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 (1939-1945) WWII Battles
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brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/19/2018 4:47:21 PM
January 19. Day 141
Friday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Europe
No notable activity

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
RAF leaflet drops suspended after 19/20 January.
Quote:
Because of severe winter weather at the English airfields, with heavy snowfalls, there were no night operations between 20 January and the night of 17/18 February and no day operations from 2 February to 17 February.
(BC War Diaries, p 28)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats left port or returned from patrol. 17 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Three ships (two neutrals) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost=4178:
Telnes, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1694 tons, en route from New York via Rotterdam to Antwerp laden with general cargo. Complement=18. Lost=18.
Quiberon, a French steam merchantman of 1296 tons, en route from Rouen via The Downs to Boston, Lincolnshire. There is no record of her cargo, if any. Complement not recorded; lost=all aboard.
Patria, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1188 tons, was carrying coal, paper and asphalt from Rotterdam to Gothenburg. Complement=23; lost=19. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

Quote:
On 19 January 1940 the neutral Telnes … was presumably torpedoed and sunk by U-55 northwest of the Orkneys. More details about the incident are not available because the ship was lost with all hands and the U-boat was also sunk a few days later.
… At 21.09 hours … the unescorted Quiberon … was hit on port side aft by one G7a torpedo from U-59 about 13 miles east of Great Yarmouth. The stern broke off and sank immediately, followed by the forward part that sank vertically within four minutes after being hit.
… At 20.30 hours on 18 Jan 1940 the Patria … was spotted on a southerly course by U-9 and was suspicious because no national markings could be seen from the distance of 500 metres. At 22.23 and 22.40 hours, the U-boat fired one torpedo each, but missed with both.
30 minutes later, the Flandria was spotted and sunk with one torpedo at 23.53 hours about 95 miles north of Ymuiden before the Patria was hit underneath the bridge by one torpedo at 01.45 hours on 19 January, which caused the ship to sink rapidly north of Ymuiden.
The survivors from Patria were picked up by the Swedish steam merchant Frigg.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – The Northern Patrol sighted 56 eastbound ships from the 19th to 31st, and 30 were sent into Kirkwall for inspection. Warships arriving back from Patrol were armed merchant cruisers CALIFORNIA and CHITRAL in the Clyde and light cruiser SHEFFIELD at Scapa Flow after being relieved by light cruiser MANCHESTER. Light cruiser DUNEDIN departed Scapa Flow on Patrol, but was recalled on the 25th and arrived back on the 26th. Also arriving at Scapa were heavy cruisers BERWICK and DEVONSHIRE from Rosyth and light cruiser DELHI.
 
European coastal waters – During the night of the 18th/19th, operation ST.3 was carried out off the Dutch coast with destroyers GRENVILLE, GRENADE, GRIFFIN and escort vessel WHITLEY. Two Dutch, one Norwegian and one Swedish ship were sent in for inspection. Returning to Harwich, GRENVILLE … was sunk by mine at 1250 off Kentish Knock in 51‑39N, 2‑17E. Seventy six ratings were lost, and the survivors picked up by accompanying GRENADE and GRIFFIN.
 
Operation ST.4 was carried out by destroyers GREYHOUND, GLOWWORM, GRAFTON and the Polish BLYSKAWICA during the night of the 19th/20th. One Norwegian and one Swedish ship were sent in for inspection. In the four ST operations, destroyers GRENVILLE (ST.1 and ST.3), GREYHOUND (ST.1 and ST.4), GLOWWORM (ST.1 and ST.4), GRAFTON (ST.2 and ST.4), GRIFFIN (ST.2 and ST.3), GRENADE (ST.3) and BLYSKAWICA (ST.2 and ST.4) had taken part in the sweeps. [Nine] anti-submarine trawlers were also involved.
 
Escort duties – Anti-aircraft cruisers CALCUTTA and CAIRO departed Sheerness on escort duties, and arrived in the Humber on the 20th.
 
Home waters escort duty – Destroyer EXMOUTH departed Invergordon escorting tanker HORN SHELL (8272grt) as far as Cape Wrath, and then returned to Aberdeen on the 20th to escort steamer CYPRIAN PRINCE (1988grt) to Scapa Flow.

East Coast convoy – Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA departed Rosyth escorted by anti-aircraft cruiser CURLEW, destroyer ESCAPADE and escort ship WHITLEY with an MT convoy for the Humber.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer BEDOUIN departed Rosyth.
 
Escort duty – Destroyer ASHANTI departed Loch Ewe with salvage ships ANCHORITE and DISPERSER for Scapa Flow.
 
Return to duty – Destroyer COSSACK arrived at Rosyth from Leith after repairs.
 
Submarine Patrol – Submarine THISTLE departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer VETERAN attacked a submarine contact off Owers Light in 50‑28N, 00‑45W.
 
French anti-submarine trawlers LA ORIENTAISE (590grt) and LA NANTAISE (590grt), sweeping to the northeast of Barfleur Light, attacked a submarine contact off Pointe de Barfleur in 49‑45N, 0‑03W. On 20 January, LA ORIENTAISE and sloop YSER were sweeping in the area.
 
U.K.-Norwegian inbound convoy – Convoy HN.8 of two British, 28 Norwegian, three Swedish and five Finnish ships departed Bergen and was joined at sea by destroyers ICARUS, IMOGEN, ISIS, INGLEFIELD, KASHMIR, KHARTOUM and KIMBERLEY. Light cruisers GLASGOW and EDINBURGH departed Rosyth on the 17th in support. On the 18th, EDINBURGH dropped depth charges on a submarine contact ESE of Sumburgh Head in 60-21N, 1-09E. On the 19th, KHARTOUM and KASHMIR were detached to hunt for a submarine in Moray Firth and attacked a contact. On the 20th, the two destroyers again attacked a contact in Moray Firth in 58-03.5N, 02-07.5W. Nine steamers were detached to ports on the west coast, and arrived at Methil early on the 22nd escorted by KASHMIR, ICARUS, ISIS and IMPULSIVE; the last two destroyers reinforcing the convoy on the 19th after the submarine contact.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.76 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops BITTERN and FLEETWOOD, and arrived at Southend on the 20th.

Collision losses – Steamer MILE END (859grt) was sunk in a collision with trawler FARADAY (322grt) in 51‑45N, 02‑40E in the North Sea. Sloop STORK picked up the survivors.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/20/2018 7:07:15 PM
January 20. Day 142
Saturday.

Finland
Quote:
Churchill … condemned Russia’s invasion of Finland, increasing fears in Moscow that Britain and France might intervene. Izvestia denounced Churchill as “the greatest enemy of the Soviet Union.”
(Goralski, p 104)

Germany
Quote:
Hitler informed his military leaders the invasion of France and the Low Countries would have to be postponed at least until March.
(Goralski, p 105)

U.S.A.
Quote:
The U.S. protested delays imposed on American ships by British authorities at Gibraltar.
(Goralski, p 105)
Quote:
There was a jeering bit of verse going around London, about how Auden and Isherwood had abandoned London during wartime:
The literary erstwhile Left-wellwisher would
Seek vainly now for Auden or for Isherwood.

Isherwood was hurt by it. “Am I afraid of being bombed? Of course. Everybody is,” he wrote in his diary. But that wasn’t why he had gone to the United States. “If I fear anything, he said, “I fear the atmosphere of the war, the power which it gives to all the things I hate — the newspapers, the politicians, the puritans, the scoutmasters, the middle-aged merciless spinsters.” Isherwood shrank, he said, from the duty of opposition: “I am afraid I should be reduced to a chattering, enraged monkey, screaming back hate at their hate.” That’s why he left. It was January 20, 1940.
(Human Smoke, p 163)

Britain
Quote:
Britain’s first lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, warned the uncommitted nations of Europe their best change of survivals to join the Allies. Churchill said of the neutrals: “Each one hopes that if he feeds the crocodile enough, the crocodile will eat him last. All of them hope that the storm will pass before their turn comes to be devoured.”
(Goralski, p 104)
Quote:
In a broadcast from London Churchill speaks of the Allied superiority at sea over the Kriegsmarine.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air

Because of harsh weather, no BC night flights from 19/20 January. [Editorial note: at this point, most if not all Bomber Command airfields were grass or turf rather than paved.]

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=3 (U-86, -201, -434); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-14) left Helgoland and one (U-58) left Kiel; one boat (U-15) returned to Wilhelmshaven from patrol of 12 days. 18 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Two ships (both neutrals) lost to torpedo attack; one ship lost to mining. Total tonnage lost=14,464:
Ekatontarchos Dracoulis, a Greek steam merchantman of 5329 tons, en route from Rosario to Tyne laden laden with 7511 tons of wheat and general cargo. Complement unrecorded. Lost=6.
Miranda, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1328 tons, laden with coal en route from Blyth to Oslo. Complement=17; lost=14.
Caroni River, a British motor tanker of 7807 tons, sunk by mine. She was in ballast while running defensive trials. Complement=55; lost=0. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

Quote:
At 04.15 hours … the unescorted Ekatontarchos Dracoulis was hit by a stern torpedo from U-44 west of Portugal. The U-boat had chased the ship since 20.05 hours the day before and at 00.21 hours fired a G7e torpedo that detonated prematurely. The commander observed how the crew abandoned ship and decided not to fire another torpedo due to the lifeboats still being so close to the vessel. The U-boat then left the area because the ship was apparently in a sinking condition.
…At 20.26 hours … the Miranda … was hit by one G7e torpedo from U-57 about 30 miles northwest of Peterhead. The U-boat had spotted a group of five steamers and an escort and tried to attack the leading ship, but the distance was too short so they fired a torpedo with a magnetic fuze at the second ship. The explosion broke the keel of Miranda and caused her to sink within five minutes. Three survivors were picked up the next day by the British armed boarding vessel HMS Discovery II and taken to Kirkwall.
…[T]he Caroni River … struck a mine laid the day before by U-34 and sank in the Falmouth Bay, while carrying out paravane trials and defensive armament tests. The master, 42 crew members, Cdr J.G. Bradshaw RN and eleven naval personnel were picked up by the Falmouth lifeboat and a naval cutter and landed at Falmouth.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Squadron dissolution – Light cruiser DELHI departed Scapa Flow for Portsmouth where she arrived on the 22nd. When she left Scapa, the 7th Cruiser Squadron ceased to exist.
 
Commercial shipping control – Light cruiser MANCHESTER stopped Norwegian steamer LISA and sent her to Kirkwall for inspection.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer ASHANTI arrived at Rosyth from Loch Ewe, via Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyers FAME and FURY arrived at Sullom Voe to refuel.
 
Destroyer KIMBERLEY sailed for the Clyde after unsuccessfully searching for the submarine that sank Swedish steamer PAJALA.
 
North Sea – Destroyers SIKH, MOHAWK, IMPERIAL and IMOGEN departed Rosyth for a sweep in the North Sea. On the 21st, IMPERIAL was in a minor collision, but was able to continue, and then on the 22nd attacked a submarine contact off Buchan Ness in 57.31N, 01‑16W. She was ordered to remain at the location until relieved by destroyers ENCOUNTER and ESCAPADE from Rosyth. Repairs to IMPERIAL were completed on the 26th.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine TRIBUNE arrived at Rosyth from patrol with engine trouble, and was docked from 21 January to 22 March. Submarines TRIDENT, SEAL, TRITON departed Rosyth for patrol on this date, but TRIDENT and SEAL arrived back next day.
 
Ships’ collision – Armed merchant cruiser SALOPIAN, en route from Devonport to the Clyde, was in a collision with Finnish steamer SAIMAA (2001grt) in the Firth of Clyde, and was grounded in the Clyde on the 21st.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Anti-submarine trawlers KINGSTON CYANITE (433grt), KINGSTON CORAL (433grt) and KINGSTON CRYSTAL (433grt) were en route from Belfast to Portland. Off Lizard Head in 49-57N, 4-50W and 49-58N, 4-58W, they attacked a submarine contact.
 
U.K. outbound convoys – Convoy OA.76 departed Southend escorted by destroyers VERITY and VETERAN until the 23rd when the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.76 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyer WARWICK and sloop DEPTFORD until the 23rd.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.76 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop LONDONDERRY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 22nd.
 
Convoy FS.77 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops FLAMINGO, WESTON and minelayer PLOVER, and arrived at Southend on the 21st.
 
Ships’ collision – Liner LLANDAFF CASTLE (10,786grt) departed London and was involved in a collision with an unknown vessel off Beachy Head. She returned to port but was able to continue her voyage to North Africa after a week's repair.
 …
Commercial ship loss – Estonian steamer NAUTIC (2050grt) was lost NW of Bergen in 63‑43N, 00‑43E to unknown cause.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.17 departed Halifax escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and RESTIGOUCHE, which detached on the 21st. Ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA, which stayed until the 29th. The convoy was escorted by destroyer VERITY from convoy OA.79 and VOLUNTEER from OB.79 from 29 January to 1 February, when it arrived at Dover.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers HEREWARD and HUNTER departed Bermuda for Halifax.

French naval activity – French heavy cruiser TOURVILLE and destroyers AIGLE and VAUBAN departed Toulon on the 20th to take a shipment of gold to Beirut, where they arrived on the 25th. The gold was sent on to Ankara to support Turkish military preparations. The French ships arrived back at Toulon on the 30th, sailed again and reached Malta on 3 February. after a patrol.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.17 departed Freetown escorted by destroyers HASTY and HERO in the local approaches, and armed merchant cruiser JERVIS BAY until the 31st. On 2 February, destroyer WREN joined and escorted the convoy until its UK arrival on the 4th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/20/2018 7:10:14 PM
January 20. Day 142
Saturday.

Finland
Quote:
Churchill … condemned Russia’s invasion of Finland, increasing fears in Moscow that Britain and France might intervene. Izvestia denounced Churchill as “the greatest enemy of the Soviet Union.”
(Goralski, p 104)

Germany
Quote:
Hitler informed his military leaders the invasion of France and the Low Countries would have to be postponed at least until March.
(Goralski, p 105)

U.S.A.
Quote:
The U.S. protested delays imposed on American ships by British authorities at Gibraltar.
(Goralski, p 105)
Quote:
There was a jeering bit of verse going around London, about how Auden and Isherwood had abandoned London during wartime:
The literary erstwhile Left-wellwisher would
Seek vainly now for Auden or for Isherwood.

Isherwood was hurt by it. “Am I afraid of being bombed? Of course. Everybody is,” he wrote in his diary. But that wasn’t why he had gone to the United States. “If I fear anything, he said, “I fear the atmosphere of the war, the power which it gives to all the things I hate — the newspapers, the politicians, the puritans, the scoutmasters, the middle-aged merciless spinsters.” Isherwood shrank, he said, from the duty of opposition: “I am afraid I should be reduced to a chattering, enraged monkey, screaming back hate at their hate.” That’s why he left. It was January 20, 1940.
(Human Smoke, p 163)

Britain
Quote:
Britain’s first lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, warned the uncommitted nations of Europe their best change of survivals to join the Allies. Churchill said of the neutrals: “Each one hopes that if he feeds the crocodile enough, the crocodile will eat him last. All of them hope that the storm will pass before their turn comes to be devoured.”
(Goralski, p 104)
Quote:
In a broadcast from London Churchill speaks of the Allied superiority at sea over the Kriegsmarine.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air

Because of harsh weather, no BC night flights from 19/20 January. [Editorial note: at this point, most if not all Bomber Command airfields were grass or turf rather than paved.]

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=3 (U-86, -201, -434); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-14) left Helgoland and one (U-58) left Kiel; one boat (U-15) returned to Wilhelmshaven from patrol of 12 days. 18 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Two ships (both neutrals) lost to torpedo attack; one ship lost to mining. Total tonnage lost=14,464:
Ekatontarchos Dracoulis, a Greek steam merchantman of 5329 tons, en route from Rosario to Tyne laden laden with 7511 tons of wheat and general cargo. Complement unrecorded. Lost=6.
Miranda, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1328 tons, laden with coal en route from Blyth to Oslo. Complement=17; lost=14.
Caroni River, a British motor tanker of 7807 tons, sunk by mine. She was in ballast while running defensive trials. Complement=55; lost=0. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

Quote:
At 04.15 hours … the unescorted Ekatontarchos Dracoulis was hit by a stern torpedo from U-44 west of Portugal. The U-boat had chased the ship since 20.05 hours the day before and at 00.21 hours fired a G7e torpedo that detonated prematurely. The commander observed how the crew abandoned ship and decided not to fire another torpedo due to the lifeboats still being so close to the vessel. The U-boat then left the area because the ship was apparently in a sinking condition.
…At 20.26 hours … the Miranda … was hit by one G7e torpedo from U-57 about 30 miles northwest of Peterhead. The U-boat had spotted a group of five steamers and an escort and tried to attack the leading ship, but the distance was too short so they fired a torpedo with a magnetic fuze at the second ship. The explosion broke the keel of Miranda and caused her to sink within five minutes. Three survivors were picked up the next day by the British armed boarding vessel HMS Discovery II and taken to Kirkwall.
…[T]he Caroni River … struck a mine laid the day before by U-34 and sank in the Falmouth Bay, while carrying out paravane trials and defensive armament tests. The master, 42 crew members, Cdr J.G. Bradshaw RN and eleven naval personnel were picked up by the Falmouth lifeboat and a naval cutter and landed at Falmouth.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Squadron dissolution – Light cruiser DELHI departed Scapa Flow for Portsmouth where she arrived on the 22nd. When she left Scapa, the 7th Cruiser Squadron ceased to exist.
 
Commercial shipping control – Light cruiser MANCHESTER stopped Norwegian steamer LISA and sent her to Kirkwall for inspection.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer ASHANTI arrived at Rosyth from Loch Ewe, via Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyers FAME and FURY arrived at Sullom Voe to refuel.
 
Destroyer KIMBERLEY sailed for the Clyde after unsuccessfully searching for the submarine that sank Swedish steamer PAJALA.
 
North Sea – Destroyers SIKH, MOHAWK, IMPERIAL and IMOGEN departed Rosyth for a sweep in the North Sea. On the 21st, IMPERIAL was in a minor collision, but was able to continue, and then on the 22nd attacked a submarine contact off Buchan Ness in 57.31N, 01‑16W. She was ordered to remain at the location until relieved by destroyers ENCOUNTER and ESCAPADE from Rosyth. Repairs to IMPERIAL were completed on the 26th.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine TRIBUNE arrived at Rosyth from patrol with engine trouble, and was docked from 21 January to 22 March. Submarines TRIDENT, SEAL, TRITON departed Rosyth for patrol on this date, but TRIDENT and SEAL arrived back next day.
 
Ships’ collision – Armed merchant cruiser SALOPIAN, en route from Devonport to the Clyde, was in a collision with Finnish steamer SAIMAA (2001grt) in the Firth of Clyde, and was grounded in the Clyde on the 21st.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Anti-submarine trawlers KINGSTON CYANITE (433grt), KINGSTON CORAL (433grt) and KINGSTON CRYSTAL (433grt) were en route from Belfast to Portland. Off Lizard Head in 49-57N, 4-50W and 49-58N, 4-58W, they attacked a submarine contact.
 
U.K. outbound convoys – Convoy OA.76 departed Southend escorted by destroyers VERITY and VETERAN until the 23rd when the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.76 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyer WARWICK and sloop DEPTFORD until the 23rd.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.76 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VALOROUS and sloop LONDONDERRY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 22nd.
 
Convoy FS.77 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops FLAMINGO, WESTON and minelayer PLOVER, and arrived at Southend on the 21st.
 
Ships’ collision – Liner LLANDAFF CASTLE (10,786grt) departed London and was involved in a collision with an unknown vessel off Beachy Head. She returned to port but was able to continue her voyage to North Africa after a week's repair.
 …
Commercial ship loss – Estonian steamer NAUTIC (2050grt) was lost NW of Bergen in 63‑43N, 00‑43E to unknown cause.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.17 departed Halifax escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and RESTIGOUCHE, which detached on the 21st. Ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA, which stayed until the 29th. The convoy was escorted by destroyer VERITY from convoy OA.79 and VOLUNTEER from OB.79 from 29 January to 1 February, when it arrived at Dover.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers HEREWARD and HUNTER departed Bermuda for Halifax.

French naval activity – French heavy cruiser TOURVILLE and destroyers AIGLE and VAUBAN departed Toulon on the 20th to take a shipment of gold to Beirut, where they arrived on the 25th. The gold was sent on to Ankara to support Turkish military preparations. The French ships arrived back at Toulon on the 30th, sailed again and reached Malta on 3 February. after a patrol.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.17 departed Freetown escorted by destroyers HASTY and HERO in the local approaches, and armed merchant cruiser JERVIS BAY until the 31st. On 2 February, destroyer WREN joined and escorted the convoy until its UK arrival on the 4th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/22/2018 6:48:21 PM
January 22. Day 144
Monday

General comment: Europe was facing a harsh winter which was affecting both the war effort and morale in all countries. Heavy snows, cold temperatures and blockade are hurting everybody. Coal for heating cannot be delivered; visibility at sea is more haphazard; BC aircraft are being grounded; ship sinking are leading to higher crew deaths.

Poland
Quote:
Pope Pius XII condemned German rule in Poland.
(Goralski, p 105)

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Frontz
No notable activity.

U.S.A.
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats left harbour; three boats (U-9; U-32; U-59) returned to Wilhelmshaven after 7, 14, and 9 days on patrol respectively. 14 U-boats at sea.

Four ships (all neutrals) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost=8050:
Songa, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 2589 tons, carrying general cargo from Philadelphia via New York and Rotterdam to Antwerp. Complement=24; lost=9.
Gothia, a Swedish motor merchantman of 1640 tons, carrying paper pulp and sulphate form Uddevalla (Sweden) to Genoa. Complement=23; lost=12.
Segovia, a Norwegian motor merchantman of 1387 tons, carrying general cargo from Lisbon via Oporto and Bergen to Oslo. Complement=22 + 1 passenger; lost=23.
Sydfort, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 2434 tons, in ballast from Kristiansand to Newcastle. Complement=24; lost=5.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 11.38 hours … the unescorted and neutral Songa … was stopped by U-25 with four rounds across her bow in good weather about 220 miles west of Scilly Isles. Schütze ordered the crew to abandon ship in the two lifeboats after it became clear that she was carrying contraband on her first voyage for the new Norwegian owner… . At 13.26 hours, the U-boat fired one G7a torpedo from a stern torpedo tube as coup de grâce, which struck on port side amidships and caused the ship to sink within three minutes after breaking in two. The Germans provided each lifeboat with a bottle of rum and told them to steer an easterly course where they could expect to be picked up when reaching the shipping lanes. The lifeboat of the master and ten men was equipped with a motor and took the second boat in charge of the chief officer with 13 occupants in tow. However, they were forced to heave to by a strong gale after 24 hours and lost contact to each other. 13 survivors were picked up by the British trawler Lodden on 26 January and landed at Kinsale the next day. The boat in charge of the master had sighted the Fastnet Lighthouse in the evening of 26 January, but had a further night to hove to before making landfall near Rock Island Lighthouse at the entrance to the inlet of Crookhaven, from where they were taken to Goleen, Co. Cork. All survivors from Songa were reunited in Cork on 28 January.
… At 09.33 hours … the unescorted and neutral Gothia was hit in the bow by a torpedo from U-51, developed a list to port and sank after one hour about 45 miles west by north of St. Kilda, Scotland. Three crew members were lost. The Germans did not see the nationality markings and only identified the vessel after she was already hit. The survivors abandoned ship in two lifeboats and one of them reached the Hebrides, but the other with nine occupants was never seen again.
…[T]he neutral Segovia … passed Lands End and was reported missing thereafter, presumed lost the next day off the west coast of Scotland. The master, 21 crew members and one passenger were lost. It is believed that she was sunk by U-55 which did not return from her patrol.
Wreckage and debris spotted in two different places northwest of the Hebrides on 27 and 28 January 1940 probably were from Andalusia [June 21] and Segovia.
… At 21.27 hours … the unescorted and neutral Sydfold … was hit by one torpedo from U-61, caught fire and sank slowly. The survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Rona.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Destroyers MAORI and TARTAR arrived at Rosyth.
 
Destroyers ICARUS and IMPULSIVE arrived at Loch Ewe for refuelling.
 
Destroyers JACKAL, JAGUAR and JAVELIN departed the Humber for submarine hunting duties, arrived at Rosyth on the 23rd, but were ordered not to be used for convoy work.
 
Escort duties – Destroyer ECLIPSE escorted cable ship ROYAL SCOT from Leith.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyers SIKH and MOHAWK departed Rosyth to hunt for a submarine reported in the North Sea.

Destroyer MONTROSE departed Quiberon Bay with convoy BC.22 at 0700/21st, and on the 22nd, was ordered to check a U-boat contact off Caldy Island in 51‑33N, 04‑42W. She was joined by destroyer VANQUISHER, which attacked a submarine contact. MONTROSE then searched Carmarthen Bay and the approaches to Bristol Channel before relieving VANQUISHER at dawn on the 23rd at the location of her attacks. MONTROSE proceeded to 51-12N, 5-45W to search for a submarine reported by anti-submarine trawler BEDFORDSHIRE (443grt), and joined by VANQUISHER, searched the entrance of the Bristol Channel near the Breaksea Light Vessel. MONTROSE returned to Milford Haven to refuel on the 24th, departing that afternoon to rejoin VANQUISHER searching in Barnstaple Bay, where the latter made an attack in 51-04.5N, 4-25.25W. They then patrolled between Bull Point and Helwick Sands the night of the 24th/25th, before MONTROSE proceeded to Milford Haven on the morning of the 25th.
 
Repair work – On patrol in the North Sea, submarine TRITON suffered damage to one of her valves and put into Lister for repairs which were soon accomplished.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.78 departed Southend, escorted by sloops FLAMINGO and WESTON, and arrived in the Tyne on the 23rd.
 
French naval activity – French sloop AMIENS attacked a submarine contact off Calais in 51-03.5N, 2-02W.
 
U-boat minelaying – U.57 laid a minefield in Cromarty Firth during the night of the 21st/22nd, on which one merchant ship was lost.

Merchant losses – Steamer KIRKPOOL (4842grt) ran aground and was a total loss on the south coast of England.
 
German supply ship movement – In the South Atlantic, German supply ship ALTMARK (10,850grt) began her return to Germany and passed through the Faroes-Iceland Channel undetected on 11 February.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy Convoy HX.17 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and RESTIGOUCHE, and was joined by light cruiser EMERALD, also from Halifax, as ocean escort the same day. The destroyers turned over the convoy to her at noon on the 23rd. EMERALD then detached on 3 February and proceeded to England to refit - escort duty in the North Atlantic had damaged the main engines and strained and buckled her decks. She arrived at Portsmouth on 4 February and was refitting at Southampton from 15 February to 30 April. Destroyers VANESSA, VANSITTART, KEITH and WARWICK joined HX.17 on 7 February as escort until its arrival at Liverpool later that day.
 
Italian building troubles – A minor fire started by a welding torch broke out on Italian battleship LITTORIO, under construction at the Ansaldo Yards at Genoa.
 
Mediterranean – Light cruiser GALATEA departed Malta on patrol, and arrived back on the 30th.
 
Southeast Asian waters – Light cruiser DAUNTLESS departed Singapore on patrol duties, and arrived at Penang on the 27th.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Destroyers HARDY and HOSTILE departed Freetown on the 13th with convoy SLF.16, and then Gibraltar on the 22nd. HARDY reached Plymouth on the 25th for docking and repair, but was able to proceed in a few days and arrived at Greenock on 14 February for duty with the Home Fleet. HOSTILE reached Dover on the 25th, before going on to Sheerness and then Chatham were she docked for repairs and refit lasting until 26 February when she also left to join the Home Fleet.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers HERO and HASTY departed Freetown on the 22nd and arrived at Gibraltar on the 29th.
 
Indian Ocean – Submarine OLYMPUS arrived at Colombo after patrolling the Seychelles area and in the Mozambique Channel.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/23/2018 4:22:26 PM
January 23. Day 145
Tuesday)

Allied statement
Quote:
Britain and France said their ships would not honour the Pan-American neutrality son and would attack any German vessel operating in hemispheric waters.
(Goralski, p 105)

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

South Africa
Quote:
An opposition peace resolution was rejected in the South African legislature by a vote of 81-59.
(Goralski, p 105)

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats left harbour (U-20 from Helgoland; U-41 from Wilhelmshaven). 15 U-boats at sea. [I believe, though the count of boats at sea has increased only one from yesterday, that this is now the correct count.]

