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10th Missouri Infantry CSA

Name: Elisha HicksRank: Unknown Company:
Like most, I am looking for any information on Elisha.
Contact Name: Michael Hicks
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Name: John MossRank: Unknown Company:
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Contact Name: Margie
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Name: John H. BakerRank: Corporal Company: A
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Contact Name: joe darby
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Name: James Lewis GentryRank: Unknown Company: A
My maiden name is Gentry. This is my Great Grandfather. He survived the Civil War. He had 15 children.
Contact Name: Lalena A Stewart
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Name: James Preston HowellRank: Private Company: A
2nd great-grandfather
Contact Name: Larry Miller
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Name: Daniel B. RichardsonRank: Private Company: A
D.B. Richardson
Side: Confederate
Regiment Name: 10 Missouri Infantry
COMPANY: A
Rank In: Private
Contact Name: Fred Rose
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Name: Charles Withers FristoeRank: Private Company: B
Served 1861-1865 POW 1864-1865 Alton, Il
Contact Name: Gordon Fristoe
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Name: Joseph Newton HerndonRank: Private Company: B
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Contact Name: Jim Herndon
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Name: Garrett KavanaughRank: Private Company: B
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Contact Name: Nancy Blocker
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Name: Benton ReesRank: Private Company: B
Service Record
Of
BENTON REES
1861-1865
10th Missouri Infantry, Co. “B” and 2nd Missouri Calvary, Co. “D”
(As told by Benton Rees to his Grand-daughter, Mary Anna Henton in 1914)

Benton Rees enlisted in the cause of the Confederacy at Georgetown, Mo. May 1, 1861, at the age of 32 years, in Dr. Joe Fox’s Company (Infantry). He remained with unit until the fight at Boomville, Mo. Under General Sterling Price commanding. He returned from Boomville to Geogetown in a two day march. He joined an Organized Mounted Infantry unit and went Southwest to Osceola through St. Clark County. They met up with Gen. Price close to El Dorado Springs, and camped their a week. They then went to Cow Skin Prairie in McDonald County. There they herd Sigel was coming to get between Price’s and Harris’s armies, and they directed themselves back to Carthage to assist Harris. They started immediately and marched as rapidly as possible, sometimes in a gallop, and all night, but failed to reach Carthage in time for the fight. Harris’s troops ran Sigel troops back to Springfield. The army camped at Cow Skin Prairie in McDonald County, where they were reorganized and reinforcements joined from Louisiana and Regular Arkansas Confederate Solders. The army went to Wilson Creek and on August 10, 1861fought with federal troops and won under Price’s command. After the battle Price went to Springfield and our company went back to Georgetown staying for a week or ten days. We again reorganized at Georgetown with Staples in command and went Southwest and met the regularly Confederate army near Drywood in Vernon County, Mo. The next morning we fought with the Federals, and after a small skirmish, we drove them back to Fort Scott. From Fort Scott we went to Warrensburg, Mo. and had a small skirmish. We next went to Lexington where we fought with the Federals and captured a steamboat with provisions on it. Price’s army surrounded the Federals at Lexington and the federal not having needed supplies, food and water surrendered to the Confederate army.
Benton Rees, a member of the Missouri State Guard, went south from Lexington in Gen. Mosby Monroe Parson’s Brigade with Gen. Sterling Price Commanding.
In 1862 he went to Arkansas and joined the regular army with others from his old company, and served in Capt. Lige Magoffin’s company. Their unit was in a fight at Prairie Grove, Arkansas, December7, 1862. Benton Rees’s company was fighting along side of Parson’s Brigade, when Col. Steen, the regiment commander was killed. The regiment was reorganized after the battle, and Col. Picket, the brother of the famous George Picket of Virginia, was the commander.
His unit wintered in and near Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1862. In the spring of 1863, they moved to Helena, Arkansas. His unit took part in a battle there and on July 4, 1863 Benton Rees was wounded (shot in the upper leg) and taken prisoner near Helena Arkansas. As a prisoner he was first sent to Memphis, Tennessee and from there he was transferred to Alton, Illinois, in September 1863. In April 1864 he was transferred from the prison at Alton to Fort Delaware. He was held as a prisoner of war for 20 months. In February of 1865 he was exchanged, and sent to Richmond, Virginia. From Richmond he was sent to Mobile, Alabama and on to Oakland, Mississippi. At Oakland, he joined the 2nd Missouri Calvary, Company “D”. On May 16, 1865 the 2nd Missouri Cavalry, disbanded, and after taking the oath of allegiance to the United States of America (September 25, 1865) he returned home near Georgetown Missouri.
