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 (1939-1945) WWII Battles
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Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/29/2018 10:31:52 AM
Hi MHO'ers,

OP, got me going on this calling USN WWII Aircraft Carriers, "Bird Farms", here are some more slang terms used by WWII Era Military, some are hilarious, check them out!? Please feel free to comment and ad more from your countries military, used now or in the past!? Kai, any current slang terms you've heard lately? Anyone else got some??

[Read More]

Could be a fun thread! Comments?
MD

So you "Big Wheels" lets "beat your gums" about which "kite" weapon was most effective, a "fish", or an "egg" ? Eggs seemed more effective at Midway?

BTW; Feel free to, Create your own military slang sentences, and see if we can decipher them??
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

ColonelMac1775
Copperas Cove, TX, USA
top 50
E-4 Specialist


Posts: 79
http://parlorsongs.ac/ http://indoctrinationveducation.blogspot.com/
Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/29/2018 2:37:47 PM
A few Marine terms:

BOHICA - Bend over here it comes again

Geedunk - Another term for food, usually a snack, or the establishment that sells such

John Wayne - A grandstander, or descriptive of a bold act, or any act which is typical in the movies but not sound Marine procedure, such as firing a machine gun from the hip. Also, the small can opener that used to come in C-rat meals and that can be carried on the dogtag chain.


LPC's - Leather personnel carriers ... boots

Pogybait - Candies

Scuttlebutt - Rumor; Gossip / water fountain (From the Navy)

Shitbird - A sloppy Marine

Slop Chute - Bar

Ten (10) Percenter - One of the small number of nonhackers in any unit

W.A.F.W.O.T. - What a F--king Waste of Time (sung to the tune of the 1940s tune "Ja-da, Ja-da, Jing, Jing, Jing)

Doggie - U.S. Army Soldier
Squid - Sailor
Zoomie - Anyone in the U.S. Air Force

Now, I have a question on Navy terminology. This is a cowl vent aboard a ship.


When I was a boy, my grandfather (a WW II Seabee) told me that there was a nickname given to this by the Old Salts on a ship. It was a man's name and they would tell the newbie crewmen to "Go find ________"(giving that name) and the kid would search all over the ship looking for "him".

Are there any Old Salts out there who might remember what that name was?
---------------
Some things are believed because they are demonstrably true. But, many others are believed simply because they've been asserted again and again.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/29/2018 7:42:23 PM
Hi Rich,

Those are good marine terms for sure, you have to remember some of us here are civilians (civies) so we find these terms amusing!

Like these?

[Read More]

keep the lingo coming,

[Read More]

pretty soon we'll all be talking,
like doggies, squids, & zoomies!?

MD

be cool, don't be a Blue Falcon!

[Read More]
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 2337

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/29/2018 9:10:51 PM
MD, there are literally thousands of terms that exist in English because of military time in what was effect occupied territory. Much of it comes from British troops stationed in the Raj or in the Far East, but it appears wherever troops spend time they adapt language.
You are talking about a different concept: terms taken from the military that might exist in real life. I doubt many of these terms became part of US slang or street language, for a host of reasons.

In non-US English-speaking countries, there is a long-standing "authority" on slang and usage by the name of Eric Partridge. Amongst his many offerings, he has published a slender volume of RAF slang titled, perhaps unsurprisingly, A Dictionary of RAF Slang. Originally published in 1945, my 1990 edition and has a foreward worth considering:

"In a classic Monty Python sketch set "'Somewhere in England, 1944", a Squadron Leader returns from a mission to tell his colleagues, 'Top hole! Bally Jerry pranged his kite right in the how's your father. Hairy blighter, dickie-birdied, feathered back on his Sammy, took a waspie, flipped over on his Betty Harper's and caught his can in the Bertie!'"

It is noted that "the sketch is surreal and hilarious because it presents language that has a ring of authenticity, but is in fact bunk." And I note that the term "bunk", a short form for "bunkum", though it might sound military in origin, may be a political term rooted in North Carolina antiquity.

I'm not certain, but I believe that many military terms have been sanitized, and therefore lost some of their value. SNAFU and FUBAR are an obvious two from the US military, but there are probably dozens of others. Point: whenever the "f-word" comes into play and is replaced, the value of the term is lost.

