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Civil War Genealogy Database
All Units - Artillery - Cavalry - Engineers - Infantry - Marines - Medical - Misc - Naval
6th Mississippi Cavalry      
Company Unknown
James Cooper Nichols - Unknown   
Born 1845 Died 1865. Joined in 1863 Served under General Nathan Bedforn Forrest. Died 1 week after he returned home form eating raw greens & cabbage. Buried on old family farm at the poind of the Leaf River, his brother Josepa A is also buried there.
Contact Name:  Patricia Nichols
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/n/i/c/Patricia-Nichols-PA/
Date Added:  6/7/2006
Company Unknown
Joseph A Nichols - Unknown   
Born 1841 Died 1864 KIA at 22 years. Buried on family land at the point of the Leaf River, near Taylorsville/ Raleigh Ms, His brother James Cooper is also buried there.
Contact Name:  Patricia Nichols
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/n/i/c/Patricia-Nichols-PA/
Date Added:  6/7/2006
Company Unknown
Jesse Clyde Snell - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Glenda McCarthy
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/7/2009
Company A
Robert Watson Barton - Sergeant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Bob Thomas
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/6/2004
Company A
Thomas Jackson Evans Sr. - Sergeant   
Thomas was 26 years old from Itawamba Co Miss. This unit began as Co A [Browns Co A] raised in Itawamba co. It then became Davenport's Battalion Miss. Cavalry. It was mustered into Confederate service 8 Sept 1863. Thomas enlisted 1 July 1863 and elected Sergeant. His horse was valued at $250 Dollars. Thomas survived the war and died 24 March 1916 in Perkinston, Stone County Miss. We are distantly related by marriage
Contact Name:  Phillip Thomas
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/14/2019
Company A
George B. Pagan - Sergeant   
Buried in Liberty Church Cem. in Winston County, MS.
Contact Name:  Jay H. Lindsey
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/24/2010
Company B
George Walker Pounds - Private   
George was born 8 Feb 1850 in Pontotoc Co. Miss. Note, the story of his service is unusual, and I will preface it by saying his father was shot dead in their home thru the window by pro- yankee sympathizes at night while at the supper table with his wife and 5 small children. George enlisted in Co B 6th Miss cavalry when he was 13 years and 1 month old. [ This story was published in the Confederate Veterans Mag. Aug 1897 Vol. V, pages 407 - 408.] He was paroled at the age of 15 years and 3 months. His wife Nancy Caroline Messick [American Indian] filed for a pension 3 Dec 1927. she was born Oct 1855 and lived 101 years, dying 15 Feb 1956. She filed for his service in the 6th Miss. Cav. However, during the war there were many consolidations. He served in 18th Miss. Cav where he was engaged in the Oxford Raid. 3rd Kentucky Cav and Co B 2nd Tenn which was consolidated into the 22nd and then to the 21st Tenn Cav. [Wilsons] Battles: Athens, Ala. Surpur Trestle, Pulaski, & Columbia Tenn. and Martins Factory, Ala. The 2nd Tenn Cav. left a comment that they recall the Little Kid riding his mule during the Tennessee raid.
He died 10 Jun 1917 and is buried beside his wife in the Kiowa City Cem. Kiowa, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma. He is the stepson of my 3rd cousin 4 x removed.
Contact Name:  Phillip Thomas
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  8/26/2023
Company B
Wyatt Nun Watson - Unknown   
Also listed in 1st battalion and 8th cavalry. He owned land in Pontotoc Co.,MS; lived in Itawamba Co,MS. There was a lot of major fighting around his land holdings.