Two or three ships (one or two neutrals) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost=4454-5454:
Bisp, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1000 tons, carrying coal from Sunderland to Åndaisnes. Complement=14; lost14.
Baltanglia, a British steam merchantman of 1523 tons, carrying 1930 tons of general cargo from Hommelvik via Methil and Tyne to Rochester. Complement=27; lost=0.
Pluto, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1598 tons, in ballast from Bergen via Methil to Middlesbrough. Complement=22; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 07.01 hours … U-18 fired a G7e torpedo at a small steamer and observed a hit on the starboard side near the bridge and the sinking of the vessel within 40 seconds about 100 miles southeast of Shetland Islands. The U-boat had spotted the ship at 00.50 hours and missed her with a first torpedo at 06.49 hours. Its victim was very likely the unescorted and neutral Bisp … which was reported missing en route from the UK to Norway.
…In the morning … U-19 spotted about 20 single and unescorted steamers east of Longstone Island, apparently ships that had arrived at Methil the day before in convoy HN-8 and were now heading south along the coast. At 08.43 hours, Pluto was hit just aft of amidships by one G7e torpedo and sank by the stern within 6 minutes. Baltanglia (Master George Edward Thomas) steamed behind her and manoeuvered to rescue the crew, thinking the other ship had been mined. But a Finnish steamer already picked up the survivors and later landed them at Seahouses, Northumberland. At 08.55 hours, Baltanglia was hit amidships by one G7e torpedo and sank by the bow after 14 minutes southeast of the Farne Islands. The crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats, which were towed in by local fishing vessels from Seahouses.

At 22.13 hours … the Onto struck a mine laid on 8 January by U-56 and sank by the bow 2.7 miles 251° from Smith´s Knoll Light Vessel off Cross Sands. The crew quickly abandoned ship in two lifeboats: 14 occupants in one of them were rescued by a Greek steam merchant, while the master and five others were picked up from the other boat by HMS Auckland (L 61) (Cdr J.G. Hewitt, RN), which was escorting the nearby convoy FN-79.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser NEWCASTLE departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol, but arrived back on the 29th with defects.
 
Ship movement – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived in the Clyde.
 
Minelaying – Destroyers JUNO and JERVIS departed the Humber with minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA for operation LB, and returned on the 24th after the minelay.
 
Ship movement; illness – Destroyers ZULU and COSSACK departed Rosyth, with ZULU proceeding to Leith for repairs and refit, and COSSACK to carry out exercises on the 24th. However, she had to return because of an influenza outbreak among the crew.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyers JACKAL, JAGUAR, JAVELIN and ASHANTI departed Rosyth to hunt for a submarine reported off Kinnaird Head.
 
Destroyers ECHO and ECLIPSE attacked a submarine contact ENE of May Island in 56-14N, 2-23W. Later in the day, ECHO attacked a contact ENE of Montrose in 56-46N, 2-12W.
 
Anti-submarine trawler BEDFORDSHIRE (443grt), escorting cable ship MARIE LOUISE MACKAY as she was repairing cables west of Lundy Island, dropped depth charges on a submarine contact in 51-11-29N, 5-46-33W. Destroyers ICARUS and IMPULSIVE joined her, but the attack was unsuccessful.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.79 departed Southend, escorted by sloops AUCKLAND and STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 24th.
 
U.18 sank Norwegian steamer VARILD (1085grt) with all hands NE of Kinnaird Head.
[Editorial note: The loss of Varild is listed on «uboat.net» as occurring in the early evening (17:08) of 24 January.]
Quote:
At Sea (continued)
German mine losses – German trawler MULHAUSEN (327grt) was lost by mining off Pillau.
 
Ship movement – Battleship VALIANT, light cruiser ENTERPRISE, and destroyers HUNTER and HEREWARD departed Bermuda and arrived at Halifax on the 26th.
 
Mediterranean – The CAVALRY convoy departed Marseilles escorted by Australian destroyers VOYAGER and VAMPIRE. Off Malta, they were relieved by Australian sister ship VENDETTA which escorted the convoy to Haifa.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/24/2018 4:46:03 PM
January 24. Day 146
Wednesday. Full moon.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
I had never met [Percival W., a retired American businessman of German parentage] before, but he dropped up to my room this morning for a chat. … Said he: “For Germans a thing is right, ethical, honourable, if it squares with the tradition of what a German thinks a German should do; or if it advances the interests of Germanism or Germany. …”
In other words, for a German to defend his country’s liberty and independence is right. For a Finn to do the same thing is wrong, because it disturbs Germany’s relations with Russia. The abstract idea there is missing in the German mentality.
…Mr. W. … says the present rations and shortages are about the same as Germany experienced in the third year of the World War. He is sure things cannot go on as at present, with the front quiet and nothing but hardship, especially the suffering from the cold we’ve had for more than a month now. “What the Germans must have,” he said in departing, “are a lot of quick victories.”
… Today the burgomaster warns the populace that they must not use gas for heating rooms or water. Hot water, even if you have coal, is restricted now to Saturdays.
(Berlin Diary, pp 281-2)

Britain
Quote:
With recurrent reports of an imminent invasion by Germany, Chamberlain reassured Belgium of Britain’s pledge to assist the Belgians if they were attacked.
(Goralski, p 105)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-13, -48 left Kiel; one boat (U-22) returned to Wilhelmshaven after 10 days. 16 U-boats at sea.

Two ships (one neutral) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost=4904:
Varild, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1085 tons, in ballast from Drammen via Horten to /Sunderalnd. Complement=15; lost=15.
Alsacien, a French steam merchantman of 3819 tons, carrying 3550 tons of phosphate from Tunisia via Algers, Casablanca and brest to Rouen. Complement not recorded; lost=4.
Pluto, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1598 tons, in ballast from Bergen via Methil to Middlesbrough. Complement=22; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 19.08 hours … U-23 fired a G7e torpedo at a small steamer and observed a hit amidships on the port side and the sinking of the vessel in 45 seconds about 40 miles east of Fair Isle. At 20.20 hours the day before, the U-boat had spotted the ship, but then two attacks failed because first the torpedo was stuck in the tube and a G7e torpedo fired at 22.13 hours became a circle runner. Its victim was very likely the unescorted and neutral Varild … which was reported missing en route from Norway to the UK.
… At 11.40 hours … the Alsacien in convoy 56-KS was hit in the foreship by one torpedo from U-44 and sank west of Lisbon.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Return from patrol – Battleship WARSPITE and battlecruiser HOOD with destroyers FURY, FAME, FORESIGHT, FOXHOUND, FEARLESS, FORESTER, FIREDRAKE, FORTUNE arrived in the Clyde from patrol.

Submarine URSULA arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarine trials and exercises – New submarine TETRARCH arrived in the Clyde for trials.

Submarine H.34, Polish submarine WILK and two destroyers exercised in the Firth of Forth.
 
Ship movement – Escort vessel/destroyer VEGA, her repairs completed, departed the Tay for Methil.
 
Destroyer JAVELIN arrived at Rosyth.

Destroyers ICARUS and IMPULSIVE arrived at Portsmouth.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers ESCAPADE and ENCOUNTER departed the scene of their submarine search off Rattray Head at dusk for Rosyth.

 
Minelaying – Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA, which left the Humber early on the 24th escorted by destroyers JERVIS and JUNO, laid 240 mines in a defensive minefield, designated LB, about 50 miles NE of Spurn Point.
 
Ships’ collision – Minesweeper SKIPJACK was in a collision with steamer RUTLAND (1437grt) and sustained minor damage.
 
U.K.-Norway convoy – Convoy ON.9 of three British, five Norwegian, one Swedish and four Finnish ships departed Methil escorted by destroyers INGLEFIELD, ISIS, KASHMIR, TARTAR and submarine SEAL. TARTAR was relieved by destroyer KHARTOUM which was in turn relieved by destroyer IMOGEN. On the 25th, light cruisers EDINBURGH and GLASGOW departed Rosyth to join the convoy as near cover. ON.9 arrived safely on the 27th at Bergen.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.79 A departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN, and arrived in the Tyne on the 25th.
 
Convoy FS.79 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop LONDONDERRY, and arrived at Southend on the 25th.
 
Convoy FS.80 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD and BITTERN, and arrived at Southend on the 26th.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers JACKAL, JAGUAR and ASHANTI sweeping off Tod Head in 56‑47N, 02‑10.8W attacked a submarine contact. Anti-submarine trawler FIFESHIRE (540grt) relieved them and they continued on patrol. ASHANTI then headed for Cowes for repair and refit, while JACKAL and JAGUAR returned to the location at 0300/25th, continuing their patrol at 1800.
 
French destroyer BOULONNAISE attacked a submarine contact east of Pointe de Barfleur in 49-45N, 00-38W, and was joined by anti-submarine trawlers LA NANTAISE and LA ORIENTAISE, both of which attacked contact in the vicinity in 49-51N, 00-28W.

U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.16 of 42 ships departed Gibraltar on the 24th, [with a combination of French and British] escorts. …
 
Merchant ship beachig – Finnish steamer AURA (4763grt) went ashore near Start Point on the 31st, but was refloated and taken to Plymouth that day.
 
Ship movement – Sloop FOLKESTONE departed Port Said for Malta, en route to England.
 
South Atlantic patrol – Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL, battlecruiser RENOWN, and destroyers DAINTY and DIAMOND departed Freetown, and rendezvoused on the 29th with the EXETER force in 17‑00S, 26‑06W, where they relieved the heavy cruisers as escorts.
 
French naval activity – French battleship PROVENCE, heavy cruisers COLBERT, DUQUESNE, and destroyers VAUTOUR and ALBATROS departed Toulon and passed Oran on the 25th. The destroyer detached on the 27th, reached Casablanca on the 28th, left there on the 31st and arrived back at Oran on 1 February. The heavy ships arrived at Dakar on the 30th.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.18 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser BULOLO from 24 January to 9 February, and a day earlier, on the 8th, merged with SLF.18. Destroyer WINDSOR relieved the armed merchant cruiser on the 9th February and took the convoy on to Liverpool, arriving on the 12th.
 
Yugoslavian ship grounding – Yugoslav destroyer LJUBJANA, entering Sebenico in a gale, ran aground and was badly damaged. She was salved but was still under repair when Yugoslavia fell to the Germans in April 1941.
 
Gulf of Finland – Finnish steamer NOTUNG (1133grt) was sunk by Soviet bombers between Abo and Aland Island.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/25/2018 7:24:25 PM
January 25. Day 147
Thursday

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
Quote:
It is stated in London that of 734,883 children evacuated since the start of the war, 316,192 had returned to their homes by 8 January.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
No notable activity.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats left harbour; two U-boats (U-57, U-58) returned to Wilhelmshaven after patrols of 10 and 6 days respectively. 14 U-boats at sea.

Four ships (two neutrals and one purported neutral) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost=10255:
Biarritz, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1752 tons, carrying general cargo from Antwerp to Oslo. Complement=58 (including at least 11 passengers); lost=37 (including at least 11 passengers).
Everene, a Latvian steam merchantman of 4434 tons, carrying unrecorded cargo from Blyth to Liepaja. Complement=31; lost=1.
Gudveig, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1300 tons, carrying coal from Tyne to Bergen. Complement=18; lost=10.
Tourny, a French steam merchantman of 1769 tons, laden with general cargo from Zighinkor, French West Africa via Dakar to Bordeaux. Complement=17; lost=8.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 02.30 hours … the unescorted and neutral Biarritz … was torpedoed by U-14 about 36 miles northwest of Ymuiden. She sank quickly and only one lifeboat with 19 people set off. 26 crewmen and eleven passengers, among them several women, died. 21 survivors and three bodies were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Borgholm, which sailed nearby and were taken to Ymuiden. …
… At 21.12 hours … the unescorted Everene was hit aft by one G7a torpedo from U-19 and sank slowly by the stern five miles off Longstone Lighthouse, Farne Island. The survivors were picked up by British fishing vessels Dole and Evesham.
… At 21.30 hours … the unescorted and neutral Gudveig was hit by one G7e torpedo from U-19 and sank immediately 4.5 miles east of Longstone Lightvessel, north of Newcastle. Eight survivors were rescued and taken to Methil. Four of them probably by the Norwegian steam merchant Vim and the others by the British steam trawler Evesham and the Latvian steam merchant Dole.
…At 04.11 hours … the Tourny …, a straggler from convoy 56-KS, was hit aft by one torpedo from U-44 west of Cape Mondego and sank after breaking in two. Since 00.55 hours, the U-boat was chasing another steamer which was missed with a torpedo at 01.11 hours. The Tourny was spotted at 03.40 hours and the U-boat continued to follow the first steamer after sinking her, but was forced to break off the chase after five more hours when a destroyer showed up and dropped six depth charges nearby. The nine survivors were picked up by the Spanish steam merchant Castillo Monforte.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK and armed merchant cruisers SCOTSTOUN and FORFAR arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Transfer of station – Light cruiser DIOMEDE departed Scapa Flow for Plymouth where she arrived on the 30th, and later sailed to join the 8th Cruiser Squadron in the North America and West Indies Station.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer JAVELIN departed Rosyth to relieve destroyer JACKAL on anti-submarine duties.
 
Escort duties – Destroyers ESCAPADE and ENCOUNTER arrived at Rosyth from submarine hunting, and after refuelling, left again on the 25th with cable ship ROYAL SCOT.
 
Destroyers ECHO and ECLIPSE departed Aberdeen escorting steamer RUTLAND (1437grt) to Scapa Flow.

East Coast convoy – Destroyer ESCORT and sloop FLAMINGO departed the Tyne escorting convoy FS.81.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.79 departed Southend escorted by destroyers ANTELOPE from the 25th to 26th and VERITY from 26th to 28th, when the convoy was dispersed. Submarine H.33 was in the convoy on passage to Portsmouth.
 
Convoy OB.79 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WINCHELSEA and VOLUNTEER until the 28th, when they detached to convoy HXF.17.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy SA.27 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by sloops FOXGLOVE and ROSEMARY, and arrived at Brest on the 27th, less steamer DIDO, which ran aground off Ouessant on the 27th. She was brought into Brest on the 30th.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.81 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer ESCORT and sloop FLAMINGO, and arrived at Southend on the 27th.
 
Weather-related incidents – Drifter RIANT (95grt) was lost in heavy weather off Gighm on the south coast of Jura Sound.
 
German destroyers WILHELM HEIDKAMP, KARL GALSTER, ANTON SCHMITT, PAUL JACOBI, RICHARD BEITZEN and HERMANNSCHOEMANN conducted a shipping sweep in the Skagerrak during the night of 25/26 January. The raid was abandoned because of heavy weather.

 Anti-U-boat activities – [As a result of U-19’s success sinking Everene and Gudveig], PELICAN and VIVIEN proceeded to 20F buoy to turn back all northbound shipping from the Tyne. The search for the submarine continued until 2200/26th when WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY set off for the Tyne to escort convoy FS.83. VEGA returned to Rosyth on the 26th to escort submarines WILK and H.34.
 
Destroyer VANQUISHER investigated a submarine contact SW of Nash Point in 51‑18N, 03‑39W, where she was joined by destroyer WAKEFUL at 0330/26th and later by destroyer KEITH. The destroyers swept westward and returned to the attack location at daylight. VANQUISHER then proceeded to Liverpool. At 1330/28th, WAKEFUL and KEITH, still on patrol, attacked a submarine contact in 51-21-30N, 3-40-50W. This was later determined to be the wreck of steamer STANHOLME (2473grt) sunk by a mine on 25 December. At 2215, the destroyers attacked a contact SW of Milford Haven in 51-32.5N, 5-24W, then at 0020/27th, proceeded on patrol.
 
French destroyer FOUGUEUX attacked a submarine contact 70 miles west of Oporto in 41-10N, 10-10W.
 
French destroyer BASQUE and sloop ANNAMITE made attacks on a submarine contact northwest of Ferrol in 44-10N, 9-10W.

Escort duty, Gibraltar-Freetown Light cruiser NEPTUNE departed Freetown to join repair ship RESOURCE en route from Gibraltar. Both ships arrived at Freetown on the 29th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 7825

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/25/2018 8:42:23 PM

Quote:
It is stated in London that of 734,883 children evacuated since the start of the war, 316,192 had returned to their homes by 8 January.
(2194 Days, p 43)


A few of those kids had been shipped overseas either by concerned parents who knew someone in the Dominions who would take the kids or by a government sponsored programme.

The first evacuations to Canada began in 1939 but these were the children of the wealthy.


Quote:
Some parents sought safety for their children further afieldi. 5,118 children came to Canada under non-governmental arrangements in 1940, and 1,532 under a government scheme. They were officially known in Canada as British Guest Children. Other British child evacuation for the period was 1,306 to Australia, 470 to New Zealand, 1,473 to South Africa, and 2,928 to the United States.


The British had set up a scheme run by the Children's Overseas Reception Board (CORB) to arrange for accommodation in the Dominions. I do not know whether the kids who went to the US arrived as non-governmental arrangements or through CORB.

CORB began taking applications in 1940 and given the dire state of affairs, it was quickly overwhelmed with applications made by parents to get their kids out of Britain.

When CORB opened for business, it announced that 20,000 could be sent off immediately with 10,000 going to Canada.

Over 211, 000 applications arrived, forcing CORB to stop accepting anymore after only two weeks.

Clearly the numbers that actually departed for the Dominions was much smaller than what CORB had planned. Why I do not know though many parents were concerned about sending their kids on a ship that could encounter a u-boat. In fact, one of the CORB transports was torpedoed though none of the kids died.

By 1942, the children started to trickle back. In fact CORB encouraged this especially for those children who had reached enlistment age.

Anyway, that's my little bit to be added to this interesting thread.

[Read More]

Cheers,

George


brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/26/2018 6:48:14 PM
January 26. Day 148
Friday

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

U.S.A.
Quote:
The US permitted its 1911 commercial treaty with Japan to lapse. Hull informed Tokyo future trade between the two countries would be conducted on a day-to-day basis.
(Goralski, p 105)

In the air
Weather restrictions still apply.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-335); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats left harbour; two U-boats (U-14, U-18) returned to Wilhelmshaven after patrols of 7 and 9 days respectively. 12 U-boats at sea.
No ships lost to torpedo attack; one ship lost to mining. Total tonnage lost=8240:
• HMS Durham Castle, a British naval accommodation ship of 8240 tons, while in tow from Rosyth to Scapa Flow. Complement=unrecorded; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
… HMS Durham Castle struck a mine laid on 21 January by U-57 and sank 3 miles east of Cromarty Firth, during a gale and in severe icy conditions. The ship was in tow by the tug HMS Watermeyer for use as a blockship at Scapa Flow.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Parol – Light cruiser DUNEDIN arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol.
 
Ship conversion – Light cruiser CURACOA completed her conversion to anti-aircraft cruiser at Chatham, and departed Portland for working up on the 30th.
 
Ship reassignment – Light cruiser ARETHUSA departed Portsmouth for Scapa Flow, and arrived on the 29th for duty with 2nd Cruiser Squadron, Home Fleet.
 
Submarine patrol – Submarine TRUANT departed Rosyth on patrol.

Ship movement – Destroyers JACKAL, ECHO and ECLIPSE arrived at Rosyth.
 
Norwegian inbound convoy duty – Destroyer SIKH arrived at Scapa Flow and after refuelling departed with destroyer TARTAR to relieve the escort of convoy HN.9.
 
Destroyers JERVIS, JUNO, JUPITER and IMPERIAL were on a sweep off the SW of Norway.
 
Weather restrictions – Destroyers JAVELIN and JAGUAR on a submarine hunt, were ordered into Invergordon for shelter from the gale.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer GREYHOUND and Polish destroyer BLYSKAWICA attacked a submarine contact off Great Yarmouth, 52-34N, 2-16E.
 
Destroyer WANDERER attacked a submarine contact off Chicken Rock, Isle of Man in 53-56N, 4-51W.

U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.78GF, was escorted by destroyers BROKE from the 23rd to 24th and AMAZON from the 23rd to 25th. Meanwhile OB.78GF with 23 ships departed Liverpool on the 24th escorted by destroyers WHITEHALL and VANOC. The two merged as OG.16F on the 26th and on the same day WHITEHALL and VANOC detached to join HG.16F. Sloop SANDWICH joined the OG escort on the 26th and left on the 31st, while destroyers VELOX and WISHART joined on 1 February off Gibraltar, and arrived later that day.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoys – Convoy BC.24 six steamers, including BARON GRAHAM and MARSLEW (Commodore) departed Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer MONTROSE, and arrived safely in the Loire.
 
Convoy AXS 10 of one steamer escorted by destroyer VETERAN arrived at Brest from Fowey on the 26th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.80 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop LONDONDERRY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 27th.
 
Convoy FS.82 departed the Tyne, escorted destroyers WOOLSTON and VEGA and sloop GRIMSBY, and arrived at Southend on the 28th.
 
German blockade – Estonian steamer KESSU (295grt) was seized in the Baltic by German naval forces and taken to Memel.
 
South African waters – Heavy cruiser CORNWALL departed Capetown on escort duties and arrived back on the 30th.
 
South American Station – New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES arrived at Montevideo.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/27/2018 6:35:04 PM
January 27. Day 149
Saturday

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
Quote:
The greatest organized mass migration since the exchange of populations between Greece and Turkey after the last war is now coming to an end in Poland. Some 135,000 Germans from Russian-occupied eastern Poland and 100,000 Germans from the Baltic states are now being settled in the part of Poland which Germany has annexed outright. To make room for them an equal number of Poles are being turned out of house, home, and farm and sent to occupied Poland.
(Berlin Diary, p 285)

Germany
Quote:
Although not yet fully convinced, Hitler orders preparations for the campaign against Norway and Denmark to commence. However, the Allies also have their eyes on Norway.
(2194 Days, p 43)
Quote:
Some miscellany. With the publication of a pocket-sized edition of Mein Kampf for the troops at the front, total sales of Hitlers Bible, I learn today, have now reached the fantastic total of 5,950,000 copies.
(Berlin Diary, p 285)


Britain
Quote:
In a speech to the Chamber of Commerce in Manchester, Churchill says he is puzzled and worried about the ‘phoney war’, and wonders why Britain has not been bombed yet.
(2194 Days, p 43)
Quote:
There was, [Churchill] said, a question that he was always running over in his mind: Why had England not yet been attacked from the air? “Is it that they are saving up some orgy of frightfulness which will soon come upon us?” he wondered. “Is it because they feared the massive counterstroke which they would immediately receive from our powerful bombing force?” It was certainly not, Churchill said, any “false sense of delicacy” that had refrained them. …
Churchill then asked: “Ought we, instead of demonstrating the power of our Air Force by dropping leaflets all over Germany, to have dropped bombs?” No, on the whole not, he believed: “We have striven hard,” he said, “to make the most of the time of preparation that has been gained, and there is no doubt the an enormous advance has been made both in the protection of the civil population and in the punishment which would be inflicted upon the raiders.”
Churchill did not say that Britain shouldn’t have dropped bombs all over Germany because the British government had pledged not to, or because the bombing of cities was wrong. He said that Britain shouldn’t have bombed because the country had needed several more months to accumulate bombers, train crews, and set up anti-aircraft defences.
(Human Smoke, p 165)

Western Front
Quote:
A phony war. Today’s dispatches from the front deal exclusively with an account of how German machine-guns fought French loud-speakers! It seems that along the Rhine front the French broadcast some recordings which the Germans say instituted a personal insult to the Führer.
… Actually the army people tell me that the French broadcast recordings of Hitler’s former speeches denouncing Bolshevism and the Soviets.
(Berlin Diary, pp 285-6)

U.S.A.
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Five U-boats left harbour, from Kiel (U-21, -24,-56), Wilhelmshaven (U-58) and Helgoland (U-41). 17 U-boats at sea.

Four ships (all neutrals) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost=6848:
Faro, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 844 tons, in ballast from Sarpsborg to Methil. Complement=15; lost=8.
England, a Danish steam merchantman of 2319 tons, in ballast from Copenhagen to Blyth. Complement=21; lost=20.
Fredensborg, a Danish steam merchantman of 2094 tons, in ballast from Copenhagen to Blyth. Complement=20; lost=20.
Hoseanger, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1591 tons, in ballast from Tananger to Leith. Complement=18; lost=17.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 20.03 hours … the neutral Faro … was damaged by one torpedo from U-20 about 15 miles southeast of Copinsay, Orkneys. The torpedo detonated about 20 metres from the ship and caused a leak. The crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats and one with eight men in it drifted away in the darkness. The master and six crew members in the other boat stayed close to the ship and reboarded her at dawn next day. They tried to save the Faro but her bow already settled so low that the propeller was out of the water. After the anchor chain broke she drifted ashore and was wrecked in the Taracliff Bay, Deerness. The survivors were taken off by breeches buoy. The missing lifeboat was washed ashore on Copinsay later that day, with only one man alive, and three bodies.
… At 21.24 hours … the neutral England was hit underneath the bridge by a G7e torpedo from U-20, broke in two and sank within 2 minutes about 15 miles southeast of Copinsay, Orkneys. The ship was sailing together with the Fredensborg and were both sunk by the same U-boat when they tried to assist the torpedoed Faro in heavy weather.
… At 20.52 hours on 27 Jan 1940 the neutral Fredensborg … was hit amidships by one torpedo from U-20 and sank in 10 seconds about 15 miles southeast of Copinsay, Orkneys.
… At 23.13 hours … the neutral and unescorted Hosanger … was hit in the stern by one G7a torpedo from U-20 15 miles southeast of Copinsay Light. The explosion broke the stern off and caused the ship to sink within two minutes. The only survivor, Magnus Sandvik, managed to reach a raft with four others, but his shipmates froze to death while he was picked up after about 15 hours by the armed boarding vessel HMS Northern Reward. A line was thrown down on him, but he was not able to fasten it around himself, so a sailor jumped overboard to assist. He was then transferred to HMS Maori (F 24) and taken to a hospital in Kirkwall.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Home Fleet activity – Battleship RODNEY, battlecruiser REPULSE, and the 8th Destroyer Flotilla less FORESTER under repair, departed the Clyde to exercise west of the Shetlands. They returned on the 31st.
 
Boiler cleaning – Light cruiser MANCHESTER arrived at Scapa Flow to boiler clean.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser DUNEDIN departed Scapa Flow and arrived at Portsmouth on the 29th.

Armed merchant cruiser SCOTSTOUN arrived in the Clyde.
 
Search and escort duties – Destroyer MAORI departed Rosyth escorting submarine TRITON to Scapa Flow. After delivering her on the 28th, MAORI proceeded to search for a boat from the Norwegian steamer HOSANGER before proceeding to the Clyde, where she arrived on the 29th.
 
Destroyers JAVELIN and JAGUAR departed Invergordon to rendezvous with tanker ATHELKNIGHT (8940grt) for Rosyth.
 
U.K.-Norwegian inbound convoy – Convoy HM.9 A[almost certainly Convoy HN 9A] of 19 Norwegian, nine Swedish, four Finnish, four Estonian and one Latvian ships departed Bergen escorted by destroyers INGLEFIELD, ISIS, IMOGEN, KASHMIR and submarine SEAL. Light cruisers GLASGOW and EDINBURGH departed Scapa Flow on the 26th to cover the convoy. Twelve ships in the convoy detached for ports on the west coast escorted by destroyers INGLEFIELD and MOHAWK before the remaining ships and escorts arrived at Methil on the 31st. ISIS then sailed for Falmouth for docking.
 
Ship refit – Sloop AUCKLAND departed Rosyth for a refit at Dundee.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.81 departed Southend, escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD and BITTERN. Sloop EGRET joined en route and anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA, which had departed the Humber, was on passage near the convoy, which arrived in the Tyne on the 28th. Convoy FN.82 was cancelled.
 
Ships’ collision – Minesweeper SKIPJACK was in a collision with Finnish steamer KARIN THORDEN (1789grt) and sustained damage to her stern.

Ship conversion – Mine bumper ILSENSTEIN was to proceed to Troon to be converted into a blockship.
 
German blockage activity – Finnish steamer CLIO (996grt) was seized in the Baltic by German warships, and taken to Pillau.
 
Ship’s weather damage – Destroyer HEREWARD was damaged by heavy weather, and repaired at Halifax until 28 February, when she left for England.
 
U.S.-French liaison – American light cruiser TRENTON (CL.11), at sea with American destroyers DICKERSON (DD.157) and HERBERT (DD.160) en route from Madeira to Lisbon, made plain language reports to French destroyer CHEVALIER PAUL, which was escorting merchant ships south towards North Africa, of apparent preparations for a breakout by German steamers ARUCAS (3369grt), LA PLATA (8056grt), WANGONI (7848grt) from Vigo.
 
French naval activity – French light cruiser JEANNE DE VIENNE departed Malta after a visit by French Admiral Sud.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/28/2018 6:27:04 PM
January 28. Day 150
Sunday. Waning crescent moon.

Finland
No notable activity.