This record entitles any descendants of Benton Rees to become Sons or Daughters of the United Confederacy.
Contact Name: Dave Rees Brewton
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Name: William FlowersRank: Private Company: C
enlisted at Thomasville, MO by W.O. Coleman. Was listed as sick in Yellville, Arkansas Hospital prior to the Battle of Pea Ridge. Returned home to Texas County Missouri.
Contact Name: Brian Flowers
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Name: John C. HullRank: 2nd Lieutenant Company: C
No Comments.
Contact Name: Frank Baptista
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Name: Amos Jefferson JusticeRank: Private Company: C
His sympathy and the sympathy of the family was with the Confederacy and, even before he
enlisted, he had been engaged in helping the Confederate troops. A receipt found in family
papers show that he had delivered twenty “pigs” of lead to General Crawford at Sedalia,
Missouri.
According to the military records in the National Archives, Amos Jefferson Justice enlisted at
Oregon County, Missouri on August 4, 1862 for three years in Company C of the 10th Missouri
Infantry as a Private. This famous fighting unit was also known as Steen’s Regiment. After three
years of Active duty, he rose to the rank of Sergeant.
Four great battles were fought in the state of Arkansas and Private Jefferson Justice fought in all
but one, the Battle of Elkhorn or Pea Ridge. He was involved in the very hottest parts of the
Battles of Prairie Grove, Helena, and Jenkins Ferry. He also fought in the Battle of Pleasant Hill in Louisiana. Soon after his enlistment, his unit joined the Confederate forces at Van Buren,
Arkansas. From there the army marched all night to a place 12 miles southwest of Fayetteville
which was to be Prairie Grove Battlefield forever after December 7, 1862. The untold and
unbelievable hardships of the war as suffered by our honored ancestor are revealed in the
accounts of these battles.
General Thomas C. Hindman who led the expedition addressed the troops with some fiery
oratory shortly before the battle. He told the men, among whom sat Amos Jefferson Justice, that
their enemy’s army was “composed of pin Indians, free Negroes, Southern Tories, Kansas
Jayhawkers, and hired Dutch Cutthroats.” He also said, “these bloody ruffians have invaded your
country; stolen and destroyed your property; murdered your neighbors; outraged your women;
driven your children from their homes, and defiled the graves of your kindred…we will utterly
destroy them…we must do it; or our country will be ruined if we fail…a just God will strengthen
our arms and give us glorious victory.” This address gives us some idea of the depths of feeling
and commitment of Private Justice and his fellow soldiers.
The weather for the battle included cold rain, ice, and snow. According to Jay Monaghan in his
book, “Civil War on the Western Border”, the cold rain caused the wounded to crawl into the
haystacks on the battlefield in order to keep dry. But the artillery fire soon set the haystacks afire
and many of the wounded were burned alive. To make the horror complete, wild razorback hogs
rooted out the burning human flesh during the night. Col. A.E. Steen, for whom Amos’ regiment
had been named, was killed in the battle. Some well known and colorful figures were involved
in this battle including Quantrell, the guerrilla, Frank and Jesse James, Stan Watie and his
division of Confederate soldiers and General Joseph Shelby.
July 4, 1863, the same day of the battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg, was the day of our
ancestor’s next battle, the Battle of Helena on the Mississippi River in Eastern Arkansas. In order
for the Southern troops under General Sterling Price to reach Helena, they had to march 65 miles
from Jacksonport over country that because of continuous rains was described in “official
Records” as “one vast lagoon”. Amos Jefferson and the 10th Missouri marched for ten days
through mud and water waist deep while plagued by giant swarms of flies and mosquitoes. E.A.
Pollard in his book, “The Lost Cause”, describes this as “one of the most difficult marches in the
history of war”.
