomb attempt a Gestapo issue or a broader SS responsibility?
• (silly question, IMHO) was there a uniformed brance of the Gestapo. If the Gestapo required uniformed assistance, did it commandeer uniformed officers from other police branches or did it automatically draw on uniformed SS personnel?

What struck me more forcefully, and perhaps more fancifully, is the psychology of the men at that meeting at Beck's home. Five senior military officers, meeting when the German army has been wildly successful during the Polish campaign and there is no indication that Germany's principal enemies are prepared to initiate active warfare. One failed assassination attempt is made, which even at the time was thought by some to be staged by those close to Hitler himself. What's going on in the heads of those 5 senior officers?

I'm trying to get my head around the idea of assassinating the leader of my country. That's the bottom line. I'm a pretty pacifist guy, I'll admit. Never served in the military. Haven't fired a gun since I was 13. Never indoctrinated to oaths of fidelity or obedience. Maybe it's no surprise I'm having some difficulty.

But we're talking German Army officers here, not some lags down at the Ratskeller chalking up the steins. Men of honour. Men who, by this time, may have pledged loyalty to the person of the Führer. So how do they even find each other, let alone gather to consider the issue of assassination/execution? What brings these military minds to realize that it is both Hitler and Himmler, as head of the SS, who must die simultaneously?

I will admit there have been times in my life when I have wanted to "kill some sonofabitch". Usually a politician. Usually on the spur of the moment. And usually without any true desire to act out what is a metaphor for let somebody know I am unhappy. But even if my desire to "kill" were more than rhetorical, I can't imagine how I'd raise the idea with a friend? Is this a bond that military service provides that is not available to those who have never served?

How does any human decide, coldly, to kill another? Yes, I recognize the West has been suffering for much too long from suicide bombers, usually of Islamic faith, who appear to be prepared to kill random humans, or random humans within a specific grouping. And I note that at least the sanest of us recognize such bombings are the actions of radical Islam rather than the SOP of protest for any believer of Islam.

I can't get my head around personally coming to the resolution that a solution to anything is to kill somebody in cold blood. Assassinations are not crimes of passion: they are punishment at the least, and purification at the "questionable" highest. If I were so delusional, I can't think of any friends who would support me, however difficult current conditions might be.

So what must Beck, Halder, von Brauschitsch, Otter and von Haefton know that makes their resolution to kill two of the three most powerful men in their world something honourable men can chat about "between friends"? What makes anybody contemplate murder, let alone treason?

Is it a limitation of my own existence that I can't contemplate such an action, or can't believe having friends or colleagues who might agree with my fantiasies?

A bit of a ramble, I admit. But I was suddenly struck by what these five men were contemplating.

Cheers
Brian G

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/5/2018 6:58:36 PM
January 5. Day 127
Friday. Waning crescent moon.

Finland
Quote:
Soviet forces launched major offensive actions against Finnish positions on the Karelian Isthmus. (Goralski, p 104)


Europe
Quote:
Russia signs a commercial treaty with Bulgaria. This is one step in a policy of growing penetration in the Balkans. (2194 Days, p 42)


USA
Quote:
Roosevelt requested $1.8 billion for national defense in his annual budget request to Congress. (Goralski, p 104)


Britain
Quote:
Leslie Hore-Belisha was dismissed as British minister of war. He was succeeded by Oliver Stanley. (Goralski, p 104)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=4 (U-439, -440, -441, -442); laid down=1 (U-752); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving or entering harbour. 7 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by torpedo or U-boat mining: total tonnage lost=2475. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – From 5th to 18th, sighted 48 eastbound ships of which 30 were sent into Kirkwall for inspection.
 
Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser CERES departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol, and left her station on the 11th for Belfast where she arrived on the 13th. There she repaired and refitted until 7 February.
 
South America Station – New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES sailed from Buenos Aires on the 5th and British sister ship AJAX from Montevideo after refuelling on the same day, and met heavy cruisers DORSETSHIRE and SHROPSHIRE off Rio de la Plata.  ACHILLES relieved AJAX as Flagship of the South America Station, and went on to the Falklands, arriving on the 14th. AJAX went to Plymouth arriving on the 31st and on to Chatham for repairs lasting until mid-July 1940.
 
Major ship movement – Battlecruiser HOOD and destroyers AFRIDI, IMPERIAL, MAORI and NUBIAN arrived at Greenock.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine UNITY arrived at Blyth after patrol.
 
Submarines TRIBUNE departed Rosyth and STARFISH departed Blyth for patrol.
 
East Coast convoy – Destroyers ESCAPADE, ECLIPSE, destroyer/escort ship VEGA and sloop LONDONDERRY escorted a MT convoy from Methil to the Tyne. Sloop STORK was to be part of the escort, but fouled the boom at Inchkeith in fog and had to return for repairs. After this duty, the two destroyers proceeded to Immingham to escort minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA.
 
Cable repair – Destroyer ECHO and cable ship ROYAL SCOT arrived at Newcastle from the south to repair the cable between Newcastle and Scandinavia.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Armed yacht PRINCESS of the 11th Submarine Striking Force sighted a U-boat on the surface off Bull Point in 51-18.5N, 04-00W. Destroyer VIVACIOUS joined her, but contact was not regained.
 
Merchant grounding – Steamer ROTHESAY CASTLE (7016grt) went ashore off Sanaig Point, Islay; the crew were taken off by tug ENGLISHMAN.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.67 departed Southend and dispersed on the 8th. No escorts were listed in the report.
 
Convoy OB.67 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WALPOLE and VERITY until the 9th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.65 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop FLAMINGO, and arrived at Southend on the 7th.
 
Destroyers ESCAPADE and ECLIPSE departed Methil with a group of merchant ships for the Tyne.
 
Gulf of Finland – Soviet submarine SC.311 sank Swedish steamer FENRIS (484grt) off Sydost Brottens Light Vessel in the Gulf of Finland. The crew was rescued and the wreck of the steamer drifted ashore NW of Sydost Brotten Light Vessel.
 
Ship re-assignment – Light cruiser PENELOPE departed Malta, arrived at Gibraltar on the 7th and Portsmouth on the 11th. After refitting, she left Portsmouth on the 29th for duty with the Home Fleet.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.14F departed Gibraltar with 15 ships, escorted by destroyer VIDETTE from the 5th to 8th, sloop BIDEFORD from the 5th to 15th, and sloop ABERDEEN from the 9th to 15th. On the 10th, HG.14F merged with SL.14 as SG.14, and was escorted by sloop LEITH (from SL.14) from the 10th to 12th. On the 11th, destroyers WANDERER and WARWICK joined from convoy OG.14 and remained until the 15th, and WITCH joined on the 11th and remained until the 15th, when the convoy arrived.
 
Mediterranean – Anti-submarine trawler KINGSTON CORNELIAN (449grt, Skipper W Green RNR) was sunk in accidental collision with French liner CHELLA (8920grt) east of Gibraltar. One or more depth charges exploded in the water and all hands - one officer and seventeen ratings, were lost. CHELLA had to go into Gibraltar for repairs.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.15 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser PRETORIA CASTLE and submarine CLYDE. On the 14th, the convoy merged with SL.15 and the SLF.15 escorts detached on the 16th.  The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 19th, and CLYDE at Portsmouth on the 21st. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/6/2018 4:01:09 PM
January 6. Day 128
Saturday.

Finland
Ongoing fighting in Karelia.

Europe
No notable activity.

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=2 (U-557, -558); launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-20, -24) leaving Kiel; one (U-44) leaving Wilhelmshaven. 10 U-boats at sea. One British ship damaged by U-boat mining: total tonnage lost=2475.
City of Marseilles, a British steam merchantman of 8,317 tons, was carrying general cargo, including jute, from Calcutta through the Mediterranean to London. Complement=164; lost=1.
No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
… the City of Marseilles was damaged by a mine, laid on 12 December 1939 by U-13, 1.5 miles southeast of Tay Fairway Buoy, River Tay. The ship had just taken a pilot aboard when the mine exploded under her bridge, stopping the engines and causing a list of 10 to 15° to starboard. The crew began to abandon ship, but two lifeboats had been destroyed by the explosion and another capsized during launch, throwing the 14 occupants into the water. One crew member was lost. Screened by a Hudson aircraft (224 Sqdn RAF), the survivors were picked up by the pilot cutter, a RAF crash launch from Tayport and the Broughty Ferry lifeboat Mona and landed at Broughty.

The abandoned City of Marseilles was boarded by crew members of HMS Cranefly (FY 539) …, HMS Sturton (FY 1595) … and the harbour defence patrol craft HMS Suilven and soon thereafter her officers and a pilot returned to the vessel aboard Mona. The next day, the vessels towed her to Dundee where temporary repairs were made. The ship then continued to the Clyde for repairs and returned to service in April 1940.(«uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer FOXHOUND, escorting damaged battleship NELSON, attacked a submarine contact south of Wolf Rock in 49‑39N, 5‑50. 5W.
 
Ship movement – Armed merchant cruisers ANDANIA, CHITRAL and WORCESTERSHIRE departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol. Light cruiser COLOMBO arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Ship grounding – Armed merchant cruiser LAURENTIC, returning to the Clyde, went ashore southwest of Islay. Tug ENGLISHMAN was carrying some of the survivors of steamer ROTHESAY CASTLE (7016grt) and had to transfer them to a destroyer before she could assist.  However, LAURENTIC got off without assistance and proceeded to Belfast arriving on the 7th. She was under repair until 25 May.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.7 of one British, one Norwegian and four Finnish ships departed Methil escorted by destroyers ESKIMO, TARTAR, KASHMIR, KHARTOUM and submarine TRITON. KASHMIR had departed the Clyde on the 4th to join the escort and arrived at Rosyth on the 6th, while KHARTOUM had left the Clyde on the 5th and refuelled at Scapa Flow on the 6th before proceeding to Rosyth. ESKIMO developed defects and was relieved by destroyer ENCOUNTER until joined by destroyer KANDAHAR which departed Scapa Flow at midnight on the 7th. Light cruisers GLASGOW and EDINBURGH left Rosyth on the 7th to cover the convoy, which arrived safely at Bergen on the 9th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.64 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloops GRIMSBY and WESTON, but was cancelled when progress was impeded by fog.
 
Convoy FS.66 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer/escort vessel VEGA and sloop LONDONDERRY. Sloop STORK was intended to join them, but (as noted on the 5th) fouled the boom net at Inchkeith and had to return to harbour. VEGA collided with steamer REGFOS (1548grt) on the 8th, but was was able to continue with the convoy, which arrived at Southend on the 8th. After temporary repairs at Sheerness, VEGA departed on the 9th and proceeded to Rosyth, but as there were no facilities available for her there, went on to Dundee, arriving on the 12th for repairs which completed on the 24th.
 