Poland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
It is difficult to believe in Berlin on this Sabbath day that a great war is on. The streets and parks are covered deep with snow and in the Tiergarten this afternoon thousands were skating on the ponds and logos. Hundreds of children were tobogganing. Do children think about war? I don’t know. This afternoon in the Tiergarten they seemed to be thinking only of their sleds and skates and the snow and ice.
(Berlin Diary, p 286)

Britain
Quote:
Sir Alan Brooke, of the British Expeditionary Force, was bothered by talk in the war office of bombing the Ruhr Valley, where there were more factories — and more people — than anywhere else in Germany. Brooke wanted to use English airplanes against the Germany army within the war zone, not against German industry outside the war zone. The day after Churchill spoke in Manchester, Brooke wrote in his diary:
To contemplate bombing the Ruhr at a time when the Germans are using their combined army and air force in one mighty uniform attempt to crush the French and British forces to clear the way into France, is in my mind sheer folly.
“Two ‘wrongs’ do not make a ‘right’ in this case,” Brooke wrote. It was January 28, 1940.
(Human Smoke, p 165)
[Editorial comment: the full entry from Brooke’s diary might make more sense. This does not. There is no meaningful activity on the Western Front. The Germans admit to firing at French loud-speakers; the weather is vicious; many a/c are unable to fly safely. The only theatre of war that is active is naval, and even that is somewhat restricted because of the weather. The debate over bombing of any object not clearly a device of war was serious in Britain, and would remain so until early summer 1940. Some claim Rotterdam as the reason for the change in attitude; some claim other bombings (largely in error). Exactly what Brooke is referring to with his platitude concerning wrongs and rights is, given this information, hard to say.]

Western Front
No notable activity.

U.S.A.
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.
––––––––––––––––––
U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats left harbour, from Kiel (U-10) and Wilhelmshaven (U-37); One ship (U-19) entered Wilhelmshaven after a patrol of 11 days. 18 U-boats at sea.

Two ships (both neutrals) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=8605:
Eleni Stathatou, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 5625 tons, in ballast from Newport to the Gulf ports. Complementi unrecord; lost=12.
Flora, a Greek steam merchantman of 2980 tons, carrying coal from Sunderland via the Downs to Rosario. Complement=25; lost=25.

One ship lost to mining. Total mining tonnage lost: 1487:
Eston, a British steam merchantman of 1487 tons, in ballast from Copenhagen to Blyth. Complement=18; lost=18.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 02.52 hours … the unescorted Eleni Stathatou … was hit near the bridge by one stern torpedo from U-34 about 200 miles west of the Scilly Isles. Because the U-boat had only one torpedo left they waited nearby for the stopped vessel to sink, but after one hour the ship moved again. At 04.21 hours, the last torpedo was fired that hit in the forward part and caused the ship to sink slowly.
…At 20.00 hours … U-44 fired one G7e from a stern torpedo tube at a southbound Greek steamer in clear weather about 200 miles west of Figueira da Foz and reported that the ship sank by the stern within nine minutes after being hit aft. This must have been the Flora which was reported missing after leaving The Downs on 22 January.
… [t]he Eston … , a straggler from convoy FN-81, struck a mine laid on 20 Dec 1939 by U-22 and sank near Blyth. The master and 17 crew members were lost.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
General escort duties – Destroyer WHITSHED arrived at Plymouth on the 26th after escorting convoy SL.16 to Dover. She and destroyers ACASTA and ARDENT then left Plymouth on the 27th to escort battleship REVENGE, which was carrying £10,000,000 sterling of gold, art treasures, and some passengers, from there to Halifax. Just after midnight on the 28th, the destroyers met REVENGE off Plymouth and escorted her to 14W where they detached and were ordered to meet light cruiser AJAX arriving from the South Atlantic.
 
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol to relieve heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE, and arrived back at Greenock on 29 February.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed the Humber, and arrived back at Immingham on the 31st.
 
Change of assignment – Light cruiser COLOMBO departed Devonport for Belfast where she arrived on the 29th, and then proceeded to the Mediterranean Fleet.
 
Weather challenges – Destroyers ESCAPADE and ENCOUNTER with cable ship ROYAL SCOT returned to Rosyth after once again being frustrated by bad weather.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer JACKAL departed Rosyth to relieve destroyer JAGUAR, which then sailed for Scapa Flow to relieve destroyer JAVELIN. JAGUAR arrived at Scapa on the 29th
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyers KEITH and WAKEFUL, patrolling at the mouth to Bristol Channel, attacked a submarine contact south of Milford Haven in 51-27.5N, 5-09.5W.
 
U.K. outbound convoys – Convoy OA.81 departed Southend escorted by sloop ROCHESTER and destroyer WREN from the 28th to 30th, when the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.81 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VISCOUNT and WALKER until the 31st, when they detached to SL.17.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.83 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN, and was attacked by German bombers off Cromer and later in the day off Whitby. There was no damage from either attack on the 29th, but on the 30th steamer VOREDA (7216grt) was hit in 52‑59N, 01‑59E by He111's of German X Air Corps. The whole crew was saved by VIVIEN, VOREDA went ashore on Winkerton Shoal, and the wreck was sunk on 5 February. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 30th.  
Note: German X Air Corps flew He111's of KG26, Ju88's of KG30, and two reconnaissance squadrons flying He59's or Do17's.
 …
North Atlantic outbound convoy – Convoy HXF.18 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA until the 29th and with ocean escort provided by armed merchant cruiser ALAUNIA, which left on 6 February. The convoy was joined in Home Waters by destroyer ANTELOPE from convoy OA.84 and sloop DEPTFORD from OB.84, and arrived at Liverpool on the 8th.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SLF.18 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser DUNVEGAN CASTLE, joined convoy SL.18 at sea on 8 February and arrived at Liverpool on the 12th.
 
Far East waters – Light cruiser LIVERPOOL arrived at Hong Kong for repairs.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/29/2018 6:37:37 PM
January 29. Day 151
Monday.

Finland
Quote:
Moscow informed the Swedish government that Russia was willing to conclude a settlement with Finland.
(Goralski, p 105)
Quote:
Secret negotiations have taken place in Stockholm on the initiative of the Russians to try and reach a diplomatic solution to the conflict. As a result of these talks the USSR sends the Swedish government a note saying: ’The Soviet Union has no objection in principle to a possible agreement with the Ryti government’ (the legitimate government of Finland). This declaration opens the way to peace, since the USSR is implicitly saying that it is ready to renounce support of Kuusinen’s puppet government.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

U.S.A.
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Four U-boats left harbour, one Z(U-17) from Kiel and three (U-15, -26, -59) from Wilhelmshaven; One ship (U-23) entered Wilhelmshaven after a patrol of 12 days. 21 U-boats at sea. No reported U-boat losses for this specific date, but three (U-15, sailing today; U-41; U-55) listed as lost during their current patrols.

One ship (a neutral) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=1503:
Eika, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1503 tons, carrying salt from Torrevieja, Spain to Aalesund. Complement=18; lost=16.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 15.30 hours … the unescorted and neutral Eika … was hit on the port side by one G7e torpedo from U-51 and sank immediately after breaking in two about 100 miles south of Cape Clear. Knorr reported that the ship carried no neutrality markings and mistook the freighter with the engine aft as tanker. Only two men survived on a raft, the mess boy Harald Støle and the stoker Alfred Johansen. They were taken prisoner by the U-boat and landed at Wilhelmshaven on 8 February. En route Harald Støle had his 17th birthday and on this occasion Knorr [Commander of U-51]gave him a drink and some chocolate. Both survivors were sent home to Norway one week after arriving in Germany.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea Ship movement – Light cruisers AURORA, ARETHUSA and NEWCASTLE arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser LETITIA and heavy cruiser SUFFOLK departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol, the latter to relieve sister ship BERWICK.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer ILEX, repairs completed, departed Liverpool for Rosyth.
 
Destroyers KANDAHAR and KASHMIR departed Rosyth for the Clyde.

Ship grounding – Destroyer MAORI took off the crew of steamer BADJESTAN (5573grt) which had gone ashore off Clachaig Point, Arran, and arrived in the Clyde on the 29th.
 
U.K.-Norwegian inbound convoy – Convoy HN.9B of three British, eight Norwegian, ten Swedish, four Finnish and four Estonian ships, delayed a day because of bad weather, departed Bergen escorted by destroyers JERVIS, JUNO and JUPITER. Destroyer IMPERIAL departed Rosyth on the 27th to join the escort. There was no west coast section and the convoy, less ships separated in a storm, arrived safely at Methil on 2 February.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.82 departed Southend escorted by destroyers VANESSA and WINDSOR from the 29th to 30th.
 
Convoy OB.82 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers MACKAY until the 30th and WARWICK to 1 February.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.83A departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops BITTERN and FLEETWOOD and was attacked by German bombers on the 30th. One rating on minesweeper NIGER was killed by a near miss and steamer HIGH WAVE (1178grt) sunk one mile NNE of Kentish Knock. Eighteen survivors were picked up by Dutch trawler RIAN (232grt), and the convoy arrived at Southend on the 31st.[Editor’s note: The above entry and the following five entries suggest new tactics by Germany. The first of the following entries is a mining issue, but was probably an air-dropped mine. Whether the use of aircraft in such relative concentration indicates Germany’s response to British degaussing effects, adverse weather conditions or simply better coordination between naval and air forces is worth considering.](«naval-history.net») continued
Luftwaffe marine activity – Dutch steamer NORA (298grt) hit a mine one miles east of the Deal Coast Guard Station, and went ashore at Deal.
 
Steamer STANBURN (2981grt) was bombed and sunk by He111's of German X Air Corps, 10 miles SE by E, one half mile south of Flamborough Head. Twenty five crew were lost and three saved.
 
Latvian steamer TAUTMILA (3724grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German KG26 five miles NW of Smiths Knoll Light Vessel.
 
Steamer IMPERIAL MONARCH (5831grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German KG26, 10 miles 62° from Scurdyness.
 
Steamer GRIPFAST (1109grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German X Air Corps, 10 miles SE by E, one quarter mile south of Flamborough Head.

U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.17F departed Gibraltar with 25 ships on the 29th, … [escorted by from one to five ships during passage to Liverpool.]
 
Far East waters – Light cruiser DURBAN departed Singapore.
 
South American Station flagship relief – Cruiser HAWKINS relieved New Zealand light cruiser ACHILLES as flagship of the South America Station. ACHILLES departed Montevideo for the Falklands where she arrived on 1 February, leaving there on the 2nd to return to New Zealand. Arriving at Auckland on 23 February, she was refitting and repairing until early June, and carried out trials in Hauraki Bay on 14 June.
 
African coast – Destroyers DECOY and DEFENDER departed Gibraltar on escort duties returning on 7 February. Both then sailed on the 8th for Freetown, arriving on the 15th and 18th respectively.
 
Ship transfer –Monitor TERROR departed Singapore on the 29th, proceeded via Penang, Colombo, Bombay and Aden, and arrived at Alexandria on 11 March and Malta on 4 April. She was to have gone on to Devonport to arrive in mid-April, but was retained in the Mediterranean.(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/30/2018 5:46:12 PM
January 30. Day 152
Tuesday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
In a speech at the Berlin Sportpalast, celebrating the 7th anniversary of his Chancellorship, Hitler declares that the first phase of the war has been completed with the destruction of Poland. The second phase might perhaps start with a ‘war of bombs’, such as Churchill showed himself so impatient for three days before.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats left harbour; One ship (U-61) entered Wilhelmshaven after a patrol of 18 days. 18 U-boats at sea. One U-boat lost.
U-55, sunk by depth charges. Complement=42; lost=1.

Two ships (one neutral) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=10111:
Vaclite, a British steam tanker of 5026 tons, in ballast from London to New York. Complement=35; lost=0.
Keramiai, a Greek steam merchantman of 5085 tons, in ballast from London to Cuidad Trujillo. Complement=29; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 07.00 and 11.05 hours …, U-55 attacked convoy OA-80G(later designated OG-16) and sank Vaclite in the first and Keramiai in the second attack. The U-boat was herself sunk by the escorts after the second attack.
The Vaclite … was sunk about 50 miles southwest of the Scilly Isles. The master and 34 crew members were picked up by the Italian steam merchant Pollenzo and landed at Barry.
… The master of Keramiai … was lost. 28 survivors were picked up by HMS Fowey (L 15) … and the British motor tanker British Unity.

Sunk … in the Celtic Sea south-west of Isles of Scilly, in position 48.37N, 07.48W, by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Whitshed, the British sloop HMS Fowey and a British Sunderland aircraft (228 Sqn RAF/Y). 1 dead and 41 survivors.
(«uboat.net»)
Quote:
Destroyers WHITSHED, ACASTA and ARDENT were escorting light cruiser AJAX to Plymouth, received the Greek steamer's distress signals, and while ACASTA remained with AJAX, WHITSHED and ARDENT detached to assist the convoy. One of the convoy escorts, French large destroyer VALMY, aircraft of RAF 228 Squadron and WHITSHED attacked the submarine, but without damaging her. U.55 was then damaged by depth charges dropped by FOWEY, and she was scuttled SW of the Scillies in 48‑37N, 07‑46W. WHITSHED and FOWEY picked up the survivors - three officers and thirty eight ratings - all the crew, except the commanding officer Kptlt. Werner Heidel, who went down with his command.
(«naval-history.net»)
[Editor’s note: The sinking of U-55 is the first confirmed U-boat loss involving a Sunderland a/c.]

At sea
Quote:
Ship conversion – Anti-aircraft cruiser CURACOA departed Chatham to work up at Portland after conversion to an anti-aircraft ship.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser CILICIA departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol.
 
Submarine patrol – Submarine SEAWOLF departed Lowestoft on patrol.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.1 departed Methil with destroyer ECHO and escort vessel VEGA.
 
Convoy MT.2 departed Methil with destroyers ENCOUNTER and ESCAPADE, but the convoy returned to Methil.
 
U.K.-Norwegian inbound convoy – Destroyer INGLEFIELD arrived in the Clyde after escorting the west coast portion of HN.9A. Destroyer MOHAWK returned to Scapa Flow.
 
Ship movement – Escort vessel/destroyer WESTMINSTER arrived at Rosyth.
 
Escort assistance – Destroyers JAVELIN and SIKH arrived at Scapa Flow, but SIKH left the same day to assist anti-submarine trawler SCOTTISH (558grt) which was being bombed.
 
U.K.-France inbound convoy – Convoy BC.23S of steamers BALTRAFFIC, BARON KINNAIRD, DUNKWA (Commodore) and FABIAN departed the Loire escorted by destroyer MONTROSE, and arrived safely in the Bristol Channel on the 31st.
 
Interesting merchant numbers – In an Admiralty release - as of 30 January 1940, twenty four German merchant ships had been captured for 103,037 tons and twenty three ships intercepted scuttled themselves for 139,236 tons. When compared to German releases (see 8 February) and post war studies, all three basically agree. The largest discrepancy rests on the fact that a scuttled ship was not always scuttled by the German crew but by the capturing warship for any number of reasons (no prize crew, poor state of ship, etc). German wartime sources regarded a scuttled ship as one that was not capable of further use regardless of who scuttled it, while British sources would count a ship captured even if they later scuttled it.
…  
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer WREN attacked a submarine contact SW of the Scillies in 49-30N, 6-52W.
 
Ship collision – Armed merchant cruiser WOLFE at Portland dragged her anchor and collided with steamer WESTERN COAST (1390grt), which was not damaged.
 
Luftwaffe shipping attacks – Steamer GIRALDA (2178grt) carrying coal for the Northern Patrol trawlers, was bombed and sunk by He111's of German X Air Corps three miles east of Grimness, S. Ronaldsay, Orkneys with the loss of all twenty three crew.
 
Steamer BANCREST (4450grt) was bombed by He111's of the German X Air Corps in 58‑53N, 01‑52W, and went ashore at Wick with the loss of one crewman. Destroyer JAVELIN rescued the survivors.
 
Steamer ROYAL CROWN (4364grt) was bombed and damaged by HE111's of German KG26, 15 miles south of Smiths Knoll Light Vessel.
 
Steamer JERSEY QUEEN (910grt) was damaged by German bombing in 53‑06N, 01‑30E.
 
U[boat activity – U.15, setting out on patrol from Wilhelmshaven on the 30th, was sunk in an accidental collision with German torpedo boat ILTIS in the North Sea in 54-21N, 4-50E. The entire crew of 25 men was lost, and ILTIS was under repair at Wesermunde until May. [Editor’s note: According to «uboat.net», U-15 sailed on January 29 and was sunk on January 31.]
 
German tanker THALIA (1122grt) was in Cadiz Bay to refuel U.44 in Operation MORO. U.44 did not appear, but U.25 arrived at 2200/30th, taking four hours to refuel.[Editor’s note: This is the first recorded fueling of a U-boat in the port of Cadiz. It adds tremendous pressure to the British and French navies’ escort demands in the Mediterranean and near Gibraltar.]
 
French naval activity – French heavy cruiser TOURVILLE and destroyers VAUBAN and AIGLE departed Beirut for patrol and arrived at Malta on 3 February.
 
North Atlantic troop convoy – Destroyers HUNTER and the Canadian ST LAURENT, FRASER, OTTAWA and RESTIGOUCHE departed Halifax escorting Canadian convoy TC.3… . [Ed. summary: 4 troopships totalled 130,000+ tons with 7200+ troops, accompanied by a liner of 11,000+ tons with civilian labourers.] Ocean escort was battleship VALIANT, and light cruiser ENTERPRISE which returned to Halifax on 4 February. HUNTER arrived at Plymouth on 8 February and went on to Falmouth for docking and refit until 9 March prior to joining the Home Fleet.
 
Australian waters – Australian heavy cruiser CANBERRA departed Fremantle for Eastern Australian waters where she carried out patrols until April.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 1/31/2018 5:37:31 PM
January 31. Day 153
Wednesday. Last quarter moon.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
Quote:
We have run out of coal. We have no garage fire and are burning wood in the house. We have had no meat this week, as the butcher has not come. We had hardly any last week. A customer brought us 2 rabbits on Monday, so we are not starving, but lots ofpeople, my great aunt among them, have had no meat. Ever so many have had no coal all the week. Arnold shot us 2 pigeons in the wood opposite.
(Muriel Green in Wartime Women, p 81)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats left harbour; Two boats (U-10, -20) entered Helgoland. Days at sea not recorded. 16 U-boats at sea. One U-boat lost.
U-55, sunk by depth charges. Complement=42; lost=1.

Two ships (one definite, one assumed; both neutral) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=2521:
Start, a Norwegian steam merchant of 1168 tons, with 1478 tons of coal from Sunderland to Oslo. Complement=16; lost=16.
Vidar, a Danish steam merchantman of 1353 tons, carrying steel bars from Grimsby via Tyne to Esbjerg. Complement=34; lost=16.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 00.43 hours … U-13 fired one G7a torpedo at a steamer of about 4000 grt in bad weather about 7 miles east-northeast of Kinnaird Head and reported that the vessel sank after being hit on starboard side just ahead of the funnel and breaking in two. The U-boat had spotted at least three steamers and seven escorts and after this attack unsuccessfully fired two G7e torpedoes on an unknown Danish steamer at 00.54 and 01.14 hours.
It is possible that the neutral Start … was sunk in this attack. The ship was reported missing after departing Sunderland on 29 January.
… At 19.54 hours … the unescorted and neutral Vidar was hit aft by a G7e torpedo from U-21 about 100 miles east of the Moray Firth and sank the next day. At 19.48 hours, the U-boat had fired a G7a torpedo that became a surface runner and detonated near the ship, which stopped. A second torpedo had been fired two minutes later, but did not run due to an operating error. The Danish steam merchant Disko, which picked up the survivors from Vidar, was attacked with a G7e torpedo at 20.11 hours, but it also became a surface runner that detonated without damaging the ship.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship movement – Battleship RODNEY, battlecruiser REPULSE and their escorts arrived back in the Clyde after exercises.
 
Light cruisers GLASGOW and EDINBURGH departed Rosyth.
 
Destroyer DARING arrived in the Clyde.
 
Armed merchant cruiser ASCANIA arrived at the Clyde.
 
Destroyer SIKH arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyers ESCAPADE and ENCOUNTER arrived at Rosyth.
 
Destroyer MOHAWK departed Sullom Voe for Scapa Flow.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine STURGEON arrived at Blyth after patrol.
 
Submarine TRIDENT departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer WAKEFUL attacked a submarine contact off Bull Point in 51-20N, 4-09W.
 
Anti-aircraft patrol – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Immingham on patrol.
 
[Ship transfer – Light cruiser DELHI left Portsmouth for the Mediterranean, arrived at Gibraltar on 3 February, departed next day and reached Malta on the 8th.
 
[Formation of U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.80G departed Southend on the 27th with destroyer WHITSHED and sloop FOWEY, and OB.80G left Liverpool on the 28th with destroyers WALPOLE and WITHERINGTON. They merged as convoy OG.16 on the 31st with 37 ships [with four to seven] escorts [at various times. OG..16 arrived at Gibraltar on February 5]. 
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FN.83 departed Southend, escorted by sloops FLAMINGO and WESTON, accompanied by minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA, and arrived in the Tyne on 1 February. The sloops then escorted the minelayer to Rosyth.

Ship movement – Light cruiser AJAX, escorted by destroyers WHITSHED, ARDENT and ACASTA arrived at Plymouth.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.18 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA, which detached on 1 February. Ocean escort was battleship ROYAL SOVEREIGN which left on the 8th. Escort consisted of destroyer WINCHELSEA and sloop ROCHESTER from convoy OB.89 from the 13th to 16th, when the convoy arrived in Liverpool.
 
East Africa patrol – Light cruiser GLOUCESTER departed Colombo after refitting, called at Mogadishu on 8 February and was at Mombasa from the 9th to 11th.

The price of remaining at sea – At the end of January, the following destroyers were under repair - ACHERON at Portsmouth, AFRIDI at Hartlepool, ANTHONY at Portsmouth, ARDENT at Plymouth, ASHANTI at Cowes, BEDOUIN at Wallsend, BOADICEA at Dover, BULLDOG at Malta, DELIGHT at Portsmouth, DUNCAN at Cromarty damaged, ELECTRA at Falmouth, ESCORT at Falmouth, ESKIMO at Southampton, GARLAND at Malta, GRENADE at Tilbury damaged, HARDY at Plymouth with defects, HAVOCK at Chatham, HEREWARD at Halifax, HOSTILE at Plymouth with defects, HOTSPUR at Chatham, HYPERION at Portsmouth, ISIS at Falmouth, JERSEY at Hull, KELLY at Tyne, KELVIN at Clyde, KIMBERLEY at Clyde, KIPLING at Tyne, MALCOLM at Cardiff, MAORI at Clyde with defects, MASHONA at Chatham refitting, PUNJABI at Clyde, SOMALI at Middlesbrough, VALOROUS at Rosyth, WALLACE at Rosyth, WHITEHALL at Plymouth, WITCH at Plymouth damaged, WITHERINGTON at Liverpool, Polish GROM at Chatham.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/1/2018 7:52:23 PM
Feb 1. Day 154
Thursday.

Finland
Quote:
Russian forces launched another attack to break Finnish defences on the Karelian Isthmus.
(«Goralski»), p 105)
Quote:
General Timoshenko launches a large-scale attack agains the Finnish line in the Summa sector. Preceded by an intensive barrage and supported by effective aerial action, the attack is carried out by tanks and infantry simultaneously.
(«2194 Days», p 43)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
Quote:
Mass Observation, the British government’s morale-sampling service, concluded that people in England find the war too dull. “A new restlessness is setting in,” according to a Mass Observation report, “a desire for something to happen, however unpleasant.” It was February 1940.
(«Human Smoke», p 166)

Western Front
No notable activity.

Japan
Quote:
In a conciliatory speech, Foreign Minister Hachiro Arita said Japan was “anxious to see the development of China’s trade with other powers and [would]welcome foreign investments in China as long as they are of a purely economic character.”
(«Goralski», p 105)

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=3 (U-110, -559, -560; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats left harbour; One boat (U-10, reported entering Helgoland on yesterday’s date) noted as having technical problems. Days at sea not recorded. 16 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Two ships (one neutral) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=2989:
Fram, a Swedish steam merchant of 2491 tons, at anchor in Aberdour Bay while in ballast from Stockholm to Hartlepool. Complement=23; lost=9.
Ellen M., a British motor merchant of 498 tons, carrying coal from Immingham to London. Complement=7 + 2 gunners; lost=9.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 01.43 hours on … the Fram, lying at anchor, was hit by one G7e torpedo from U-13 and sank off Rosehearty Buoy in Aberdour Bay, Scotland. The survivors were picked up by HMS Khartoum (F 45) … and the British armed trawler HMS Viking Deeps.
… At 20.44 hours … the unescorted Ellen M. … was hit in the foreship by one G7e torpedo from U-59 and sank in a few minutes northeast of Lowestoft. The master, six crew members and two gunners were lost.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol results – The Northern Patrol sighted 49 eastbound merchant ships from the 1st to 14th and sent 21 into Kirkwall for inspection.
 
Ship transfer – Destroyers were transferred to the Rosyth Command to assist in anti-submarine patrols. BRAZEN and BOREAS of the 19th Destroyer Flotilla arrived at Rosyth from Harwich on the 1st. GRIFFIN was delayed in her departure due to DG fitting, but both she and GALLANT of the 1st Flotilla departed Harwich on the 2nd and arrived at Rosyth on the 3rd. INTREPID and IVANHOE of the 20th Flotilla arrived on the 8th.
 
Senior command movement – Destroyer BASILISK departed Dover for Boulogne with Lord Gort, and came back later that day carrying the Chief of Naval Staff, Chief of Imperial General Staff and other staff members.
 
Escort duty – Destroyer JACKAL and JAVELIN arrived at Rosyth escorting  tanker ATHOLLKNIGHT (8940grt).
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON departed the Tyne for Scapa Flow after her refitting.
 
East Coast convoy escortSloop FLAMINGO arrived at Rosyth escorting minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA, which had departed Immingham at 0200/1st and joined convoy FN.83, escorted by FLAMINGO and sloop WESTON.
 
Heavy weather – Destroyers KASHMIR and KHARTOUM departed Rosyth, escorting A.S.I.S. SARDIS (970grt) to Aberdeen, where steamer CYPRIAN PRINCE was to join for the passage to Scapa Flow. However, because of bad weather, CYPRIAN PRINCE was unable to join.
 
Anti-U-boat attack with U.K.-Norwegian inbound convoy – Destroyer JUNO, escorting convoy HN.9B, made an attack on a submarine contact.
 
Nothern Patrol – Heavy cruiser BERWICK and armed merchant cruisers TRANSYLVANIA and CARINTHIA arrived at the Clyde after Northern Patrol duties.
 
Submarine movement – Submarines URSULA and H.34 departed Rosyth for Blyth and were escorted as far as the Longstones by destroyer ENCOUNTER. The submarines arrived at Blyth on the 2nd and ENCOUNTER back at Rosyth also on the 2nd.
 …
French naval collision – French destroyer OURAGAN was damaged in a collision with French patrol vessel/trawler LOUISE MARIE which was lightly damaged. OURAGAN was temporarily repaired at Boulogne, departed on the 14th, and arrived at Brest on the 25th for completion of work.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.84 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN, and arrived in the Tyne on the 2nd.
 
Convoy FS.84 departed Methil for the Thames escorted by escort vessel/destroyer WHITLEY and sloop EGRET. The convoy consisted of 27 ships, but two more joined at Middlesborough and nine more in the Humber. Off Blea Wyke Point on the 2nd, a submarine contact was made at 0820 by EGRET. WHITLEY dropped depth charges and was later relieved at the scene by destroyer GLOWWORM and escort vessel/destroyer WESTMINSTER, both of which attacked the contact. Destroyer GREYHOUND also joined the hunt, but the search was abandoned at 1400. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 3rd.
 
Convoy MT.1 departed Methil, escorted by escort vessel/destroyer WESTMINSTER and sloop STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 2nd.
 
[Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers VETERAN and VESPER, on an anti-submarine sweep, attacked a submarine contact west of Scilly Island, in 49‑56N, 08‑07W.
 
U.48 departed Wilhelmshaven for, during which she laid mines off Weymouth. No shipping was sunk or damaged in this minefield.
 …
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.17 departed Gibraltar with 20 ships, escorted by destroyers VIDETTE, the French CHACAL and French patrol vessel CAPITAINE ARMANDE. CHACAL later detached and arrived in Brest on the 9th and the patrol vessel on the 10th. The convoy was escorted in Home Waters by destroyer VIMY from the 8th to 11th when the convoy arrived.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – U.Convoy SL.19 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser PRETORIA CASTLE from the 1st to 16th, merged with SLF.19 on the 16th, and the two convoys arrived at Liverpool on the 20th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/2/2018 6:10:30 PM
Feb 2. Day 155
Friday.