The Tenth Missouri was assigned the task of capturing Battery C, a federal artillery post, which
they did in short order. Then they made a death defying charge down the hill on which the
battery stood and into the city itself, but were finally repulsed by shelling from the Gunboat
Tyler which was anchored in the Mississippi nearby. This was the very hottest part of the battle.
6
The third and fourth major battles in which Amos Jefferson Justice participated were the Battle
of Pleasant Hill in northern Louisiana, April 9, 1864, and the Battle of Jenkins Ferry near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, April 30, 1864. An Arkansas soldier who had been present at the Battle of
Jenkins Ferry told the FORDYCE ADVOCATE on April 20, 1933 in referring to the Missouri
Brigade of which Amos Jefferson Justice was a member that…”This brigade was one of the best
the confederacy ever had…it was the boast of its commander that he never lost a man except by
death. So when it passed us on the roadside with Parsons and Marmaduke riding in front its
members told our wounded to be of good cheer for they were going down to ‘get even.’
Perhaps the best description of these two battles that could be given in a short speech like this is
the notarized statement of Mr. Wright Simpson, a veteran of the Tenth Missouri Infantry, which
appeared in THE SOUTH MISSOURIAN November 30, 1905. “The command marched five
hundred miles and fought two battles in a little over one month and helped to capture twohundred
and fifty wagons and ambulances and twenty-one pieces of artillery and eight-thousand
stands of small arms which was read on dress parade by order of General Curby Smith
commanding the Department of the Trans-Mississippi Army of Confederate States, drove
General Banks’ army to Alexander, Louisiana, and General Steel’s army to Little Rock,
Arkansas though the blood ran out of many of our soldiers’ feet and many had to stop on the
roadside with fatigue, their feet were so scalded and bloody they could not walk…this army left
Camp Sumpter near Red River in Hempstead County, Arkansas the 20th of March, 1864 and
marched to Mansfield, Louisiana then four miles to where the battle began. It lasted 16 miles to
Pleasant Hill.
This battle began the eighth of April and lasted to the ninth of April and night closed the battle
under Major General Richard Taylor, Rough and Ready’s son, commanding the District of
Louisiana…It was an open field battle at Pleasant Hill…We lost three killed…Bent Stevens, Jery
Williams, and William Lawson. These brave men fell on the field. Our soldiers said when we
went off the battlefield: ‘Throw out a pint cup and you can catch it full of bullets.’ Night closedthe battle and saved many a life.
It was one of the greatest battles that ever taken place. Armies surged to and fro with saber and
bayonet in each one’s breast till dark. Late in the night the Union soldiers retreated and we
returned back to Arkansas to fight General Steele…We found General Steele cooped up in
Camden by the calvary. We give him a few shots in the evening then he took a scare and cut
down his wagons and threw his harness in the river. Then he stretched pontoon bridges across
the river and made for Little Rock. Next morning we took after him, run him to Jenkins Ferry
where we overtaken him. Here we had a hard battle with him and his soldiers. They fought us till
late in the day through the rain and water. It rained till our guns was red with rust. Here we lost
our Lt. Col. and our Col. was wounded…Steele was as cunning as a fox and brave with it. He
7
made his way across the Saline River and saved his army though both sides lost a number of
men. Here we turned back to Camden and took winter quarters…”
The loyalty, perseverance, and conviction of Private Amos Jefferson Justice are evidenced by his
record in this horrible conflict. In spite of homesickness, heat, cold, rain, mud, flies, mosquitoes,insufficient clothing, equipment and the realization that theirs was a lost cause, he remained
faithful. Apparently, he never went home for three long years and yet there is not one single
shred of evidence that he ever was AWOL, ever reprimanded for any fault as a soldier. Many,
because of the unspeakable privation, deserted, but not Amos Jefferson Justice. When his
regiment was paroled at Camp Allen, June 8, 1865, he was 2nd Sergeant.