U.K. friendly losses – Tanker BRITISH LIBERTY (8485grt) was sunk on a British defensive minefield two miles NE of Dyck Light Vessel; twenty four crew, including a Marine gunner, were lost.
 
German minelaying in the Thames estuary – During the night of the 6th/7th, German destroyers of the 1st Flotilla, FRIEDRICH ECKHOLDT, ERICH STEINBRINCK and FRIEDRICH IHN, supported by KARL GALSTER, RICHARD BEITZEN and HERMANN SCHOEMANN laid mines in the Thames Estuary.
… [Between Jan 6 and Jan 19, d]estroyer GRENVILLE and six merchant ships for 21,617 tons were lost in the field. …
U-boat minelaying – U.30 laid mines in Liverpool Bay, on which four merchant ships were sunk and one badly damaged.
 
German merchant activity – German steamer FRANKENWALD (5062grt) was lost by stranding near Bratholmen and Felsen.
 
German steamer BAHIA (4118grt) departed Bahia, arrived at Narvik on 6 February, and continued on to Hamburg which she reached on the 17th.
_____
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.15 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and RESTIGOUCHE, which detached on the 7th. Ocean escort was battleship RESOLUTION which detached on the 18th, and proceeded to Plymouth, arriving on the 19th for refitting. Destroyers WREN, VANESSA and VANQUISHER were with the convoy from the 18th to 19th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
PASSAGE OF FIRST ANZAC CONVOY TO NORTH AFRICA
 
The first of the Australian-New Zealand troop convoys, US.1, departed Wellington with liners ORION (23,456grt), EMPRESS OF CANADA (21,517grt), STRAITHAIRD (22,284grt) and RANGITATA (16,969grt) carrying troops for North African service, and escorted by battleship RAMILLIES and Australian heavy cruiser CANBERRA from Wellington. New Zealand light cruiser LEANDER departed Wellington on the 4th, arrived at Lyttleton on the 5th and after collecting liners DUNERA (11,162grt) and SOBIESKI (11,030grt) left again the same day. They joined the convoy in Cook Strait off North Island on the 6th.
 
On the 9th, liners ORCADES (23,456grt), STRATHNAVER (22,457grt), OTRANTO (20,032grt) and ORFORD (19,941grt) escorted by Australian heavy cruiser AUSTRALIA departed Sydney and joined the convoy on the 10th off Sydney.
 
Light cruiser LEANDER arrived at Sydney on the 11th. Australian light cruiser SYDNEY joined the convoy on the 11th and was detached on the 12th in Jervis Bay. Liner EMPRESS OF JAPAN (26,032grt) from Melbourne joined on the 12th.
 
Earlier, on the 8th, heavy cruiser KENT and the French SUFFREN departed Colombo and arrived at Fremantle on the 17th. On the 20th they relieved the escorting Australian cruisers, which arrived in Fremantle for refuelling.
 
On the convoy's arrival at Colombo on the 30th, KENT and SUFFREN were in turn relieved by Force I - aircraft carrier EAGLE, heavy cruiser SUSSEX (Flag Murray) and Australian light cruiser HOBART.
 
Force I had been conducting sweeps in the Indian Ocean since the 15th when it departed Colombo, arriving back on the 18th. It left again on the 25th, reached Trincomalee on the 28th, and sailed on the 30th to meet the convoy. Reaching Colombo on the 30th together, both force and convoy sailed for the Middle East on 1 February.
 
Destroyer WESTCOTT departed Singapore on the 28th, arrived at Colombo on 1 February and left the same day as a convoy escort. French liner ATHOS II (15,276grt) joined the convoy at Colombo.
 
The convoy was also screened by submarines OTUS and OLYMPUS, patrolling submerged in Nine Degree Channel between the Laccadives and Minicoy after investigating the Maldives, Addu and Chagos groups. The convoy's entry into the Red Sea on 8 February was preceded by anti-submarine patrols by Australian destroyer VENDETTA, which had been detached from the Mediterranean Fleet, and WESTCOTT, which reached Aden on the 8th. The convoy escorts were detached on the 10th and US.1 arrived safely at Suez on 12 February.
… . («naval.history.net»)
[Editorial note: the 11 liners acting as troop-carriers have a combined tonnage of almost 220,000 tons, an amazing commitment to a single enterprise. Add the additional weight of the French liner joining Convoy US.1 at Colombo and the total tonnage approaches 235,000 tons.
I have not found figures on the number of troops under transport from New Zealand and Australia respectively, though the numbers must be available. If any members have that information, could they please include it in a post to this thread?]
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/6/2018 9:23:38 PM
Not something easy to answer in a post Brian. But will try my best.

First of all, with the creation of the Reichssicherheitsamt ( State Security Main Office ) under Heydrich in September 1939 , all police forces, including the Gestapo under Heinrich Müller, became subordinated sections of the RSHA. I´ll search out an organigramm.

I´ll post more about the German Resistance.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/7/2018 7:00:51 PM
January 7. Day 129
Sunday.

Finland
Fighting continues on the Karelian front.
Quote:
Command of the Russian forces is taken over by Gernal Semyon Konstantinovich Timoshenko. (2194 Days, p 42)


Europe
No notable activity.

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
Leaflet Raids, 4/5 January to 19/20 January 1940. (BC War Diaries, P 28)


U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats entering or leaving harbour.. 10 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by torpedo or U-boat mining: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
British Submarine losses, Heligoland Bight – On patrol in the Heligoland Bight, 15 miles from Heligoland, submarine UNDINE … was attacked and badly damaged by German auxiliary minesweepers M.1201 (trawler HARVESTEHUDE,  523grt), M.1204 (trawler ANNA BUSSE, 468grt) and M.1207 (trawler FRISIA, 429grt) after she had unsuccessfully attempted to attack two of the trawlers at 1100/7th. Early next morning, UNDINE was scuttled and the entire crew … were taken prisoner. M.1204 took off the crew and M.1201 attempted to take her in tow. When UNDINE sank, several crew members of M.1201 were lost with her.
 
Submarine SEAHORSE … of the 6th Flotilla departed Blyth on 26 December. On the 7th, she was sunk by a minesweeper of the 1st Minesweeping Flotilla in a 24 hour long attack in the Heligoland Bight. Damage to the submarine early in the attack provided a considerable oil leak to guide the attacking minesweeper. Lt Massey-Dawson, Lt J W Fleming, Lt J C Baker, Lt W Thain RNR, Warrant Engineer A Cockburn and thirty four ratings of crew were lost (see Casualty List). The German 1st Minesweeping Flotilla was composed at this time of minesweepers M.1, M.3, M.4, M.7, M.8 and M.14. (Some recent sources indicate that SEAHORSE may have been lost by mining in 55‑26N, 07‑02E on 29 or perhaps 30 December. According to Seekrieg, she was sunk by M.122 and M.132.)
 
Ship collision – Destroyer NUBIAN, departing the Clyde, was damaged in a collision with an examination vessel two miles off Greenock. Her damaged stem required drydocking at the Clyde until the 24th, when she returned to duties with the Home Fleet.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer AFRIDI departed the Clyde to join sister ship TARTAR escorting HN.7 from Scapa Flow.
 
Battleship ROYAL SOVEREIGN departed Plymouth, escorted by destroyers WITCH and WIVERN on working up exercises.
 
U.K.-Gibralter outbound convoy – Convoy OB.68GF departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WANDERER and WARWICK, and on the same day OA.68GF, with destroyers VETERAN and WHITSHED left Southend. The two groups merged on the 10th to form convoy OG.14F of 29 ships, and on the same day, WANDERER and WARWICK  detached to HG.14F. Sloop ENCHANTRESS was with OG.14F from the 10th to 13th, when she detached to convoy HG.15F. The OG convoy was joined by destroyers VELOX and VORTIGERN from the 13th to 15th, and arrived that day at Gibraltar.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.65 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop STORK, but was obliged to anchor in Knock Deep due to fog. It left on the 8th, and arrived in the Tyne on the 9th. There was no convoy FN.66.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers TRANSYLVANIA and AURANIA arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser CERES arrived with captured Norwegian steamer TROMA (5029grt)  off North Rona.
 
Submarine depot ship TITANIA departed Rosyth for the Tyne with two tugs and escorted by sloop AUCKLAND, and arrived with the tugs on the 8th.

Submarine TRIUMPH, after emergency repairs, departed Rosyth escorted by destroyer EXMOUTH for Chatham. Off the Humber, destroyer GRIFFIN relieved EXMOUTH which returned to Rosyth escorting convoy FN.67.
 
Destroyer ESKIMO departed Rosyth for refitting at Southampton.
 
U-boat minelaying – U.32 laid mines off Ailsa Craig in the Firth of Clyde, but no shipping was sunk or damaged.
 
German merchant ship movements – German steamer CONSUL HORN (8384grt) departed Aruba and evaded blockading French submarine AGOSTA near St Martin. She was later sighted by an American PBY flying boat from San Juan, then located by light cruiser ENTERPRISE on the 27th in 46‑51N, 42‑50W, but CONSUL HORN, disguised as a Soviet steamer, was able to convince the British cruiser she was a neutral. CONSUL HORN arrived at Trondheim on 6 February and reached Hamburg on the 19th.
 
French ship losses – French auxiliary sloop BARSAC (1145grt) was lost when she ran aground on the Isle of Onza near Vigo.
 
Northern Far Eastern waters – Submarine RAINBOW departed Hong Kong on the 7th to patrol off Vladivostok from the 13th to 19th. At the time, 1st Submarine Flotilla had the following units in refit: depot ship MEDWAY at Singapore, submarines PARTHIAN, PHOENIX and PANDORA at Hong Kong, REGENT, ROVER, RORQUAL and GRAMPUS at Singapore, while PROTEUS was en route to Hong Kong to refit.
 
RAINBOW arrived back at Hong Kong from Vladivostok on the 25th and confirmed the results of submarine REGULUS's patrol in the same area that no German submarines were using the Soviet port. Due to RAINBOW's difficulties with heavy icing, there was no Vladivostok patrol in February, but  PROTEUS did leave Hong Kong at the end of the month for a repeat patrol. («naval-history.net»)]/quote]
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/8/2018 5:38:58 PM
January 8. Day 130
Monday

Finland
Quote:
The Finns scored a major victory on the Karelian front, wiping out the entire Russian 44th Division. (Goralski, p 104)

Quote:
The Russian 44th Assault Division is annihilated by the Finns under General Siilasuvo in the areas of Suomussalmi. The Finns capture 35 tanks, 50 guns, 25 Anti-tank guns and 250 trucks. (2194 Days, p 42)


Europe
Quote:
Did a mike interview with General Ernst Udet tonight, but Göring, his boss, censored our script to badly that it wasn’t very interesting… . Udet, a likeable fellow…, is something of a phenomenon. A professional pilot, who only a fews years ago was so broke he toured America as a stunt flyer, … is now responsible for the designing and production of Germany’s war planes. Though he never had any business experience, he has proved a genius at this job. …Udet would never be entrusted with such a job in America. He would be considered “lacking in business experience.” Also businessmen, if they knew of his somewhat Bohemian life, would hesitate to trust him with responsibility. And yet in this crazy Nazi system he had done a phenomenal job. Amusing: last night Udet put on a little party in his home, with three generals, napkins slung over their shoulders, presiding over his very considerable bar. There were pretty girls and a great dal of cutting up. Yet these are the men who have made the Luftwaffe the most terrible instrument of its kind in the world. (Berlin Diary, p 42)


USA
No notable activity.