Contact Name:  Mary Rhoads
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  8/23/2008
Company C
Ephriam Aston - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Phyllis Aston Allen
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/13/2011
Company C
Onesimus Pendleton Aycock - Private   
Father:James Jackson Aycock,B:6 Nov 1814,D:2 May 1887
Mother:Caroline Dillard Young,B:6 Feb 1826,D:27 Sept 1904
4th Son:Onesimus Pendleton Aycock,B:6 Mar 1848.D:3 Mar 1887
Wife:Coreller(Cora)Elizabeth Goode,B:31 Jan 1856,D:22 Feb 1916
Contact Name:  Billy L. Aycock
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/23/2010
Company C
Charles Hurte Moore - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Sharon Crockett
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/4/2007
Company D
Washington Cooper - Private   
Washington enlisted in Jackson County , Mississippi on 3 Sept. 1862. Enlisted by Capt Benjamin Stevens into Co F 17th Battn Steede's Miss. Cavalry. This unit became Co D 9th Miss. Cavalry on 24 Dec. 1863. They were surrendered at Citronell, Alabama on 4 March 1865 and paroled at Mobile on 30 May 1865. Washington is described as 6ft 1 inch tall with fair complexion. He has dark hair and eyes
Contact Name:  Phillip Thomas
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/5/2015
Company F
Albert G Heflin - Unknown   
Albert G. Heflin and his son James Henry Heflin enlisted together at Columbus, MS. In October, 1863, Colonel Isham Harrison was forming his regiment at Columbus, according to report of Col. Richardson, commanding district. Harrison was ordered to report to General Ruggles at Columbus, February 11, 1864, his regiment to be armed there. February 23, Colonel Harrison, commanding cavalry brigade in the Columbus district, was directed to send his regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Sykes' detachment, Colonel Morton's Battalion and Haller’s section of Rice's Artillery to Cotton Gin port for defense of the Tombigbee. February 24, General Lee asked that the regiment be sent to Artesia to await his orders.
The regiment was assigned to Mabry's Brigade, with the Fourth Cavalry, Fourteenth Confederate, and Thirty-eighth Mounted Infantry, about 1,000 in all, which, upon the approach 0f the third Federal expedition in Forrest's country, moved from Saltillo to Ellistown, July 9, 1864. and reported to General Bufford, of Forrest's Cavalry. Colonel Harris was sent with the Sixth to Plentytude, to operate on the flank of Gen. A. J. Smith's Union troops, moving to Pontotoc, and they skirmished on the 11th. On the 13th, Mabry's Brigade, accompanied by Generals Lee and Forrest, followed the enemy toward Tupelo, skirmishing sharply. Smith went into line of battle at Harrisburg, and Lee and Forrest attacked July 14. Mabry’s Brigade advanced under a furious fire of artillery. He reported: 'My line advanced steadily, driving a heavy line of skirmishers back to the fortifications. A most terrific fire of small arms was opened on me when we were within about 300 yards of the works. I immediately ordered a charge, but the heat was so intense and the distance so great that some officers and men fell exhausted and fainting along my line, while the fire from the enemy's line of works by both artillery and smallarms was so heavy and well directed that many were killed and wounded. These two causes of depletion left my line almost like a line of skirmishers. At about sixty yards from the enemy's works, seeing that my line was too much weakened to drive the enemy, I halted and directed the men to protect themselves by lying down in a hollow and behind a low fence. I held this position until our second line came up to within about 100 yards of my rear and was repulsed, when I gave the order to fall back. My loss in the hollow and in falling back was severe.' Among the killed were Col. Isham Harrison, Lieut.-Col. Thomas M. Nelson, Capt. T. G. Fields, and Lieuts. W. D. Carrington, Company H; and A. D. Clifton, Company C. Among the wounded, Lieut. J. F. Clifton, Company B; Sergt. W. J. Sweeney, D; Lieut. J. Turner, E; Capt. A. C. Johnson, Lieut. William Bell, I; Lieut. T. W. Cobb, A.
Colonel Heath, Thirty-third Missouri (Union), reported that after the repulse of the last assault, Captain McKee's company, deployed to fill a gap in the line, 'came upon a party of the enemy's sharpshooters, whom he charged and drove frown cover,' capturing a flag 'supposed to belong to the Sixth Mississippi,' which the party was 'endeavoring to recover from the hands of their dead color bearer.'
The total casualties of the Sixth were 13 killed, 46 wounded, 14 missing. The brigade of which it was a part was about 1,000 strong before the battle. Total Confederate casualties, killed and wounded, 1,262; Federal, killed and wounded, 636.
'The battle of Harrisburg will furnish the historian a bloody record, but it will also stamp with immortality the gallant dead and the living heroes it has made. Prominent among the dead the names of Col.. Isham Harrison and Lieut.-Col. Thomas M. Nelson, of the Sixth Mississippi; Lieut.-Col. John B. Cage, commanding Fourteenth Confederate, Lieut.-Col. Sherrill, of the Seventh Kentucky, and Major Robert C. McCay, of the Thirty-eighth Mississippi, will shine in fadeless splendor. They were lion-hearted officers and courteous men. It was a sad blow that struck down these gallant spirits. In unselfish devotion to the cause and high courage they leave no superiors behind among men. Their noble natures and ardent patriotism, it is hoped, will find in the soldier's grave that peace for which their country has thus far struggled in vain, and for the achievement of which they have sacrificed their lives. Future generations will never weary in hanging garlands upon their graves.' (Report of General Forrest.)