During this war a great religious revival swept the Southern armies. According to W.W. Bennett
in his book, THE GREAT REVIVAL IN THE SOUTHERN ARMIES, this revival came to the
troops under General Sterling Price among whom were the men of the Tenth Missouri Infantry in
the winter of 1863-64 while they were camped at Camp Bragg near Camden, Arkansas and
continued even beyond the Battles of Pleasant Hill and Jenkins Ferry. B.T. Kavanaugh, a
Methodist Missionary to Price’s troops, recalled after the war that more than two-thousand were
converted to Jesus Christ as the revival swept the camps. A church called the Army Church was
organized in Price’s Army and many of the converts of the revival joined it.
We have no hard evidence as to which specific denomination Amos Jefferson Justice belonged,
but it is reasonable to conclude that he was a Baptist since his grandfather, Amos, had been a
messenger to the first meeting of the French Broad River Baptist Association in North Carolina
in about 1800, and since Amos Jefferson’s son, John Henry, was a Baptist deacon and a licensed
preacher. “The Story of Henderson County (North Carolina)” by Sadie Smathers Patton
mentions the names of several Baptist preachers who were ancestors and relatives of Amos. General E.K. Smith surrendered the Trans Mississippi Department of the Confederate States
Army May 26, 1865 at Shreveport, Louisiana. On June 2, when General Sterling Price
announced the surrender terms to the Missouri troops, an eyewitness is reported in Albert
Castel’s book, General Sterling Price, to have said, “Some of the men jump for joy while others
curse and swear and gnash their teeth in frantic rage and yet others are cast down, silent and
dejected sighing as if their hearts are broken.” The Tenth of Missouri was paroled on June 8,
1865 from Camp Allen in Shreveport.
There are three miscellaneous considerations I want to make here in regard to A.J. Justice and
the War Between the States. First of all, why did he fight? Some will immediately respond that
he fought to preserve slavery. The problem with this simplistic answer is that neither Amos
Jefferson Justice nor probably any other of the poor farm boys in his regiment owned slaves.
Would they then risk life and limb to preserve the institution of slavery? Second, it is important to note that it is highly unlikely that A.J. Justice was able to return home
at all during his three years in the army because Missouri was held by the Union throughout
Amos Jefferson’s term of service. This fact, of course, added to his suffering and misery in
support of the lost cause.
Third, and perhaps most important here, from the fact that Amos Jefferson Justice served for the
duration of the war when desertion was rampant, the fact that he was present when his outfit
surrendered at Shreveport at the close of the war, and the fact that he had risen to the rank of
sergeant at the close of the war, it is fair to assume that Amos Jefferson Justice was a man of
genuine character and patriotism. He was no conscientious objector, nor straggler, nor deserter.
Contact Name: Eddy Justice
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Name: James D. SpenceRank: 1st Lieutenant Company: C
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Contact Name: Ken Spence
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Name: John HanceRank: Private Company: D
John Hance arrived at Prescott, AT on Dec. 4, 1868, and was well known at the Grand Canyon (1883-1919). He died in 1919 at Flagstaff and is burried at the Grand Canyon.
Contact Name: Michael Mauer
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Name: William R. HensonRank: Private Company: D
William R. Henson of the 10th Inf. MO. Co. D was my great great grandfather.
Contact Name: Clayton Henson
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Name: William Thomas KeplerRank: Private Company: D
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Contact Name: Kirk Kepler
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Name: Andrew M. PerrineRank: Private Company: D
He is buried at the Confederate Home in Higginsville. The place where the State took the Confederate Battle Flag down.
Contact Name: Gary Ayres
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Name: Bennett S. PhillipsRank: Private Company: D
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Contact Name: Jesse Sherwood
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Name: Samuel CampbellRank: Unknown Company: E
Surrendered May 26th 1865 in New Orleans La. paroled at camp Allen La. June 8th 1865.
Contact Name: David Campbell
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Name: Daniel Jefferson LanceRank: Private Company: F
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Contact Name: Kevin Bright
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Name: James W. LincycombRank: 1st Sergeant Company: F
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Contact Name: S. Foster
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Name: Harris P. H. ReevesRank: 2nd Corporal Company: F
Harris P. H. Reeves a resident of Fulton co. Ark. and the younger brother of William E. and George L. Reeves, enlisted Aug 1st 1862. He was presumably present with the regiment at the battle of Prairie Grove Ark. Dec. 7th 1862 and the long retreat to Little Rock where,at the age of 23, he died from pneumonia contracted on that dismal retreat Feb. 22 1863
Contact Name: Charlie Hammett
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Name: George Washington RogersRank: 1st Corporal Company: F
Three Rogers next show up in Company F, 10th Missouri Infantry. George W. (Corporal, enlisted 7/11/62 in Lawrence County , AR ), Jeremiah D. (Private, enlisted 7/10/62 in Lawrence County , AR ) and William H. (Private, enlisted 7/16/62 in Lawrence County , AR ).