Britain
Quote:
Britain began rationing fool. Butter, sugar, bacon and ham were limited to four ounces per adult each week. German weekly rations then were 32 ounces of all meats and fats, 8 ounces of sugar, two pints of milk, plus restrictions on clothes, soap, shoes, and boots. (Goralski, p 104)


Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=12 (too many to list); laid down=1 (U-754); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat leaving Kiel (U-23); one U-boat (U-58) entering Kiel after 13 days. 10 U-boats at sea. No ships sunk by torpedo or U-boat mining: total tonnage lost=0. No U-boats lost. (Data collated from «uboat.net»).

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK departed the Clyde for Rosyth where she arrived on the 10th.
 
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK and armed merchant cruiser SCOTSTOUN departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser COLOMBO departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol, which she left on the 12th for Devonport and arrived on the 14th. With her departure from Scapa Flow, the 11th Cruiser Squadron ceased to exist.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO arrived at Chatham.
 
Destroyer WESTMINSTER completed her conversion to fast escort vessel. Following working up at Portland, she joined Convoy C operating from Rosyth, arriving on the 30th.
 
Allied Submarine activities – Submarines SEAWOLF and SEALION departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Polish submarine WILK arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarines SEAL and NARWHAL departed Gosport, via the Downs where they spent the night of the 8th/9th, for Rosyth. They arrived on the 10th escorted by sloop FLAMINGO for duty as convoy escorts on the ON/HN convoy routes. NARWHAL departed Rosyth on the 15th with convoy ON.8.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.69 departed Southend escorted by destroyer VANESSA from the 9th to 11th. Destroyer WIVERN also joined until detached on the 11th.
 
Convoy OB.69 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers MACKAY and WITHERINGTON until the 12th. The convoy dispersed next day on the 13th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.67 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops AUCKLAND and STORK, and arrived at Southend on the 9th.
 
] Merchant collision – Steamers GITANO (3956grt) and TYNEHOME (628grt) collided in fog with the loss of TYNEHOME. Ten survivors were picked up by GITANO.
 
U-boat activity –U.19 sank Norwegian steamer MANX (1343grt) in 58‑30N, 01‑33W. Thirteen crew were lost and six crew rescued.
[Editor’s comment: this sinking is listed on «uboat.net» for January 9.]
Quote:
U-boat minelaying – U.56 laid mines off Cross Sands near Yarmouth on which one steamer was lost.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar incoming convoy – Convoy HG.14 departed Gibraltar with 33 ships escorted by destroyer KEPPEL. The convoy was turned over to ocean escort Sloop ENCHANTRESS and French destroyers VALMY and CHEVALIER PAUL outside the Gibraltar approaches, and arrived on the 17th.
 
African patrols – Battlecruiser RENOWN and destroyers HERO and HASTY departed Freetown and joined aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL off Sierra Leone. The destroyers detached on the 10th for refuelling.
 
Light cruiser NEPTUNE departed Dakar on patrol, and stopped and boarded Q-ship LAMBRIDGE (armed steamer BOTLEA (5119grt)) off Freetown without discovering her true identity. After her patrol, NEPTUNE arrived at Freetown on the 20th.
 
French naval activity – French light cruiser ÉMILE BERTIN departed Toulon on the 8th and proceeded to Casablanca, joined by destroyer ÉPERVIER which departed Bizerte on the 9th. Both ships arrived at Casablanca on the 12th. They then relieved heavy cruisers DUPLEIX, FOCH and destroyer CASSARD, and conducted a surveillance patrol off the Canary Island en route and arrived at Dakar on the 19th. On the 20th, they set off for another patrol off the Canaries. Meanwhile, DUPLEIX and FOCH left for Halifax on escort duty with a convoy at the beginning of February, while CASSARD departed Dakar on the 21st and arrived at Casablanca on the 25th, where she was under repair until 14 February. She then departed Casablanca and arrived at Toulon on 17 February. Destroyer MILAN remained on station
 
U.K.-Africa incoming convoy – Convoy SL.16 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser ESPERANCE BAY until the 25th. Next day, sloop DEPTFORD joined the convoy as escort until its arrival on the 27th.
 
Far East – Light cruiser DAUNTLESS departed Singapore on patrol duties as a unit of the 5th Cruiser Squadron, and arrived back on the 17th.
 
German mercantile movement – German steamer SAO PAULO (4977grt) had departed Pernambuco on 16 November 1939 and arrived at Cabedelo the next day. Leaving there on 8 January, she safely arrived at Cuxhaven on 3 March. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/9/2018 6:56:24 PM
January 9. Day 131
Tuesday. New moon.

Finland
Quote:
Harry C., probably the best-informed man we have in the Moscow Embassy, passed through today with his wife, who is going to have her baby in America. Harry, no Bolo-baiter, had some weird tales. He says the one and only thought of a Russian nowadays is to toe the Stalin line so that he can save his job or at least his life. The Russians, he says, have hopelessly bungled the attack on Finland. A hundred thousand casualties, already, the hospitals in Leningrad and the north jammed with wounded. … Harry says everyone in Moscow, from Stalin down, thought the Red army would be in Helsinki a week after the attack started. They were so sure that they timed an attack on Bessarabia for December 6, and only called it off at the last moment. (Berlin Diary, p 275)

Poland
Quote:
[I] learn that eighteen Poles were killed and thirty wounded recently in a Polish prison camp. The S.S. here claim there was a “revolt.” The army is protesting to Hitler about the senseless brutality of the Gestapo in Poland, but I doubt if that will change matters. (Berlin Diary, p 275)

Germany
Quote:
This has been one of he coldest days I’ve experienced in fourteen years in Europe. Tens of thousands of homes and many offices are without coal. … With the rivers and canals, which transport most of the coal, frozen over, the Germans can’t bring in adequate supplies. (Berlin Diary, p 275)

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats leaving Kiel (U-15, -60); no U-boats entering harbour. 12 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

One ship sunk by torpedo: total tonnage lost=1343:
Manx, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1,343 tons, was carrying coal from West Hartlepool to Drammen. Complement=19; lost=13.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»).

Quote:
At 02.21 hours … the unescorted and neutral Manx was hit by one torpedo from U-19 off Kinnaird Head and sank within two minutes. Eight survivors managed to grab hold of an upturned lifeboat, but were scantily clad and in the stormy weather four of them gave up. After 8 hours the remaining four survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Leka. Two other survivors were rescued from a raft by the Norwegian steam merchant Isis («uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Submarine activity – Submarine STARFISH (Lt T A Turner) of the 6th Flotilla arrived in the Heligoland Bight to relieve submarine SEAHORSE which was due to return to Blyth. There she attacked German minesweeper M.7 of the 1st Minesweeping Flotilla. M.7 was undamaged, and in return badly damaged  STARFISH at 1000 in 55-00N, 07-18E. She was scuttled to avoid capture and the crew of Lt Turner, Lt R T V Kyrke, Sub Lt Geoffrey Wardle, Lt W S W Main RNR, Warrant Engineer C Dodsworth and thirty four ratings were taken prisoner.

Submarine SALMON arrived at Harwich after patrol.
 
Ship transfer – Armed merchant cruiser VOLTAIRE departed the Tyne for Portsmouth and transfer to the Mediterranean.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser DUNEDIN arrived at Scapa Flow from Northern Patrol, and armed merchant cruiser ASTURIAS at the Clyde. AMC CORFU also arrived at the Clyde for duty with the Northern Patrol.

Esccort duties – Destroyer ENCOUNTER with  tanker BRITISH PRUDENCE (8620grt) departed Invergordon for the Tyne, and both arrived on the 10th.
 
Destroyers ECLIPSE and ESCAPADE arrived at Invergordon with minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA.
 
Post-repair assignment – Destroyers SIKH and DUNCAN departed Sheerness for the Clyde after repairs .
 
Ship movement – Destroyers ESCORT and ELECTRA with defects proceeded to Falmouth for repairs.
 
Destroyer MAORI departed the Clyde to relieve sister ship TARTAR in HN.7.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy SA.24 with two steamers departed Southampton escorted by destroyer SHIKARI, and arrived at Brest on the 11th.
 
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.7 of two British, 19 Norwegian, five Swedish, eight Finnish and four Estonian ships departed Bergen escorted by destroyers KASHMIR, KHARTOUM, KANDAHAR and TARTAR. Destroyer FORESTER departed the Clyde on the 8th and joined the convoy at sea. Destroyer AFRIDI departed the Clyde on the 7th to relieve TARTAR, but was reassigned en route and MAORI departed the Clyde on the 9th to relieve TARTAR instead. Light cruisers GLASGOW and EDINBURGH, which departed Rosyth on the 7th to support convoy ON.7, supplied cover for this convoy. On the 9th at 1006, SSW of Utvaer in 60-48.5N, 04-20E,  EDINBURGH dropped depth charges on a submarine contact. GLASGOW dropped depth charges at 1052 in 60-45N, 04-25E. GLASGOW, EDINBURGH and convoy HN.7 arrived safely at Methil on the 12th. KHARTOUM took the west coast section of five ships, and escorted tankers SCOTTISH AMERICAN (6999grt) and ARNDALE (8296grt) to the Clyde.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.67 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers VALOROUS, VEGA and sloop LONDONDERRY. Destroyer EXMOUTH proceeded northward with the convoy until dark on the 10th, and arrived in the Tyne on the 10th.
 
Destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY departed Methil for the Tyne for duty escorting convoy FS.68.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Southwest of Eddystone in 49‑57.8N, 04‑32.2W, sloop SCARBOROUGH made a submarine contact. Destroyer KELVIN, en route from Portland to Greenock joined to assist as did destroyer WINDSOR from Plymouth. Destroyers ACASTA and VISCOUNT also joined to hunt the contact, but all without success.
 
Destroyer VESPER attacked a submarine contact south of Scilly Isle in 49‑09N, 6‑24W.
 
Sloop BIDEFORD, escorting convoy HG.14F, attacked a submarine contact  175 miles west of Cape Finisterre in 42-36N, 13-16W.
 