A lot of military terms have been absorbed into civilian language. I agree, though I would argue the the percentage of absorption is less than expected. Some have become part of both civilian and military life because of their active description: sonar; blip; bogey are WW2 terms that have survived because they are needed and understood.

Lots more to explore on this topic, I think.

Cheers
Brian G

---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 698

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/29/2018 10:32:09 PM
SNAFU: Situation Normal All Fucked Up

FUBAR: Fucked Up Beyond All Recognition

Butter Bar: 2nd Lieutenant

Leg, or Straight Leg: Non-Paratrooper

REMF: Rear Echelon Mother Fucker

Grunt: Soldier

Cheese Dick Mother Fucker: Cheese Dick Muther Fucker

Cherry: Newbie to an Airborne unit, aka someone to be avoided at all cost in the air.., and at a bar!

Major: Jesus Christ Wannabe, or Wishes He was a Colonel

Warrant Officer: Someone on vacation

Command Sgt Major: God

1st Sgt: Top





---------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 9033

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/30/2018 7:51:16 AM
I was trying to recall some of the Canadian army military slang from WW2, that my Dad would use once in a while.

Some of it would be common to the British and Commonwealth armies.

Buck shee: anything that you got that was free

One pip wonder: Name for a brand new lieutenant or leftenant as the British and Commonwealth said. Usually a derisive comment.

Doesn't Know Shit from Toothpaste: Often combined with one pip wonder

Big Boss Salute: exaggerated salute, (long way up, short way down). Reserved for senior officers and special occasions.


Slit Trench: I think that this was Brit and commonwealth. Is the US analogy a fox hole?


Dad had a name for the battalion military officer. Sounded like MOGI to me, which may be an acronym. Anybody??


World War 1:

Funk hole: protective cuts into a trench wall




ColonelMac1775
Copperas Cove, TX, USA
top 50
E-4 Specialist


Posts: 79
http://parlorsongs.ac/ http://indoctrinationveducation.blogspot.com/
Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/30/2018 8:48:25 AM
George,

In the US military, a slit trench is actually a place where one relieves oneself.

Rich
---------------
Some things are believed because they are demonstrably true. But, many others are believed simply because they've been asserted again and again.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/30/2018 10:12:44 AM
Hi George,

Your right, the Brits used some great slang terms, check them out!?

[Read More]


Go Crab Air,

Cheers, Mates,
MD

BTW Also feel free to list slang from a particular war like WWI, Civil War, WWII, Nam, or even Modern Military Terms!?

Also, Brian G., dt, Rich, thanks for your insights, good posts!
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Riaindevoy
Geelong, Australia
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 1568

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/30/2018 2:13:10 PM
SCRAN; Shit Cooked by RAN.

---------------
Fact: The phrase "she'll be right mate" increases an Australian's healing process by 40%.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 11/30/2018 10:38:32 PM
Hey Riain,

Check out this bloke, saying slang terms from Oz!?

[Read More]

Wow,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

kaii
Tallinn, Estonia
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2534

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/1/2018 12:30:33 PM
PURE: Previously Undetected Recruiting Error

---------------
I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.

17thfabn
Ohio, USA
top 60
E-3 Private First Class
Posts: 56

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/1/2018 8:54:59 PM
Dough Boy versus G.I.

I used to think of Dough Boy as slang for a World War I U.S. soldiers and G.I. as the nickname for his World War II counterpoint.

However, I've seen many articles that were written during World War II where the Dough Boy term was still being used. I've seen the term Armored Doughs for Armored Infantry.

My Uncle's Divisional (76th) and Regimental (304) histories both used Dough Boy for World War II U.S. Soldiers.
---------------
Withdrawal in disgust is not the same as apathy.

R Leonard
Richmond, VA, USA
New User
E-2 Private


Posts: 24

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/1/2018 10:47:40 PM
Always remember to play nice lest someone dump a bucket of prop wash on you while you are loosening that bolt with your trusty left handed monkey wrench, a gift from the gunner's daughter.

:)

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/2/2018 12:13:53 PM
How the Navy Talks, 1942: http://ibiblio.org/hyperwar/NHC/NewPDFs/USN/USN%20How%20The%20Navy%20Talks%201942.pdf

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/2/2018 5:45:38 PM

Quote:
How the Navy Talks, 1942: [Read More]
--OpanaPointer


good one, OP,
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/2/2018 5:50:09 PM
Try it on the Chief and he'll send you for a hundred yards of shoreline and a bucket of steam.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/12/2018 4:17:25 PM

Quote:
How the Navy Talks, 1942: [Read More]
--OpanaPointer




OP

Navy talk has always been salty!?

MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/12/2018 5:55:48 PM
The 18th and 19th Centuries were very salty. Before that I really can't tell, the lingo escapes me for the most part.

The file I posted was dated 1943.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/15/2018 11:40:56 AM
What branch of the military had the wildest slang terms??

Or for that matter what country did!?
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 2337

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/15/2018 7:30:23 PM

Quote:
What branch of the military had the wildest slang terms??

Or for that matter what country did!?

Dave, I don't know whether that question (those questions?) can be answered. Most slang dies quickly, and much that survives is "sanitized". We all know that the "F" in SNAFU or FUBAR doesn't stand for "fouled"!

If, on the other hand, you asked about terms adapted from the military into "decent" civilian discourse, I would expect that the British Army would lead the way, perhaps closely followed by the RN. And even that might depend on where you live and where influences may stick.

Example: I am a wine drinker. I drink beer when I'm out with the boyz, but at home I drink wine. While my partner-in-crime Annette was alive, we drank white wine: she was allergic to something in reds. At least in Canada (and I believe in GB as well) there is a well-known term for cheap wine. If you ask for "plonk", you'll not get vintage stuff. But IIUC, "plonk" is a WW1 term for cheap French white wine, normally known as "blanc". Tommies (different language question, should that be Tommys?), of course, didn't get the pronunciation quite right, and ordered "plonk".

At least that's my story, and I'm sticking to it!

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/16/2018 9:45:40 AM
Bri,

It's just like you, to be "whining" all the time!?

Cheers,
MD

BTW Michigan has great wines! ever have any?

[Read More]
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Phil andrade
London, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Moderator
Posts: 3810

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/16/2018 11:27:44 AM

Quote:

Quote:
What branch of the military had the wildest slang terms??

Or for that matter what country did!?

Dave, I don't know whether that question (those questions?) can be answered. Most slang dies quickly, and much that survives is "sanitized". We all know that the "F" in SNAFU or FUBAR doesn't stand for "fouled"!

If, on the other hand, you asked about terms adapted from the military into "decent" civilian discourse, I would expect that the British Army would lead the way, perhaps closely followed by the RN. And even that might depend on where you live and where influences may stick.

Example: I am a wine drinker. I drink beer when I'm out with the boyz, but at home I drink wine. While my partner-in-crime Annette was alive, we drank white wine: she was allergic to something in reds. At least in Canada (and I believe in GB as well) there is a well-known term for cheap wine. If you ask for "plonk", you'll not get vintage stuff. But IIUC, "plonk" is a WW1 term for cheap French white wine, normally known as "blanc". Tommies (different language question, should that be Tommys?), of course, didn't get the pronunciation quite right, and ordered "plonk".

At least that's my story, and I'm sticking to it!

Cheers
Brian G
--brian grafton



Brian,

Cockney rhyming slang : Vin blanc = Plink Plonk, hence Plonk.

Regards, Phil
---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/16/2018 12:18:20 PM
Yeah, "blanc" sounds like "Plonk" to an English-tuned ear.

Phil andrade
London, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Moderator
Posts: 3810

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/16/2018 1:30:22 PM
Blighty and deolali pronounced “ doolaly “ are imperishable words from British military slang .

These come from the days of the Raj, British Imperial rule of India.

‘Blighty “ is a Hindi word for “ home”. To get a “ Blighty one “ meant to get a slight wound : get home and be intact to enjoy the wine, women and song, with honour intact.

“ Deolali “ was the hospital in India where British soldiers suffering from heatstroke were sent to recover . To “ go doolaly “ meant to go mad.

Imperial rule imparts a true lexicon to the tradition of army slang.

The American experience must have this, too.

Did frontier warfare in the nineteenth century, or twentieth century forays into South East Asia, impart a similar legacy ?

Regards, Phil



---------------
"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/16/2018 2:00:11 PM
http://www2.iath.virginia.edu/sixties/HTML_docs/Resources/Glossary/Sixties_Term_Gloss_A_C.html

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
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E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 2337

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/16/2018 5:45:35 PM
Phil, thanks for the link to Cockney rhyming slang. I note too that at least one explanation from Wiki suggests it is originally an Australian term adopted by the British, and only rarely used in Canada. Neither you nor Wiki says whether the term came from either army slang or from WW1. My curiosity is aroused.

