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The current time is: 9/19/2018 11:22:56 PM
 (1914-1918) WWI Battles
AuthorMessage
anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 6851
http:// 82.44.47.99
The Battle of the Somme 1916
Posted on: 7/1/2018 4:16:53 AM
DUPLICATE--DO NOT USE


On this first day of July, exactly 102 years ago, the peoples of the British Empire suffered the greatest military disaster in their history. A century later, “the Somme” remains the most harrowing place-name in the annals not only of Great Britain, but of the many former dependencies that shed their blood on that scenic river.

The single regiment contributed to the First World War by the island of Newfoundland, not yet joined to Canada, suffered nearly 100 percent casualties that day: Of 801 engaged, only 68 came out alive and unwounded.

Altogether, the British forces suffered more than 19,000 killed and more than 38,000 wounded: almost as many casualties in one day as Britain suffered in the entire disastrous battle for France in May and June 1940, including prisoners. The French army on the British right flank absorbed some 1,600 casualties more.
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Phil andrade
London, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major
Moderator
Posts: 3198

Re: The Battle of the Somme 1916
Posted on: 7/1/2018 5:33:02 AM
The bloodiest disaster, by a long, long way...no doubt about that. So much worse - in terms of loss of life - than anything that happened to the British Commonwealth in WW2 that it’s hard to believe .

But, in terms of humiliation and geopolitical impact, might not the fall of Singapore in 1942 rank as the worst military disaster to befall the British Commonwealth ?


The Somme is a misleading name ; British soldiers did not fight on the banks of that river in 1916...they were to the north, in the tributary area of the Ancre.

But it was the departement of the Somme, in Picardy.

The Newfoundlanders were massacred at Beaumont Hamel : most - or, at least, many of them - were cut down behind the British lines as thy moved forward over open ground. The lie of the land offered the German a fantastic chance to use long range, indirect machine gun fire : and, this is important, their artillery fire was extrmemely deadly, too. People seem to underestimate the proportion of the British casualties that were caused by artillery that day.

Another battalion - the Accrington Pals ? - suffered even worse losses as they attacked Serre that day.


Regards, Phil. ( I read your PM Jim, but cannot delete your superfluous posts )
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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!"

"That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."

Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes

anemone
DONCASTER S. YORKS, UK
top 5
E-9 Cmd Sgt Major


Posts: 6851
http:// 82.44.47.99
Re: The Battle of the Somme 1916
Posted on: 7/1/2018 5:55:26 AM
DUPLICATE--DO NOT USE

Unfortunately you have chosen a duff posrt .I left the one with 10 views and one answer for you not to make a mistake it also has Read More.Be obliged if you would cut and paste your answer and insert it in this post--please.

Regards

Jim
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