Luftwaffe maritime activities – German bombers of the FliegerKorps X attacked British shipping off Stonehaven, and sank steamers GOWRIE (689grt) four miles east of Stonehaven and OAKGROVE (1985grt) seven miles NW by W of North Leman Buoy. The entire crew of GOWRIE was rescued, but one man on OAKGROVE was lost. They also damaged Danish steamers IVAN KONDRUP (2369grt) east of Stonehaven and FEDDY (955grt) two and a quarter miles ESE of Aberdeen. Trawler THRIFTY (139grt) rescued the survivors from  IVAN KONDRUP.
 
Steamer UPMINSTER (1013grt) was badly damaged by German bombing nine miles east of Hammond Knoll Light Vessel in 53‑03N, 01‑29E, and sank on the 10th with the loss of three of her crew . Attacks also damaged steamer NORTHWOOD (1146grt) off Whitby, steamer RECULVER (683grt) off Great Yarmouth,  and trawler CHRYSOLITE (251grt) eight miles NW by N of Smith Knoll Light Vessel. RECULVER was taken in tow by  trawler TAMORA (275grt).
 
Ship grounding loss – Greek steamer TONIA CHANDRIS (3161grt) was lost when she ran aground off Unst. Tug ST MELLONS was sent to assist her and the crew was rescued by the Lerwick lifeboat.
 
Mediterranean – Destroyer WATCHMAN was taken in hand at Gibraltar to repair defects. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/10/2018 7:05:34 PM
January 10. Day 132
Wednesday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
Hitler tells the commanders of the three services, Hermann Goering (airforce), Erich Raeder (navy) and Walther von Brauchitsch (army) that he has decided to attack on the Western Front on 17 January. (2194 Days, p 42)


USA[
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
A German aircraft carrying Major Reinberger and Major Hoenmans makes a forced landing near Mechelen-sur-Meuse, a Belgian agricultural town not far from the German frontier. The two officers are carrying secret documents for the commander of Army Group B, dealing with plans for attack on he Western Front. The authorities in Brussels are thus alerted about Hitler’s intention to attack their country and the Netherlands, which will be in the middle of the German thrust westward. (2194 Days, p 42)


In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-144); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving Kiel or Wilhelmshaven; one U-boat (U-46) entering Kiel after 23 days. 11 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

No ships sunk by torpedo or from U-boat mining: total tonnage lost=0. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Return from patrol – Battleship RODNEY, battlecruiser REPULSE and the destroyers that had departed on the 4th arrived back at Greenock. Destroyer FIREDRAKE had been detached on a detail and arrived at Greenock on the 11th.
 
German merchant losses – German steamer BAHIA BLANCA (8558grt) departed Hamburg pre-war, arrived at Rio de Janiero on 11 September 1939 disguised as a Greek ship, and then on 6 December attempted to run the British blockade back to Germany. On the 10th, evading the blockade, she ran onto the ice pack in the Denmark Strait, sank in 66‑09N, 26‑20N and her crew was rescued by Icelandic trawler HAFSTEIN (313grt). Light cruiser NEWCASTLE, which departed Scapa Flow on the 2nd, was diverted from Northern Patrol to assist and sank the German ship with gunfire. NEWCASTLE arrived back at Scapa Flow on the 14th.
 
Degaussing – Heavy cruisers BERWICK, NORFOLK, DEVONSHIRE arrived at Rosyth from Northern Patrol for de-magnetization.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser DELHI departed Belfast for Scapa Flow, where she arrived on the 11th.
 
Ship grounding – Armed merchant cruiser CANTON ran aground off Barra Head, Isle of Lewis, in the Hebrides, and armed merchant cruiser CALIFORNIA stood by until  tugs ENGLISHMAN and BANDIT arrived  from Campbeltown and Ardrossan respectively. CANTON got off on the 12th without assistance and headed towards the Clyde escorted by destroyers FAME, ISIS, FORESIGHT and IMPERIAL. Destroyers FORESTER, FORTUNE and FURY came out from the Clyde and met destroyers FAULKNOR and FOXHOUND to screen CANTON's passage. On the 12th, FORESIGHT attacked a submarine contact NNW of Inishtrahull. On the 13th, CANTON and BANDIT arrived in Rothesay Bay en route for the Clyde. On the 17th, at the head of Holy Loch, CANTON was intentionally beached when her pumps failed to control the flooding.
 
Maintenance – Destroyer MATABELE arrived at Plymouth for docking and refitting.

 Minelaying – Early on the 10th, destroyers INTREPID and IVANHOE of the 20th Destroyer Flotilla laid small minefield IE‑1 in channels through the German minefields in the Heligoland Bight in 54‑06N, 05‑29E.
 
Submarine patrol – Submarine URSULA departed Blyth on patrol.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.22 of steamers BARON CARNEGIE, BATNA, COXWOLD and DAVID LIVINGTONE (Commodore) departed Bristol Channel, escorted by destroyer WESSEX, and safely arrived in the Loire on the 12th.
 
Convoy AXS 9 of one steamer arrived at Brest from Fowey, escorted by destroyer BROKE.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.68 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY, and arrived at Southend on the 11th.

German minelaying – On the night of the 10th/11th, German destroyers KARL GALSTER, ANTON SCHMIDT, RICHARD BEITZEN, FRIEDRICH  IHN, escorted by destroyers WILHELM HEIDKAMP and FRIEDRICH ECKHOLDT, laid a minefield off Newcastle. On the return, IHN broke down and was escorted back by BEITZEN. On the 11th, the minefield claimed its only victim, trawler LUCIDA (251grt) in 55‑00N, 00‑53W with the loss of one crewman.
 
On the night of 10/11 January, German destroyers BRUNO HEINEMANN, WOLFGANG ZENKER, ERICH KOELLNER laid a minefield off Cromer. Three merchant ships for 11,155 tons were lost on this minefield [in the following week.]

German collision loss – German trawler AXEL (343grt) was sunk in an accidental collision with German patrol yacht GRILLE (2560grt) in the Baltic.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer DIAMOND departed Gibraltar for Freetown arriving on the 15th for patrol duties.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser GALATEA departed Malta and arrived at Alexandria on the 13th, left next day and arrived back at Malta on the 17th. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/11/2018 4:37:15 PM
January 11. Day 133
Thursday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
Quote:
A Wilhelmstrasse official admitted to me today that the Germans had imposed forced labour on all Jews in Poland. He said the term of forced labour was “only two years.” (Berlin Diary, pp 276-7)

Germany
[Editorial comment: Hitler first committed to invading the west in October 1939, with a tentative invasion date of November , 1939. As noted in 2194 Days under yesterday’s date, Hitler’s directive to his military leaders would be executed on January 17, which indicates the high state of readiness of German forces. What surprises me is that William Shirer, no lover of the Nazis, is able to hear such rumours of Hitler’s military directives so rapidly. Either German security is lax, or Shirer is not just using a buzz-word when he talks about his “spies”.]
Quote:
Hitler … saw the military yesterday and today and there is talk about a big push in the spring. The army, according to my spies, is still against an offensive on the Maginot Line despite party pressure for it. Will the Germans try to go through Holland, as many think? They want air bases on the Dutch coast for the take-off against Britain. Also fantastic talk here of an invasion of England,; of the Germans going into Sweden to sew up their Swedish iron-ore supplies. (Berlin Diary, p 276)

Eastern Europe
Quote:
Learned today from a traveller back from Prague that produces of butter, flour, and other things in Slovakia and Bohemia are marking their goods destined for Germany as “Made in Russia.” This on orders from Berlin, the idea being to show the German people how much “help” is already coming from the Soviets. (Berlin Diary, p 276)


USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-755); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving Kiel on patrol; one U-boat (U-56) returning from patrol after 23 days. 10 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

One ship sunk by torpedo and one lost to a mine: total tonnage lost=8417:
Fredville, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1,150 tons, was in ballast from Drammen to Methil. Complement=16; lost=11.
El Oso, a British steam tanker of 1,150 tons, was laden with almost 10,000 tons of oil products en route from Angols via Halifax to Ellesmere Port.. Complement=36; lost=4.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 16.32 hours … the Fredville (enroute to obtain a cargo of coal for Oslo) was torpedoed by U-23 about 100 miles east of the Orkney Islands and broke in two. The forepart remained afloat and five survivors left their lifeboats several times to go back on board and look for more surviviors. The survivors were picked up by a Swedish ship and taken to Kopervik.

At 11.00 hours … the El Oso … in convoy HX-14B, struck a mine laid on 6 January by U-30 and sank six miles 280° from the Bar Lightship, Liverpool. Three crew members were lost. The master and 32 crew members were picked up by HMS Walker (D 27) … and landed at Liverpool. Eight injured survivors were taken to a hospital where one of them died of wounds. («uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser MONTCLARE arrived at Belfast from Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movements – Destroyer FORTUNE departed Liverpool for Glasgow.
 
Destroyer KIMBERLEY departed Portland after trials for Greenock, where she arrived on the 12th.
 
German aerial attack – Minesweeping trawler OLYMPIA (Skipper H. C. Hall RNR) and armed patrol trawler VENTURE (Lt A. S. Bennett RNVR) were attacked by German bombers off Haisborough. OLYMPIA had one rating killed, and because of damage from near misses, both trawlers had to be towed in.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.70G departed Southend escorted by destroyers VESPER and VISCOUNT from the 12th to 13th, when they were detached off the Lizard. Destroyers KEITH and ARDENT escorted the convoy from the 13th to 14th. Meanwhile, convoy OB.70G departed Liverpool escorted by destroyer VERSATILE and sloop DEPTFORD. The two convoys merged on the 14th as OG.14 with a total of 48 ships. VERSATILE and DEPTFORD escorted the convoy on the 14th, and then joined HG.14. French destroyers TIGRE and PANTHERE escorted OG.14 from the 14th to 19th, and arrived at Gibraltar on the 19th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.68 departed Southend, escorted by sloops AUCKLAND and STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 12th.
 
Convoy FS.69 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN, and arrived at Southend on the 12th.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Steamer EL OSO (7267grt) of convoy HX.14B was sunk off Mersey Light, six miles 280° from Bar Light Vessel on a mine laid by U.30 on the 9th. Escorting destroyer WALKER was joined by destroyer VIMY and later by destroyers FAULKNOR and FOXHOUND. Shortly after midnight on the 12th, anti-submarine trawler KING SOL (486grt) sighted a submarine on the surface near Bar Light Vessel. She chased the submarine for more than an hour, but lost it in the darkness. Destroyers VIMY, VERSATILE, sloop DEPTFORD, anti-submarine yacht CUTTY SARK and two other anti-submarine trawlers were also patrolling in the area. At 0345, VIMY attacked a submarine contact 12 miles 300° from the Light Vessel. A minelaying submarine was suspected and destroyers FAME, ISIS, FORESIGHT and IMPERIAL patrolled across North Channel to intercept her.
 
German aerial attack – Steamer KEYNES (1706grt) was attacked by German bombers in 53‑03N, 01‑40E but escaped serious damage. However, later that same day, German bombers sank her in 53‑47N, 00‑46E, but the entire crew was rescued.
 
