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The current time is: 5/25/2019 7:54:13 PM
 (1939-1945) WWII Battles
AuthorMessage
Larry Purtell
USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 711

U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 2/12/2019 3:17:58 PM
The U.S.S. Hornet has been found.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/uss-hornet-wreckage-world-war-two-warship-discovered/
---------------
"My goal is to live forever. So far, so good.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 5018

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 2/12/2019 3:35:58 PM

Quote:
The U.S.S. Hornet has been found.

[Read More]
--Larry Purtell



Larry,

That's great news the Hornet was quite the WWII Aircraft Carrier!

Thanks for the breaking news!

Regards,
MD
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 720

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 2/12/2019 9:40:39 PM
111 crewman died serving on CV-8 Hornet and during the Battle of Santa Cruz Islands; "Destroyers USS Mustin (DD-413) and USS Anderson (DD-411) tried to scuttle her with torpedoes and 5" gunfire, but had to retire as enemy forces closed in. Hornet was finally scuttled by Japanese destroyers Makigumo and Akigumo with four 24" torpedoes, early on October 27. In all, she took two planes, 7-8 bombs, 16 torpedoes and an unknown number of 5" shells."

Its good to see she has been located and, IJN Hiei was recently discovered as well; Hiei was the first Japanese BB sunk by US forces in WWII. [Read More]

One of the enduring pictures of Hornet under attack.

---------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 7854
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 2/13/2019 1:28:56 PM
On the morning of 26 October, 1942, HORNET was operating north of Santa Cruz Islands as part of a task force. Enemy action during the day was expected and the ship was at General Quarters with condition "Afirm" set before and during the attacks. The weather was clear with low scattered clouds. Several small rain squalls passed over the area of action. In the afternoon the atmosphere became somewhat murky with reduced visibility. The sea was slight with a moderate swell.

7. At 0920 radar contact was made with enemy aircraft 60 miles distant. The combat air patrol was landed, fueled, and flown off again. This operation was completed by 0948. Immediately after servicing the last fighter, the gasoline system of the ship was completely blanketed with CO2. As the enemy approached, speed was built up to 28 knots and radical maneuvers were employed in an attempt to evade bombs and torpedoes.

8. At 1010 anti-aircraft fire was opened on a coordinated enemy dive bombing and torpedo plane attack. Two bombs fell at some distance off the starboard beam and in line with the bridge. No damage resulted from the detonation of these bombs. About 1012 a delayed-action bomb struck the flight deck at frame 80 near the centerline. It penetrated to the third deck and detonated in compartment A-310-1LM. A few moments after this, two more bombs struck the flight deck aft. The first, at frame 151, detonated upon contact blowing an 11-foot hole in the flight deck about 20 feet inboard of the starboard deck-edge. The other, a delayed-action bomb, hit at frame 155, penetrated to the third deck and detonated in compartment D-503-1L. At 1014 an enemy dive bomber, armed with three bombs, dove into the forward port corner of the stack, glanced off and crashed on the flight deck. One of the bombs detonated upon hitting the stack. The other two passed through the flight deck. One detonated in a squadron ready room and the other was a dud. About 30 seconds later the first of two aircraft torpedoes detonated against the starboard side. This torpedo, running quite shallow, struck at frame 112 in way of the forward engine room. Twenty seconds later the second torpedo, which was also running shallow, struck at frame 160 in way of the magazine group. About 1017 another dive bomber, unarmed and burning fiercely, came in from the port quarter and attempted to crash HORNET but initially overshot. The plane then rounded the bow and crashed into the port side in way of the forecastle deck just forward of No. 1 elevator. About a minute later an unarmed torpedo plane, coming from dead ahead, attempted a "suicide" crash but missed and crashed into the sea off the port bow.

9. As a result of this attack: the ship listed immediately 10-1/2° to starboard and then slowly righted to 7° starboard; the forward engine room was flooded; all propulsion was temporarily lost; all power was lost; all communication facilities were disrupted; fire main pressure was lost; and large fires were started on the signal bridge, flight deck, No. 2 ready room, C.P.O. quarters, GSK storeroom, forward messing compartment, No. 1 elevator pit, forward port side gallery deck, hangar deck amidships, and hangar deck aft.