These men fought at Prairie Grove, Helena , and were in the trenches north of Little Rock until just before the city fell. Many of the men in Company F were from northern Arkansas and in early 1864 they were transferred to Company M, 38th Arkansas Infantry.
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Name: Jeremiah D. RogersRank: Private Company: F
Three Rogers next show up in Company F, 10th Missouri Infantry. George W. (Corporal, enlisted 7/11/62 in Lawrence County , AR ), Jeremiah D. (Private, enlisted 7/10/62 in Lawrence County , AR ) and William H. (Private, enlisted 7/16/62 in Lawrence County , AR ).
These men fought at Prairie Grove, Helena , and were in the trenches north of Little Rock until just before the city fell. Many of the men in Company F were from northern Arkansas and in early 1864 they were transferred to Company M, 38th Arkansas Infantry.
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Name: William H. RogersRank: Private Company: F
Three Rogers next show up in Company F, 10th Missouri Infantry. George W. (Corporal, enlisted 7/11/62 in Lawrence County , AR ), Jeremiah D. (Private, enlisted 7/10/62 in Lawrence County , AR ) and William H. (Private, enlisted 7/16/62 in Lawrence County , AR ).
These men fought at Prairie Grove, Helena , and were in the trenches north of Little Rock until just before the city fell. Many of the men in Company F were from northern Arkansas and in early 1864 they were transferred to Company M, 38th Arkansas Infantry.
Contact Name: Donna Hale
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Name: George CampbellRank: Private Company: G
Died during war still haven't got details
Contact Name: David Campbell
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Name: Josuha CampbellRank: Private Company: G
Captured July 4th 1863 Helena Ark.released Sept. 16th 1863 on oath. Home Pulaski Co. Mo. Believed to have rejoined Southern forces after release.
Contact Name: David Campbell
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Name: Lorenzo D CampbellRank: Private Company: G
Enlisted July 27th Died Dec.29th 1862 at age 19 in Little Rock Ark. Home Pulaski Co. Mo.
Contact Name: David Campbell
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Name: William H CampbellRank: Sergeant Company: G
Captured at the battle of Helena July 4th 1863 freed on oath July 27th 1863 at the Alton Confederate prison. Home Pulaski Co. Missouri.
Contact Name: David Campbell
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Name: Samuel James MansfieldRank: Private Company: G
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Contact Name: Kevin Mansfield
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Name: George W. WallRank: Private Company: G
He was my GGrandfathers brother. Both joined in July 1862.
Contact Name: William Wall
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Name: Thomas Benton WallRank: Private Company: G
Joined Coleman's Missouri Partisan Cavalry in Jul 1862 along with brothers and a cousin in Howell County. When the unit was unhorsed and made into the 10th Missouri Infantry he was assigned to Company G. He survived to surrender in May 1865 in Louisiana and was released in Jun 1865.