Ship collisions – Steamer LEONARD PEARCE (1571grt) was sunk in a collision in Bristol Channel off Bull Point.
 
Anti-submarine yacht PRINCESS (730grt) and steamer BLAIRMORE (4141grt) collided near Elswell Bay, Bristol Channel. PRINCESS sank, and her crew picked up by BLAIRMORE.
 
German aerial attack – Three British vessels were bombed by aircraft of the German X Air Corps - trawler CROXTON (195grt) was sunk in 53‑20N, 02‑40E, but her entire crew rescued, trawler FLAVIA (202grt) was damaged 90 miles NE by E of Buchanness, and steamer PITWINES (932grt) was damaged 25 miles SE by E of Flamborough Head. .
 
Note: German X Air Corps flew He111's of KG26, Ju88's of KG30, and two reconnaissance squadrons flying He59's or Do17's. 

Baltic activity – German trawler DIETRICH HASSELDIECK (172grt) was lost in the Baltic off Pakdiski on a minefield laid by Finnish submarine VESIHIISI on 27 December.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser AJAX, returning to England, arrived at Rio de Janiero.
… 
Far East waters – Soviet steamer SELENGA (2492grt), carrying a cargo of wolfram from Japan to Germany, was seized shortly after leaving Manila by light cruiser LIVERPOOL, and taken to Hong Kong. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/12/2018 6:53:30 PM
January 12. Day 134
Friday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Eastern Europe
No notable activity

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving Kiel on patrol; two U-boats (U-19, U-24) returning from patrol after 9 and 7 days respectively. 8 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

One ship totally lost to torpedo attack: total tonnage lost commercially=10,517:
Danmark, a Danish tanker of 10,517 tons, was carrying 8200 tons of petrol and 5760 tons of kerosene from Aruba to Nyborg. Complement=40; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 06.50 hours … the Danmark was hit by one G7e torpedo from U-23 when lying at anchor in Inganess Bay, Kirkwall. The ship exploded, broke in two and drifted ashore. The after part sank on 21 January, but the forepart was later refloated, taken to Inverkeithing and used as a storage hulk for fuel oil. («uboat.net»)
.
At sea
Quote:
Ship assignments – Anti-aircraft cruiser CARLISLE completed her conversion to an anti-aircraft cruiser at Devonport and later headed for the Mediterranean. Following working up at Malta from 10 February to 26 March, she arrived at Gibraltar on 29 March to return to England, where she was assigned to the 20th Cruiser Squadron working with the Humber Force.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruisers DUNEDIN and DELHI departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol duties, with both arrived back on the 17th.
 
Ship movement – Armed merchant cruiser CALIFORNIA arrived in the Clyde after standing by armed merchant cruiser CANTON.
 
Light cruiser EMERALD departed Portsmouth for Halifax where she arrived on the 18th.
 
RN minelaying – Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA, escorted by destroyers ESCAPADE and ECLIPSE, conducted operation PA 1.  Minesweepers HARRIER and SKIPJACK accompanied this force, which arrived back at Rosyth on the 13th.
 
Escort duty – Destroyer EXMOUTH relieved destroyer ECHO on escort duty with cable ship ROYAL SCOT.
 
Submarine activities – Submarine TRIDENT arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarine L.23 departed Blyth on patrol.
 
U.K.-Africa outbound convoy – Convoy OA.71 departed Southend escorted by destroyers ACASTA and WINDSOR from the 12th to 14th. Destroyers VETERAN and VERITY escorted the convoy from 14th to 16th, when it dispersed to join convoy SL.15. Meanwhile convoy OB.71 departed Liverpool, escorted by destroyers VANOC and WINCHELSEA to the 16th when it too joined SL.15.
 
East coast convoys – Convoy FN.69 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 13th.
 
Convoy FS.70 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD and BITTERN, and arrived at Southend on the 13th. Convoy FS.71 was cancelled.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer ASHANTI made two attacks on a submarine contact NNW of Great Orme's Head, in 53-33N, 4-01W. Anti-submarine yacht CUTTY SARK was also in the area.
 
Anti-submarine yacht ANNA MARIE (344grt) sighted what was taken to be a periscope feather off Bull Point, in 51-15N, 04-17W, and dropped depth charges on a presumed submarine contact. Portuguese steamer MELLO (4020grt) also sighted a submerged object near this location about the same time. It was later determined that the contact was the wreck of steamer LEONARD PEARCE sunk in a collision on the 11th.
 
Anti-submarine training – Patrol yacht SHEMARA (834grt) and anti-submarine yacht VALENA (882grt) were exercising with submarine H.50 off Portland Bill in 50-25-50N, 2-47-40W, and made attacks on a submarine contact. Motor anti-submarine boats 3 and 6 were also searching in the area. SHEMARA escorted H.50 back to harbour.

German air action – Armed patrol trawler VALDORA (251grt, T/Skipper A. Potterton RNR) was sunk by aircraft of German X Air Corps off Cromer with the loss of her entire crew of one officer and nine ratings.
 
Three more British vessels were also attacked and bombed by aircraft of the German X Air Corps - trawler WILLIAM IVEY (202grt) was sunk 15 to 16 miles north, one half mile east, of Longstone Light House, steamer BLYTHMOOR (6582grt) damaged in 54‑16N, 00‑10W, and trawler PERSIAN EMPIRE (195grt) damaged seven miles east by north of Filey.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser CAPETOWN was refitting at Malta beginning on this date and completing on the 30th.
 
Far East escort duty – Light cruiser DURBAN departed Singapore on escort duty, and arrived back on the 20th.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.16 departed Halifax at 1000 escorted by Canadian destroyers OTTAWA and SAGUENAY, which detached on the 13th. The ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser AUSONIA, which detached on the 21st. The convoy was escorted in Home Waters by destroyers MACKAY and WANDERER from convoy OB.74 and destroyers ANTELOPE and VESPER, and arrived at Dover on the 21st. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/13/2018 5:52:57 PM
January 13. Day 135
Saturday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.
Europe
Quote:
Fearing a German spring offensive, Belgium ordered full-scale mobilization. Holland canceled all army leaves. (Goralski, p 104)


Eastern Europe
No notable activity

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
Quote:
Hitler puts off the attack on the Western Front to 20 January because of unfavourable weather conditions. (2194 Days, p 42)


In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=1 (U-101); commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-25) leaving Wilhelmshaven on patrol; no U-boats returning from patrol. 9 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

One ship sunk by torpedo: total tonnage lost=1524:
Sylvia, a Swedish merchantman of 1524 tons, was carrying general cargo and coal from Hull via Aberdeen to Gotenburg. Complement=20; lost=20.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»).
Quote:
At 04.30 hours … the unescorted and neutral Sylvia was hit amidships by a G7a torpedo from U-20 and sank within one minute with all hands northeast of Aberdeen. The ship was reported missing after leaving Aberdeen, only the body of a crewman was later recovered from a raft. («uboat.net»)
.
At sea
Quote:
Naval mindlaying – Late on the 13th, minelaying destroyers IVANHOE and INTREPID of the 20th Destroyer Flotilla laid minefield IE‑2 in the German channels of the West Wall minefield in the Heligoland Bight in 54‑06N, 05‑29E. They reached the Humber on the 14th after this operation. Operation IE 3 for the 17th was cancelled and the destroyers proceeded to Rosyth.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser DIOMEDE departed Plymouth for Rosyth.
 
Destroyers FAME, FORESIGHT, FURY, FORESTER arrived in the Clyde.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Minesweeper NIGER attacked a submarine contact in Knock Deep in 51-39N, 1-33E.
 
Sloop GRIMSBY escorting a convoy attacked a submarine contact off Scarborough in 54-18N, 00-12W.
 
North Sea – Submarine TRIBUNE at 1900 was missed by two torpedoes in 57-58N, 10-15E. There is no German record of this attack and submarine SHARK was exercising at this time in the area, but did not report an attack on a submarine.
 
Ship collision – Destroyer COSSACK departed Leith on the 10th to prepare for high speed trials. Lying in the stream, she was involved in a collision with cable ship ROYAL SCOT, escorted by destroyer EXMOUTH, in the Firth of Forth on the 13th. COSSACK returned to Leith for repairs and was able to carry out her gun trials on the 15th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.70 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 14th. There was no convoy FN.71.
 
Convoy FS.72 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops AUCKLAND and STORK, and arrived at Southend on the 15th.
 
Mine recovery – Sloop BITTERN found a German mine which she towed towards Sheerness. It was secured to the Nord Buoy and beached from there by harbour defence patrol yacht GLALA (51grt).
 
Entrance to the Gulf of Bothnia – Russian submarine SC.324 unsuccessfully attacked a Finnish convoy consisting of ANNEBORG and BORE I, escorted by patrol yacht AURA II (563grt) and patrol boat TURSAS, in 60-23N, 19-10E. AURA II dropped depth charges, which damaged her and she later sank.

U.K.-Gibraltar incoming convoy – Convoy of HG 15F of thirteen ships departed Gibraltar 13 January… [, supported by an escort ranging from one to five ships].

Change of assignment – Completing her time in the East Indies, aircraft carrier GLORIOUS departed Trincomalee on 29 December and arrived at Aden on 7 January, Suez on the 9th and Alexandria on the 13th. She proceeded to Malta on the 15th escorted by destroyers VENDETTA and BULLDOG, and arrived on the 17th for refitting, completed on 25 March. BULLDOG also refitted at Malta, until the 24 February. On 26 March, GLORIOUS, escorted by destroyer WESTCOTT and Australian destroyer STUART was departed Malta for flying-off exercises.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.16 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser CHESHIRE, destroyers HARDY, HOSTILE and submarine SEVERN. The destroyers and submarine were returning for duty in Home Waters. HARDY and HOSTILE left the convoy on the 20th and called atGibraltar. Sloop ROCHESTER and destroyer VISCOUNT joined on the 24th relieving the armed merchant cruiser and submarine. SEVERN reached Portsmouth on the 24th, while the convoy arrived in port on the 27th. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/14/2018 6:05:06 PM
January 14. Day 136
Sunday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

USA
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

Far East
Quote:
Admiral Mitsumasa Yonai was named to head a new Japanse government. (Goralski, p 104)


In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-432); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-59 leaves Kiel on patrol; no U-boats return from patrol. 10 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

No ships lost to torpedo or U-boat minelaying attack: total tonnage lost commercially=0. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Home waters – Battleship WARSPITE and destroyers FAULKNOR, FORESIGHT, FORESTER, FOXHOUND, FORTUNE, FEARLESS, FIREDRAKE, FAME, FURY of the 8th Destroyer Flotilla departed Greenock on patrol, and arrived at Scapa Flow on the 17th.
 