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/27/2018 9:35:07 AM
[Read More]
--OpanaPointer


Hi OP,

Nice site, we don't talk about Nam as much as it warrants!?

[Read More]

What say you?
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/27/2018 11:21:56 AM
I draw the line at the Korean Armistice. Too personal after that.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/31/2018 9:40:20 AM
OP,

The Civil War slang terms are also fascinating!?

[Read More]


Comments, & other slang, anyone?

Regards,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 12/31/2018 10:32:42 AM
There's a contemporary newspaper cartoon mocking the men who fled from First Manassas, one of them is saying "I skedaddled!"

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 1/2/2019 10:07:56 AM
OP,

I hope you didn't get Tight, Wall Papered, have too much Bark juice, on New Years Eve? Did you have any sheet iron crackers? Why you couldn't put an Arkansas toothpick in them!?

Don't do the Quick step!
& never be a parlor soldier!?

Bully!
MD

---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 1/2/2019 11:24:03 AM
Bit of Monteczuma's revenge, that's all. Luckily I didn't wind up in LBJ.

Brian Williams
Atlanta, GA, USA
Administrator


Posts: 573
http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com
Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 1/25/2019 3:06:23 PM


Ah yes, the faithful P-38 Can Opener.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 2/16/2019 8:58:32 AM
Hi Brian,

If it works use it! lots of in-genius ways to open a beer!?

Cheers,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 2/16/2019 11:38:39 AM

Quote:
Hi Brian,

If it works use it! lots of in-genius ways to open a beer!?

Cheers,
MD
--Michigan Dave

Bad idea. The John Wayne starts with a pin hole and ends with a narrow slit. Sprays the beer. Now if you have your lips ready to receive some near gaseous brew, then it's all good.

wazza
Sydney , Australia
top 30
E-5 Sergeant
Posts: 481

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 2/16/2019 5:46:53 PM
The Australian version is a bit longer and has a spoon on the end.
We call them FRED.

" F%$#ing Ridiculous Eating Device"

Were, worth their weight in gold once, before the sachet MRE's meals of today.

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 2337

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 2/16/2019 9:09:32 PM
i actually had one of those openers at one time. For the hell, I tried to use it, and it did work. Not easily, and it wasn't as smooth as a "Swingway", but it worked.

Maybe my uncle brought it back with him rom WW2; he certainly brought some excellent medical devices (he was a sergeant corpsman, having refused he chance to become an officer).

The name Eric Partridge might mean something to some of you. He's a well-respected British lexicographer. At any rate, I have his Dictionary of RAF Slang, a bit of whimsy running to 76 pages. Most of the slang included in Partridge's volume is cute, clever, and ephemeral. Fun, interesting, valid and often meaningless outside the service which adopted it. I like "Penguin" from his volume, e.g.: "ground crew who does not fly."

I think it impossible to consider what is real slang and what is simply military realism. I think the rather vulgar US mess term "shit on shingle" so perfect a description that is deserves to become part of the language. I think SNAFU and FUBAR, however rewritten and tamed they might be, are realities far beyond war usage.

Just look at the image Brian W shows us! That design is worthy of the Bauhaus, for God's sake! And it was designed to hang with the dogtags. My guess is that, had this been created by IKEA it would have come in two pieces and needed a small Allen wrench to put together!

Cheers
Brian G
---------------
"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 2/17/2019 5:43:35 AM
I wish I had known the term "penguin" back in the day. While on shore duty I had the occasion to fly on government business, always with another sailor or two. One of my guys was an aviation rating, one of the non-aircrew types. He was a white-knuckle flier to but he always got on the plane. At one point he said "the landing is my favorite part of a flight!"

"Yeah, but that's when they're TRYING to hit the ground."

He never did thank me for that.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4889

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 3/4/2019 9:07:25 AM
On another note is the slang terms that the kids of today use!?

[Read More]

Least we lose touch with today's new generation??

What the????
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1270

Re: Military slang terms!? :)
Posted on: 3/23/2019 3:36:59 PM
I saw one, "AIR", Adult In Room, meaning you had to be careful what you texted to them.

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