Finland
Fighting continues.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-53) left Wilhelmshaven; no boats returning to harbour. 17 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Two ships lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=1902:
FCreofield, a British steam tanker of 838 tons, carrying creosote from London to Middlesbrough. Complement=16 + 1 gunner; lost=17.
Portelet, a British steam merchant of 1064 tons, in ballast from Ipswich to Sunderland. Complement=11; lost=2.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 06.24 hours … the unescorted Creofield … was hit amidships by one G7a torpedo from U-59, exploded and sank east of Lowestoft. The master, 15 crew members and one gunner were lost.
… At 20.40 hours … the unescorted Portelet … was hit in the stern by one torpedo from U-59 and sank less than one mile southwest by west of Smith’s Knoll Lightship. Two crew members were lost. The master and eight crew members were picked up by the Finnish steam merchant Oscar Midling and landed at Immingham on 4 February.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Inbound troop convoy – Destroyers FAULKNOR, FEARLESS, FURY, FOXHOUND, FAME, FORTUNE, FORESIGHT, FIREDRAKE, DELIGHT, DARING and DIANA departed Greenock for an anti-submarine sweep towards the Mull of Kintyre, before joining Canadian troop convoy TC 3 in the Western Approaches. DELIGHT was diverted after sailing to escort convoy ON.10 and was replaced by destroyers KINGSTON and KELVIN. The convoy of five liners had been escorted across the Atlantic by battleship VALIANT, which had completed working up the Caribbean, and supported in the Western Approaches by battlecruiser HOOD. The convoy was met at 1000/5th. Light cruiser ENTERPRISE had already been detached and arrived back at Halifax on the 4th. Convoy TC 3, battleships VALIANT and MALAYA and destroyers FAULKNOR, FEARLESS, FORESIGHT, FIREDRAKE, FOXHOUND, FORTUNE, FAME, FURY, DIANA, DARING, KELVIN, KINGSTON and HUNTER arrived in the Clyde without event on the 7th.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser MANCHESTER departed Scapa Flow, and armed merchant cruisers CORFU and WORCESTERSHIRE from the Clyde, all for Northern Patrol.
 
Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE and armed merchant cruiser ANDANIA arrived in the Clyde, and armed merchant cruiser PATROCLUS at Liverpool, all from Northern Patrol.
 
Northern waters – Light cruiser SOUTHAMPTON arrived at Scapa Flow, and departed the same day for North Cape in Operation WR to intercept German merchant ships attempting to return to Germany. She was ordered to return to Scapa Flow at daylight on the 6th if no contact had been made.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer ILEX departed Liverpool for Rosyth after refitting.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers BOREAS and BRAZEN departed Rosyth for anti-submarine operations off Kinnaird Head.
 
Destroyers VISCOUNT and WREN attacked a submarine contact south of the Scilly Island in 49‑25N, 06‑22W.
 
Anti-submarine trawler KINGSTON CHRYSOBERYL (448grt) attacked a submarine contact off Owers Light Vessel in 50-36N, 0-40W.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine SHARK arrived at Sheerness to refit, and completed on 26 March.
 
Submarine L.23 arrived at Blyth after patrol.
 
Submarine THISTLE arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.84 departed Southend escorted by destroyer VERITY from the 2nd to 4th, and also destroyer ANTELOPE from the 2nd to 5th, when she joined HXF.18. Convoy SA.28 of two steamers departed Southampton on the 2nd and travelled with OA.82 until the 3rd, when it detached without escort and arrived at Brest on the 4th.
 
Convoy OB.84 departed Liverpool, escorted by destroyer VANOC and sloop DEPTFORD from the 2nd to 3rd. DEPTFORD then joined HXF.18 and OB.84 dispersed on the 5th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.85 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN, and arrived in the Tyne on the 3rd.
 
Convoy FS.85 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WESTMINISTER and sloop STORK, and with submarines UNITY and H.34 in company. Destroyer VEGA replaced WESTMINSTER shortly after sailing, and on the 3rd, He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) attacked the convoy, but were driven off by VEGA. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 4th.
 
Note: German X Air Corps flew He111's of KG26, Ju88's of KG30, and two reconnaissance squadrons flying He59's or Do17's.
 
Convoys MT.2 and MT.3 departed the Methil. Weather had delayed sailing and the number of ships was too large for one convoy. Destroyers ESCAPADE and JACKAL escorted the convoys, which arrived in the Tyne on the 3rd.
---
Ship loss to U-boat mines – Tanker BRITISH COUNCILLOR (7048grt) struck a mine laid by U.26 (Seekrieg) off Withernsea in 53‑48N, 00‑34E. Destroyers GALLANT and GRIFFIN stood by and took off the survivors. Forty three survivors were picked up by destroyer WHITLEY. Tug YORKSHIREMAN was dispatched to assist, but the tanker sank on the 3rd.
 
Ship transfer – Armed merchant cruiser VOLTAIRE arrived at Gibraltar from Portsmouth, sailed the same day for Malta and arriving, was in a collision with Danish steamer JENNY (843grt).
 
New York-Mediterranean French convoy – Having previously arrived from Halifax, French steamers LEOPOLD LD (5267grt, carrying 47 aircraft for shipment to France), OREGON (7706grt, carrying 34) and SAN PEDRO (5947grt, carrying 26) left New York, escorted by heavy cruisers DUPLEIX and FOCH (Force X) for Bermuda, departing there at 0800/5th. Meanwhile, on the 4th, large destroyer MAILLE BREZE sailed from Algiers and on the 6th VAUTOUR and ALBATROS from Oran, arriving at Casablanca on the 6th and 7th respectively. The destroyers then left on the 11th to meet the convoy in 31-30N, 19W. Destroyers FORTUNE, SIMOUN and BASQUE departed Casablanca on the 12th also to meet the convoy. Late on the 15th, MAILLE BREZE, FORTUNE, BASQUE were detached to Casablanca with the merchant ships, arriving at 1000/16th. The other warships, DUPLEIX, FOCH, VAUTOUR, ALBATROS and SIMOUN, proceeded to the Mediterranean with SIMOUN later detaching to Casablanca and the other ships to Oran, arriving on the 16th. The cruisers carried on to Toulon reaching there on the 18th, while MAILLE BREZE arrived there on the 23rd after escorting a steamer from Casablanca.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/3/2018 7:59:26 PM
Feb 3. Day 156
Saturday.

Finland
Fighting continues.
Quote:
The Finnish army succeeds in holding the Russian attack on the Mannerheim Line.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Germany
No notable activity. An entry from Garmisch-Partenkirchen, where American journalists have been invited to attend winter games, captures a moment of human interest:
Quote:
I feel sorry for Bob X, a young American correspondent who came down [to Garmisch] with us. He just couldn’t take the strain of association with the Nazis since the war began, which is understandable. Arriving here, he let himself go — a plain case of nerves — drank more than he should have, expressed his honest thoughts, which alcohol sometimes releases, but unfortunately also made a general nuisance of himself. I gather the Nazis, on his return to Berlin, will ask him to leave. Two of our leading American correspondents today refused to sit at the same table in the dining-room with him, which I thought was a little uncalled for. They are the two who court the Nazis the most.
Hitler decreed today that henceforth babies must have ration cards for clothing. A country is hard up when it has to save on diapers..
(Berlin Diary, pp 287-8)

Britain
No notable activity. But a touch of human interest:
Quote:
This morning I went with Arnold [the mechanic employed at the garage] to Lynn with the car, an Oldsmobile, to take some things to a storage warehouse at which the man told Arnold that the ARP had sent for the boss as they had received warning of raiders 30 miles away. We went round with the car shopping and forgot all about the warning. I saw a lot of girls who I went to school with and hoped that seeing me with A. (he’s very fat) and the Oldsmobile they would not think I’d married a war profiteer!
(Muriel Green in (Wartime Women, p 80)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats left base or returning to harbour. 17 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost.

Two ships (one neutral) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=7620:
Reet, an Estonian steam tanker of 815 tons, carrying unrecorded cargo from Methil to Gothenburg. Complement=18; lost=18.
Armanistan, a British steam merchant of 6805 tons, carrying 8300 tons of general cargo from Antwerp to Basra. Complement=54; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 09.36 hours … the unescorted and neutral Reet was hit on the starboard side by one G7e torpedo from U-58 and sank in less than four minutes about 80 miles east-southeast of Fair Isle. The U-boat had chased the ship for 13 hours, missing with the first two torpedoes at 02.15 and 04.52 hours and eventually firing the third torpedo from a distance of less than 300 meters. The Reet was reported missing after leaving Methil on 31 January.
… At 14.32 hours … the Armanistan … in convoy OG-16 was torpedoed and sunk by U-25 west of the River Tagus, Portugal. The crew was rescued by the Spanish merchant Monte Abril and landed at Tenerife.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Luftwaffe activity – Minesweeper SPHINX (Cdr J R N Taylor, SO 5th Minesweeping Flotilla), sweeping with minesweeper SPEEDWELL, was bombed and badly damaged at 1030 by He111's of KG26 (X Air Corps) 15 miles north of Kinnaird Head. … SPEEDWELL took SPHINX in tow, which parted at 1045, and she was unable to regain the tow for a time. After an unsuccessful attempt to tow was made by minesweepers SPEEDWELL and HARRIER, destroyer BOREAS went alongside and took off survivors but sustained damage to her hull forward in the process. SPHINX capsized in heavy weather early on the 4th and went ashore a total loss. Destroyers BOREAS and BRAZEN, minesweepers SKIPJACK, SPEEDWELL, HARRIER and tug WATERMEYER arrived at Invergordon on the 4th. The damage to BOREAS was repaired at Aberdeen completing on the 7th.
 
Ship movements – Light cruiser PENELOPE departed Portland for Rosyth to arrive on the 5th, but was delayed by fog and did not arrive until the 7th.
 
Destroyers KHARTOUM and KASHMIR arrived in the Clyde.
 
Destroyer JAGUAR arrived at Rosyth from Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyer ISIS departed Rosyth for the Clyde. Destroyer KANDAHAR was to have sailed in company, but had so many sick cases on board she was unable to leave.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers DERBYSHIRE and CIRCASSIA arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
_____
 
Minesweeping trawler FIREFLY (392grt) was damaged when a mine being hoisted inboard exploded near Dundee. … [11 officers and men were killed; fifteen wounded. One wounded later died. Firefly] was towed to Leith by minesweeping trawler WARDOUR (335grt) and arrived at Rosyth on the 4th.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.83GF sailed from Southend on 30 January, escorted by destroyers WHITEHALL and BROKE, and OB.83GF from Liverpool on the 1st with destroyers VERSATILE and WINCHELSEA. On the 3rd, they merged as OG.17F with thirty ships, escorted by BROKE, VERSATILE, WINCHELSEA on the 3rd and sloop ENCHANTRESS from the 3rd to 7th. All four escorts detached to convoy HG.17F. OG.17F was escorted by destroyer VELOX from the 5th to 8th, and destroyer HERO from the 7th to 8th, on which day it arrived at Gibraltar.
 
U.K.-Norwegian outbound convoy – Convoy ON.10 was to have sailed, but was delayed 24 hours and then another 24, and did not sail until the 5th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy TM, with an escort of the 1st Anti-Submarine Group, departed Newcastle, and arrived at Methil on the 4th escorted by the trawlers and destroyers ESCAPADE and JACKAL.
 
Convoy FS.86, escorted by sloops FLAMINGO and WESTON, departed the Tyne supported by destroyer JUNO, but was forced to anchor in heavy fog. Convoy FS.88 joined them, FLAMINGO and WESTON proceeded to Rosyth and left destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY to escort both convoys. WOOLSTON later had to detach to Sheerness as she was short of fuel. Both convoys arrived at Southend on the 9th. Convoy FS.87 was cancelled.
 
Ship’s collision – Sloop DEPTFORD, escorting convoy OB.84, collided with American steamer ANTIGUA (6982grt). Other sources show the merchant ship as British steamer ANTIGONE (4545grt). The sloop sustained only slight damage.

Mine damage – Dutch steamer LAERTES (5825grt) was damaged by mining off Royal Sovereign Light Vessel in 50‑43N, 00‑35E, and tug BUCCANEER was to sent to assist.

Luftwaffe anti-shipping activity – Norwegian steamer TEMPO (629grt) was bombed and sunk by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) off Longstone Light, Farne Island in 55-59N, 1-35W. Five crew were lost, and the survivors rescued by tug BRAHMAM.
 
Steamer KILDALE (3877grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) in 53‑47N, 00‑34E. Destroyer JACKAL was able to drive off further attacks, minesweeper trawler ST DONATS (349grt) took off the crew and she was towed to the Humber by tug YORKSHIREMAN.
 
Steamer YEWDALE (823grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps (He111's of KG26 or Ju88's of KG30) four miles NNE of Scarborough.
 
Steamer BEECHWOOD (4897grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) three miles east of Smiths Knoll Light Vessel.
 
Steamer HARLEY (400grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps (He111's of KG26 or Ju88's of KG30) eight miles SSE of Flamborough Head.
 
Steamer NEW MINSTER (967grt) was damaged by German bombing in 54‑49N, 01‑03E.
 
Trawler ROSE OF ENGLAND (223grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps (He111's of KG26 or Ju88's of KG30) five to six miles east of Scarborough Castle.
 
Trawler NAIRANA (225grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps (He111's of KG26 or Ju88's of KG30) in 54‑00N, 02‑20E.
 
Greek steamer ALEXANDRA (4355grt) was attacked and bombed by aircraft of German X Air Corps (He111's of KG26 or Ju88's of KG30) six miles off Longstone, but was not damaged.
 
Greek steamer NICOLAOU ZOGRAFIA (7050grt) was bombed and attacked by aircraft of German X Air Corps (He111's of KG26 or Ju88's of KG30) in 55-25N, 1-23W, but not damaged.

Ship transfer – Light cruiser DELHI arrived at Gibraltar from Portsmouth to join the Mediterranean Fleet, and departed on the 4th, arriving at Malta on the 6th to relieve light cruiser GALATEA as flagship Vice Admiral Destroyers, Mediterranean. The flag was shifted on the 8th.
 
Actions by Mediterranean Fleet ships – Destroyers DECOY and DEFENDER departed Gibraltar to carry out an anti-subgmarine patrol off the Portuguese coast. At 2310, DEFENDER was detached to stand by steamer OREGON which had broken down in 40-57N, 10-42W. DECOY arrived back at Gibraltar on the 8th.
 
French naval activiies – French heavy cruiser TOURVILLE and destroyers VAUBAN and AIGLE arrived at Malta at 0700 from Beirut carrying out a contraband patrol in the Aegean en route, and departed Malta the next day for Toulon.
 
French destroyers FORTUNE, SIMOUN and submarine PROTÉE departed Oran for Casablanca, passed Gibraltar on the 4th, and were sent to investigate an explosion near the Danish steamer JAVA (8681grt) in 36-34N, 8-55W.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/4/2018 5:52:21 PM
Feb 4. Day 157
Sunday. Waning crescent moon.

Finland
Fighting continues.

Germany
On the train from Munich to Lausanne:
Quote:
[Two of t]hree stories I must put down:
1. In Germany it is a serious penal offence to listen to a foreign radio stations. The other day the mother of a German airman received word from the Luftwaffe that her son was missing and must be presumed dead. A couple of days later the BBC in London, which broadcasts weekly a list of German prisoners, announced that her son had been captured. Next day she received eight letters from friends and acquaintances telling her they had heard her son was safe as a prisoner in England. Then the story takes a nasty turn. The mother denounced all eight to the police for listening to an English broadcast, and they were arrested.
(When I tried to recount this story on the radio, the Nazi censor cut it out on the ground that American listeners would not understand the heroism of the woman in denouncing her eight friends!)
2. The parents of a U-boat officer were officially informed of their son’s death. The boat was overdue and had been given up by the German Admiralty as lost. The parents arranged a church funeral. On the morning of the service the butcher called and wanted a few words with the head of the house in private. Next came the grocer. Finally friends started swarming in. They had all heard the BBC announce that the son was among those taken prisoner from a U-boat. But how to call off the funeral without letting the authorities know that someone in the confidence of the family had listened to a foreign station? If the parents wouldn’t tell, perhaps they themselves would be arrested. A family council was held, It was decided to go through with the funeral. After it was over, the mourners gathered in the parents’ home, were told the truth if they already don’t know it, and everybody celebrated with champagne.
(Berlin Diary, pp 288-9)

Britain
Quote:
Destroyers BASILISK, carrying the Prime Minister, the War Cabinet and the Chiefs of Staff, and BRILLIANT departed Dover for Boulogne.
(«naval-history.net»)

The Balkans
Quote:
Members of the Balkan Entente (Rumania, Yugoslavia, Greece and Turkey) declared their neutrality.
(Goralski, p 105)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-20) sailing from Helgoland; one (U-31) returning to Wilhelmshaven after 21 days. 16 U-boats at sea.

Two ships (one neutral) lost to torpedo attack. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=5695:
Hop, a Norwegian steam merchant of 1365 tons, in ballast from Bergen to Middlesbrough. Complement=17; lost=17.
Leo Dawson, a British steam merchant of 4330 tons, carrying iron ore from Narvik to Immingham. Crew complement=35; lost=35.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 04.17 hours … the Hop was torpedoed and sunk with all hands by U-37 near the Shetland Islands.
… At 21.25 hours the unescorted Leo Dawson was hit aft by one torpedo from U-37 about 15 miles east of Bressay, Shetlands. The master and 34 crew members were lost. The ship had been missed by a first torpedo at 21.11 hours.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser AURORA arrived at Scapa Flow, and armed merchant cruisers ASTURIAS and CALIFORNIA in the Clyde, all from Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser NEWCASTLE sailed from Scapa Flow, and armed merchant cruiser CARINTHIA from the Clyde, both on Northern Patrol.
 
Ships’ collision – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO collided with steamer LULONGA (821grt) while entering the Humber. CAIRO was not damaged, but the steamer was beached to prevent her sinking.
 
RN minelaying – Destroyers EXPRESS, IVANHOE, INTREPID, ESK arrived in the Humber at 1255 after Minelaying Operation JB in the North Sea. The minelaying was screened by Motor Torpedo Boats 22, 24, 25 which arrived in the Humber at 1228.
 
Submarine activity – Submarines SEAL and NARWHAL exercised in the Firth of Forth. Afterwards SEAL set off on patrol, while NARWHAL was to have joined convoy ON.10. When the convoy was delayed, NARWHAL returned to Rosyth.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer BRAZEN departed Invergordon to hunt for a submarine off Lossiemouth reported by aircraft, but was later recalled.
 
East Coast activity – Destroyers JERVIS and JUPITER departed Rosyth on the 4th, patrolled in the vicinity of Farne Island and then proceeded to the Humber. Destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY, waiting for convoy FS.87, also patrolled the area.
 
Ship movements – Destroyer COSSACK departed Rosyth for Scapa Flow, where she arrived on the 5th.
 
Destroyer KANDAHAR departed Rosyth for the Clyde, where she arrived on the 5th.
 
Destroyers KIPLING and KIMBERLEY departed Greenock for Scapa Flow with steamers KYLE FISHER (520grt) and FLORISTAN (5478grt). FLORISTAN arrived at Scapa Flow on the 6th.
 
VIP transportation – Destroyers BASILISK, carrying the Prime Minister, the War Cabinet and the Chiefs of Staff, and BRILLIANT departed Dover for Boulogne. Both ships returned to Dover that evening.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Destroyers WHITSHED, HAVANT, ARDENT departed Plymouth for a position 40 miles 270° from Cape Finisterre.
 
Destroyers WOLSEY, WINCHELSEA and sloop SANDWICH, escorting convoy SLF.18 west of Ushant in 48‑23N, 09‑27W, attacked a submarine contact.
 
East Coast convoy – Submarines UNITY and H.34 accompanied convoy FS.85 on the 3rd and 4th, when they arrived in the Nore. They were then escorted by patrol sloop PUFFIN on to Portsmouth on the 7th.
 
U.21 sank Yugoslav steamer VID (3547grt) in 58‑15N, 00‑48W with all hands.
[Editor’s note: This is the only reference I have seen to this sinking. U-21 was on its 7th patrol from Jan 27–Feb 9, and on Jan 31 sank Vidar, a Danish steamer. No Vid is listed in U-21’s raiding history]
Quote:

Ship groundings – Steamer BARON RUTHVEN (3178grt) ran aground off the Tees.
 
Norwegian steamer JERNFJELD (1369grt) ran aground off Whitby Bay.
 
Mining victim – French collier MARIE DAWN (2157grt) was damaged by a mine six miles NE of the Sunk with one crewman killed. She was abandoned by the survivors who reached Harwich, but then towed in by tugs.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.19 departed Halifax at 1400 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY and SKEENA, which detached on the 5th. Ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser AUSONIA which left on the 14th. The convoy was joined in Home Waters by destroyers VENETIA from convoy OB.89 and WITCH from convoy OA.89 from the 14th to 17th, when it arrived at Liverpool.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/5/2018 4:53:53 PM
Feb 5. Day 158
Monday.

Finland
Fighting continues.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
Quote:
Britain and France decided to send military aid to Finland
(Goralski, p 105)
Quote:
The Allied Supreme War Council approves a plan for intervention in Finland; meanwhile they send substantial help in aircraft, anti-tank and anti-aircraft guns. The expeditionary force is to comprise at least three divisions.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-652); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-10) sailing from Kiel and two (U-9, -33) from Welhelmshaven; one (U-13) returning to Wilhelmshaven after 13 days. 16 U-boats at sea. One U-boat (U-41) lost with all hands (49) on the 14th day of patrol. This is the 3rd U-boat lost in 1940.

One ship lost to torpedo attack; one ship (neutral) damaged. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=9874; total tonnage affected=17930:
Beaverburn, a Canadian owned but British registered steam merchant of 9874 tons, carrying general cargo from London to St. John, NB. Complement=77; lost=18.
Ceronia, a Dutch motor tanker of 8096 tons, en route from Las Piedras to Rotterdam either in ballast or with unspecified cargo. Crew complement unknown; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 13.10 hours … the Beaverburn … in convoy OA-84 was torpedoed and sunk by U-41 about 150 miles south of Berehaven, Co. Cork. One crew member was lost. The master and 75 crew members were picked up by the Narragansett and landed at Falmouth.
… At 03.32 hours on 5 Feb 1940 the unescorted and unarmed Ceronia was hit by a torpedo, but made it to Rotterdam under her own power.
The attacker must have been U-41… .

U-41 was sunk during her second attack on convoy OA-84 by HMS Antelope (H 36)… .
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Anti-U-boat activity – U.41, on her third war patrol, attacked convoy OB.84 south of Ireland… . Destroyer ANTELOPE escorting the convoy was able to sink U.41 in 49‑21N, 10‑04W at 1313 with the loss of all 49 crew, and also claimed to have sunk a second submarine, although U.41 was the only one in the area. The second attack was at 1125 and was later determined to be the wreck of tanker SAN ALBERTO lost in December in 49-18N, 9-50W.
 
Destroyer VANOC attacked a submarine contact near Morecambe Light Vessel in 53-53N, 2-29W.
 
Armed patrol yacht SHEMARA (588grt) made an attack on a submarine contact off Portland Bill in 50-25N, 2-29W.
 
U.K.-Norwegian outbound convoy – Convoy ON.10 of seven British, ten Norwegian, seven Swedish, four Finnish and one Estonian ship departed Methil escorted by destroyers IMOGEN, IMPERIAL, ILEX, DELIGHT, TARTAR and submarine NARWHAL. DELIGHT was ordered to Scapa Flow with dispatch on the 6th, and TARTAR was relieved by destroyer KIMBERLEY at sea. On 7th February, DELIGHT attacked a contact east of South Ronaldsay in 58-55N, 2-09E, and was joined by destroyers GALLANT and GRIFFIN. ON.10 arrived safely at Bergen on the 8th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.88 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer WOOLSTON and sloop GRIMSBY, but before arrival, WOOLSTON was detached to Sheerness to refuel. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 9th with FS.86 after being considerably delayed by heavy fog. Convoy FS.89 was cancelled.
 
Convoy MT.4 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers JACKAL, JAGUAR, sloop LONDONDERRY, and anti-submarine trawlers of the 3rd Anti-Submarine Group, and arrived in the Tyne on the 6th.
 
Weather delay on mining – Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA, escorted by destroyers ECHO and ECLIPSE, was to have departed Aberdeen on the 4th for minelaying operation LD 1 during the night of the 4th/5th, but was delayed by fog. The operation was finally conducted on the 6th/7th when 48 mines were laid.
 
Outbound convoy – Convoy OA.86 departed Southend and was dispersed on the 8th. No escorts are listed.
 
Mediterranean – Anti-aircraft cruiser CARLISLE arrived at Gibraltar from Devonport to work up after conversion to anti-aircraft ship, departed on the 8th for Malta, and arrived on the 10th.
 
Sloop FOLKESTONE arrived at Gibraltar from Malta.
 
Minesweeper FERMOY departed Port Said to relieve minesweeper GOSSAMER at Gibraltar.
 
French naval activities – French heavy cruiser TOURVILLE and destroyers VAUBAN and AIGLE departed Malta for Toulon.
 
French armed merchant cruiser EL D'JEZAIR stopped Portuguese steamer GUINE (2648grt) in the North Atlantic and removed a German citizen.
 
Merchant ship rescue – Steamer OREGON (6008grt), which had broken down on the 2nd with boiler problems, was located off Caesces, Portugal by destroyer DEFENDER. She had been attacked on 30 January in 45-40N, 11-36W while sailing with convoy SL.17. DEFENDER stood by and Danish salvage tug VALKYRIAN arrived to take her in tow. DEFENDER was relieved by destroyer VORTIGERN on the 8th, and OREGON arrived at Lisbon on the 10th.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoyConvoy SLF.19 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser MOOLTAN. Convoys SL.19 and SLF.19 merged on the 16th and SL.19’s escort, armed merchant cruiser PRETORIA CASTLE joined MOOLTAN. Destroyers VERITY, VIMY, WALPOLE and sloop SANDWICH relieved the armed merchant cruisers on the 17th and took the convoys on to their destination on the 20th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/6/2018 5:59:35 PM
Feb 6. Day 159
Tuesday. First quarter moon.

Finland
Fighting continues.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
The home front:
Quote:
…We yesterday received the first US [a printed news sheet produced by M-O]. I like it but hope it will grow bigger. We decided today to stretch a point and have ordered War Begins at Home[M-O publication] from the newsagent’s I had given up buying any books except the sixpenny lines but we decided to pay half each. Also sent subscription for US
(Muriel Green in Wartime Woman, p 80)
[Ed. expansion: With her mother and older sister Jenny, 18-year-old Muriel Green ran a small village garage and candy shop near the coast of Norfolk. She and her sister were both diarists for Mass-Observation (M-O), a private organization which collected anecdotal information about civilian behaviour.
Initially at odds with Government announcements, by early 1940 M-O was being used sporadically by government to assess home morale.
“Sixpenny” lines of books meant books like (but not exclusively) the various Penquin series, which cost sixpence (6d) each. Many volumes in the various Penguin series were also seen to challenge official government positions. As war progressed, government began relying on Penguin books as a means of reaching a broad spectrum of the British public.
]

[Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-50) sailing from Helgoland and 0ne (U-29) from Welhelmshaven; one (U-34) returning to Wilhelmshaven after 37 days. 17 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost to date=12; lost in 1940=3.

One ship lost to mining. Total tonnage lost to mining=1421:
Anu, an Estonian steam merchant of 1421 tons, carrying general cargo from Gothernburg via aberdeen to Dundee. Complement unknown; lost=7, including master’s wife.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
…[T]he Anu … struck a mine, laid on 12 December 1939 by U-13, off the entrance to River Tay and sank. The master, his wife and four crew members were lost. The cook later died of burns in a hospital in Dundee.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship maintenance/repairs – Battlecruiser REPULSE and destroyers ISIS, KASHMIR, KHARTOUM and KANDAHAR departed the Clyde for Devonport. ISIS called in at Falmouth for refitting, while REPULSE arrived at Plymouth for repairs and degaussing.
 
Light cruiser SHEFFIELD departed Scapa Flow, arrived at Rosyth on the 5th, then began repairs at South Shields on the 6th. These were completed on 15 March and she returned to duties with the 18th Cruiser Squadron.
 
U.K.-Norwegian outbound convoy – Light cruisers AURORA sailed from Scapa Flow and EDINBURGH from Rosyth, and rendezvoused to cover convoy ON.10.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers CALIFORNIA, escorted by destroyer GURKHA, and AURANIA arrived in the Clyde after Northern Patrol.