Blockade failure – Light cruiser AURORA departed Scapa Flow on the 14th to intercept German steamer TRAUTENFELS (6418grt) which was reported six miles off the Norwegian coast without a rudder. Light cruisers MANCHESTER on the 15th and NEWCASTLE on the 16th departed Scapa Flow, while destroyers MAORI, KASHMIR, KANDAHAR and TARTAR departed Rosyth, and destroyers INGLEFIELD, ICARUS, KIMBERLEY, KELVIN and KHARTOUM departed the Clyde on the 15th to support AURORA. Destroyer AFRIDI was to have accompanied this group from Rosyth, but was held back with defects. The operation was cancelled when it was learned that German steamer RAUENFELS (8460grt) had taken TRAUTENFELS in tow and took her into Narvik.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser CIRCASSIA arrived at the Clyde from Portland for Northern Patrol.
 
Submarine activity – Submarines TRIAD and NARWHAL were exercising in the Firth of Forth. Later in the day, TRIAD departed for patrol.
 
Submarine TRUANT arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Destroyer action on local German shipping – All available J-class destroyers were ordered to Harwich to support operation ST 2, and JERVIS, JANUS, JUNO, JACKAL met JAVELIN and JAGUAR west of Outer Dowsing.
[Editorial note: J-Class destroyers were a relatively small class of 8 ships, weighted towards torpedos rather than gunnery.]
Quote:
After submarine SALMON on patrol off Terschelling reported that shipping was moving coastwise between Germany and Holland, patrols were ordered off the Dutch coast to intercept this traffic. Destroyers GLOWWORM, GREYHOUND, GRENVILLE of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla from Harwich and minesweeping trawlers WILLIAM WESNEY (364grt), RIVER CLYDE (276grt), STELLA LEONIS (345grt) operated off the Dutch coast on operation ST 1 during the night of the 14th/15th. At 2250/14th, German steamer PHAEDRA (619grt) was captured off the Dutch coast near Ijmiuden in 52‑17N, 04‑19.5E by GREYHOUND after being sighted by WILLIAM WESNEY. Danish steamers SVANHOLM (1321grt) and KNUD (1944grt) were sent to the inspection station in the Downs escorted by RIVER CLYDE, and two Dutch and one Swedish ship were stopped, but after inspection allowed to continue.
 
PHAEDRA was renamed EMPIRE SENTINEL for British service and in 1943 taken over by the Royal Navy for use as a wreck dispersal vessel RAMPANT.

Collision damage – Destroyer WESSEX was in a collision at 0600 in the Bristol Channel with French steamer THISBE (1782grt) which stood by. WESSEX was holed before the bridge and one rating killed. Destroyers HYPERION and HOTSPUR were in the convoy escort with WESSEX, which arrived at Milford Haven for repairs. At the end of the March, repairs were delayed due to a strike by shipwrights, but completed on 8 April.
 
Anati-U-boat activity – Destroyers HOTSPUR and HYPERION departed Bermuda on the 4th. At 1130/14th, they attacked a U-boat contact west of Lundy Island in 51-12N, 5-10W which had been reported on the 13th to them and destroyer WESSEX which was also investigating. Both HOTSPUR and HYPERION arrived at Portsmouth on the 14th. HYPERION went into dock there for refitting and repairs until 2 March, prior to joining the Home Fleet, while HOTSPUR sailed for Chatham on the 15th for docking and refitting, completing on 27 February, also before joining the Home Fleet.
 
Anti-submarine trawler LOCH MONTEITH (531grt) in Liverpool Bay in 53-32N, 3-55W attacked a submarine contact.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser ENTERPRISE departed Halifax and arrived at Bermuda on the 17th.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.16 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers OTTAWA and SAGUENAY. The destroyers turned over the convoy to ocean escort battleship MALAYA and detached at 1800/15th. The battleship detached on the 23rd. Destroyers VENETIA and WINDSOR escorted the convoy from the 25th to 28th, when the convoy reached Liverpool.
 
French Anti-U-boat activity – French destroyer FOUGUEUX attacked a submarine contact off Oporto in 41-26N, 10-26W.
 
Mediterranean – Liners DUCHESS OF ATHOLL (20,119grt) and ETTRICK (11,279grt) departed Marseilles escorted by French destroyers SIMOUN and TEMPÊTE to Malta. They then departed Malta on the 16th, escorted by destroyer WATERHEN for Alexandria and Port Said, respectively.
 
Sloop LOWESTOFT departed Port Said for Malta en route for England. After repairs at Malta, she sailed on the 24th for Gibraltar.
_____
 
German mercantile losses – German steamer ALBERT JANUS (1598grt) departed Vigo on the 13th to return to Germany. On the 14th, 75 miles west of Vigo off Cape Finisterre, she was intercepted by French armed merchant cruiser VICTOR SCHOELSCHER and scuttled to prevent capture. («naval-history.com»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/15/2018 1:57:50 PM
January 15. Day 137
Monday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
Belgium refused a request for Britain and France to grant transit rights across the Belgian territory. (Goralski, p 104)


Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Three U-boats (U-22, U-61 from Kiel; U-31 from Wilhelmshaven) left on patrol; one U-boat (U-23) returns to Wilhelmshaven from patrol (of 8 days). 12 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Two ships lost to torpedo: total tonnage lost=8496:
Fagerheim, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1590 tons, en route from Algeria to Middlesbrough with unrecorded cargo. Complement=20; lost=15.
Arendskerk, a Dutch merchantman of 7906 tons, was carrying 4000 tons of general cargo from Rotterdam via Capetown to Durban. Complement=65; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 00.13 hours … the Fagerheim was hit by one torpedo from U-44 about 80 miles southwest of Quessant, broke in two and sank. The survivors were rescued and taken to Vigo, Spain.

At 07.05 hours on … the neutral Arendskerk … was spotted by U-44 about 100 miles southwest of Quessant and tried to escape when the U-boat was sighted. The Germans fired seven shots across her bow to stop the vessel. When the papers were checked it became clear that she carried contraband and the crew was ordered to abandon ship. At 10.10 hours, the U-boat fired one torpedo that struck in the engine room and broke the ship in two. The after part sank, but the forepart remained afloat and had to be sunk 30 minutes later by 18 rounds from the deck gun. The survivors were picked up by the Italian steam merchant Fedora, transferred to the Dutch motor merchant Poelau Bras and landed at Lisbon.(«uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Battleship ROYAL SOVEREIGN departed Devonport after refitting, escorted by destroyers ACHATES, ARROW and ANTHONY for Halifax. On the 16th, the escort was relieved by destroyers WINDSOR, VISCOUNT, VANQUISHER.
 
New vessel – Destroyer HEARTY (Lt Cdr D G F W Macintyre) was completed, and following working up at Portland, joined the 9th Destroyer Flotilla operating with the Home Fleet. On 27 February, she was renamed HESPERUS to avoid phonetic confusion with destroyer leader HARDY.
 
Refitting – Submarine CACHALOT was refitting at Chatham until 21 March, leaving on 29 March for Portsmouth.
 
U.K.-Norwegian outbound convoy – Convoy ON.8 departed Methil with six British, three Norwegian and one Finnish ship escorted by destroyers DUNCAN (Cdr J S Salter, escort SO), IMPULSIVE, IMPERIAL, ISIS and submarine NARWHAL. Destroyer EXMOUTH departed the next day and escorted chartered aircraft transport FOSSBECK (4918grt) and cable vessel LASSO to Scapa Flow. Light cruisers EDINBURGH and GLASGOW left Rosyth on the 17th to cover this convoy. On the 17th, DUNCAN collided with Norwegian steamer HAUKESFJELL (2495grt) of the convoy and was badly damaged. She was towed by IMPULSIVE, screened by EXMOUTH, to Invergordon arriving at Cromarty at 0800/18th. DUNCAN was relieved by destroyer KIMBERLEY, and after towing in the damaged ship, IMPULSIVE returned to the convoy. At Invergordon, EXMOUTH and minesweeper SPHINX went alongside DUNCAN to take off ammunition to lighten ship. The convoy arrived at Bergen on the 19th without enemy interference.
 
East Coast convoy – Destroyers ECHO, ECLIPSE and ENCOUNTER departed Methil escorting a MT convoy to the Tyne. In bad weather, the convoy dispersed and ECHO and ECLIPSE each took half the convoy and escorted them back to Methil on the 16th. The three destroyers departed again on the 17th with this convoy for the Tyne and again was forced to return. The convoy finally left Methil the evening of the 18th.
 
Repair work – Anti-aircraft cruiser COVENTRY departed Sullom Voe for the Humber where she arrived later the same day. She went on to Chatham and arrived on the 16th for docking and repairs. These were completed on 29 April, and she left that day for Sheerness to take on ammunition.
 
UK outbound convoys – Convoy OA.72 departed Southend escorted by destroyers WHITEHALL from the 13th to 15th and ANTELOPE from 14th to 15th, when the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.72 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WANDERER and WALPOLE, and dispersed on the 18th.

East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.72 departed Southend, escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD and BITTERN. Gales forced the convoy to shelter in the Humber, and it arrived in the Tyne on the 18th.
 
Convoy FS.73 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN, and arrived at Southend on the 17th.
 
Destroyers ECHO, ECLIPSE, ENCOUNTER escorted a group of merchant ships from Methil to the Tyne. Convoy FS.74 was cancelled.
 
Ship grounding – Armed merchant cruiser WOLFE ran aground.
 
Sweeps for German coastal traders – Destroyers GRIFFIN and GRAFTON and the Polish BLYSKAWICA swept off the Dutch coast in Operation ST 2 during the night of the 15th/16th, supported by destroyers JERVIS, JUNO, JANUS, JACKAL, JAVELIN and JUPITER. GRAFTON sent Latvian steamer RASMA (3204grt) in for inspection.

Minelaying losses – Merchant ship GRACIA (5642grt) of convoy OB.71 was badly damaged on a mine laid by U.30 on the 9th five miles WSW of Bar Light Vessel. Destroyer VOLUNTEER attacked a submarine contact in Liverpool Bay while investigating the damage, and dropped depth charges in 53-30N, 3-28W.
 
Trawler NEW HAVEN (162grt) was sunk on a mine eighteen miles SSE of Lowestoft.
 
Mediterranean – Convoy CAVALRY departed Malta (to be checked) on the 15th, reached Marseilles on the 18th, left again on the 23rd, arrived at Malta on the 25th, and then proceeded to Haifa. The convoy consisted of liners DILWARA (11,0880grt), ROHNA (8602grt), DEVONSHIRE (11,275grt), TALAMBA (8018grt), LANCASHIRE (9557grt), and RAJULA (8478grt). LANCASHIRE did not go to Haifa, but proceeded independently to Bombay after leaving Malta. Australian destroyer VOYAGER departed Malta with the convoy on the 15th, sister-ship VAMPIRE joined the next day, and they remained with the convoy until its arrival at Marseilles. VAMPIRE and VOYAGER rejoined the convoy on the 23rd when it left Marseilles, and destroyer VENDETTA joined off Malta on the 25th.
 