Contact Name: William Wall
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Name: William Henry WoodRank: Private Company: G
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Contact Name: Chris Wood
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Name: Abraham BrasierRank: Private Company: H
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Contact Name: Ruby Totten
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Name: Francis Marion BrasierRank: Private Company: H
Fr ancis M. Brasier; Regiment 10th Missouri Infantry Confederate Company H Private Film Number M380 roll 2 10th Infantry Regiment [also called 12th Regiment] was organized November, 1862. Some of its members were raised in the counties of Chariton, Crawford, and Howard. The unit was assigned to A.E. Steen`s, Parson`s, and S. P. Burns` Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and saw action in Arkansas and Missouri. It lost, 11 killed, 41 wounded, and 237 missing at Helena, and after the fight it mustered 236 men. The regiment sustained 34 casualties at Pleasant Hill and 10 at Jenkins` Ferry. During the spring of 1865 it disbanded. The field officers were Colonel W.M.Moore, Alexander C. Pickett, and A.E. Steen; Lieutenant Colonel Simon Harris; and Major Elijah Magoffin. . On Dec.9,1862 Francis fought in the battle at Prairie Grove Arkansas and after the battle most of his unit deserted and they swam across the river and went home. Francis may have deserted his unit after the battle of Prairie Grove, the next information that I found , Francis was Captured by the Union Army on Dec. 24, 1863 in Miller Co., MO and was taken to Rolla, Mo. were he was sentenced on Jan. 6, 1864 to one year hard labor in the Alton Illinois Prison for Confederate Soldier's and Citizens. He attempted an escape on Sept.10, 1864 and was shot and killed. The information handed down through the family was, he received word that his home was burned by the bushwackers and he asked to leave to help his family. His request was denied and he decided to leave anyway. The family said he swam across the river and was shot when he reached the other side, but the war records say that he was shot on the state grounds. I found an article about the events that may have caused his death. This did take place in northern part of Miller County were Francis and Susan lived. From the Miller County Museum and Historical Society notes written by Peggy Smith Hake

The Civil War years in central Missouri were times of great distress and at times, pure terror. Missouri was a controversial state during the war. In fact, it has been said Missouri fought her own Civil War. It was a borderline state where the people simply could not decide which side to fight for. There were pioneers who had migrated from the southern states of Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, Georgia, and the Carolinas and they, naturally, tended to support the Confederacy. Another faction of pioneers came from the northern states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and New England. The Union Army was often infiltrated by men who actually favored the South, but joined the Northern armies because they knew they would get a monthly pay voucher....the Southern Army was much poorer!

Guerilla forces, called bushwhackers, were very prevalent in Missouri. Some of the bandits of central Missouri were actually an arm of Quantrill's Raiders who terrorized all of Missouri and Kansas. Their atrocities are well documented in the history of the Civil War. A Confederate general named Crabtree and his raiders ran rampant in the central Missouri area and especially in the region of southern Cole and northern Miller counties. He and his forces had their local headquarters in caves along the Osage River near the old railroad town of Hoecker in northeast Miller County. At first, Crabtree's intent was to round up able-bodied men so they could be sent on to southern Missouri, near the Arkansas border, to join General Sterling Price's army. He recruited many men for this cause but after awhile, it seemed his greater pleasure was terrorizing the local residents and their families. His band of marauders began to steal and plunder anything they could get their hands on....horses, livestock, wagons, food, and provisions. High on his priority list was grain sheds and smokehouses where the farmers had stored cultivated crops and meat supplies. Many homes, barns, crops, etc. were torched and burned to the ground. It was not beneath him to torture families in order to get information about military activities in the area....he was also interested in their valuables and where they were hidden.

After some time, area-wide enrolled militias were organized. One of these militia groups, the Provisional Company of Mt. Pleasant-Missouri Militia, was commanded by Capt. Thomas Babcock who operated from the small village of Mt. Pleasant, Saline township, Miller County. Capt. Babcock kept his men on Crabtree's trail constantly. In the second week of August 1864, one of Crabtree's men, John P. Wilcox, was captured and sent to Jefferson City. He was tried for war crimes by a military commission and was ordered executed. The execution was carried out immediately ... Receiving word of the execution of one of his men, Crabtree sent his band of guerillas out on rampaging maneuvers ... plundering, burning, and killing.
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Name: Peter C. DavisRank: Corporal Company: H
My 3rd cousin Peter C. Davis (1823-1863)fought for Southern independence and was killed in action in Little Roack, Arkansas, 2 June 1863.
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Name: Eric Emil EricsonRank: Private Company: H
Private in the Union Army under Fremont between 1862-1863 and Mo. Militia, Co. H., Infantry, Reg. 10.
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Name: James M. PankeyRank: Private Company: H
James enlisted 4 March 1862 at Shannon---- County Mo. enlisted for 12 months by W.O Colman Co H. 10th Regt. [Steen's] Mo. Infantry. CMR Remarks [Died Mulberry, Confederate Hospital on 19 Nov. 1862. It does not give a reason for death.
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