Destroyer BOADICEA (D 19) carrying the Prime Minister, the First Lord, the First Sea Lord and other important personages, departed Dover escorted by destroyer BEAGLE for Boulogne. The two ships returned to Dover that evening.
[Ed. comment: note similarities with an item recorded for Feb 4:
VIP transportation – Destroyers BASILISK, carrying the Prime Minister, the War Cabinet and the Chiefs of Staff, and BRILLIANT departed Dover for Boulogne. Both ships returned to Dover that evening.
The Allied Supreme War Council has been meeting re Finnish issues, and announcements were made on Feb 5. Whether this entry is a “ghost entry” is at question, IMHO, since I have seen no record of the PM and some of his senior war cabinet returning to England between Feb 4 and Feb 6.]
Quote:
Weather restrictions on East Coast convoys – Heavy fog “completely disorganized” the east coast convoys. FN.86, FS.88 and FN.87 were postponed for 24 hours, and FS.89 and FN.88 cancelled. The escort for FN.88 was to proceed to Rosyth, unless required to augment FN.89.
… 
Ship beachings – Steamer VERBORMILIA (3275grt) went ashore west of Fast Castle Point.
 
Steamer HIGHCLIFFE (3247grt) went ashore on Fitful Head in the Shetlands, and one of her lifeboats went adrift. Destroyers GALLANT and GRIFFIN searched unsuccessfully for the boat.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OG.17 was formed just from the 23 ships of convoy OA.85G (OB.85G did not sail), escorted by destroyers WOLVERINE and AMAZON. They were relieved off the Lizard by destroyer VIMY and sloop SCARBOROUGH, while the escort from the 6th to 13th was French destroyer TIGRE and escort ship MINERVE. The convoy arrived on the 14th.
 
U.K.=France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.25 departed Barry with steamers BARON CARNEGIE and BATNA escorted by destroyer MONTROSE, and arrived safely in the Loire.
 
Ships/ collision – French auxiliary minesweeper VETERAN (253grt) was sunk in an accidental collision with British cable ship ALERT off Calais near Cape Griz Nez in 50-58-20N, 1-43-54E. There were no casualties and ALERT's bow was only slightly damaged.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.18F departed Gibraltar with 33 ships. In the escort force was minesweeper GOSSAMER and submarine OTWAY which were returning to England for service in Home Waters. Both continued with the convoy until the 13th with OTWAY reaching Portsmouth on the 14th. Destroyer VORTIGERN escorted from the 6th to 8th, sloop FOLKESTONE from the 6th to 14th, sloop ENCHANTRESS from the 8th to 15th after detaching from convoy OG.17F, and destroyer VERSATILE from the 12th to 15th after detaching from OG.18F. The convoy arrived at Liverpool on the 15th, by which time FOLKESTONE had reached Portsmouth - on the 14th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/7/2018 7:43:47 PM
Feb 7. Day 160
Wednesday.

Finland
Fighting continues on the Mannerheim Line.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

[Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-562); launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats sailing on patrol; one (U-29) returning to Helgoland after 2 days. 16 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost in 1940=3. Total lost=12.

One ship lost to mining. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=4305:
Munster, a British motor passenger ship of 4305 tons, carrying general cargo from Belfast to Liverpool. Complement=45 + 190 passsengers; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
About 06.00 hours … the Munster … struck a mine laid on 6 January by U-30 in the Queens Channel and sank near Mersey Light. The master, 44 crew members and 190 passengers were picked up by the British coaster Ringwall and landed at Liverpool.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruisers DEVONSHIRE and BERWICK departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol and relieved sister ships NORFOLK and SUFFOLK.
 
Armed merchant cruisers DERBYSHIRE and CIRCASSIA departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyers COSSACK and SIKH were submarine hunting from Scapa Flow.
 
Ship collision damage – Destroyer JANUS brushed destroyer JUPITER while berthing in the Humber. The damage to JANUS required 48 hours to repair.
 
RN minelaying – Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA and minelaying destroyers ESK and EXPRESS, escorted by destroyers BRAZEN and BOREAS, departed Aberdeen for minelay LD 2 in the North Sea. The minelay was successfully completed and the ships arrived at Rosyth on the 8th.
 
Ship collision damage – Submarine H.43 and destroyer VETERAN collided in Plymouth Sound. VETERAN was not damaged, but H.43 required three days to repair.
 
Outbound convoys – Convoy OA.87 departed Southend escorted by destroyers VANESSA and WREN. VANESSA was replaced on the 8th by sloop WELLINGTON, and on the 9th, the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.86 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WITHERINGTON and WALPOLE. WALPOLE detached on the 8th, WITHERINGTON on the 9th, and the convoy dispersed on the 10th.
 
Convoy OB.87 departed Liverpool escorted by sloop ROCHESTER and destroyer WALKER from the 7th to 10th, when it dispersed.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.86 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WHITLEY and sloop EGRET. In heavy fog, the convoy anchored for the night, and arrived in the Tyne on the 9th.
 
Convoy FN.87 departed Southend escorted by destroyer VEGA, sloop STORK, destroyer JUPITER, and also arrived in the Tyne on the 9th. There was no convoy FN.88.
 
Convoy FS.90 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers JAGUAR, WESTMINSTER and sloop LONDONDERRY, and arrived at Southend on the 9th.
 
Convoy MT.5 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers VIVIEN, JAVELIN, sloop PELICAN, and anti-submarine trawlers of the 1st A/S Group, and arrived in the Tyne on the 8th.
 
Escort breakdown – Steamer CYPRIAN PRINCE (1988grt) departed Aberdeen, but due to an error, destroyers KIMBERLEY and KIPLING did not join her as escorts until later.
 
Repair and refit – Light cruiser AURORA arrived at Rosyth from Scapa Flow for repairs to her propellers and to undergo degaussing.
 
Light cruiser CERES completed her refit at Belfast, and then proceeded to the Mediterranean for duty with the Mediterranean Fleet, arriving at Malta on the 22nd.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Armed boarding vessel KINGSTON TURQUOISE (358grt), which had just left Kirkwall for the North Rona patrol, attacked a submarine contact off Sule Skerry in 59-15N, 4-40W. Destroyer SIKH joined her and tried to remake contact.
 
Ships patrols – Destroyers JAVELIN and VIVIEN patrolled in the vicinity of Farne Island during the night of the 6th/7th.
 
Ships’ collision – Patrol sloop MALLARD collided with sister ship PINTAIL off Harwich. PINTAIL's damage was slight and she was able to continue on patrol, but MALLARD required docking. Temporarily repaired at Harwich on the 8th and 9th, she went on to Lowestoft to repair from the 10th to 22nd.

Steamer MUNSTER (4305grt) was sunk near Mersey Light in 53‑56N, 03‑24W on a mine laid by U.30 on 9 January. All on board, 134 survivors in total, were rescued by steamer RINGWALL (407grt).
[Ed.: note discrepancy in total aboard ship from «uboat.net» tally, above.]
Quote:
Ship groundings – Steamer ELDONPARK (5184grt) went ashore at Elwick.
 
Polish steamer BUG went ashore at Rosehearty.
 
German minelaying – German minelayer COBRA laid an anti-submarine mine barrier off Borkum.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.19 departed Halifax at 0900 escorted by Canadian destroyers SAGUENAY, SKEENA and RESTIGOUCHE until detached on the 8th. Ocean escort was battleship REVENGE, which was in collision with tanker APPALACHEE (8826grt) of the convoy on the 7th. The tanker was extensively damaged, and REVENGE required ten days to repair, although she was able to continue and did not detach until the 14th. The convoy was joined in Home Waters by destroyers WOLVERINE and VANOC from convoy OB.92 and destroyer VANESSA from OA.9 between the 19th to 22nd, when HX.19 arrived at Liverpool.
 
French naval activities – French sloop COMMANDANTE RIVIERE with submarines RUBIS, SAPHIR and NAUTILUS departed Oran, and passed Gibraltar on the 8th en route for repairs to the submarines at Brest. These ships joined convoy 9R of eight steamers, escorted by sloop SAVORGNAN DE BRAZZA, which left Oran on the 6th. The convoy passed Gibraltar on the 8th, and in the Atlantic, joined convoy 63 KS for the passage to Brest. 63 KS of eight steamers departed Casablanca on the 8th, escorted by destroyer CYCLONE, patrol vessel GROENLAND and submarine PASCAL.
 
French light cruiser EMILE BERTIN departed Dakar to return to France in preparation for allied operations in Finland. She arrived at Casablanca on the 11th, left on the 15th, and reached Brest on the 17th. For the operations, the cruiser would be the flagship of Contre Amiral Derrien, Commander Force Z.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/7/2018 8:06:49 PM
7 Feb 1940 Day 160

Convicted IRA terrorists Peter Barnes and James Richards are executed at Winson Green prison, Birmingham, England for their part in a street bombing in Coventry which killed five innocent passers-by.

Toshihide Masukawa, the japanese physicist is born in Nagoya, Aichi Japan.
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/8/2018 5:57:15 PM
Feb 8. Day 161
Thursday. New moon.

Finland
Fighting continues.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-22, -57) sail from Welhelmshaven; three (U-51, -58, -59) return to Wilhelmshaven after 23, 13 and 11 days respectively. 15 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost to date=12; lost in 1940=3.

No ships lost to torpedo or mine. Total tonnage lost=0. (Data collated from «uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyers GALLANT and BOREAS unsuccessfully searched for a submarine reported at 2057, nine miles 207° from Sumburgh Head.
 
Destroyer GRIFFIN departed Aberdeen to search for a submarine SSE of Buchanness. Destroyers IVANHOE and ESCAPADE joined her to assist in the hunt.
 
Destroyer KIPLING attacked a submarine contact in Shapinsay Sound in 59-01N, 2-51W.
 
Anti-submarine trawlers of the 17th Anti-Submarine Striking Force were searching for destroyer DELIGHT's contact of the day before – the 7th - NNE of St Abbs Head in 56-04N, 2-14W. LE TIGRE (516grt) attacked a contact and signalled CAPE WARWICK (516grt) which altered course to assist. CAPE WARWICK then struck a submerged object a glancing blow on the starboard side and dropped depth charges.
 
Ship movement – Light cruiser SHEFFIELD arrived in the Tyne.
 
Escort duties to Scapa – Destroyer DARING rendezvoused with tanker BRITISH GOVERNOR (6840grt) and former German merchant ship ILSENSTEIN (8216grt) for escort to Scapa Flow, where they arrived safely on the 10th. ILSENSTEIN was sunk as a blockship at Scapa Flow on the 18th.
 
Destroyer movement, home waters – Destroyers ESK and EXPRESS arrived at Aberdeen, and BOREAS departed
 
Destroyers BRAZEN arrived at Rosyth, as did INTREPID and IVANHOE, and JAVELIN after dark.
 
Destroyers KIPLING and KIMBERLEY arrived at Scapa Flow. KIPLING immediately departed again to hunt a submarine.
 
Destroyers GURKHA and NUBIAN departed the Clyde for Scapa Flow.
 
Refitting – Netlayer GUARDIAN departed Scapa Flow for Rosyth, and from there was due to proceed to the Clyde for refitting.
 
Minelaying – Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA and destroyers ESK and EXPRESS departed Aberdeen later that day on minelaying operation LD 3.
 
Submarine activity –Submarines TRUANT arrived at Rosyth from patrol, and SEALION departed on patrol.
 
Submarine TRITON and minesweepers SEAGULL and SHARPSHOOTER departed Scapa Flow for Rosyth where they arrived on the 9th.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser ANDANIA arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser WOLFE departed the Clyde to relieve light cruiser NEWCASTLE on Northern Patrol Station 53 and allow her to proceed to Station 3.
 
Armed merchant cruiser FORFAR arrived at Greenock from Northern Patrol.
 
Irish Sea – Armed merchant cruiser CIRCASSIA investigated the report of a Fleetwood trawler about the sighting of a large merchant ship in company with a submarine.
 
U-boat to Ireland – U.37 landed two agents in Donegal Bay, Ireland.
 
U.K.-Norwegian inbound cconvoy – Convoy HN.10 with two British, nineteen Norwegian, nine Swedish, two Finnish, six Estonian and one Panamanian ship departed Bergen escorted by destroyers IMOGEN, IMPERIAL, ILEX, DELIGHT and submarine NARWHAL. DELIGHT detected a submarine contact SSE of Copinsay in 58‑55N, 02‑09W, and destroyers GALLANT, GRIFFIN and anti-submarine trawlers of the 11th Anti-Submarine Group joined in the hunt. Destroyer GURKHA and NUBIAN departed Scapa Flow the same day on anti-submarine patrol and attacked a contact shortly after sailing. On the 10th, destroyers KIMBERLEY and NUBIAN took over the escort of the twelve ships of the west coast portion of HN.10, while destroyers KANDAHAR, KHARTOUM, KASHMIR and KINGSTON departed the Clyde, also on the 10th to meet this section. At dawn on the 11th, NUBIAN and KIMBERLEY left the convoy in 58-20N, 09-00W. (After her escort duties, destroyer GURKHA was to join.) On the 12th, a German submarine was located near the west coast portion of HN.10 and attacks by destroyers GURKHA and NUBIAN prevented any damage being done to the convoy. Meanwhile, the east coast portion of the convoy had arrived at Methil safely on the 11th.
 
East Coast convoy – Convoy FS.91 departed the Tyne at 2300, escorted by destroyers VIVIEN and JAVELIN, and arrived at Southend on the 10th.
 
South American Station – Heavy cruisers DORSETSHIRE and SHROPSHIRE arrived at Buenos Aires and Montevideo, respectively, to refuel after escorting heavy cruiser EXETER.
 
Germans against the blockade – German steamers CORDILLERA (12,055grt) had departed Livinston, Guatemala, on 25 August and arrived at Murmansk on 10 September while PHOENICIA (4124grt) had left Curacao on the same day in August and reached Murmansk in mid-September. There, they were assigned respectively as accommodation and replenishment ships for German submarines to operate against British lumber and ore shipping out of Murmansk and Narvik. Both steamers departed Murmansk on 2 December 1939 for Zapadnaya Litsa Bay, which was to be known as Basis Nord, and fishing vessel SACHSENWALD (650grt) arrived there with supplies a day earlier. Her job was to serve as a dispatch vessel. At the end of November, U.36 and U.38 departed Germany for Basis Nord, but were reassigned for operations against British shipping off northern Norway. The base itself was never used, CORDILLERA almost immediately returned to Murmansk, and then completed her voyage home reaching Hamburg on 8 February.
 
German steamer KONIGSBERG (6466grt) departed Para, Brazi, but returned on the 16th after failing to break away from coastal patrol boats.
 
On the 8th, a Berlin communiqué admitted the following merchant shipping losses - 13,196 tons captured in enemy harbours (steamers POMONA, CHRISTOPH V. DOORNUM and HAGEN in September 1939), 82,236 tons captured at sea by the enemy, and 141,525 tons scuttled to avoid capture. (See British list of 30 January).
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/9/2018 7:31:41 PM
Feb 9. Day 162
Friday.

Finland
Fighting continues on the Mannerheim Line.

Germany
Quote:
General von Manstein is appointed Commander-in-Chief of the newly formed XXXVIII Army Corps.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Britain
No notable activity.

U.S.A.
Quote:
Roosevelt sent Under Secretary of State Sumner Welles to Britain, France, Germany, and Italy, to report back on “present conditions in Europe”. Welles was actually sounding out the prospects for peace but found no interest in any of the Axis or Allied capitals. The omission of Russia from Welles’s itinerary was significant. The Soviet Union was a pariah among nations. its Finnish and Polish invasions were roundly condemned internationally. With Welles visiting the other major combatants, Moscow’s suspicions of the West deepened and added to Russia’s sense of isolation.
(Goralski, pp 105-6)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-23) sailing from Wilhelmshaven on patrol; three boats (U-221, -24, -44) returning to Wilhelmshaven after 14, 14 and 35 days respectively. 13 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=3. Total lost=12.

One ship lost to mining. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=5406:
Chagres, a British steam merchantman of 5406 tons, carrying 1500 tons of bananas from Victoria, cameroons to Garston. Complement=64; lost=2.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 01.05 hours … the Chagres … struck a mine, laid on 6 January by U-30 and sank 5.5 miles bearing 270° from the Bar Light Vessel off Liverpool. Two crew members were lost. The master and 61 crew members were picked up by the HMS Loch Montreith (FY 135) … and landed at Liverpool.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Home waters? – Battleship WARSPITE and battlecruiser HOOD with destroyers FAULKNOR, FAME, FOXHOUND, FORTUNE, FURY, FORESIGHT, FIREDRAKE and FORESTER departed the Clyde at 1130 on patrol. FAME and FORESTER refuelled at Sullom Voe on the 11th and returned to the force, FAULKNOR, FOXHOUND, FORTUNE refuelled on the 13th, FURY, FORESIGHT, FIREDRAKE on the 14th, and FORESTER again on the 15th.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers NUBIAN and GURKHA arrived at Scapa Flow from the Clyde.
 
Destroyers KASHMIR, KANDAHAR, KHARTOUM departed Rosyth for the Clyde.
 
Escort change – Armed merchant cruiser CIRCASSIA escorting Norwegian steamer SOLFERINO (2580grt) requested a destroyer, and GURKHA was detailed to take over escort.
 
Blockade activity – Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE brought in Norwegian steamer TRAFALGAR (5542grt) for investigation. She was later boarded and released.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers PATROCLUS and AURANIA departed the Clyde for Northern Patrol.
 
Light cruiser GLASGOW departed Rosyth to relieve sister ship SOUTHAMPTON on patrol off North Cape in Operation WR. SOUTHAMPTON was to proceed to Scapa Flow for a week and then relieve another sister ship NEWCASTLE, also on Northern Patrol.
 
Local patrols – Destroyers KIMBERLEY and KIPLING departed Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyers GALLANT and BOREAS were patrolling in the vicinity of Rattray Head.
 
Destroyer TARTAR was patrolling between Muckle Flugga and a position 20 miles north.
 
Minelaying – The second half of Minelaying operation LD 1 was conducted when 42 mines were laid the night of the 9th/10th by minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA and destroyers ESK and EXPRESS.
 
Ship reassignment – Destroyer GRAFTON of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla departed Harwich for Humber where she arrived later that day. She was attached to the Humber for patrol operations.
 
U.K._France outbound convoy – Convoy AXS 12 departed Southampton escorted by sloop ABERDEEN, and arrived at Brest on the 11th.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.11 with seven British, thirteen Norwegian, one Swedish, two Danish, three Finnish and one Estonian ship departed Methil escorted by destroyers ECHO, ESCAPADE, ECLIPSE and ENCOUNTER. Three ships were detached and did not proceed to Norway, including blockship BRANKSEA (214grt) bound for for Scapa Flow in tow of tug PRIZEMAN. Submarine NARWHAL sailed with the convoy, but lost touch during the night of the 10th/11th February, and was ordered to patrol and then return to Rosyth. Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed the Humber on the 10th and joined the convoy in support on the 11th. ON.11 arrived safely at Bergen on the 12th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.89 departed Southend, escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD, BITTERN and HASTINGS, and arrived at Methil on the 11th.
 
Convoy FN.90 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WOOLSTON, JANUS and sloop GRIMSBY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 10th.
 
Convoy MT.6 departed Methil, escorted by destroyers WHITLEY, JUPITER and sloop EGRET, and arrived in the Tyne the next day.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer GRIFFIN departed Aberdeen and joined destroyers BOREAS, IVANHOE and ESCAPADE sweeping for a submarine reported one mile SSE of Buchan Ness in 57-34N, 1-42W. During the sweep, GRIFFIN dropped depth charges on a contact four miles NNE of Buchan Ness in 57-34N, 1-42W.
 
North Atlantic outbound convoy – Convoy OB.89 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WINCHELSEA and VENETIA from the 9th to 12th, when they detached to join HX.18 and HXF.19 respectively. OB.89 dispersed on the 14th.
 
U-boat minelaying – U.9 laid mines off Tarbett Ness in Cromarty Firth during the night of the 9th/10th which accounted for one merchant ship on 4 May.
German naval minelaying – During the night of the 9th/10th, German destroyers FRIEDRICH ECKHOLDT, RICHARD BEITZEN and MAX SCHULTZ laid 110 magnetic mines in the Orfordness-Shipwash area. Destroyers WILHELM HEIDKAMP, THEODOR RIEDEL, HERMANN SCHOEMANN were at sea supporting this minelay as well as one off Cromer Knoll being laid at the same time (following). Six merchant ships totalling 28,496 tons were lost in the Orfordness-Shipwash field [between Feb 11 and March 12].

Trawler AGNES ELLEN (293grt) sank on a mine sailing from Holyhead to Workington on the west coast.
 
Luftwaffe attacks – Minesweeping trawlers FORT ROYAL…, ROBERT BOWEN…, THOMAS ALTOFT and OHM were operating off Aberdeen when they were attacked and bombed by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps). FORT ROYAL was sunk with the loss of [7 of her complement] and ROBERT BOWEN with [her entire crew of 14]. OHM was damaged by near misses, but she and THOMAS ALTOFT rescued survivors and returned to Aberdeen.
 
Steamer BOSTON TRADER (371grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps (Note: He111's of KG26 or Ju88's of KG30, also following) one quarter mile SE by S of Blakeney Bell Buoy.
 
Hopper barge FOREMOST 102 (833grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps, four miles west of Bell Rock. Paddle minesweeper BRIGHTON QUEEN stood by, and the barge was towed to Dundee by minesweeping trawler EQUERRY (369grt).
 
Steamer CLINTONIA (3106grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps, two miles east of Flamborough Head.
 
Steamer LAURIESTON (1304grt) was bombed and damaged by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) seven miles east of Coquet Island.
 
Steamer CREE (4791grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps, five miles east of Rattray Head. Steamer DALLINGTON COURT (6889grt) stood by and was joined by destroyer GRIFFIN as destroyer ACHATES headed for them to assist. Tug STALWART was sent to take the damaged ship in tow. During this time, GRIFFIN was herself machine gunned by aircraft of German X Air Corps three miles 137° from Buchanness, and two crew wounded.

 
Trawler LOWDOCK (276grt) was bombed and damaged by aircraft of German X Air Corps, two and a half miles east of Scarborough.
 
Paddle minesweeper PLINLIMMON was attacked by aircraft of German X Air Corps, four miles 330° from Bass Rock.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.18 with 34 ships departed Gibraltar escorted by destroyer ACTIVE from the 9th to 10th, and French destroyer VALMY and French armed trawler VIKING from the 9th to 16th. The convoy split In Home Waters, with HG.18 being escorted by destroyer VISCOUNT and HG.18B by destroyer VANQUISHER, both from the 16th to 19th, when the convoys arrived at Liverpool.
 
Mediterranean – On the 8th at 0800, Vice Admiral J C Tovey CB, DSO, transferred his flag as Vice Admiral, Destroyers, Mediterranean Fleet, from light cruiser GALATEA to light cruiser DELHI, and then to destroyer WRESTLER at sunset the same day. GALATEA then left Malta on the 9th to return England, called at Gibraltar on the 11th/12th and on leaving, was attached to Western Approaches Command to intercept German merchant ships which had departed Vigo on the 9th/10th (following). She arrived at Plymouth on the 15th after screening heavy cruiser EXETER on the final leg of her voyage back to England.
 
German blockade running – During the night of the 9th/10th, German steamers ROSTOCK (2542grt), MOREA (1927grt), WAHEHE (4709grt), WANGONI (7848grt), ORIZABA (4354grt) and ARUCAS (3359grt) slipped out of Vigo to attempt to return to Germany.
 
Mediterranean – Polish troopship BATORY (14, 287grt) and French destroyer L'ALCYON arrived at Gibraltar from Marseilles, and left on the 10th to return to Marseilles.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/10/2018 5:40:42 PM
Feb 10. Day 163
Saturday.

Finland
Quote:
At a meeting of the Finnish Defence Council attended by Prime Minister Ryti, Foreign Minister Tanner and General Mannerheim, three possible political approaches to the USSR are discussed: (1) to offer the Russians, as a peace concession, the island off Hanko, which they demanded when hostilities began; (2) to continue the war with active support from Sweden (assuming that is forthcoming); (3) as a last resource, to accept the offer of intervention by Great Britain and France.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Germany
Quote:
Germany and the Soviet Union concluded an expanded trade treaty involving increases in material to be exchanged. (By the time Germany invaded Russia, Moscow had delivered 1.5 million tons of grain, a million tons of mineral oil, and vast amounts of chrome and manganese. Germany procrastinated during the 16 months the treaty remained in effect but did provide substantial amounts of raw materials and military goods, including the heavy cruiser Lützow.)
(Goralski, p 106)

Britain
No notable activity. Life on the Home Front:
Quote:
Mon anniversaire et j’ai dix-neuf ans! I received War Begins at Home. We are very pleased with it and are especially gratified because we have four observations printed in it. I have one on evacuation and Jenny two, and one we both claim because we both put it. The only snag about it is we daren’t lend the book to anybody in the village now because we are afraid it would ‘get round’ whom we had written about and it is not very complimentary to village behaviour …
(Muriel Green in Wartime Women, pp 80-1)

U.S.A.
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. No U-boats leaving on patrol; one boat (U-17) returning to Wilhelmshaven after 13 days. 13 U-boats at sea. No Ul-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=3. Total lost=12.

Two ships (both neutral) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=8112:
Silja, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1259 tons, carrying salt from Trapani via Gibraltar to Bergen. Complement=15; lost=15.
Bergerdijk, a Dutch steam merchantman of 6853 tons, carrying wheat and maize from New York to Rotterdam. Complement unrecorded; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
The neutral Silja … left Gibraltar on 5 February and was reported missing thereafter.
At 20.59 hours …, U-37 fired one torpedo at an unescorted steamer about 75 miles west of Cape Clear, Ireland. The vessel broke in two after being hit aft. The stern part sank immediately and the fore part followed after a few minutes. This must have been the Silja.
… At 17.03 hours … the Burgerdijk … was stopped by U-48 southwest of the Scillies after being followed for three hours. The master came with the papers on board and it was discovered that he had orders to go to The Downs, so the crew and passengers had to abandon ship. At 18.45 hours, the vessel was hit by one torpedo amidships and sank. The survivors were picked up by the Dutch steam merchant Edam from the same shipping company.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ships’ collision – Heavy cruiser SUFFOLK was in a collision with steamer MASIRAH (6578grt) off Little Cumbrae and was badly damaged abreast B-turret with three men killed, five  missing and eight injured, three of them seriously. The steamer was seriously damaged and anchored in Rothesay Bay. SUFFOLK arrived at Govan and began repairs on the 12th which were not completed until 10 April.
 
Ship assignment – Destroyer HAVELOCK … was completed, and after working up at Portland, joined the 9th Destroyer Flotilla.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruisers WOLFE and FORFAR departed the Clyde for  Northern Patrol, and armed merchant cruiser LETITIA arrived back.
 
Submarine reconaissance – Submarines SEAL and TRIAD departed Rosyth on a special mission to investigate the courses of German iron ore ships off the Norwegian coast.
 
Polish submarine patrol – Polish submarine WILK departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy SA.29 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by sloops FOXGLOVE and ROSEMARY, and arrived at Brest on the 12th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.91 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WESTMINSTER, JAVELIN and sloop LONDONDERRY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 11th.
 
Convoy FS.92 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers WHITLEY, JUPITER and sloop EGRET. WHITLEY and EGRET attacked a submarine contact NNW of St Abbs Head, in 56-01. 5N, 2-14. 5W, and the convoy arrived at Southend on the 12th.
 
Convoy MT.7 departed Methil, and arrived in the Tyne the next day. Convoy MT.8 was cancelled.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer WINDSOR made an attack on a submarine contact south of the Scilly Isles in 49‑16N, 6‑19W.
 
Armed boarding vessel NORTHERN ISLES (655grt) attacked U.53 north of North Rona in 59-58N, 5-43W.
 
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Destroyers COSSACK, SIKH and MOHAWK departed Scapa Flow to escort convoy HN.10B from the Norwegian coast.
 
Escort duty – Destroyer GURKHA was involved in the escort of tanker ATHELKNIGHT (8940grt).
 
Destroyer deployment – Destroyers IVANHOE and GRIFFIN arrived at Aberdeen. GRIFFIN departed again that day to relieve destroyer BOREAS on patrol off the northeast coast, and BOREAS reached Aberdeen on the 11th.
 
Destroyer INGLEFIELD departed the Clyde for Rosyth.
 
Home waters ship movement – Steamer HOUSATONIC (5559grt), escorted by destroyers DIANA and DARING, departed Muckle Flugga for Rosyth. Tanker BRITISH GOVERNOR (6840grt) joined them on passage and all four ships reached Rosyth on the 11th.
 
Minelaying – Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA with destroyers ESK and EXPRESS departed Rosyth to lay 60 mines in minefield LD 2 during the night of the 10th/11th.
 
Boat deployment – Motor torpedo boats MTB.22, MTB.24, MTB.25 departed the Nore for Blyth to act under the command of Commander in Chief, Rosyth.
 
Minesweeping – Auxiliary minesweeper SALVO swept the first magnetic mine with an LL sweep off Sunk Light Vessel.
 