Ship repairs – Light cruiser AJAX, returning to England from the South Atlantic for repairs, met Force H, battlecruiser RENOWN and aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL, in mid South Atlantic and arrived at Freetown on the 19th.

Early January: degaussing program begins – The degaussing of British ships began in mid-January. By 9 March, 321 warships and 312 merchant ships had been fitted with degaussing cables and 219 more warships and 290 more merchant ships were in hand for degaussing installations. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4533

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/15/2018 2:06:44 PM
Brian,

 Just want to say you're doing a fantastic job with this. The detail is magnificent. Thank you.

Cheers

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/15/2018 3:39:47 PM

Quote:
Brian,

 Just want to say you're doing a fantastic job with this. The detail is magnificent. Thank you.

Cheers

BW
--BWilson


Seconded.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

kaii
Tallinn, Estonia
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2339

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/15/2018 8:27:44 PM
Agree
---------------
I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/16/2018 8:03:55 PM
January 16. Day 138
Tuesday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
Hitler definitely defers his offensive in the west until the spring. (2194 Days, p 42)


France
Quote:
The French decide to raise two more armoured divisions.(2194 Days, p 42)


Europe
Quote:
The Allies begin to prepare for armed intervention in the Scandinavian peninsula. (2194 Days, p 42)


Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

U.S.A.
Quote:
Christopher Isherwood [like W.H. Auden and Aldous Huxley, a pacifist] who was writing a movie for MGM, went to a meeting of the Hollywood Antiwar League. He disliked the dishonesty and self-interest in the arguments that the pacifists were using. One of the speakers, a screenwriter named Dudley Nichols, announced that he was a militant pacifist; he said he was willing to get in a fistfight with anyone who wanted America in the war.
… “How all these people fear the plain moral stand against killing!” he wrote in his diary. It was January 16, 1940. (Human Smoke, p 161)


In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=16; laid down=1 (U-651); launched=0; commissioned=0. Three U-boats (U-9, U-55, U-57) left Kiel on patrol; one U-boat (U-20) returned to Wilhelmshaven from patrol (of 11 days). 14 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

One ship lost to torpedo; one ship lost and one damaged from mines: total tonnage lost=19,759:
Panachrandos, a neutral Greek steam merchantman of 4661 tons, en route from Antwerp to Key West with unrecorded cargo. Complement=31; lost=31.
Inverdargle, a British tanker of 9456 tons, was carrying 844 tons of general cargo fromLiverpool to St. John’s, NFLD. Complement=49; lost=49.
Gracia, a British merchantman of 5642 tons, was carrying 4000 tons of general cargo from Rotterdam via Capetown to Durban. Complement=47; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 06.11 hours … the neutral and unescorted Panachrandos … was hit on the port side amidships by one G7a torpedo from U-44 about 185 miles west of Brest. The ship broke in two with its bow and stern raising steeply out of the water and disappearing within three minutes. …
At 16.19 hours … the unescorted Inverdargle … struck a mine laid on 9 Nov 1939 by U-33, broke in two and sank in the Bristol Channel southwest of Nash Point. The master and 48 crew members were lost.
The stern section lies in 51°16´31N/03°47´15W and the bow lies 1300 metres to northeast. …
[T]he Gracia in convoy OB-72 was badly damaged by a mine laid on 6 January by U-30 about 5 miles west-southwest of the Bar Light Vessel off Liverpool.
The Gracia was beached on the Newcome Knoll, later salvaged and repaired. She returned to service in February 1941 only to be bombed and sunk in convoy OB-287 by a German Fw200 aircraft about 90 miles northwest of Cape Wrath in position 59°39N/07°24W on 19 February. All 48 crew members were rescued. («uboat.net»)


At sea
Quote:
Patrol duties –Heavy cruiser NORFOLK departed Rosyth on patrol duties, and arrived in the Clyde on the 23rd.
 
Light cruiser NEWCASTLE departed Scapa Flow on patrol and arrived back on the 18th.
 
Light cruiser DIOMEDE departed Scapa Flow on patrol.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser DERBYSHIRE arrived at the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser CALIFORNIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.

 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW departed Scapa Flow for the Humber, and on passage arrived at Rosyth on the 16th.
 
Cancelled action – Destroyers IVANHOE and INTREPID were to conduct minelaying operation IE-3 in the North Sea, but it was cancelled due to bad weather.
 
Ship collision – Destroyers KIMBERLEY and KELVIN collided at sea SE of Barra in 56-45N, 7-15W between the Clyde and Scapa Flow. KIMBERLEY was not damaged, but KELVIN was taken to the Clyde for repairs, escorted by destroyer BEDOUIN. Repairs to KELVIN were completed on 2 February. KIMBERLEY arrived at Scapa Flow on the 16th.
 
Failed activity – Destroyer EXMOUTH and cable ship ROYAL SCOT arrived at Rosyth after an unsuccessful attempt in bad weather to repair the Danish cable.
 
Ship activity – Destroyers SIKH and MOHAWK departed the Clyde escorting base ship MASHOBRA to Scapa Flow. They arrived at Scapa Flow on the 18th, and the destroyers went on to Rosyth arriving later that day.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine SUNFISH departed Harwich on patrol.
 
Submarine H.34 departed Rosyth to exercise in the Firth of Forth, and off Inchkeith, rendezvoused with sloop FLAMINGO.
 
Ship movement – Salvage ship TEDWORTH, escorted by escort vessel/minesweeper JASON departed the Clyde for Liverpool.

Ship collision – Italian steamer PREMUDA (4427grt) collided with a Lightship and was run aground on Goodwin Sands to prevent her sinking.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.15 departed Gibraltar with 37 ships, [including 4 escorts for the entire duration.]
 
French naval activity – French light cruiser DUGUAY TROUIN and destroyer RAILLEUSE departed Casablanca with French steamer DE LA SALLE for Lorient, and French steamer BRAZZA departed Casablanca at the same time, escorted by destroyer BASQUE for Bordeaux. The destroyers were relieved on the 17th by large destroyer JAGUAR, which had departed Brest on the 15th, and destroyer BOUCLIER from Lorient.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.17 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser CARNARVON CASTLE and destroyer DAINTY. The armed merchant cruiser was with the convoy until the 31st, but the destroyer was detached in the local approaches. On 2 February, sloop ROCHESTER and destroyers VISCOUNT and WALKER joined the convoy and escorted it until its UK arrival on 4 February.
 
Friendly fire – At 0700, steamer HIGHLAND PRINCESS (14,133grt) coming out of La Cruz, Canary Islands, was attacked by French submarine PASCAL which mistook her for a German blockade runner. No damage was done.
 
South America station – New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES departed the Falkland Islands for patrol in the Rio de Janiero area. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/17/2018 4:36:19 PM
January 17. Day 139
Wednesday. First quarter moon.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
Belgium refused a request for Britain and France to grant transit rights across the Belgian territory. (Goralski, p 104)


Britain
Quote:
Harold Nicolson had dinner at the Carlton Club with some parliamentarians and a man from the Air Ministry. …
The Air Ministry man told the others that the Chamberlain cabinet had forbidden the dropping of bombs on Germany. “The Group agrees that this is a very serious situation,” Nicolson wrote in his diary.
There was a faction in the war cabinet, Nicolson learned, that was in negotiations with former German chancellor Heinrich Brüning. The aim was to make peace with the German high command on the condition that they “eliminate” Hitler. “We discuss the means by which this intrigue can be countered,” Nicolson wrote. (Human Smoke, p 163)
[Editorial note: Harold Nicolson spend most of his life in public service, either in Britain’s diplomatic service or as MP and sometimes cabinet officer. He was a Churchill supporter largely because he too was anti-Nazi.]

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-14, U-51) left Kiel on patrol; one U-boat (U-30) returned to Wilhelmshaven from patrol of 26 days. 15 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Two ships lost to torpedo attack; one ship lost to mine. Total tonnage lost=11,385:
Enid, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1140 tons, en route from Steinkjær via Trondheim to Dublin carrying wood pulp. Complement=16; lost=0.
Polzella, a British merchantman of 4751 tons, was carrying iron ore from Narvik to Middlesbrough. Complement=36 + 1 gunner; lost=37.
Cairnross, a British merchantman of 5494 tons, was carrying general cargo from Tyne via Leith and Liverpool to St.John, NB. Complement=48; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 11.56 hours U-25 spotted two steamers 6-7 miles north of Muckle Flugga, Shetland Isles and fired one torpedo at 12.35 hours that missed the first ship, the Enid… . Ten minutes later, another torpedo was fired at the second ship, the Polzella, which was hit near the bridge and sank in 12 seconds with the loss of all men. The Norwegian ship went to her assistance and the order was given to lower the boats, but the U-boat surfaced and fired a shot across the bow to stop her. When the ship turned away they opened fire and after three shots the crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats. Then the U-boat fired 21 rounds from the deck gun and hit seven times, setting her on fire. At 14.10 hours, a coup de grâce was fired that broke the ship in two. The forepart sank immediately while the burning stern remained afloat and was later scuttled by HMS Firedrake (H 79) … which was sent to the area to hunt for the U-boat together with HMS Fortune (H 70) … and several A/S-trawlers.
Eight survivors in one lifeboat made landfall after 3 hours at Burra Firth on Unst. The master and seven crew members were picked up by the Danish motor merchant Kina and taken to Las Palmas, arrving on 23 January.

At 17.00 hours … the Cairnross … in convoy OB-74 struck a mine, laid on 6 January by U-30 and sank seven miles 276° from the Bar Lightvessel, Liverpool. The master and 47 crew members were picked up by the HMS Mackay (D 70) and landed at Liverpool. («uboat.net»)
[Editor’s comment: Enid was a neutral ship carrying arguably non-strategic material between two neutral countries. At 14:00, ship markings should have been visible at gun range.
Viktor Schutze, skipper of U-25 was 4 days into his second patrol of the war this date. He was a highly successful, highly decorated officer who survived the war. This sinking makes me wonder if he were also unnecessarily “efficient” in fulfilling his duties.]

At sea
Quote:
Submarine activity – Submarine TRIBUNE fired six torpedoes at 0250 at a submarine in 57-50N, 11-00E at the mouth of the Kattegat, and fired two more at 0253, but there was no German submarine in the area.

Submarine SNAPPER departed Blyth on patrol.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser DUNEDIN arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruisers ANDANIA arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol and CALIFORNIA departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer KANDAHAR arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Norwegian coast patrol – Destroyers MAORI, TARTAR, INGLEFIELD and FORESIGHT were sent to patrol off the Norwegian coast to intercept German ore ships.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar convoy formation – Convoy OA.74 departed Southend escorted by destroyers WHITEHALL and WIVERN from the 17th. WIVERN was detached on the 19th and WHITEHALL on the 20th, both to convoy HGF.16.
 
