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The current time is: 2/16/2019 11:20:41 PM
 (1939-1945) WWII Battles
AuthorMessage
vpatrick
Boston , MA, USA
top 20
E-7 Sgt First Class
Moderator


Posts: 552
http://vpatricksblog.blogspot.com/
Pets and the Blitz
Posted on: 1/26/2019 8:53:16 AM
I was laying in bed last night with my trusty hound next to me (not the wife my 11 pound Maltese.. kidding please!) and was thinking about how scared the dog gets during thunder. Then I started thinking about what dogs would do during a bombing like the London Blitz during 1940. It must have been beyond terrifying for both owner and hound. I like the side stories in history gives a fuller picture of an imagined horrific situation. As a dog lover the Nazi bombs would have a hard time getting me to do what this article suggests. Horrible situation and just adds to the terrifying aspects of the blitz that language has trouble conveying. My first thread on this board in years and its about what did Spot do? not a good showing

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vpatrick

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nuts

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4598

Re: Pets and the Blitz
Posted on: 1/26/2019 9:28:38 AM
hi Vince,

Right you are! all of our dogs, past & present, are or were terrified of fireworks, thunder storms or any loud exploding sounds!?

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They will run to the basement, jump in the bath tub, crawl under the bed! Anything to get away!?

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Poor things, & bombing during the war had to be doubly terrifying!?

Regards,
MD

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"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

Larry Purtell
USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 700

Re: Pets and the Blitz
Posted on: 1/26/2019 5:37:21 PM
My dog (a beagle) will start running circles,panting and crying a half hour or more before a thunder storm arrives. Drop in pressure, super keen hearing, I don't know but he is the best weather predictor in our household. Can't imagine him in the blitz.

Larry
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"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

vpatrick
Boston , MA, USA
top 20
E-7 Sgt First Class
Moderator


Posts: 552
http://vpatricksblog.blogspot.com/
Re: Pets and the Blitz
Posted on: 1/26/2019 6:33:21 PM
I cant imagine my dog either during the blitz we would both be running for Scotland on dogs orders(although I think I could still be drafted at 48 not sure maybe some kind of anti aircraft duty), I would never give up my dog for a culling, my dog would be like giving up a family member. Maybe I could exchange an elderly mother inlaw, (I love my mother inlaw kidding). I would guess if you had money you could keep your dog in London according to the article, Churchill had bulldogs or is that a myth?.


Very sad time 1940 Britain.

vpatrick
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nuts

brian grafton
Victoria, BC, Canada
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major


Posts: 2244

Re: Pets and the Blitz
Posted on: 1/26/2019 9:08:29 PM
Vince, great little insight into the war that has been largely forgotten or glossed over. But a little perspective might help here.

However bad the impact of the Blitz, or the much longer and more powerful assault on German civilians, nothing was as bad as the official expectations of the impact of bombing before the war began. Keep in mind that the first air raid sirens howled over some locations in Britain within an hour of the official declaration of war: no German aircraft could have reached Britain in that time. Keep in mind that it was expected that civil conduct and discourse would evaporate, and that bombed civilians who survived the assault would run amok, bringing about the collapse of government.There are reports of 50,000 papier-mache coffins stored in London alone to look after the expected deaths from the initial two-week bombing offensive, where in fact fewer died during the entire nine-month period of the Blitz.

Bombing of civilian targets, even through the first year of the war, was proscribed, and was considered as heinous a war activity as poison gas: that's how deep the fear went. During US diplomatic visits attempting to bring the belligerents to the peace table, there were codicils attempting to gain assurances that the ban on the bombing of civilians would continue to be recognized by all belligerents.

I'm not trying to minimize the ugly truth that many pets were put down at the outset of war. But I think the hint in the article that putting pets down was a rather callous part of a check list is unfair,
Quote:
The story is not more widely known because it was a difficult story to tell, says Kean.

"It isn't well known that so many pets were killed because it isn't a nice story, it doesn't fit with this notion of us as a nation of animal lovers. People don't like to remember that at the first sign of war we went out to kill the pussycat," she says.
I don't think that final para is fair or accurate. I think it closer to the truth to suggest that since the pet owners saw every chance of themselves being dead, what would their pets face?

I always sense that in a time of crisis, every nation should have a duchess or two around.
Quote:
In the middle of the pet-culling mayhem, some people tried desperately to intervene. The Duchess of Hamilton - both wealthy and a cat lover - rushed from Scotland to London with her own statement to be broadcast on the BBC. "Homes in the country urgently required for those dogs and cats which must otherwise be left behind to starve to death or be shot."
That comment says worlds about Britain in 1939, and about duchesses at any time!

Cheers
Brian G
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"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly.

"The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

Lew & Ginny Gage
Cornish, NH, USA
top 50
E-4 Specialist
Posts: 75

Re: Pets and the Blitz
Posted on: 1/28/2019 3:50:31 PM
Oh, my goodness! Something I have never heard about. How sad.

Ginny Gage

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1114

Re: Pets and the Blitz
Posted on: 1/28/2019 7:06:55 PM
Britain spent millions to send children overseas. The individual pet owners would have been much strained to have some in the country look after their pets for the duration.

Gregory C. White
Canton, GA, USA
top 40
E-4 Corporal
Posts: 221

Re: Pets and the Blitz
Posted on: 1/28/2019 9:04:34 PM
In the American Civil War, the Troup Artillery, which was quite active in Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, had a dog as its mascot, that accompanied the Georgia unit in all of its marches and battles. Sadly, it was wounded by Union schrapnel 3 days before the surrender @ Appomattox Court House, and died.
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"I do not believe that any man can adequately appreciate the world of to-day unless he has some knowledge of...[and] some feeling for...the history of the world of the past." Theodore Roosevelt

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