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The current time is: 1/16/2019 1:59:25 PM
 (1900-1938) Pre-WWII Battles Other than WWI
AuthorMessage
BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4775

A struggle forgotten in the West
Posted on: 11/10/2018 10:18:54 AM

Quote:
The victory in 1920 could not have been possible had it not been for the Entente’s support and the consequential alignment of Poland with France, Britain and the US. Although the political support from those countries was inconsistent, many soldiers and officers joined the Polish Army to fight the Bolsheviks, or aided Poland as part of official military missions. Such was the case of Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart, or Charles de Gaulle who saw the use of manoeuvrable tank units for the first time then. Janusz Cisek, in Kościuszko: We Are Here, details how the Bolsheviks feared the planes piloted by the Americans from the Kościuszko's Escadrille.


[Read More]

 11 November will mark the centennial of Poland's "rebirth". And a tumultuous 100 years it has been.

Cheers,

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 8533

Re: A struggle forgotten in the West
Posted on: 11/10/2018 12:19:27 PM
Hello Bill,

The article mentioned that some Polish factions were fighting against Czechs.

There was a Czech Legion that had been fighting with the Russian government against the Bolsheviks.

Was that the "Czechs" with whom some Poles were in conflict?

Here is my confusion.

The allies sent troops as part of an allied effort to fight the Bolsheviks but also to get the Czech Legion out of Russia.

Did the allied expeditionary force assist the Poles too or were they in conflict with them?


EDIT: I am aware that the allied forces were much farther to the east and north into Siberia so the Czech reference is what is confusing me.


BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4775

Re: A struggle forgotten in the West
Posted on: 11/10/2018 1:35:36 PM
Hi George,

 I'd be fibbing if I said I know for certain. But what I believe the article refers to were brief clashes along what became the Polish-Czech frontier after both peoples formally emerged as states. My guess is that ideas about where exactly the frontier should run were not in agreement and probably where one group lived in strength in another's province, there was contention. This issue emerged again in the late 1930s when the Germans [IIRC] occupied Bohemia and Moravia [what today we call "Czech"]; Poland at that time took advantage of the situation to reclaim some border lands that were believed to have been lost in the immediate aftermath of World War One.

 Historically, the Czechs and the Poles have been on-and-off rivals.

Cheers,

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4775

Re: A struggle forgotten in the West
Posted on: 11/10/2018 1:39:50 PM
 A Wikipedia article about the border issues between the Czechs and the Poles. No idea as to how balanced the article may or may not be.

[Read More]

Cheers,

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 8533

Re: A struggle forgotten in the West
Posted on: 11/10/2018 2:43:56 PM
Thanks for the article, Bill

I noted that the Treaty of Versailles in 1919 was mentioned and its decisions impacted the Poles and the Czechs.

The negotiators met with deputations from so many countries that they could not keep track. When individual ethnic communities made their pitch for autonomy to the Big 3 or 4, I suspect that they did not even understand what these regional conflicts were about. It was impossible to re-draw the map of Europe and other parts of the world without offending someone, like the Poles and the Czechs.

Also noted that while Germany was making noises about partitioning parts of Czechoslovakia that the Poles, in 1938, were in the process of annexing a small section of territory that had been occupied by the Czechs.

How ironic then that the Poles were accused of being collaborators with Nazi Germany given what befell Poland not so many months after and after the victory.

Cheers,

George

BWilson

top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 4775

Re: A struggle forgotten in the West
Posted on: 11/11/2018 12:30:56 AM
George,

 Another twist is that Slovakia became a German ally and re-absorbed, in 1939, the disputed parts of the border that weren't under direct German control after the conquest of Poland. Took a while to sort the border, even postwar.

Cheers,

BW
---------------
With occasional, fatigued glances at life's rear-view mirror from the other side of time.

OpanaPointer
St. Louis, MO, USA
top 10
E-9 Sergeant Major
Posts: 1085

Re: A struggle forgotten in the West
Posted on: 11/11/2018 5:37:28 AM
"Also noted that while Germany was making noises about partitioning parts of Czechoslovakia that the Poles, in 1938, were in the process of annexing a small section of territory that had been occupied by the Czechs."

Should they have left it to the Germans?

George
Centre Hastings, ON, Canada
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Posts: 8533

Re: A struggle forgotten in the West
Posted on: 11/11/2018 6:29:50 AM

Quote:
"Also noted that while Germany was making noises about partitioning parts of Czechoslovakia that the Poles, in 1938, were in the process of annexing a small section of territory that had been occupied by the Czechs."

Should they have left it to the Germans?
--OpanaPointer


No, but Poles chose to annex. I should read Bill's link again but it seems to me that the Poles didn't like the decision made by the League of Nations regarding the parcel of land that they annexed. It had been given to the Czechs by the Big 3 at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919 but the League had to rule on the decision because the Poles didn't like it and felt that they had a legitimate claim.

The article did say that the Nazis were more than happy to let the Poles have the land because it would divert international attention away from their controversial demand to seize the Sudetenland, thus spreading the blame a little.

In the end, for the Poles, it really didn't make a difference to their eventual fate.

Cheers,

George


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