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The current time is: 3/25/2019 2:53:27 PM
 (???? - 1799 AD) Pre-19th Century Battles
AuthorMessage
anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 7733
http:// 82.44.47.99
Bloody Towton 2nd February 1461
Posted on: 1/5/2019 10:28:21 AM
On Kimg Edward’s orders, no mercy was shown in victory.

Skulls later found on the battlefield showed the most horrific injuries: faces split down the bone, heads cut in half, holes punched straight through foreheads. Some men died with more than 20 wounds to their head: the signs of frenzied slaughter by men whipped into a state of barbaric bloodlust.

Some victims were mutilated: their noses and ears ripped off, fingers snipped from hands to remove rings and jewellery in the plunder of the dying.

The field of Towton was known as the "Bloody Meadow", and with good reason. On April 7, Bishop Neville of Exeter wrote to the bishop of Teramo in Flanders. He reported the events of the six weeks that had just passed, including the slaughter at Towton, where he estimated that 28,000 men had been killed. “Alas!” he wrote, “we are a race deserving of pity even from the French.”

[Read More]

Regards

Jim






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dt509er
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
top 15
E-8 Master Sergeant


Posts: 673

Re: Bloody Towton 2nd February 1461
Posted on: 1/5/2019 11:45:41 AM
Interesting, thank you for sharing Jim.

Dan
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"American parachutists-devils in baggy pants..."

I take offense to your perception of being offended!

“If your experiment needs statistics, you ought to have done a better experiment.” Lord Ernest Rutherford

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 7733
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: Bloody Towton 2nd February 1461
Posted on: 1/5/2019 12:02:58 PM
Thanks Dan


Quote:
The field of Towton was known as the "Bloody Meadow", and with good reason. On April 7, Bishop Neville of Exeter wrote to the bishop of Teramo in Flanders. He reported the events of the six weeks that had just passed, including the slaughter at Towton, where he estimated that 28,000 men had been killed. “Alas!” he wrote, “we are a race deserving of pity even from the French.”


Bloody Towton was a ghastly one day episode in English history; and was even more horrific than the first day of the Battle of the Somme .Bishop Neville was right to say that "we were a race to be pitied" such was the carnage brought about by the English fighting each other WITHOUT guns.The common man fought with weapons fashioned out of farm implements and cudgels-they stood no chance against armoured knights on horses.

Regards

Jim
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Pro Patria Saepe Pro Rege Semper

kaii
Tallinn, Estonia
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 2511

Re: Bloody Towton 2nd February 1461
Posted on: 1/6/2019 8:50:16 AM
When I toured the battlefield at Towton a few years ago (incidentally after a failed attempt to organise a MHO Euro Muster), the guide told that the battle killed 1% of the population of England at the time (with 28,000 estimated deaths, that would mean the population was 2,8 million, which sounds about correct, but was probably slightly higher.

(yet, even if the number is 0.5% of the population, it is a staggering number. Just imagine one single battle with 2,4 mill casualties!)

K
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I’m not worried about the Third World War. That’s the Third World’s problem.

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 7733
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: Bloody Towton 2nd February 1461
Posted on: 1/6/2019 9:04:23 AM
Thanks kaii--talking about %age of population -the two sides mustered 108,660 sr nearer 3%

Throughout March, thousands of men bearing weapons like these assembled throughout England and beyond. By the end of the month, Edward and Warwick had 48,660 men. The Queen may have had as many as 60,000. A showdown for the throne of England had begun.

The armies met in the north, near Towton, on Palm Sunday, March 29 1461. The Yorkshire countryside was frozen. Snow and sleet fell, increasingly heavy as the early morning unfolded.

Nevertheless, the two massive armies rumbled into position and by nine o’clock they were ready to fight, mustered in two huge lines, facing each other across a shallow ridge.

The blizzard swirled around them, making the battlefield a slippery, half-blind nightmare.

Regards

Jim
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George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 8825

Re: Bloody Towton 2nd February 1461
Posted on: 1/6/2019 9:13:01 AM
Jim, did the battle alter the balance of power at all?

I don't think that the issue of which house would rule was settled with this battle after all of the killing, was it?

Cheers,

George

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 7733
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: Bloody Towton 2nd February 1461
Posted on: 1/6/2019 9:35:22 AM

Quote:
Jim, did the battle alter the balance of power at all?

I don't think that the issue of which house would rule was settled with this battle after all of the killing, was it?

Cheers,

George
--George


Your assumption is correct George--Bosworth was the last battle in the Wars of the Roses.

The Wars of the Roses were a series of battles fought in medieval England from 1455 to 1485 between the House of Lancaster and the House of York. The name Wars of the Roses (sometimes mistakenly referred to as War of the Roses) is based on the badges used by the two sides, the red rose for the Lancastrians and the white rose for the Yorkists.


Major causes of the conflict include: 1) both houses were direct descendents of king Edward III; 2) the ruling Lancastrian king, Henry VI, surrounded himself with unpopular nobles; 3) the civil unrest of much of the population; 4) the availability of many powerful lords with their own private armies; and 5) the untimely episodes of mental illness by Henry VI.

The wars ended when Richard III, the last Yorkist king, was defeated at the battle of Bosworth in 1485 by Henry Tudor founder of the house of Tudor--the overall dearth toll was c. 55,000.

Regards

Jim


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