Outbound convoy – Convoy OA.89 departed Southend escorted by sloop FOWEY. Destroyer WITCH joined the escort on the 11th, both warships detached on the 12th, and the convoy dispersed on the 13th.
 
Ship loss – Blockship BRANKSEA (214grt) sank off Girdle Ness at 0500 for no apparent reason, and the mate of the tug was lost attempting to free the tow.
 …
Luftwaffe activity – Trawler THERESA BOYLE (224grt) was bombed and sunk by He111's of German KG26 (X Air Corps) 115 miles east by north of Aberdeen, and her survivors rescued by minesweeping trawlers BRABANT (240grt) and ALMANDINE (295grt) after they were located by British aircraft.
 
Mine damage – Dutch steamer GALLIA (9974grt) was damaged on a mine off the Downs.
 
Destroyer activity – Destroyers HASTY and HERO departed Gibraltar for England, screened heavy cruiser EXETER, after joining her on the 13th in 43-00N, 17-40W, and searched for German blockade runners before arriving at Plymouth and Portsmouth, respectively, on the 15th. Both destroyers joined the Home Fleet in mid-March after refitting.
 
U-boat deployment – U.26, U.37, U.48 were deployed west of the English Channel to intercept warships ARK ROYAL, RENOWN and EXETER returning to England from the South Atlantic. This deployment continued until the 14th, without any contact being made.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer DECOY departed Gibraltar for Freetown.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.20 departed Freetown on the 10th escorted by armed merchant cruiser ESPERANCE BAY until the 25th, and SLF.20 departed Freetown on the 14th, escorted by armed merchant cruiser CHESHIRE. The two convoys merged on the 25th and were joined by destroyers VANQUISHER, VANSITTART, VERSATILE and VETERAN until the 28th, when they all arrived in the UK.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/11/2018 7:15:42 PM
Feb 11. Day 164
Sunday.

Finland
Quote:
Intense fighting developed between the russians and Finns on the Karelian front as the Red Army launched what was to become the decisive assault on the Mannerheim Line. About 140,000 Russians attacked on a 12-mile front, a massive concentration of seven men each yard.
(Goralski, p 106)
Quote:
The Soviet 7th Army breaches the Mannerheim Line. The Finns retire in good order to a second defensive line.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Bomber Command night operations (including leaflet raids) remain suspended because of weather conditions.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Three U-boats leaving on patro, one (U-29) from Helgoland and two (U-14, -8) from Wilhelmshavenl; no boats returning from patrol. 15 U-boats at sea. No Ul-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=3. Total lost=12.

Four ships (three neutral) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=7471:
Togimo, a British steam fishing trawler of 290 tons, carrying15 tons of fresh fish from the fishing grounds. Complement unrecorded; lost=1.
Orania, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1854 tons, carrying maize, bran and oil cake from Buenos Aires to Malmö and Åhus. Complement=24; lost=14.
Snaestad, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 4114 tons, in ballast from Bergen to Philadelphia. Complement=36; lost=2.
Bergerdijk, a Dutch steam merchantman of 6853 tons, carrying wheat and maize from New York to Rotterdam. Complement unrecorded; lost=0.

One ship damaged by torpedoes. Returned to service in June 1941:
Linda, an Estonian steam merchantman of 1213 tons, carrying coal from Blyth to Gothenburg. Complement unregistered; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 03.30 hours …, U-37 spotted a light of a fishing trawler 68 miles southwest of Milford Haven and fired a warning shot. The Togimo … put out the lights, turned away and tried to escape so the U-boat opened fire with the deck gun at 04.58 hours. The trawler sank after 26 rounds were fired. The survivors were picked up by the Spanish steam merchant Monte Navajo.
… At 23.54 hours … the unescorted Orania was hit by one torpedo from U-50 and sank within three minutes 65 miles north-northeast of Flugga Lightvessel, Shetland Islands. The U-boat had spotted the illuminated vessel at 22.40 hours, but was not able to identify her as neutral. The wife of the master was also aboard. All hands on board abandoned ship in two lifeboats, but one of them with 14 occupants was never seen again. The survivors in the other boat were picked up the next day by HMS Faulknor (H 62) …, transferred to HMS Foxhound (H 69)… and landed at Lerwick.
… At 11.00 hours ... the neutral Snestad was hit aft by one torpedo from U-53 about 100 miles west of the Hebrides. After the crew abandoned ship in three lifeboats, the ship was hit by a coup de grâce and sank within 3 minutes. Because one of the boats was damaged, the survivors were distributed among the other two lifeboats. They were all picked up after 22 hours by Albert L. Ellsworth on her way to Bergen. …
… At 18.20 hours ... the Linda was hit by one torpedo from U-9and broke in two. The forepart sank immediately and the stern followed four minutes later.

At 22.30 hours ... the unescorted Imperial Transport … was hit on port side in the empty #6 tank by one torpedo from U-53 (Grosse) while steaming at 12 knots on a non-evasive course en route from Scapa Flow to Trinidad in ballast about 200 miles west-northwest of Butt of Lewis in position 59°00N/12°00W. The tanker immediately began to break in two and the forward part broke off completely within 5 minutes after the hit. The last two men had to jump over a gap of 2 feet to get to the stern section. All 43 crew members and gunners (the ship was armed with one 4.7 gun) then abandoned ship in both aft lifeboats in the very dark night, but two crewmen fell overboard and drowned during the launch of the port boat. Later the master and the other occupants of his boat reboarded the ship and tried to attract the attention of an illuminated neutral vessel sighted during the night, but to no avail. The remaining crew members also returned to the ship after 17 hours when it became clear that the stern section will not sink. They could not send distress signals because the wireless station had been destroyed, so they painted “SEND HELP URGENT” on deck in case if they were spotted by an aircraft. As the sea was rather choppy at that time they waited for the weather to improve until raising steam and sailing off with not more than 4 knots during the morning of 13 February, passing the still drifting bow section which was about 45 feet out of the water. Just before dusk on 14 February and after sailing the stern section more than 130 miles they met four British destroyers of which HMS Kingston (F 64) … remained with Imperial Transport to escort her. The next morning the weather was deteriorating and the tanker had to stop to examine the forward bulkhead and then tried to sail by the stern, but just went round in circles. After an unsuccessful attempt to take her in tow, the destroyer took all men off the ship for the night. On 16 February, the tug HMS Buccaneer (W 49)and HMS Forester (H 74) … arrived and the master asked to be returned to the tanker for the salvage operation, but the weather was too bad so during the afternoon he and his crew were all transferred to HMS Forester which landed them at Scapa Flow on 17 February. The tug made three fruitless attempts to tow the stern section, but it could only be moved after the tugs HMS St. Martin (W 27) and HMS Englishman arrived and were escorted to the Clyde by HMS Gleaner (J 83)… . HMS Mohawk (F 31) … screened the salvage operation from 20 to 23 February. On 26 February, the remains of the tanker were beached on the Isle of Bute in Kilchattan Bay.

The stern section of Imperial Transport was later salvaged and docked in … Glasgow. The battered bulkhead and all distorted material cut away and fitted with a new fore part that was built to the original plans by William Hamilton & Co Ltd, Port Glasgow and was launched bow first with deckhouse, mast, derricks and auxiliary equipment complete. The ship returned to service in June 1941.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.10B with twenty Norwegian, seven Swedish and two Finnish ships departed Bergen on the 11th, escorted by destroyers COSSACK, SIKH, MOHAWK and TARTAR, with twelve of the ships being detached down the west coast of Britain. Next day, HN.11 with one British, fifteen Norwegian, ten Swedish and one Finnish ship left Bergen and were escorted by the same warships from HN.10B, but in this case, none of the ships were bound for west coast ports. Still on the 12th, COSSACK and GURKHA attacked a submarine contact northeast of Sumburgh Head in 60-12N, 00-22W, and on the 13th SIKH also attacked a contact, off Aberdeen in 57-15. 7N, 1-47W. That same day, the 13th, destroyer DIANA departed Rosyth to relieve destroyers COSSACK and GURKHA for operation DT. They reached Rosyth later in the day, as did the east bound section of HN.10B. Light cruisers EDINBURGH and ARETHUSA also arrived in Rosyth, on the 14th, and the later convoy, HN.11 safely reached Methil on the 15th.
 
Ship damage – Destroyer GALLANT, leaving Aberdeen, damaged her propellers on a submerged object, and was docked for examination.
 
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived at Scapa Flow from Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser ASTURIAS departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Blockade activity – Heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE intercepted Norwegian steamer BORGLAND (3636grt) and requested a trawler to take her in to Kirkwall.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer EXPRESS attacked a submarine contact off Flamborough Head in 54‑13N, 00‑08E.
 
Destroyer KINGSTON was submarine hunting 22 miles west by south of Dubh Artch.

Anti-submarine trawler HUDDERSFIELD TOWN (399grt), escorting a convoy, attacked a submarine contact off the Smalls in 51-38N, 5-57W. Destroyer WINCHELSEA joined in the hunt.

Minelaying – During the night of the 11th/12th, minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA with destroyers EXPRESS and ESK laid the 52 mines in minefield LD 3 (first half). After the operation, the minelayer anchored in Yarmouth Roads.

U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.88GF departed Southend on the 8th, escorted by destroyer BROKE which was relieved on the 10th by sloop BIDEFORD and destroyer VETERAN, while OB.88GF sailed from Liverpool, also on the 8th with 29 ships escorted by sloop LEITH and destroyer VERSATILE. On the 11th, they merged as OG.18F. Destroyer VERSATILE escorted the convoy on the 11th before detaching to HG.18F, sloops LEITH and  BIDEFORD were with the convoy from the 11th to 17th, and destroyer ACTIVE joined it in the Gibraltar approaches out of Gibraltar, where OG.18F arrived on the 17th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.92 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers JUPITER, VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN, and arrived in the Tyne on the 13th.
 
Convoy FS.93 departed the Tyne at 2300 escorted by destroyers VEGA, JAGUAR and sloop STORK, and arrived at Southend on the 13th.

Naval aspects of the German-Soviet trade pact – Trade negotiations between Germany and Russia which began in the latter part of 1939 were signed in Moscow. As part of the treaty, German handed over the incomplete heavy cruiser LUTZOW, plans for battleship BISMARCK, heavy naval guns, and about thirty aircraft including ME.109 fighters, ME.110 fighter bombers and JU.88 bombers. The sale of incomplete heavy cruisers SEYDLITZ and PRINZ EUGEN and turrets of two of the Z-programme battleships had also been discussed during the negotiations, but had been vetoed by Hitler on 8 December.
 
Blockade activiy – Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL, battlecruiser RENOWN, and destroyers HASTY and HERO, which departed Gibraltar on the 10th to return to England, searched for the German ships which had escaped from Vigo (Operation VO). Other ships taking part included aircraft carrier HERMES which left Freetown at 1200/11th, light cruiser GALATEA from Gibraltar at 1800/12th, and French destroyers TRIOMPHANT and FOUGUEUX on patrol in 43-00N between 13 and 11W. Destroyer departures from Plymouth were KEITH, WAKEFUL and VETERAN on the 9th,  ANTELOPE on the 10th to join ARK ROYAL at 0900/12th in 45-00N, 15-00W, ACASTA, WHITSHED, VESPER at 1430/11th with ARDENT to sail as soon as possible, and WREN, WOLVERINE and HEARTY at 0830/12th. Aircraft from ARK ROYAL sighted several of the German steamers, leading to the capture of ROSTOCK and MOREA.
 
French naval activity – German steamer ROSTOCK (2542grt), which left Vigo on the 9th/10th, was captured off the Spanish coast by French sloop ELAN. A prize crew was put aboard and she was taken into Brest arriving on the 14th. Renamed SAINT MAURICE for French service, she reverted to German service after the fall of France.
 
Africa east coast – Light cruiser GLOUCESTER departed Mombasa and arrived at Durban on the 21st.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/12/2018 5:47:13 PM
Feb 12. Day 165
Monday. Waxing crescent moon.

Finland
Quote:
The Finnish cabinet authorized moves to end the war against the Russians. It became apparent the Karelian defence line would not hold. At the same time, Finland requested aid from Sweden (which Stockholm rejected).
(Goralski, p 106)
Quote:
General Mannerheim expresses anxiety about the proposals for Allied intervention.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

North Africa
Quote:
The first contingent of ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand) troops arrived in Egypt.
(Goralski, p 106)

In the air
Quote:
NORTH SEA SHIPPING SEARCHES…
18 Wellingtons on the 11th and 12 on the 13th failed to locate any targets.
(BC War Diaries, p 28)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-501); launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats leaving on patrol, one (U-54) from Kiel and one (U-61) from Wilhelmshaven; no boats returning from patrol. 16 U-boats at sea. One U-boat (U-33) lost this date. Complement=42; lost=25. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13:
• U-33, a Type VIIA U-boat lost in the Firth of Clyde. Complement=42; lost=25.

Two ships (both neutral) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=7409:
Nidarholm, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 3482 tons, carrying cotton and grapefruit from Tampa via Halifax to Liverpool. Complement=25; lost=0.
Dalarö, a Swedish steam merchantman of 3927 tons, carrying 5400 tones of linseed in bags from Rosario with various stops to Malmö. Complement=30; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 09.55 hours … the unescorted Nidarholm was hit amidships by one torpedo from U-26 after she had been stopped at 09.25 hours by two shots across her bow. The ship broke in two, the bow sank and the afterpart remained afloat. The U-boat fired two coups de grâce at 10.09 hours, one torpedo detonated prematurely while the other sank the wreck. The survivors were picked up about 10 hours later by the Norwegian steam merchant Berto which was en route from Torrevieja to Bergen via Gibraltar and Kirkwall.
…At 09.35 hours … the unescorted and neutral Dalarö was torpedoed and sunk by U-53 west of Scotland. The master was lost. The survivors were picked up by the Belgian trawler Jan de Waele and landed at Buncrana, Loch Swilly.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Blockade work – German fishing trawler HERRLICHKEIT (268grt) was captured near Tromso in 69‑56N, 16‑49E (68-24N, 11-05E in the Rosyth War Diary) by light cruiser GLASGOW. HERRLICHKEIT was in poor shape … and had to be towed part of the way by GLASGOW. She was forced to put into Fraserburgh due to heavy weather, and finally arrived at Aberdeen on the 21st. Taken over later by the Ministry of War Transportation, she was renamed EMPIRE FISHER for British use.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA departed the Humber for Sullom Voe, and arrived on the 13th.
 
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser MANCHESTER arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser FORFAR departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer KIMBERLEY arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Destroyers KANDAHAR, KASHMIR, KHARTOUM arrived at Greenock.

Destroyer INTREPID relieved destroyer GRIFFIN on patrol in Moray Firth. GRIFFIN arrived at Rosyth on the 13th.
 
Destroyer HARDY departed Portland for the Clyde.
 
Steamer CYPRIAN PRINCE (1988grt) departed Stromness for Aberdeen.
 
Submarine activity – Submarines THISTLE and TRITON exercised in the Firth of Forth.
 
Submarine SALMON and destroyer ESCORT exercised off Harwich.
 
Submarine NARWHAL arrived at Rosyth after patrol.
 
Submarines L.23 departed Blyth on patrol, and STURGEON for the Tyne to refit.
 
Submarine SWORDFISH departed Dundee on trials to arrive at Rosyth on the 13th, but was diverted and arrived at Blyth on that date.
 
Minelaying – Minelayer PRINCESS VICTORIA with destroyers EXPRESS and ESK laid 38 mines in operation LD 3 (second half) in the North Sea. After the minelay, the ships proceeded to the Thames.
 
Return to fleet – Destroyer VIMIERA completed conversion to fast escort vessel, and after working up at Portland, was assigned to Convoy C working from Rosyth.
 
U.K.-France outbound convoy – Convoy BC.26 with six steamers, including BARON KINNAIRD, DUNKWA … and RONAN departed the Bristol Channel escorted by destroyer MONTROSE, and arrived safely in the Loire on the 14th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.9 departed Methil, escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD, BITTERN and HASTINGS, and arrived in the Tyne later that day.
 
Convoy FS.94 departed the Tyne, escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD, BITTERN and HASTINGS, which had just arrived from Rosyth with MT.9.
 
Loss to mining – Belgian fishing vessels O. H. BEWAAR ONS (62grt) was lost in the North Sea and STEUR (61grt) ten miles NW of West Hinder Light Vessel due to mining.
 
Loss of U-33 – Attempting to lay mines in the Firth of Clyde, U.33 was damaged by minesweeper GLEANER at 0440 halfway between Pladda Lighthouse and Ailsa Craig in 55‑25N, 05‑07W in a depth charge attack which seriously affected the minesweeper's electrical system and put asdic and searchlights out of action. U.33 surfaced, the crew surrendered and she sank after her scuttling charges went off at 0530. Twenty five of the crew were lost and 17 saved. Destroyer KINGSTON recovered 20 bodies.
...
Anti-U-boat activity – Sloop ROSEMARY attacked a submarine contact ESE of Start Point. Sloop SANDWICH passed nearby at 0840/13th, joined ROSEMARY and carried out her own attack. Destroyer BROKE also joined in the search at 1030, and the operation continued until 1630 when ROSEMARY was ordered to return to harbour.
 
Loss of U-54 – U.54 … set out from Wilhelmshaven on the 12th on her first patrol, which was to be off Cape Finisterre, and was never heard from again. It is now presumed that she was lost on the 12th/13th with all 41 crew, sunk by a mine laid by the 20th Destroyer Flotilla on the 9/10 January in 55-07N, 5-05E. On the 14 March, German patrol vessel Vp.1101 (trawler PREUSSEN, 425grt) found one of U.54's torpedoes, and later, on the 16 April, naval auxiliary ship Schiff 37 (trawler SCHLESWIG, 433grt) found another one in the Skagerrak.
 
Ship loss through collision – Belgian steamer FLANDRES (5827grt) was sunk in a collision with Belgian steamer KABALO (5186grt) in the Fairway of the South Downs.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HXF.20 departed Halifax at 1400 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER and ST LAURENT, which detached on the 13th. Ocean escort until the 22nd when she left, was armed merchant cruiser LACONIA. On that day, the convoy was joined by destroyers ACASTA and VENETIA and escorted until its arrival at Liverpool on the 25th.
 
Blockade activity – Destroyer HASTY captured German steamer MOREA (1927grt), which had departed Vigo on the 9th/10th, off the Portuguese coast in 41‑42N, 15‑03W. MOREA joined convoy HG.17, arrived at Falmouth on the 17th, and was renamed EMPIRE SEAMAN for British service.
 
Friendly fire – French submarine ACHERON and British steamer SOMME (5265grt) exchanged gunfire around 1815, in 34-25N, 18-08W, each believing the other to be German. ACHERON was hit in the bow by a shell which did not explode.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/13/2018 7:39:59 PM
Feb 13. Day 166
Tuesday.

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
NORTH SEA SHIPPING SEARCHES…
18 Wellingtons on the 11th and 12 on the 13th failed to locate any targets.
(BC War Diaries, p 28)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-62) leaving Helgoland on patrol; no boats returning from patrol. 16 U-boats at sea. One U-boat (U-54) lost this date. Complement=41; lost=41. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=5. Total lost=14:
• U-54, a Type VIIB U-boat lost in the North Sea to mines north of Terschelling. Complement=41; lost=41.
[Ed. note: U-54 Sailed from Kiel on Feb 12, and in listing its sailing «uboat.net» notes its sinking date as Feb 14. For today’s date, it lists either date as possible.]

Two ships (both neutral) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=6199:
Chastine Mærsk, a Danish motor merchantman of 5177 tons, carrying phosphate fertilizer from Morocco to Denmark. Complement=30; lost=0.
Norna, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1022 tons, carrying salt from Gibraltar to Stockholm. Complement=18; lost=18.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 07.16 hours … U-25 fired a shot across the bow of the neutral Chastine Mærsk, but it took two more shots until she stopped. The Germans then ordered the crew to abandon ship in 10 minutes and shelled and sank the ship from 08.36 to 08.45 hours. The survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Hilda.
U-25 had spotted the ship at 16.30 hours the day before and fired a stern torpedo that missed at 20.10 hours. 19 minutes later Schütze fired his last torpedo and observed a hit aft without effect, but the torpedo probably detonated prematurely without damaging the ship. The U-boat then chased the ship on the surface during the night and attacked with the deck gun at dawn.
… [T]he Norna was torpedoed and sunk by U-53. The ship went missing after leaving Gibraltar.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Operations activity – Destroyers KELVIN, KINGSTON, KANDAHAR and KHARTOUM departed the Clyde on the 13th to participate in Operation WR, and rendezvoused with armed merchant cruiser CIRCASSIA.
 
Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Boat trials – Submarine TARPON was carrying out trials in Gare Loch.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.12 of ten British, eight Norwegian, two Swedish, two Danish, four Finnish and one Panamanian ship departed Methil escorted by destroyers INGLEFIELD, ILEX, IMPERIAL, DELIGHT and submarine THISTLE. Light cruisers ARETHUSA and PENELOPE were originally to provide close cover, but had been assigned to Operation DT, and light cruiser EDINBURGH sailed from Rosyth to take over. Four ships were detached before making the North Sea crossing, including Norwegian steamer FERNMOOR (4268grt) which IMOGEN took into Scapa Flow on the 14th. IMOGEN left again on the 15th and joined anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA which had departed Sullom Voe the same day to provide anti-aircraft protection. ON.12 arrived safely at Bergen on the 16th.
 
U.K. outbound convoys – Convoy OA.91 departed Southend escorted by destroyer VERITY from the 13th to 16th, when it dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.91 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WALPOLE and VIMY from the 13th to 16th, and dispersed on the 17th.

East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.93 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WHITLEY, JACKAL and sloop EGRET, and arrived in the Tyne on the 15th.
 
Convoy FS.95 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers WOOLSTON, JANUS and sloop GRIMSBY, and arrived at Southend on the 15th.
 
Convoy MT.10 departed Methil, escorted by anti-submarine trawlers of the 19th Anti-Submarine Group, and arrived in the Tyne later that day.
 …
U.50 attacked Norwegian tanker ALBERT L. ELLSWORTH (8309grt) in the North Sea, NW of the Shetlands in 61-10N, 07-15W, but the attack failed due to torpedo malfunctions.
 
German ship collision – German steamer NAHALT (5870grt) was damaged in a collision in the North Sea, and was assisted by German steamer KONIGSBERG PREUSSEN (2530grt).
 
South American waters – Heavy cruiser DORSETSHIRE’s seaplane sighted German steamer WAKAMA (3771grt) off Cape Frio at 1615/12th. DORSETSHIRE intercepted her next day in 22‑42S, 41‑38W, and WAKAMA which had departed Rio de Janiero on the 11th scuttled herself rather than be captured.
 
Reorganization of Forces – Allied Hunting Groups were reorganized as follows:
 
Force G - Heavy cruisers HAWKINS and DORSETSHIRE
 
Force H - Heavy cruisers CORNWALL and CUMBERLAND
 
Force I - Aircraft carrier EAGLE, heavy cruiser SUSSEX, Australian light cruiser HOBART
 
Force M - Heavy cruiser KENT and the French SUFFREN
 
Force X - French heavy cruisers FOCH and DUPLEIX
 
Force Y - French battleship PROVENCE, heavy cruisers COLBERT, DUQUESNE,and light cruiser EMILE BERTIN
 
Ship movement – Destroyer DEFENDER departed Gibraltar for Freetown.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/14/2018 5:04:26 PM
Feb 14. Day 167
Wednesday

Finland
Quote:
The Finnish cabinet authorized moves to end the war against the Russians. It became apparent the Karelian defence line would not hold. At the same time, Finland requested aid from Sweden (which Stockholm rejected).
(Goralski, p 106)
Quote:
General Mannerheim expresses anxiety about the proposals for Allied intervention.
(2194 Days, p 43)

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
Quote:
Britain began arming its merchant ships operating in the North Sea.
(Goralski, p 106)
Quote:
Britain announces that all her merchant ships in the North Sear are to be armed.
(2194 Days, pp 43-44)[Ed. Note: This is confusing. Certain ships have been armed before this date, and have been recorded as losing gunners considered excess to crew complement when attacked. Is this North Sea specification an indication of a change in activity in the North Sea?]
––––––––––
Western Front
No notable activity.

North Africa
Quote:
The first contingent of ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand) troops arrived in Egypt.
(Goralski, p 106)

In the air
Quote:
NORTH SEA SHIPPING SEARCHES…
The main daylight operations over the North Sea were now allocated to the Blenheims of 2 Group and operations were flown on 34 out of 47 days between 14 February and 1 April. Most of these flights were uneventful, though German ships were bombed on at least 6 occasions and the Blenheim several times encountered German fighters. A total off 250 Blenheim sorties were flown of which 9 were purely photo-reconnaissance flights to the German coast. 4 Blenheims (1.6 per cent of those dispatched) were lost; all were believed to have been shot down by fighters. In addition to the Blenheim operations, 26 Wellington and 21 Hampden sorties ere flown but these are all recorded as ‘training sweeps’ and no contact was made with any German forces and no casualties were suffered.
There was one confirmed bombing success for a Blenheim. On 11 March Squadron Leader M.V. Delap of 82 Squadron attacked a U-boat off Borkum bombing from such a low altitude that his aircraft was damaged by the explosions and nearly crashed. German records show that this was their Type VIIIA submarine U-31 and that Squadron Leader Delap’s bombs sank i. …
(BC War Diaries, pp 28-9)[.Ed. note: German aircraft of X Air Corps had been attacking shipping since at least 2 February, using Heinkel He 111 (KG26) and Junkers Ju 88 (KG34) aircraft, with reconnaissance support from He 59 and D0 17 aircraft.]

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=12 (U-513 to U-524); laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Three U-boats (U-10,-19,-64) leaving on patrol from Wilhelmshaven; One boat (U-9) returning to Helgoland from patrol (10 days). 18 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.

Four ships (one neutral) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=29,214:
Langleeford, a British steam merchantman of 4622 tons, carrying 6800 tons of wheat from Boston via Halifax to Tyne. Complement=34; lost=4.
Sultan Star, a British steam merchantman of 12,306 tons, carrying frozen meat, butter and general cargo from Buenos Aires to Liverpool. Complement=73; lost=1.
Martin Goldschmidt, a Danish steam merchantman of 2095 tons, carrying phosphate from Safi, Morocco to Fredericia, Denmark. Complement=20; lost=15.
Gretafield, a British steam tanker of 10,191 tons, carrying 13,000 tons of fuel oil from Curaçao via Halifax to Invergordon. Complement=40 + 1 gunner; lost=10 crew + 1 gunner.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 08.00 hours … the Langleeford ..., a straggler from convoy HX-18, was hit amidships by one G7e torpedo from U-26, broke in two and sank within 13 minutes about 70 miles northwest of Fastnet, Ireland. Four crew members were lost. The Germans questioned the survivors, handed over two bottles of rum, 100 cigarettes, bread and dressing materials and told them the course to the nearest land. The master and 29 crew members made landfall at Ross, Co. Clare.
… At 16.55 hours …, U-48 fired a G7e torpedo at the unescorted Sultan Star … southwest of the Scilly Isles. The ship was struck on starboard side aft and sank by the stern with a heavy list after 20 minutes. One crewman was killed by the explosion. The survivors abandoned ship in the lifeboats, only the radio operator stayed in the wireless room until the last moment and was picked up by one of the boats after jumping overboard. He was later awarded the MBE and Lloyds War Medal for Bravery at Sea.
The attack on Sultan Star was witnessed on the horizon by the destroyers in the screen of HMS Exeter (68) …, returning to the UK from the Battle of the River Plate. HMS Whitshed (D 77) … was immediately sent to assist and arrived at the scene about 40 minutes after the torpedo hit. The destroyer located the U-boat and her attack was soon joined by HMS Vesper (D 55) … and HMS Acasta (H 09)… . They claimed the sinking of the U-boat, which in fact escaped undamaged at dusk and reported that 22 depth charges had been dropped. The survivors were then picked up by HMS Whitshed (D 77), the half of them later transferred to HMS Vesper (D 55) and all landed at Plymouth the next day.
… At 05.00 hours … the unescorted and neutral Martin Goldschmidt was torpedoed and sunk by U-53 northwest of Ireland. The survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Berto.
… At 01.35 hours … the unescorted Gretafield …, a straggler from convoy HX-18, was hit by one G7a torpedo from U-57 southeast of Noss Head. The tanker caught fire after being hit aft by one G7e torpedo at 01.48 hours. Ten crew members and one gunner were lost. The master and 29 crew members were picked up by the British armed trawlers HMS Peggy Nutten (4.450) (Skipper J.C. Taylor) and HMS Strathalladale (4.458) and landed at Wick.
The burning Gretafield drifted ashore at Dunbeath, Caithnesshire in 58°14´15N/03°25´45W. On 19 March, the tanker broke in two and was declared a total loss.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Altmark sighting – German supply ship ALTMARK (10,847grt) was sighted by RAF Hudsons of 220 Sqn off Trondheim as she was being escorted to Bergen by Norwegian torpedo boats TRYGG and GARM for contraband inspection.
 