At 1020 MORRIS and RUSSELL, and later MUSTIN, came alongside and passed fire hoses to HORNET. In addition to the facilities of these destroyers there were many bucket brigades which carried foamite and water to the fires. At 1100 all fires were under control, although those on the flight deck and in the C.P.O. quarters were still requiring a great deal of attention. At this time all excess personnel were transferred to assisting destroyers. During this time preparations were being made by the USS Northampton to take Honet in tow; but it was too late.

Regards

Jim.
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 720

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 2/17/2019 1:46:25 PM

Quote:
At 1020 MORRIS and RUSSELL, and later MUSTIN, came alongside and passed fire hoses to HORNET. In addition to the facilities of these destroyers there were many bucket brigades which carried foamite and water to the fires. At 1100 all fires were under control, although those on the flight deck and in the C.P.O. quarters were still requiring a great deal of attention. At this time all excess personnel were transferred to assisting destroyers. During this time preparations were being made by the USS Northampton to take Honet in tow; but it was too late.

Regards

Jim.
--anemone


Prior to the arrival of the two Japanese destroyers Makigumo & Akigumo, US "...Destroyers USS Mustin (DD-413) and USS Anderson (DD-411) tried to scuttle her with (10) torpedoes and (numerous) 5" gunfire, but had to retire as enemy forces closed in."

Upon the arrival of the Japanese destroyers, they concluded it was useless to capture the ship, confirmed the hull number of "8", then backed away and struck Hornet with four 24" torpedoes.

---------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 7854
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 2/17/2019 2:25:27 PM
Hi dt

A pretty tough old "bird box"--5" AND 8" GUNFIRE AND `14 WOW! TORPEDOES--4 of whic she took.I assume were Long Lance-she did not deserve to die--that was some beating. I hope they kept the construction plans of her.

Regards

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 720

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 2/17/2019 5:45:03 PM
Hi Jim:

CV-8 Hornet was one of three carriers in the "Yorktown class" of carriers; CV-5 Yorktown, CV-6 Enterprise & CV-8 Hornet. All three carriers took a beating but it was Enterprise who stayed the course throughout the war ending with 21 battle stars.

Had the CA-26 USS Northampton been able to continue towing Hornet, she may have made a valiant return to the battles in the Pacific but, the towing failed on 3 or 4 attempts and on the final attempt the word was out, the Japanese were sailing in for a fight.

USS Hornet with the Doolittle raiders

---------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 7854
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 2/18/2019 4:38:07 AM
Hi old Buddy
IF she had been able to come home-she would have been a national icon for all to admire
All our early carriers were sunk by torpedo-However I would match the USS Hornet with
the Royal Navy's HMS Illustrious Class for ruggedness-but that is another story argued
many times over.

Regards#

Jim
---------------
Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 5018

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 3/4/2019 9:27:15 AM
Hi Jim, & MHO'ers

I agree, also there was another thing about WWII US Carriers is the great job that their damage control teams did! Just look at the USS Yorktown, at Midway the Japs thought it was another Carrier, it got repaired so fast!? That & how it was saved at Coral Sea earlier! What say you??

[Read More]

Amazing job, damage control USN !
MD

---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1320

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 3/4/2019 7:13:21 PM
LOL. Remember what happened to Enterprise?

dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 720

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 3/4/2019 11:15:40 PM

Quote:
LOL. Remember what happened to Enterprise?
--OpanaPointer


What didn't happen to Big E!? That ship took the brunt of fighting from the beginning to the end in the Pacific and then she succumbed to the scrappers torch.what a shame!!
---------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1320

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 3/5/2019 1:28:17 PM
Ed Zachery. She wasn't respected after all that.

Dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 720

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 3/5/2019 6:02:48 PM

Quote:
Ed Zachery. She wasn't respected after all that.
--OpanaPointer


The Big E not respected? I dare say not from this site or commentor.
---------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1320

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 3/5/2019 7:26:52 PM
I meant post-war. She wasn't preserved like she should have been.

Dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 720

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 3/6/2019 5:04:02 PM

Quote:
I meant post-war. She wasn't preserved like she should have been.
--OpanaPointer


Got it and I agree 100%!!
---------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

scoucer
Berlin, Germany
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 2511

Re: U.S.S. Hornet
Posted on: 3/15/2019 9:48:54 AM
Just announced, they´ve found the US.S. Wasp in the near of the Hornet.

[Read More]

Trevor
---------------
`Hey don´t the wars come easy and don´t the peace come hard`- Buffy Sainte-Marie

Some swim with the stream. Some swim against the stream. Me - I´m stuck somewhere in the woods and can´t even find the stupid stream.

Michigan Dave
Muskegon, Michigan, MI, USA
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 5018

Re: U.S.S. Hornet & USS Wasp;
Posted on: 3/15/2019 11:27:11 AM
Hi Trevor,

I didn't realize that the USS Wasp sank so close to Hornet! makes you wonder where any of their airborne planes may have landed or did they crash into the sea??

Also very cool to hear the German commentary on it!? For those of us who only speak English here is a CBS News take on it!/

[Read More]

Thanks, & Regards,
MD

BTW SPECS & History of USS Aircraft Carrier Wasp! Comments on her service in WWII??

[Read More]
---------------
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract."

dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 720

Re: U.S.S. Hornet & USS Wasp;
Posted on: 3/16/2019 11:23:00 PM
"On Tuesday, 15 September 1942, those two carriers (Wasp & Hornet) and BB-55 North Carolina, with ten other warships, were escorting the transports
carrying the Seventh Marine Regiment to Guadalcanal as reinforcements. Wasp had drawn the job of ready-duty carrier and was operating some
150 miles southeast off San Cristobal Island. Her gasoline system was in use, as planes were being refueled and rearmed for antisubmarine patrol missions;
and Wasp had been at general quarters from an hour before sunrise until the time when the morning search returned to the ship at 1000.
Thereafter, the ship was in condition 2, with the air department at flight quarters. There was no contact with the enemy during the day,
with the exception of a Japanese four-engined flying boat downed by a Wasp Wildcat at 1215.

About 1420, the carrier turned into the wind to launch eight fighters and 18 SBD-3s and to recover eight F4F-3s and three SBDs that had been airborne since before noon.
The ship rapidly completed the recovery of the 11 planes; she then turned easily to starboard, the ship heeling slightly as the course change was made.
The air department at flight quarters, as they had done in earlier operations, worked coolly at refueling and re-spotting the ship's planes for the afternoon mission.
Suddenly, at 1444, a lookout called out, "three torpedoes . . . three points forward of the starboard beam!"

A spread of four torpedoes, fired from the tubes of the Japanese submarine I-19, churned inexorably closer. Wasp put over her rudder hard-a-starboard, but it was too late.
Two torpedoes smashed home in quick succession while a fourth passed ahead. Both hit in the vicinity of gasoline tanks and magazines."


Imperial Japanese Naval Submarine I-19, a B-1 type sent the deadly spread of torpedoes that broke Wasp up as well as heavily damaging BB N. Carolina and sinking destroyer USS O'Brien.
I-19 along with her sister subs would wreck havoc in this region of the Pacific during 1942. Previously to this attack I-26 punched the Saratoga so hard
he was removed from the Guadalcanal campaign and at a critical moment at that. I-26 would strike again after sending Wasp basically to the depths
(Wasp was eventually sunk by the USS Lansdowne who fired 5 torpedos, three of which hit); it took some time while Wasp was engulfed in a burning pool of fuel and oil,
when she finally sank nearly 9 hours after the first I-26 torpedoes had struck. I -26 would strike again weeks later hitting the USS Juneau in the infamous Sullivan brothers saga.

Even with these successes, these B-1 type subs would be decimated with only one of twenty subs of this class surviving the war; typical crew size was 90+ men.
---------------
"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

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