Convoy OB.74 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WANDERER and MACKAY which later transferred to HXF.16…. .
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.73 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY. In a gale, the convoy had to turn back just off the harbour entrance, but finally arrived in the Tyne on the 20th.
 
Convoy FS.75 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop LONDONDERRY, and arrived at Southend on the 19th.

Ships’ collision – Italian steamer ERNANI (6619grt) collided with Lightship BRAKE in the Thames Estuary. BRAKE sank and ERNANI was badly damaged.

German merchant losses – German steamer GRATIA (2068grt) was stranded and lost at Aussenems.
 
German blockade dodging – German steamer SANTOS (5943grt) departed Rio de Janiero for Hamburg where she safely arrived on 16 March.
 
Ships’ collision – French large destroyer JAGUAR collided with British destroyer KEPPEL at 0435, 100 miles SW of Vigo. KEPPEL had been escorting convoy HG.15F until 1900/16th when she turned the convoy over to sloop ENCHANTRESS. She was badly damaged and escorted to Gibraltar by French destroyer LA RAILLEUSE and the British VORTIGERN, screened by French light cruiser DUGUAY TROUIN. KEPPEL arrived at Gibraltar on the 20th, departed on 10 February and was repaired in the dockyard at Malta from 14 February until 5 April. She arrived back at Gibraltar on 19 April. JAGUAR was repaired at Brest.
 
Transfer of station – Repair ship RESOURCE departed Malta for the South Atlantic, escorted by Australian destroyer STUART as far as Gibraltar, reaching there on the 21st. RESOURCE sailed from Gibraltar, while French destroyer LA RAILLEUSE left Casablanca on the 23rd and light cruiser NEPTUNE left Freetown on the 25th, to join her. The British ships arrived at Freetown on the 29th, while RAILLEUSE reached Dakar on the 27th. She left on 1 February and arrived back at Casablanca on the 5th. («naval-history.net»)

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/18/2018 5:36:37 PM
January 18. Day 140
Thursday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Europe
Quote:
AMSTERDAM, January 18
Ed [Murrow] and I here for a few days to discuss our European coverage, or at least that’s our excuse. Actually, intoxicated by the lights at night and the fine food and the change in atmosphere, we have been cutting up like a couple of youngsters suddenly escaped from a stern old aunt or a reform school. … The Dutch still lead the good life. llThey dine and dance and go to church and skate on canals and tend their businesses. And they are blind — oh, so blind — to the dangers that confront them. …The Queen, they say, stubbornly refuses to allow staff talks with he Allies or even with the Belgians. In the meantime, as I could observe when I crossed the border, the Germans pile up their forces and supplies on the Dutch frontier.
Ed a little alarming with his tales of British muddling and the comfortable belief in Britain that the Allies will win the war without losing many men or doing much fighting by merely maintaining the blockade and waiting until Germany cracks. … (Berlin Diary, pp 277-78)


Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No unanticipated activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-756); launched=0; commissioned=1 (U-63). Two U-boats (U-18,-19) left from Kiel on patrol and one boat (U-23) from Wilhelmshaven; one U-boat (U-14) returned to Helgoland from a patrol of 2 days. 17 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Four ships (all neutrals) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost=11,187:
Canadian Reefer, a Danish motor merchantman of 1831 tons, en route from Haifa to Glasgow carrying oranges and grapefruit.
Pajala, a Swedish motor merchantman of 6873 tons, en route from Buenes Aires to Gothenburg carrying 9150 tons of grain and cattle food. Complement=35; lost=0.
Foxen, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1304 tons, was carrying pit coal from Garston to Gothenburg. Complement=19; lost=17.
Flandria, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1179 tons, was carrying general cargo and paper from Gothenburg to Amsterdam. Complement=21; lost=17. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

Quote:
At 10.19 hours … the unescorted and neutral Canadian Reefer was ordered to stop by U-44 about 20 miles west-southwest of Cape Finisterre. The crew was given 30 minutes to abandon ship because she carried cargo for Britain. One G7e torpedo fired at the stopped vessel at 11.20 hours was a dud. Six minutes later one G7a torpedo was fired that struck on starboard side amidships in the fuel bunker and set the ship on fire. The Canadian Reefer slowly settled on an even keel and then sank vertically by the stern with a slight list to port about 15 minutes after being hit. The survivors were picked up by the Spanish trawler Jose Ignacio de C. at 16.00 hours and landed at Coruna, Spain the next day….
At 16.25 hours … the neutral Pajala … was hit forward of the bridge by one torpedo from U-25, after the ship had been spotted with an escort in a scurry of snow about 20 minutes earlier. The explosion shattered the bridge and injured the radio operator. Lookouts had observed the U-boat before the attack and the crew immediately abandoned ship in two lifeboats after the hit. At 16.50 hours, a first coup de grâce missed due to the bad visibility, but the second fired at 17.03 hours hit aft and caused the ship to sink quickly by the stern 10 miles 72° from North Rona, Hebrides. The escort observed was the armed boarding vessel HMS Northern Duke (4.11) …, escorting the ship to Kirkwall for contraband inspection. At 17.26 hours, she forced the U-boat to submerge by gunfire and then attacked with depth charges. They claimed hits on the conning tower and the sinking of the enemy, which in fact escaped undamaged. The survivors were picked up after two hours by the armed trawler and taken to Kirkwall.
…At about 17.45 hours … the Foxen … broke in two after an explosion and sank within 90 seconds about 85 miles from Pentland Sound. On 24 January, one survivor was picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Leka. Another survivor had been rescued earlier by another Norwegian ship and taken to Bergen.
There is no corresponding attack report from a U-boat, but it is likely that Foxen was sunk by U-55 which did not return from her patrol.
…At 20.30 hours … the Patria was spotted on a southerly course by U-9 and was suspicious because no national markings could be seen from the distance of 500 metres. At 22.23 and 22.40 hours, the U-boat fired one torpedo each, but missed with both. 30 minutes later, the Flandria was spotted and sunk with one torpedo at 23.53 hours about 95 miles north of Ymuiden before the Patria was hit underneath the bridge by one torpedo at 01.45 hours on 19 January, which caused the ship to sink rapidly north of Ymuiden.
The survivors from Flandria … were picked up from a raft by the Norwegian steam merchant Balzac after two days. The master and 16 crew members were lost. («uboat.net»)
At sea
Quote:
Northern waters – Battleship WARSPITE and battlecruiser HOOD with destroyers FURY, FAME, FORESTER, FOXHOUND, FEARLESS, FORESIGHT, FIREDRAKE, FORTUNE of the 8th Destroyer Flotilla departed Scapa Flow. FORESTER and FIREDRAKE attacked submarine contacts on the 20th, east of the Faroes in 62-27N, 2-01W, and FORESIGHT attacked a contact NE of the Faroes in 62-54N, 3-10W on the 20th. The force returned to Scapa Flow on the 24th.
 
East Coast convoy Convoy FN.74 departed the southern terminus escorted by destroyer GREYHOUND and sloop AUCKLAND, with GREYHOUND being relieved by sloop STORK, which had been delayed at the start. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 19th. There was no FN.75.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy SA.26 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by sloop ROSEMARY, and arrived at Brest on the 19th.
 
Protection – Destroyers AFRIDI and BEDOUIN departed Rosyth to provide anti-aircraft protection for the merchant ships at Methil.
 
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruisers DEVONSHIRE and BERWICK, after undergoing alterations, departed Rosyth for Northern Patrol.
 …
Armed merchant cruiser WORCESTERSHIRE arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol, while CARINTHIA arrived in the Clyde from Portland for duty with the Patrol.

A/C loss – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK's Walrus of 712 Squadron crashed on landing at Cadder, near Bishopbriggs, Glasgow. Lt (A) E F Pope and Leading Airman J Baxter were killed.
 …
Polish naval activity – Polish submarine ORZEL departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
U.K.-Norway convoy escort duty – Destroyer IMOGEN arrived at Rosyth from convoy ON.8.
 
Destroyers INGLEFIELD and FORESIGHT arrived at Sullom Voe to refuel prior to joining convoy HN.8.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer KIPLING arrived at the Clyde from Portland.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers MAORI and TARTAR were sent to hunt for a submarine reported in 63-30N, 7-30E.
 
Destroyer VERITY, escorting a convoy, attacked a submarine contact south of Scilly Island in 49-02N, 6-14W.
 
Sloops FOXGLOVE and ROSEMARY were escorting a convoy bound for Brest when a tanker going in the opposite direction advised them of a submarine contact. FOXGLOVE attacked a contact north of Alderney in 50-06N, 2-14W.
 
Destroyers BROKE, WALKER, DIANA were sent to investigate a report of a U-boat on the surface west of Lizard Head in 49-58N, 5-30W. DIANA dropped depth charges on a submarine contact.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OB.73GF had departed Liverpool on the 15th, and OA.73GF from Southend on the 16th escorted by destroyer BROKE from the 16th to 18th. On the 18th, the two convoys merged as OG.15F, totalling 26 ships. Escort was provided by sloop ABERDEEN and destroyer DOUGLAS from the 18th to the 23rd, when the convoy arrived at Gibraltar.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.23S of steamers BALTRADER, BARON KINNAIRD, BRITISH COAST, DUNKWA (Commodore) and FABIAN departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer MONTROSE, which attacked a submarine contact west of Hartland Point in 50-55-45N, 5-18-30W. The convoy arrived safely in the Loire on the 20th.
 
French anti-U-boat activity – French torpedo boat BRESTOIS attacked a submarine contact off Boulogne in 50-35N, 2-32W.

German merchant loss – German steamer AUGUST THYSSEN (2342grt) was sunk on a mine off Aland Island in the Baltic, part of a Swedish field, according to Seekrieg.
 
Escort duty – Heavy cruisers DORSETSHIRE and SHROPSHIRE arrived at Port Stanley from Rio de Janiero to escort heavy cruiser EXETER to England.
(«naval.history.net)
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"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/18/2018 6:18:21 PM

Quote:


U.S.A.
Quote:
Christopher Isherwood [like W.H. Auden and Aldous Huxley, a pacifist] who was writing a movie for MGM, went to a meeting of the Hollywood Antiwar League. He disliked the dishonesty and self-interest in the arguments that the pacifists were using. One of the speakers, a screenwriter named Dudley Nichols, announced that he was a militant pacifist; he said he was willing to get in a fistfight with anyone who wanted America in the war.
… “How all these people fear the plain moral stand against killing!” he wrote in his diary. It was January 16, 1940. (Human Smoke, p 161)



--brian grafton


Interesting to note that Isherwood and Auden, along with Stephen Spender had lived in Germany pre-war and observed the rise of the Nazis. Huxley in Italy and observed the rise of fascism.

Trevor
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`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

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