Light cruiser ARETHUSA (Captain Q  D  Graham), with Rear Admiral Destroyers (Rear Admiral R  H  C  Hallifax) aboard, destroyers COSSACK (Captain P  L  Vian), SIKH (Cdr J  A  Giffard), NUBIAN (Cdr R  W  Ravenhill), INTREPID (Cdr R  C  Gordon) and IVANHOE (Cdr P  H  Hadow) departed Rosyth at 2300 on Operation DT.  Light cruiser PENELOPE (Captain G  D  Yates) also began the sortie, but ran onto the submarine baffles at Rosyth, and with damaged propellers,  was forced to remain in port for repairs. Orders on this sortie were to sweep up the Norwegian coast from Kristiansand and intercept enemy ships returning to Narvik. ARETHUSA, INTREPID and IVANHOE were assigned to one group and the Tribal destroyers to the other. Rear Admiral Destroyers normally flew his flag on light cruiser AURORA, and men from AURORA were sent to augment the crews of destroyers MAORI and COSSACK.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – After destroyer GURKHA attacked a submarine contact in Moray Firth in 58-22N, 1-40W, destroyers KASHMIR, KIPLING and BOREAS joined in the search, KIPLING sailing from Scapa Flow on the same day. The search was unsuccessful and was abandoned at 1600/15th.
 
Anti-submarine trawler LORD HOTHAM (464grt), escorting tug BRIGAND and a battle target off Cape St Vincent in 36-50N, 9-46W attacked a submarine contact.
 
Ship repairs – Anti-aircraft cruiser COVENTRY departed Sullom Voe for repairs at Chatham, arriving en route in the Humber on the 15th.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser SCOTSTOUN departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Activity shifts – Destroyers BRAZEN and DIANA departed Rosyth and BOREAS was detached from submarine hunting off Rattray Head. All three reached Invergordon on the 15th and left again later that day to escort the collision-damaged destroyer DUNCAN under tow by tugs ST MELLONS and NORMAN from Invergordon to Rosyth for repairs following the collision of 17 January. BRAZEN and BOREAS were last minute replacements for SIKH and NUBIAN which were needed for DT.  DUNCAN repaired at Grangemouth completing on 22 July 1940.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine TRIDENT arrived at Rosyth from patrol.
 
Submarine TRIBUNE was exercising in the Firth of Forth.
 
East coast convoys – Convoy FN.94 departed Southend escorted by destroyers VEGA, JAGUAR and sloop STORK, and arrived in the Tyne on the 16th.
 
Convoy FS.96 departed the Tyne (?) escorted by destroyers WESTMINSTER, JAVELIN and sloop LONDONDERRY, and WESTMINSTER and LONDONDERRY attacked a submarine contact north, NNW of St Abbs Head in 56‑04N, 2‑14W. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 16th.

U.53 sank Swedish steamer NORNA (1022grt), which had departed Gibraltar on the 7th for Stockholm, in 55‑30N, 11‑00W with all hands, as well as Danish steamer MARTIN GOLDSCHMIDT (2095grt) in 55‑53N, 12‑37W.  Fifteen of her crew were lost and five survivors rescued by Norwegian BERTO, the same steamer that had picked up the survivors of the Norwegian steamer NIDARHOLM (3482grt) sunk on the 12th.
[Ed. note: Norna is listed on «uboat.net» as being sunk on 13 Feb.
Quote:

U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.19F departed Gibraltar with 25 ships, escorted by destroyer WISHART from the 14th to 16th, French destroyer TIGRE and auxiliary patrol ship MINERVE from the 14th to 21st, and destroyer WREN from the 21st until the  23rd,  when the convoy arrived at Liverpool.
 
U.K.-Africa convoy – Convoy SL.20 departed Freetown on the 10th escorted by armed merchant cruiser ESPERANCE BAY until the 25th, and SLF.20 on the 14th, escorted by armed merchant cruiser CHESHIRE. The two convoys merged on the 25th when they were joined by destroyers VANQUISHER, VANSITTART, VERSATILE and VETERAN, all the escorts remaining with the convoys until its arrival on the 28th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/15/2018 6:42:00 PM
Feb 15. Day 168
Thursday

Finland
Some troop movement but no notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
Germany declared any armed British merchant ship would be treated as a combatant.
(Goralski, p 106)
Quote:
The German government declares that all British merchant ships will be regarded as warships.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Quote:
NORTH SEA SHIPPING SEARCHES…
The main daylight operations over the North Sea were now allocated to the Blenheims of 2 Group and operations were flown on 34 out of 47 days between 14 February and 1 April. Most of these flights were uneventful, though German ships were bombed on at least 6 occasions and the Blenheim several times encountered German fighters. A total off 250 Blenheim sorties were flown of which 9 were purely photo-reconnaissance flights to the German coast. 4 Blenheims (1.6 per cent of those dispatched) were lost; all were believed to have been shot down by fighters. In addition to the Blenheim operations, 26 Wellington and 21 Hampden sorties ere flown but these are all recorded as ‘training sweeps’ and no contact was made with any German forces and no casualties were suffered.
There was one confirmed bombing success for a Blenheim. On 11 March Squadron Leader M.V. Delap of 82 Squadron attacked a U-boat off Borkum bombing from such a low altitude that his aircraft was damaged by the explosions and nearly crashed. German records show that this was their Type VIIIA submarine U-31 and that Squadron Leader Delap’s bombs sank i. …
(BC War Diaries, pp 28-9)[.Ed. note: German aircraft of X Air Corps had been attacking shipping since at least 2 February, using Heinkel He 111 (KG26) and Junkers Ju 88 (KG34) aircraft, with reconnaissance support from He 59 and D0 17 aircraft.]

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=1 (U-65). No U-boats leaving on or returning from patrol. 18 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.

A disputed number of ships (all neutral) lost to torpedoes. At issue are Rhone and Sleipner, Danish ships travelling in tandem. Rhone is recorded in one location of «uboat.net» as being sunk on 16 Feb, but in detailed description «uboat.net» records her sinking at 23:57 on 15 Feb. Sleipner is detailed as being struck at exactly midnight and sinking at 00:10 on 16 Feb, but the sinking is logged on 15 Feb. Because both vessels were sunk during the same attack, I have chosen to list both as occurring on 15 February. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=19,679. Total ships lost by my count=6.
Maryland, a Danish steam merchantman of 4895 tons, carrying oil cake from Santos via Madeira to Copenhagen. Complement=34; lost=34.
Aase, a British steam merchantman of 12,306 tons, carrying frozen meat, butter and general cargo from Buenos Aires to Liverpool. Complement=16; lost=15.
Steinstad, a Danish steam merchantman of 1206 tons, carrying fresh fruit from Valencia to Bristol. Complement=24; lost=13.
Den Haag, a British steam merchantman of 12,306 tons, carrying 11,800 tons of oil produce from Aruba via New York to Rotterdam. Complement=39; lost=26.
Rhone, a Danish steam merchantman of 1064 tons, carrying coal from Methil to Esbjerg, Denmark. Complement=20; lost=9.
Sleipner, a Danish steam merchantman of 1066 tons, carrying coal from Methil to Esbjerg, Denmark. Complement=23 + 18 Greek seamen in passage to a ship; lost=7 crew + 6 passengers.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 02.07 hours … the unescorted and neutral Maryland was hit by one torpedo from U-50, broke in two and sank within seven minutes. A first torpedo fired at 01.54 hours had detonated prematurely. The ship was reported missing after sending her position the last time on 9 February, only a wrecked lifeboat was later found at North Uist.
… At 05.45 hours … the neutral and unescorted Aase was hit in the stern by one torpedo from U-37 and sank fast after breaking in two. 15 crew members were lost. The only survivor was picked up by HMS Verity (D 63) … on 17 February.
… At 08.37 hours … the unescorted and neutral Steinstad … was hit amidships by a G7a torpedo from U-26 and sank within 5 seconds about 75 miles west of the Aran Islands, Ireland. The U-boat had sighted the ship at 19.12 hours the evening before, noticed the Norwegian flag and followed her during the night to stop the vessel according to the prize rules at the first daylight. At 07.50 hours, the Germans fired a shot across the bow of Steinstad which did not react apart from turning towards the U-boat after the third shot was fired. So the following shots were aimed more closely to the ship without actually hitting her and shortly thereafter the crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats. The master and 12 crew members in one of the lifeboats were never seen again, despite of [sic] an aircraft search in the area. The other lifeboat with 11 survivors made landfall at Arranmore Island on 20 February.
… At 14.00 hours … the unescorted and neutral Den Haag … was hit amidships by one G7e torpedo from U-48, broke in two and sank about 150 miles west of Ouessant. The U-boat had spotted the tanker about five hours earlier, but had to evade a flying boat before an attack could be made. 13 survivors in one lifeboat were later picked up by the British steam merchant Glen Orchy. The other lifeboats with bodies were later found adrift and some bodies were washed ashore on the French coast.
…At 23.15 hours …, U-14 spotted two steamers in a line and an escort about 50 miles north of Rattrey Head and fired at 23.40 hours one G7e torpedo at the second ship that detonated prematurely. This ship was the Rhone, which sank two minutes after being hit in the bow by a second G7e torpedo at 23.55 hours. The other steamer, the Sleipner stopped to rescue survivors and sent distress signals, but was also hit in the foreship by one G7e torpedo at 00.00 hours on 16 February and sank after 10 minutes.
All three lifeboats from Sleipner had already been launched before the ship was hit and they picked up 13 survivors from Rhone, but two of them died in the boats and their bodies were placed on a raft, which was found and recovered three days later by HMS Eclipse (H 08) … in 58°40N/01°05W. 18 survivors from Sleipner and 11 from Rhone in two lifeboats were picked up after 9 hours by the Swedish trawler Standard and landed at Wick. Twelve survivors in the third boat were picked up after about 12 hours by HMS Kipling (F 91) … . Seven of 23 crew members and six of 18 passengers (Greek seamen to join a ship in Denmark) from Sleipner were lost.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Light cruiser MANCHESTER departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser CARINTHIA arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Submarine activities – Submarine TETRARCH and tender CUTTY SARK arrived in the Clyde.
 
Submarine SWORDFISH and destroyer IMPERIAL departed Rosyth for Scapa Flow. From there IMPERIAL was to join the west coast section of convoy HN.12, but on the 16th, the order was cancelled and she was ordered to the Norwegian coast.
 
Submarine TRIBUNE was exercising in the Firth of Forth.
 
Submarine SEAWOLF departed Sheerness with convoy OA.92 for Portsmouth.

Ship movement – Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Scapa Flow for Sullom Voe.
 
Destroyer activities, home waters – Destroyer TARTAR departed Scapa Flow to relieve armed merchant cruiser FORFAR in 64-22N, 12-05W.
 
Destroyer MOHAWK arrived in the Clyde escorting tanker MONTENOL (2646grt).
 
Destroyers ESCAPADE, ECHO and ECLIPSE arrived at Rosyth, and ELECTRA separately from Dover.
 
Destroyer JERVIS arrived at Rosyth from the Humber.
 
MTB activities – Motor torpedo boats MTB.22, MTB.24 and MTB.25 carried out a night patrol off Farne Island.
 
U.K.-Halifax outbound convoys – Convoy OA.92 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers BROKE from the 15th to 16th, and VANESSA from 16th to 18th when the convoy dispersed. Submarine SEAWOLF joined the convoy for passage to Portsmouth.
 
Convoy OB.92 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers VANOC and WINCHELSEA from the 15th to 18th, when VANOC joined HX.19.
 
U.k.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.90G sailed from Southend on the 12th escorted by destroyers VISCOUNT and VANQUISHER, and OB.90G from Liverpool with 45 ships, also on the 12th, escorted by sloops DEPTFORD and SCARBOROUGH. They merged on the 15th as OG.18, escorted by French destroyer PANTHÈRE and auxiliary patrol ship MERCEDITA from then until the 21st, and arrived at Gibraltar on the 22nd, escorted by destroyer VELOX of the local escort. Destroyer ACTIVE, also of the local escort, arrived the next day with steamer MACLAREN (2330grt), which had broken down on the 22nd.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.95 departed Southend escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD, BITTERN and HASTINGS, and joined by destroyer JANUS on the 16th. The convoy arrived in the Tyne on the 17th.
 
Convoy FS.97 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN and sloop PELICAN, and with submarine STERLET joining from Blyth for the passage south. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 17th.
 
Convoy MT.11 departed Methil, escorted by destroyer VIVIEN, sloop PELICAN, and anti-submarine trawlers of the 19th Anti-Submarine Group, and arrived in the Tyne later that day.
 
Convoy MT.12 departed Methil, escorted by sloops FLAMINGO, WESTON and anti-submarine trawlers of the 3rd Anti-Submarine Group, and arrived in the Tyne the next day. Convoy MT.13 was cancelled.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer VENETIA, escorting the Liverpool section of a homebound convoy, attacked a submarine contact east of Fastnet in 50‑59N, 8‑38W.
 
Destroyer DARING attacked a contact NNE of Kinnaird Head in 58‑10N, 1‑45W. Destroyers KIPLING and IMPERIAL were also hunting in the area, and the search continued on the 16th.
 
Anti-submarine trawlers NORTHERN SPRAY (SO), NORTHERN DAWN, NORTHERN GEM, NORTHERN WAVE and NORTHERN PRIDE of the 12th Anti-Submarine Striking Force were on patrol north of the Shetland Islands in 61-27N, 1-09W, when NORTHERN DAWN attacked a submarine contact.
 
Damage on assignment – Mine destructor ship BORDE was damaged by a mine off the Kent coast near the Downs, and repaired at Chatham from 25 February to April.

Northern Patrol summary – The Northern Patrol sighted 61 eastbound ships between the 15th and 29th and sent 24 into Kirkwall for inspection.
 
Altmark – German supply ship ALTMARK (10,847grt), received a perfunctory contraband check at Bergen, and put to sea for her return to Germany escorted by Norwegian torpedo boats SKARV and KJELL.

 
Major vessel protection – Heavy cruiser EXETER .. finally arrived at Plymouth, screened by aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL,battlecruiser RENOWN and light cruiser GALATEA, but without destroyer HERO. In the South Western Approaches, she had been joined by her close destroyer escort, starting with HASTY on the 13th, ACASTA and WHITSHED earlier on the 14th, and ARDENT, HEARTY, WOLVERINE and WREN later in the day. ARK ROYAL also reached Plymouth on the 15th escorted by destroyers KEITH, WAKEFUL, VETERAN and ANTELOPE, and EXETER repaired at Devonport until 10 March 1941.
 
Ship movement – Minesweeper FERMOY arrived at Gibraltar from Malta to replace minesweeper GOSSAMER, which had returned to England with convoy HG.18F.
 
French naval activity – French armed merchant cruiser KOUTOBIA, large destroyer CASSARD and torpedo boat BAYONNAISE passed Gibraltar eastbound – KOUTOBIA sailing from Casablanca for Marseille for repairs, where she arrived on the 17th, CASSARD from Dakar for Toulon after duty in the South Atlantic, also arriving on the 17th, and BAYONNAISE from Casablanca, arriving at Oran on the 16th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/16/2018 5:40:23 PM
Feb 16. Day 169
Friday. First quarter moon.

Finland
Some troop movement but no notable activity.

Germany
Re Altmark action (see At Sea below, item 1):
Quote:
What the British did may have been a violation of international law, but German and Norwegian protests were ignored. Hitler felt the incident was proof the British would not respect Norwegian neutrality and ordered accelerated planning for the occupation of Norway.
(Goralski, p 106)[Ed. note: this or a similar incident is reported under 26 Feb. in 2194 Days, p 44.

Britain
No notable activity.

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Sporadic North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=6 (U-213 to -218); laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-13) leaving Wilhelmshaven on patrol. 19 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.

A disputed number of ships (all neutral) lost to torpedoes. At issue are Rhone and Sleipner, Danish ships travelling in tandem. Rhone is recorded in one location of «uboat.net» as being sunk on 16 Feb, but in detailed description «uboat.net» records her sinking at 23:57 on 15 Feb. Sleipner is detailed as being struck at exactly midnight and sinking at 00:10 on 16 Feb, but is logged as occurring on 15 Feb. Because both vessels were sunk during the same attack, I have chose to list both as occurring on 15 February. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=3172. Total ships lost by my count=2.
Osmed, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1526 tons, carrying coal from Blyth to Halmstad, Sweden. Complement=20; lost=13.
Liana, a Swedish steam merchantman of 1646 tons, carrying coal from Blyth to Halmstad, Sweden. Complement=20; lost=10.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 21.25 hours … U-14 attacked two ships about 10 miles north of Kinnaird Head and first torpedoed the Osmed and ten minutes later the Liana.
… The Osmed sank by the bow with a list to starboard within two minutes after being hit on starboard side amidships by one G7a torpedo. 13 crew members were lost.
… The Liana sank by the stern within one minute after being hit aft by one G7a torpedo. Ten crew members were lost. Ten survivors from Liana and seven from Osmed were later picked up from a raft by the British trawler Loch Hope in position 58°07N/02°12W and landed at Scrabster. Eight of these survivors went aboard Santos for repatriation to Sweden, but the ship was sunk by U-63 (Lorentz) on 24 February with the loss of six men from the Liana.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
The British destroyer Cossack attacks he German ship Altmark in Jossing fjord, in Norwegian territorial waters. The Altmark had been acting as a supply ship for the Admiral Graf Spee, and has on board 299 British prisoners, whom the Cossack succeeds in releasing. The Oslo government protests against British volition of Norwegian neutrality.
(2194 Days, p 44)
Quote:
The Altmark incident – Just after midnight, Admiral Forbes ordered the ships of Operation DT, which began late on the 14th, to intercept German supply ship ALTMARK. The British force split up to search the Leads and offshore islands south of Bergen. Light cruiser ARETHUSA sighted ALTMARK a short time later off Egero Light and destroyers IVANHOE and INTREPID were dispatched to stop her. However, the Norwegian escorts intervened and ALTMARK was able to enter Jossing Fjord. At that time, Norwegian naval units in the Fjord and nearby were torpedo boats KJELL, SKARV, TEIST and armed auxiliaries FIRERN and HVAL IV. Destroyer COSSACK followed ALTMARK in and after unsuccessful talks with the Norwegian escort commander, a boarding party of three officers and thirty ratings (under the command of Lt Cdr B. T Turner) boarded ALTMARK from COSSACK. ALTMARK ran aground, four German sailors were killed and five wounded, but 299 British prisoners from ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE's sinkings were released. Gunner J J F Smith in the boarding party from light cruiser AURORA was wounded. While alongside ALTMARK, COSSACK's bow and side plates were damaged and port propeller cracked. When IVANHOE approached German merchant ship BALDUR (5805grt) off Jossing Fjord near Lister Light, she was scuttled.
 
Still on the 16th, submarines SEAL, TRIAD, ORZEL were ordered into the area and joined SALMON and SEALION which were already there. SEAL sighted the sinking BALDUR and the DT operation ships, but the other submarines sighted nothing at all.
 
Battleship WARSPITE, battlecruiser HOOD, and destroyers FAULKNOR, FOXHOUND, FURY, FAME, FORESIGHT, FORTUNE and FIREDRAKE of the Home Fleet were at sea near Pentland Firth covering the operation. And after leaving Scapa Flow on the 16th, heavy cruiser NORFOLK met light cruisers SOUTHAMPTON, EDINBURGH and destroyers DARING and IMPERIAL to provide support. There was no German Fleet reaction.
 
After the rescue, the SOUTHAMPTON group joined convoy HN.12 on the 17th, together with ARETHUSA in support, COSSACK and her force returned to Rosyth arriving on the 17th after which she reached Leith on the 19th for repairs, and the HOOD force arrived back in the Clyde on the 18th.
 
German steamer WIEGAND (5869grt) arrived in Jossing Fjord on the 21st, supposedly to tow ALTMARK, but left alone the next day. Instead, ALTMARK remained aground under the guard of Norwegian minelayer OLAV TRYGVASSON until 6 March when she was refloated, and headed for Sandefjord escorted by two Norwegian destroyers while submarine UNITY shadowed and the Polish ORZEL patrolled nearby. After reaching Sandefjord, ALTMARK’s repairs were completed on 22 March.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser WORCESTERSHIRE arrived in the Clyde from Northern Patrol.
 
Submarine activity – Submarines TRUANT and TRITON exercised in the Firth of Forth.
 
Ship transfers – Aircraft carrier ARK ROYAL, battlecruiser RENOWN and destroyer HERO arrived at Portsmouth and Force K was dissolved. After short refits, the three [j]oined the Home Fleet.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Anti-submarine whaler THIRLMERE (560grt) at 0905 attacked a submarine contact west of Sumburgh Head in 59-58N, 3-08W. Anti-submarine whaler ELLESMERE was sent to assist, but no further contact was made and the search was abandoned at 1700/17th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FN.96 departed Southend, escorted by destroyers WOOLSTON, JANUS and sloop GRIMSBY, and arrived in the Tyne on the 18th.
 
Convoy FS.98 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyer JERVIS and sloops FLAMINGO and WESTON, was forced to anchor in the Humber overnight, but arrived at Southend on the 18th.
 …
U.K.-Norway inbound convoy – Convoy HN.12 of three British, fifteen Norwegian, eight Swedish, one Danish, two Finnish and one Estonian ship departed Bergen escorted by destroyers INGLEFIELD, ILEX, IMOGEN, DELIGHT and submarine THISTLE. Anti-aircraft protection was provided by anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA and close support by light cruisers EDINBURGH and ARETHUSA. Destroyer DARING departed Rosyth on the 15th to join the convoy at sea. On the 17th, INGLEFIELD and IMOGEN, and EDINBURGH and ARETHUSA detached to Scapa Flow to refuel and arrived on the 18th. Three merchant ships joined from the Orkneys for passage to the east coast, and destroyer IMPERIAL escorted the Methil section. The convoy arrived on the 19th
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.20 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers FRASER, ST LAURENT and the British HEREWARD. Canadian destroyer SKEENA accompanied the convoy until it was clear of the harbour. Light cruiser ORION and liner DUCHESS OF BEDFORD departed Halifax with HX.20 and then proceeded independently to Liverpool. HEREWARD returned to Halifax on the 20th, but before then, the other destroyers turned the convoy over to the ocean escort, light cruiser ENTERPRISE, at 1400/17th. Destroyers VOLUNTEER, WITCH and sloops FOWEY and ROCHESTER escorted from 29 February to 4 March, when the convoy arrived at Liverpool.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
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E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/16/2018 6:51:22 PM
17 Feb 1940 Day 170

As it was customary for new corps commanding officers to dine with the Führer, Hitler's aide Colonel Schmundt arranged such a meeting for Hitler and General Von Manstein. During the course of dinner, Manstein presented his plan for the invasion of France and the Low Countries. Hitler was impressed.

Trevor
---------------
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Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/16/2018 8:45:18 PM
Trevor, I have the issue down for my 17 Feb post. What I don't understand is the nature of such dinners with Der Fuhrer. Von Manstein was taking command of XXVII Army Corps, so a formal time with his boss was part of the process. But when he met with Hitler he offered not just his assessment of Fall Gelb, a rather sad reworking of WW1 plans, but his alternative, which was largely adopted.

Without this formal dinner meeting, would there have been any means by which von Manstein could have presented his ideas for the assault on the west? Was von Manstein breaking protocol by raising his alternatives in such a setting?

Thanks for jumping in! Please feel free to do it any time. I'm concerned that I will not be able to cover the subject when Scandanavia appears, and especially when Germany marches west.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/16/2018 8:52:50 PM

Quote:
Without this formal dinner meeting, would there have been any means by which von Manstein could have presented his ideas for the assault on the west? Was von Manstein breaking protocol by raising his alternatives in such a setting?

Cheers
Brian G
--brian grafton


Unlikely . Which is why I posted it.

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
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Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/17/2018 5:32:07 PM
Feb 17. Day 170
Saturday

Finland
Quote:
Finnish forces began pulling back from the Karelian defence line. The Russians now had assembled 35 divisions (organized under General Semyon Timoshenko), and the Finns, with 15 depleted divisions, were on the defensive.
(Goralski, pp 106-7)
Quote:
Finnish troops complete their withdrawal from the Mannerheim Line to intermediate positions.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Germany
Quote:
According to the Führer’s Directive No. 6 of 6 October 1939, a great German offensive on the Western Front should have been launched on 12 November. But the operation, entrusted to General von Bocks Army Group North, was never carried out. …
The plan of attack, Fall Gelb (Yellow Plan), drawn up by the army high command, followed far too closely the Schlieffen Plan, prepared for the First World War in 1914. The plan was both unpractical and out of date. … Many officers were opposed to the Yellow Plan, foremost among them General Erich von Manstein, Chief of Staff of von Rundstedt’s Army Group South, who … prepared an alternative plan of his own, involving an assault by armoured divisions in the Ardennes sector, where the enemy would not be expecting an offensive because of the rough terrain. This would be followed by a break-through towards Sedan and the mouth of the Somme, to reach the sea.
Von Manstein was strongly criticized by the heads of the Wehrmacht and he was relieved of his command and appointed to command the newly formed XXXVIII Army Corps. On 17 February 1940 von Manstein paid his formal visit to the Führer before taking up his new post, and he took the opportunity to discuss his plan of attack.
(2194 Days, pp 42-43)

Britain
Quote:
Britain announced that 400,000 more children would be evacuated from the larger cities and sent to the safer countryside.
(Goralski, p 107)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Sporadic North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April.
Quote:
Leaflet Raids and Seaplane-base Patrols
17/18 February to 8/9 April
Both types of operations continued, with Wellingtons and Hampdens increasingly gaining in the leaflet raids and with Hampdens taking over the seaplane-base patrols. At least one of these 2 types of operations was flown on 37 out of the 52 nights in this period but the number of aircraft dispatched was usually small.
A total of 228 leaflet sorties – 102 by Wellingtons, 64 by Hampdens and 62 by Whitleys – were despatched between 17/18 February and 6/7 April. The only new feature was the inclusion of Poland in locations where leaflets were dropped, Poznan on 7/8 March and Warsaw on the 15/16th. … Only 6 of the leaflet-dropping planes were lost – 3 Wellingtons, 2 Whitleys and 1 Hampden. One of the Whitleys … was shot down by Dutch anti-aircraft fire while flying over Holland on 27/28 March; 1 crew member was killed and 4 interned. 7 more leaflet-operations planes crashed in England.
Anti-minelayer patrols were flown over German seaplane bases from 23/24 February until 8/9 April. The total number of sorties flown was 61 – 54 by Hampdens and 7 by Whitleys. No aircraft were shot down by the Germans but 4 Hampden’s crashed in England.
(BC War Diaries, p 29)

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. Two U-boats (U-9; -63) leaving Helgoland on patrol; one (U-56) returning after 22 days. 19 [20?] U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.

Three ships (two neutral) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=12,633.
Kvernaas, a Norwegian steam merchantman of 1819 tons, carrying coke from Rotterdam via Amsterdam to Oslo. Complement=20; lost=0.
Pyrrhus, a British steam merchantman of 7418 tons, carrying 4000tons of general cargo from Glasgow via Liverpool and Gibraltar to Manila. Complement=81 (including gunners for 2 deck guns) + 4 naval personnel; lost=4 crew.
Wilja, a Finnish steam merchantman of 3396 tons, carrying general cargo from Savannah via Norfolk and Antwerp to Rotterdam. Complement=27; lost=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 02.05 hours … the unescorted and neutral Kvernaas … was hit by one torpedo from U-10 and sank within five minutes four miles northwest of Schouwen Bank, Netherlands. The crew abandoned ship in two lifeboats and was picked up after 4 hours by the Dutch steam merchant Oranjepolder. The vessel was en route to London, but turned back and landed the men at the pilot station in Hoek van Holland the next day.
… At 15.53 hours … the Pyrrhus …, a straggler from station #51 in convoy OG-18, was hit on the starboard side at #5 hatch by one torpedo from U-37 about 84 miles north-northwest of Cape Finisterre. She was the ship of the vice-commodore Vice-Admiral Alfred E. Evans, CB, OBE, RN and was about to rejoin convoy after having spent all day rounding up ships from convoy that had lost touch during a gale the previous night. The explosion broke the ship in two, causing the after part of about 160 feet to sink immediately. Eight Chinese crew members were lost. The master, 72 crew members (the ship was armed with one 4in and one 12pdr gun), the vice-commodore and his staff of four naval ratings abandoned ship in three boats in heavy sea and swell about 20 minutes after the hit. Three stragglers were following the ship and two of them, the British steam merchants Uskside and Sinnington Court stopped despite the danger of being torpedoed themselves, picked up the survivors and landed them at Gibraltar. The wreck of Pyrrhus was left adrift and eventually foundered two days later.
… At 20.36 hours … the unescorted and neutral Wilja … was hit aft by a G7a torpedo from U-48, caught fire and sank after five minutes about 40 miles south-west of Bishop Rock. The U-boat had spotted an illuminated Dutch ship and a darkened vessel about 30 minutes earlier and attacked the latter. The other ship was Maasdam, which picked up the survivors and landed them in Havana, Cuba.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Northern Patrol – Heavy cruiser NORFOLK arrived at Scapa Flow and departed to relieve heavy cruiser DEVONSHIRE on Northern Patrol. DEVONSHIRE reached Greenock on the 20th.
 
Light cruiser NEWCASTLE arrived at Scapa Flow after Northern Patrol, and destroyer KINGSTON departed Scapa Flow for Northern Patrol.
 
East Coast escort duty – Destroyers DIANA, ENCOUNTER and BRAZEN escorted two tankers from Rosyth to Aberdeen, after which they left with steamers HIRONDELLE (1243grt) and RUTLAND (1437grt). Destroyer KIPLING joined en route, with HIRONDELLE being taken into Lerwick and RUTLAND into Scapa Flow.
 
Submarine activities – Submarines TRIBUNE and TRUANT exercised in the Firth of Forth with destroyer ELECTRA serving as the target ship.
 
Submarine URSULA departed Blyth on patrol, but had to return with engine problems.
 
U.K.-France inbound convoy – Convoy BC.25 of five steamers, including BARON CARNEGIE and BATNA, which had sailed from Nantes on the 13th and 14th respectively, departed Quiberon Bay on the 16th. It arrived in Barry Roads on the 17th escorted by destroyer MONTROSE.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Destroyer WOLVERINE on convoy escort, attacked a submarine contact southwest of the Scilly Isle on the 17th in 49‑38N, 06‑40W and the 18th in 49-37N, 7-10W.
 
Sloop ABERDEEN, on convoy escort with OG.19F, attacked a contact southwest of Portland Bill in 50-10N, 2-52W.
 
Anti-submarine trawler PEARL (649grt) attacked a contact in Lune Deep in Morecombe Bay in 53-53N, 3-33W.
 
Equipment failure – Destroyer HAVANT developed defects while on escort duty.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – Convoy ON.14 with ten British, seven Norwegian, one Swedish, five Finnish and one Estonian ship departed Methil escorted by destroyers ESCAPADE, ESCORT, ECLIPSE, ELECTRA and submarine NARWHAL. (There was no ON/HN.13.) ECLIPSE attacked a submarine contact in the Firth of Forth in 56-09N, 2-49W, and one merchant ship detached before the North Sea crossing. Light cruisers EDINBURGH and ARETHUSA left Scapa Flow on the 19th to rendezvous with the convoy at 0700/20th, and when German surface ships appeared in the North Sea, ON.14 put into Kirkwall, still on the 19th, but left next day once the German ships had returned to Wilhelmshaven, reaching Bergen on the 22nd.
… 
U.K.-Gibraltar inbound convoy – Convoy HG.19 of 35 ships departed Gibraltar with sloops LEITH and BIDEFORD as ocean escort from the 17th to 27th. Before then, on the 24th, the convoy split into two. HG.19 A was escorted in Home Waters by BIDEFORD and destroyer WHITSHED, and HG.19B by destroyers WALPOLE, WHITSHED and MACKAY from the 24th to 27th when the convoy arrived at Liverpool.
 
U-boats v convoys – U.37 was en route to join U.53 for attacks off Portugal on French convoys 10 RS, en route from Gibraltar to Brest, and 65 KS, en route from Oran/Casablanca to Brest/St Nazaire. Off Cape Finisterre, U.37 attacked British convoy OG.18, escorted by French destroyer PANTHÈRE and French auxiliary patrol vessel MERCEDITA, and torpedoed British steamer PYRRHUS (7418grt) in 44‑02N, 10‑18W. She broke in two, the aft section sank immediately, but the fore part stayed afloat for two days. Eight Chinese crew were lost and the survivors, including Convoy Vice Commodore Vice Admiral A. E. Evans CB, CBE and his staff were rescued by British steamers USKSIDE (2706grt) and SINNINGTON COURT (6910grt). Also in OG.18 were British steamers AGAPENOR (7392grt), PROMETHEUS (6095grt) and GLENIFFER (9559grt).
 
The joint U-boat operation also netted three other ships. On the 18th, U.37 sank independently sailing Greek steamer ELLIN (4917grt) 25 miles NW of Cape Finisterre, the crew being picked up by Spanish fishing vessel MANIN (251grt, and French steamer PLM 15 (3754grt) from convoy 10 RS in 43‑37N, 09‑15W with the loss of her entire crew. French anti-submarine trawlers LA TOULONNAISE (738grt) and LA SETOISE (738grt) carried out attacks on U.37.
 
U.53 sank Spanish steamer BANDERAS (2140grt) eight miles NW of Cape Velano, also on the 18th. Twenty two crew were lost and six survivors rescued by Spanish fishing vessel TRITONIA (268grt). The U-boat also attacked French tanker GARONNE (3533grt) in convoy 10 RS, but malfunctioning torpedoes prevented any damage being done.
 
U.26 and U.50 had been ordered to operate with U.37 and U.53, but were too far away to join in time.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/18/2018 4:54:13 PM
Feb 18. Day 171
Sunday

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
No notable activity.

Britain
No notable activity, but an intimate glance at three women (mother and two daughters) living and working together.
Quote:
This morning we were laying in bed and Mother called out what’s that noise. I listened and heard machine-gun fire, lay in bed and listened and hear burst after burst of guns. This was about eight o’clock. Mother called out, ‘Do you think they are landing on the beach?’ She then said, ‘If they come I shall get under the bed and lie low.’ Jenny said, ‘I think I shall be more of a success with them if I stay in bed!’ We all laughed and after a time it stopped and I went to sleep again. Lots of ties during the morning we heard it agains, and lots of aeroplanes went over, Spitfires included…
(Muriel Green in Wartime Women, p 81)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-25) leaving Wilhelmshaven on patrol; no boats returning from patrol. 20 U-boats at sea. No U-boats lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.

Seven ships (five neutral) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=22,426.
Ameland, a Dutch steam merchantman of 4537 tons, carrying general cargo from Rotterdam to India. Complement=48; lost=0.
• HMS Darling, a British D-class destroyer of 1375 tons, escorting an inbound convoy from Norway. Complement=161; lost=156.
Ellin, a Greek steam merchantman of 4917 tons, carrying coal from Cardiff to Piraeus. Complement unlisted; lost=0.
P.L.M. 15, a French steam merchantman of 3754 tons, carrying ore from Sierra Leone via Casablanca to Brest. Complement=37 + 5 gunners; lost=42.
Bandaras, a Spanish steam merchantman of 2140 tons, carrying 3400 tons of phosphates fromBona to Pasajes. Complement=29; lost=22 crew.
El Sonador, a Panamanian steam merchantman of 1406 tons, carrying coal from Methil to Gothenburg. Complement=17; lost=17.
Sangstad, a Norwegian motor merchant of 4297 tons, carrying grain from Buenos Aires to Stavanger. Complement=29; lost=1.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 09.26 hours … the Ameland had just passed the Maasbank-buoy and was hit by a torpedo from U-10. She began to sink and the 48 crew members (3 of them injured) abandonded the ship. The master A. Kokké returned to rescue the documents and the ship sank later by the stern.
The survivors were picked up by the Dutch merchant Montferland … and were transferred to the tug Zwarte Zee. The wounded men were brought to Vlissingen and the crew was put ashore in Maassluis.
… At 03.54 hours … HMS Daring (H 16)…, escorting convoy HN-12, was hit by two torpedoes from U-23 about 40 miles east of the Pentland Firth and sank immediately. The commander, eight officers and 147 crew members were lost.
…At 00.45 hours the unescorted and neutral Ellin was hit on port side forward by one G7e torpedo from U-37 about 60 miles north-northwest of Cape Villano. The hit had not much effect and the ship only settled slowly by the bow, so at 01.09 hours a second torpedo was fired as coup de grâce that struck amidships and caused the ship to sink immediately after breaking in two. The survivors were rescued by the Spanish fishing trawler Manin.
…At 08.23 hours … U-37 fired one torpedo at the P.L.M. 15, a straggler from convoy 65-KS and observed how the ships [sic] sank within 40 seconds after being hit amidships about 30 miles from Cape Villano.
…At 04.20 hours … the unescorted and neutral Banderas … was torpedoed and sunk by U-53 about 8 miles west-southwest of Cape Finisterre. The Germans apparently assumed that she was a straggler from the combined French convoy 65-KS/10-RS, but was in fact just heading in the same direction astern of convoy. The survivors, two of them badly injured, were picked up by the Spanish fishing trawler Tritonia and landed at Coruna, Spain.
… At 00.23 hours … U-61 fired one G7a torpedo from a distance of only 350 meters at a steamer of about 3000 grt about 90 miles southeast of the Shetlands and observed it to sink in less than one minute after being hit on starboard side amidships. This must have been the El Sonador, which was reported missing since 17 February.
…At 06.09 hours the neutral Sangstad … was hit on the port side by one torpedo from U-61 east of Kirkwall and sank with a heavy list to port after 15 minutes. The port lifeboat had been destroyed by the explosion, so the survivors abandoned ship in the starboard boat and a raft and were rescued about 12 hours later. The master was last seen swimming towards the lifeboat but he drowned. The six survivors on the raft were picked up by HMS Diana (H 49) … and the 22 in the lifeboat by HMS Brazen (H 80) … and landed at Kirkwall on 21 February.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Anti-U-boat activity – Destroyer DARING…, escorting convoy HN.12, was sunk by U.23 off Duncansby Head in 58‑40N, 01‑40E. …Destroyers BRAZEN and ENCOUNTER, which had been hunting in the area, were ordered to search for the submarine responsible. They were joined by the convoy escort and by destroyers DIANA, which had departed Rosyth on the 17th, KIPLING, which had left Scapa Flow on the 14th, INGLEFIELD, ILEX, DELIGHT which earlier were released from HN.12’s escort, and anti-submarine trawlers of the 11th Anti-Submarine Striking Force. Submarine THISTLE rescued Lt L A Rogers and four ratings from DARING. The 11th A/S Striking Force did make an attack on U.23 east of Duncansby Head in 58-37N, 1-18W, but did no damage.
 
Destroyers GALLANT, JAGUAR, NUBIAN and SIKH departed Rosyth as convoy escorts and joined HN.12 bringing it into Methil on the 19th without further interference. After a loop crossing had been detected, destroyers GRIFFIN, IVANHOE, INTREPID hunted for another submarine in the Forth of Forth and were joined by escort vessel VALOROUS.
 
KIPLING reached Scapa Flow on the 18th and because of prior defects, went on to the Tyne for repairs arriving on the 20th.
 
Major German naval activity – German Admiral Marschall departed Wilhelmshaven for Operation NORDMARK with battleships SCHARNHORST and GNEISENAU, heavy cruiser ADMIRAL HIPPER, and destroyers KARL GALSTER, WILHELM HEIDKAMP, WOLFGANG ZENKER with the object of attacking allied shipping between the Shetlands and Bergen. However, ZENKER was damaged by ice and forced to return at the start. The remaining force was escorted through the Skagerrak by destroyers PAUL JACOBI, THEODOR RIEDEL, HERMANN SCHOEMANN, LEBERECHT MAAS and torpedo boats LUCHS and SEEADLER which raided in the Skagerrak after being detached. U-boats were disposed to support this operation. Three operated between the Shetlands and Norway, two in the Fair Isle Channel, three off the Pentland Firth and three held in reserve near the north coast of Scotland. … [In all,13 U-boats were] deployed …, including some off Kinnnaird Head.
 
British naval response – Submarine SALMON in the Heligoland Bight was ordered to attack the German surface ships, and convoy ON.14 was ordered into Kirkwall to avoid any contact with the enemy force, arriving on the 19th. Admiral Forbes was in the Clyde having only arrived on the 17th from supporting the ALTMARK hunt. After refuelling, he departed, still on the 19th with battleship RODNEY, battlecruiser HOOD, and destroyers FAULKNOR, FEARLESS, FOXHOUND, FURY, FORESIGHT, FORTUNE, FIREDRAKE. Destroyers HARDY left Greenock on the 19th, KHARTOUM Scapa Flow the same day, and KANDAHAR and TARTAR from Scapa on the 20th and joined Forbes at sea. With the British out and extreme cold immobilizing his seaplanes, Admiral Marschall was forced to return to Wilhelmshaven empty handed. Ice breakers were required to clear the Rivers Jade and Weser before they could reenter on the 20th. On the 21st/22nd, ENE of Muckle Flugga in 61‑19N, 01‑30E, HARDY attacked a submarine contact, was joined by FORTUNE, but the search was unsuccessful.
 
RN minelaying – Minelayer TEVIOTBANK and minelaying destroyers EXPRESS and ESK laid Deep Line S in operation DML.8 east of Outer Gabbard escorted by destroyers KEITH and BOADICEA. Minesweeper FRANKLIN had already laid the marker buoys on the 16th. After the lay, the minelaying ships proceeded to Immingham on the 19th,
 
Ship movements – Anti-aircraft cruiser CALCUTTA and destroyer KELVIN arrived at Sullom Voe, refuelled and departed again later that day.
 
Motor torpedo boats MTB.22, MTB.24 and MTB.25 departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
Submarine SEALION arrived at Harwich after patrol.
 
Submarine TETRARCH and tender CUTTY SARK were to depart the Clyde for Portsmouth, but TETRARCH engine defects prevented them leaving.
 
Northern Patrol – Armed merchant cruiser ASTURIAS on Northern Patrol picked up the survivors of fishing vessel SEA RAMBLER.
 
OUtbound convoys – Convoy OA.94 departed Southend escorted by destroyer WITCH. Destroyer ACASTA joined on the 19th, detached the next day and on the 21st, the convoy dispersed.
 
Convoy OB.94 departed Liverpool escorted by destroyers WALKER and VENETIA. They detached on the 20th and 21st respectively, with VENETIA joining HXF.20.
 
U.K.-France convoys – Convoy SA.30 of two steamers departed Southampton, escorted by sloops FOXGLOVE and ROSEMARY, and arrived at Brest on the 20th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy MT.14 departed Methil escorted by the 3rd Anti-Submarine Group, supported by destroyers VEGA, JAGUAR and sloop STORK, and arrived in the Tyne later that day.
 
Convoy FN.97 departed Southend, escorted by destroyer WESTMINSTER and sloop LONDONDERRY, and arrived at Methil on the 20th.
 
Convoy FS.99 departed the Tyne, escorted by destroyers VEGA, JAGUAR and sloop STORK, which had just arrived from Methil with MT.14. The convoy arrived at Southend on the 20th.
 …
Anti-U.boat- activity – Anti-submarine trawler CAPE PORTLAND (497grt) attacked a submarine contact off Aberdeen in 57-19N, 1-50W.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy – Convoy HX.21 departed Halifax at 0800 escorted by Canadian destroyers OTTAWA and SAGUENAY, which detached on the 19th. Ocean escort was armed merchant cruiser ALAUNIA, which left on 1 March. Destroyers WINDSOR and WOLVERINE escorted the convoy 2 to 4 March, when it arrived at Liverpool.
 
U.K.-Africa inbound convoy – Convoy SL.21 departed Freetown escorted by armed merchant cruiser DUNNOTTAR CASTLE until 4 March. Destroyers WANDERER joined on the 4th, VERSATILE on the 5th and the convoy arrived on the 7th.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/19/2018 5:00:06 PM
Feb 19. Day 172
Monday

Finland
No notable activity.

Germany
Quote:
Hitler orders more rapid progress with Operation Weserübung, the code-name for the invasion of Norway and Denmark.
(2194 Days, p 44)


Britain
No notable activity.

U.S.A.
Quote:
[Secretary] Hull extended the U.S. moral embargo to the Soviet Union.
(Goralski, p 107)
[Ed. note:assistance requested in defining whether this is a specific legal and legitimate embargo or not. IIUC, there was at the time an embargo against Japan. whether the embargo Secretary Hull extended to include the Soviet Union is that embargo or another such entity, I don’t know. Are moral embargoes the same as what we now call economic embargoes?]

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=0; launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-25) entering Wilhelmshaven after 38 days on patrol. 19 U-boats at sea. No U-boats reported lost this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.
One ship (British) lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=5225.
Tiberton, a British steam merchantman of 5225 tons, carrying iron ore from Narvik via Middlesbrough to Immingham. Complement=34; lost=34.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)
Quote:
At 04.05 hours … the unescorted Tiberton … was hit by one G7e torpedo from U-23, broke in two and sank in 30 seconds about 33 miles east of Kirkwall, Orkney Islands.
(«uboat.net»)

At sea
Quote:
Ship repair – Light cruiser GLASGOW arrived at Scapa Flow with rudder defects and then left for refitting at Belfast, where she arrived on the 24th. She later went on to Rosyth for refitting which was completed in early April.
 
Merchant interdiction – Armed merchant cruiser ASTURIAS boarded and sent in for inspection Norwegian steamer SKRAMSTAD (4300grt).
 
Northern Patrol – Destroyer KIMBERLEY departed Scapa Flow on Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser WORCESTERSHIRE departed the Clyde on Northern Patrol.
 
Armed merchant cruiser ANDANIA arrived at the Clyde after Northern Patrol.
 
Anti-U-boat patrol – Destroyers GRIFFIN, INTREPID, IVANHOE, VALOROUS arrived at Rosyth after a submarine hunt.
 
Ship movement – Destroyers JAGUAR and ILEX arrived at Rosyth.
 
U.K.-Gibraltar outbound convoy – Convoy OA.93GF sailed from Southend on the 16th escorted by destroyer WREN and sloop ENCHANTRESS, and OB.93GF from Liverpool on the 17th escorted by sloops ABERDEEN and DEPTFORD with twenty eight ships. The two convoys joined on the 19th as OG.19F escorted by ABERDEEN and DEPTFORD, were joined by destroyer WISHART, and arrived at Gibraltar on the 24th.
 
East Coast convoys – A TM Convoy departed the Tyne escorted by the 19th Anti-Submarine Group and supported by destroyer JACKAL.
 
Convoy FN.98 departed Southend escorted by sloop PELICAN and destroyers VIVIEN and JERVIS, and arrived in the Tyne on the 21st. Convoy FN.99 did not sail.
 
Convoy FS.100 departed the Tyne escorted by sloops FLEETWOOD, HASTINGS and destroyers VALOROUS and JANUS, and arrived at Southend on the 21st.
 
North Atlantic inbound convoy Destroyer WOLVERINE joined convoy HX.19 at 0815 with destroyers VANOC and VANESSA joining shortly after. WOLVERINE attacked a submarine contact WSW of Cape Clear in 50‑50N, 11‑23W, while the other two destroyers continued with the convoy. Destroyer WINCHELSEA joined WOLVERINE to continue the hunt.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – The 14th Anti-Submarine Striking Force attacked U.13 ESE of Duncansby Head in 58-30N, 1-30W, but did no damage.
 
Two German 250 ton U-boats were reported five miles off Vlieland in 53-16N, 05-00E at 1000 steering northwest and one 500 ton boat was reported six miles off Ijmuiden in 52-28N, 4-34E at 1300 steering southwest. French sloop AMIENS was ordered to join anti-submarine trawler LADY PHILOMENA to hunt for them, but did not join. AMIENS returned to Dunkirk early on the 20th.
 
Submarine SUNFISH at 0951 fired four torpedoes at U.14 in 54-28N, 07-11E.
 
Ship damage – Minelayer TEVIOTBANK was slightly damaged in collision with tug GOOLE No. 10 in Immingham Dock.
 
U-boat attacks – U.19 attacked tanker DAGHESTAN (5742grt) in 59‑21N, 01‑48W, but the attack failed due to torpedo defects.
 
Steamer TIBERTON (5225grt) was believed lost to unknown cause in the Moray Firth with all her crew. Uboat.Net and Rohwer's "Axis Submarine Successes" confirm she was sunk by U.23 in 58.07N, 02.39W.
 
German mercantile interdiction – Swedish steamer START (1765grt) was seized in the Baltic by German warships, and taken to Bremerhaven.
 
Ship reassignment – Aircraft carrier HERMES arrived at Dakar after VO operations, escorted by destroyers DAINTY, DIAMOND, DEFENDER and DECOY.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2329

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/20/2018 6:09:10 PM
20 Feb 1940

General Nikolaus von Falkenhorst is appointed to command the German invasion of Norway.

Poland

Representatives of the German Gestapo (including Adolf Eichmann) and the Soviet NKVD (including Grigoriy Litvinov) meet at Zakopane, Poland to coordinate the suppression of Polish resistance efforts.
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/20/2018 7:52:53 PM
Feb 20. Day 173
Tuesday. Waxing gibbous moon.

Finland
Quote:
Moscow offered new peace terms to Finland.
(Goralski, p 107)

Germany
Quote:
General Nikolaus von Falkenhorts, former commander of the XXI Army Corps, is given command of the German troops to occupy Norway and Denmark.
(2194 Days, p 44)

Britain
No notable activity.

Switzerland
The second paragraph is a lovely, subtle bit of writing!
Quote:
Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland
Down in bed with my annual flu for ten days. Must start back to Berlin tomorrow. Spring will soon be here. Action. The offensive. The war. Far away it has seemed here. …
At first, and the last three days after I got out of bed, skating on the rink below with Wellington Koo, Chinese Ambassador in Paris, himself recovering from the grippe and just learning to skate. Koo, who looks thirty and is probably over fifty, trying to impart to me the long view which the Chinese have learned to take, and I never patient nor wise enough to take. He sees the China war and this war as just chapters in a long story, places where men stop and pause on a long hard road, and he speaks softly and trudges along on his faltering skates.
(Berlin Diary, pp 289-90)

Western Front
No notable activity.

In the air
Regular but not daily North Sea shipping searches, largely by Blenheims of RAF 2 Group, on 34 of 47 days between 14 Feb. and 1 April. Leaflet and seaplane-based sorties also on a regular but not daily basis, with raids by at least one of these types on 37 of 52 nights between 17/18 Feb. and 8/9 April.
Quote:
German warships, Heligoland
20/21 February.
20 Wellingtons were dispatched, 2 as reconnaissance planes and 18 as the bombing force but a recall signal was sent because of fog. 1 Wellington was lost over the sea and 1 crashed in England.
This may have been an experimental raid with the object of finding and bombing German warships by night, to avoid the heavy casualties of recent daylight raids, but the attempt was not repeated.
(BC War Diaries, p 29)
[Ed. note: It is late February, and relatively soon the need to bomb German warships will have changed to the need to bomb on a broader scale. Night bombing will become the modus operandi of Bomber Command, but this aborted little raid still cost Bomber Command 10 per cent of its a/c, without reflecting on personnel lost.]

U-boat activity
On this date: commissioned U-boats ordered=0; laid down=1 (U-111); launched=0; commissioned=0. One U-boat (U-52) leaving Kiel on patrol; 2 U-boats (U-10, -14) entering Wilhelmshaven after 7 and 10 days on patrol respectively. 17 U-boats at sea. No U-boats reported lost on this date. U-boats lost in 1939=9; lost to date in 1940=4. Total lost=13.
No Allied or neutral ships lost to torpedoes. Total tonnage lost to torpedoes=0.
(Data collated from «uboat.net»)[Ed. note: I am concerned with the number of U-boats listed at sea by «uboat.net». Yesterdays count was 19; today’s count is 17. With two ships returning to port and one entering on patrol, the count should be 18. Unless I can account for it, I will continue to provide «uboat.net» data.]

At sea
Quote:
Luftwaffe shipping raids – He111 bombers of German KG26 (X Air Corps) attacked anti-submarine trawlers of the 11th Anti-Submarine Striking Force operating 52 miles 090° from Copinsay. FIFESHIRE (540grt) … was sunk in 58‑53N, 1‑12W with 21 of a complement of 22 lost. AYRSHIRE (540grt) was attacked and badly damaged, and CAPE SIRETOKO (590grt) also attacked. Destroyer INGLEFIELD departed Scapa Flow to support them. …
 
Ship damage – Submarine L.23 was depth charged by a German destroyer off the Danish coast, and sustained damage to her OF tanks. She reached Rosyth on the 22nd, left on the 23rd for Blyth and was repaired there from the 27th until March.
 
Destroyer ILEX was damaged at Rosyth while berthing alongside destroyer SIKH, and was repaired at Rosyth completing on 11 March.
 
Cange of posting – Destroyers GALLANT, GRIFFIN, INTREPID, IVANHOE departed Rosyth for Scapa Flow to operate under the Orkneys and Shetlands Command.
 
Ship movement – Destroyer KIPLING arrived in the Tyne.
 
Destroyer ECHO arrived at Leith for refitting.
 
Destroyers DELIGHT and INGLEFIELD arrived at Scapa Flow.
 
Submarine activity – Submarine URSULA departed Rosyth on patrol.
 
U.K.-Norway outbound convoy – After arriving at Kirkwall on the 19th to avoid contact with the German Battlecruiser force, convoy ON.14 left there escorted by destroyers ESCAPADE, ECLIPSE, ESCORT, ELECTRA and submarine NARWHAL. It was met by light cruisers EDINBURGH and ARETHUSA which departed Scapa Flow on the 20th. Anti-aircraft cruiser CAIRO departed Sullom Voe on the 21st and joined en route. EDINBURGH attacked a submarine contact east of Copinsay in 58-55N, 1-43W on the 20th, and also east of the Shetland Islands in 60-35N, 1-44W on the 21st. ON.14 arrived safely at Bergen on the 22nd.
 
Anti-U-boat activity – Polish destroyer BURZA attacked a submarine contact east of Orfordness in 52-04N, 1-59E.
 
Ship collisions – Destroyer KEITH, alongside depot ship SANDHURST in Dover Harbour, was rammed by armed yacht GULZAR. She left on the 22nd for repairs at Chatham, after which she returned to Sheerness on the 28th.
 
East Coast convoys – Convoy FS.100 arrived at Humber. Destroyers ESK and EXPRESS joined the convoy for passage to Portsmouth.
 
Convoy MT.15 departed Rosyth escorted by destroyers WHITLEY, JAGUAR and sloop EGRET. The three escorts joined convoy FS.101 when it sailed from the Tyne at 2230, and EGRET attacked a submarine contact seven miles 290° from Flamborough Head in 54-04. 6N, 00-06.6W. WHITLEY remained in the area for a time before rejoining FS.101, which arrived at Southend on the 22nd. Convoy FS.102 was cancelled.
 
Anti-U-boat activities – Trawler LADY ELEANOR (324grt) attacked a submarine contact eight miles SE of Flamborough.
 
French destroyer FOUDROYANT and aircraft operated south of Colbart Ridge at dawn on anti-submarine patrol.
 
Cable laying – Cable ship MONARCH departed Dover for Calais to complete laying loops 16 and 17. The operation continued on the 22nd.
 
Destroyer VORTIGERN departed Gibraltar to escort cable ship MIRROR. When it was found further cable repairs were needed, the destroyer escorted her to Lisbon and returned to Gibraltar.
 
French convoy activity – French large destroyers VAUTOUR and GERFAUT departed Oran on the 19th, escorting three French transports to Brest as convoy 1F. They passed Gibraltar on the 20th, and were joined by large destroyer BISON, en route. This movement was in preparation for allied operations in Finland. Troopship CHAMPOLLION, arrived at Brest on the 23rd, escorted by the three destroyers. Torpedo boats BOUCLIER, MELPOMONE, LA FLORE of the 14th Destroyer Division departed Lorient on the 22nd and joined troopships VILLE D'ALGER and MARECHAL LYAUTEY, and they arrived at Cherbourg on the 24th. Due to turbine vibration, GERFAUT was replaced by destroyer VERDUN for the operation.
(«naval-history.net»)
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Moderator


Posts: 2010

Re: WW2: day-to-day
Posted on: 2/20/2018 9:06:06 PM
Trevor, can you (or anyone, for that matter) help me with something. You note:
Quote:
General Nikolaus von Falkenhorst is appointed to command the German invasion of Norway.
I note (even after your post):
Quote:
General Nikolaus von Falkenhorts [sic], former commander of the XXI Army Corps, is given command of the German troops to occupy Norway and Denmark.

Invasion and occupation are two different functions, though von Falkenhorst ultimately held both commands. I assume his appointment would come from OKW, but can we read the difference between your note and mine to be some kind of carrot and stick game? Kind of a "Take these countries and you can control them forever!"?

I'm a non-military man. I had assumed orders were relatively specific, but broader as one went up command. But, were I a military man, I would make different preparations for invasion and conquest than I would for control and occupation. The differences between your note and mine may just be differences in language. But clearly, it has given me pause... .

Cheers
Brian G

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

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