August 1 the brigade was reported 400 present for duty. Captain Lipscomb was promoted as Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding the regiment, which was returned to Gen. Wirt Adams' district.
Colonel Lipscomb was at Macon with about 250 of Mabry's Brigade, when Grierson's raiders, from Memphis, struck the Mobile and Ohio Railroad in December, 1864. Grierson eluded most of the Confederate commands, and Lipscomb, in his pursuit, did not come up with him.
In February, 1865, with Mabry's Brigade, Wirt Adams' Cavalry, between Vicksburg and Jackson. March 3, General Forrest ordered Mabry's Brigade broken up and assigned the Sixth to Brig.-Gen. Starke's Brigade. This brigade arrived at Selma, Ala., during the battle of April 2, but was unable to render assistance. Thence they fell back to Livingston, Ala., their post, April 30. The dates of capitulation were: By General Taylor, commanding department, May 4; by General Forrest, at Gainesville, Ala., May 22, 1865. In 1865 the Sixth was consolidated with the Eighth, Colonel Duff, but the Sixth Regiment, Col. R. G. Brown, retained its identity to the last.
Contact Name:  Edith G. (Heflin) Smith
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/28/2008
Company F
James Henry Heflin - Unknown   
Military Records:
Service Record Jacket: 3rd MS Militia (3rd Battalion Mississippi State Troops Co. G. (Sgt.)
Service Record Jacket: 6th MS Cavalry Co. F. (age 16)
6th Regiment, Mississippi Cavalry
(from Dunbar Rowland’s 'Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898'; list of companies courtesy H. Grady Howell’s 'For Dixie Land, I’ll Take My Stand')
In October, 1863, Colonel Isham Harrison was forming his regiment at Columbus, according to report of Col. Richardson, commanding district. Harrison was ordered to report to General Ruggles at Columbus, February 11, 1864, his regiment to be armed there. February 23, Colonel Harrison, commanding cavalry brigade in the Columbus district, was directed to send his regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Sykes' detachment, Colonel Morton's Battalion and Haller’s section of Rice's Artillery to Cotton Gin port for defense of the Tombigbee. February 24, General Lee asked that the regiment be sent to Artesia to await his orders.
The regiment was assigned to Mabry's Brigade, with the Fourth Cavalry, Fourteenth Confederate, and Thirty-eighth Mounted Infantry, about 1,000 in all, which, upon the approach 0f the third Federal expedition in Forrest's country, moved from Saltillo to Ellistown, July 9, 1864. and reported to General Bufford, of Forrest's Cavalry. Colonel Harris was sent with the Sixth to Plentytude, to operate on the flank of Gen. A. J. Smith's Union troops, moving to Pontotoc, and they skirmished on the 11th. On the 13th, Mabry's Brigade, accompanied by Generals Lee and Forrest, followed the enemy toward Tupelo, skirmishing sharply. Smith went into line of battle at Harrisburg, and Lee and Forrest attacked July 14. Mabry’s Brigade advanced under a furious fire of artillery. He reported: 'My line advanced steadily, driving a heavy line of skirmishers back to the fortifications. A most terrific fire of small arms was opened on me when we were within about 300 yards of the works. I immediately ordered a charge, but the heat was so intense and the distance so great that some officers and men fell exhausted and fainting along my line, while the fire from the enemy's line of works by both artillery and smallarms was so heavy and well directed that many were killed and wounded. These two causes of depletion left my line almost like a line of skirmishers. At about sixty yards from the enemy's works, seeing that my line was too much weakened to drive the enemy, I halted and directed the men to protect themselves by lying down in a hollow and behind a low fence. I held this position until our second line came up to within about 100 yards of my rear and was repulsed, when I gave the order to fall back. My loss in the hollow and in falling back was severe.' Among the killed were Col. Isham Harrison, Lieut.-Col. Thomas M. Nelson, Capt. T. G. Fields, and Lieuts. W. D. Carrington, Company H; and A. D. Clifton, Company C. Among the wounded, Lieut. J. F. Clifton, Company B; Sergt. W. J. Sweeney, D; Lieut. J. Turner, E; Capt. A. C. Johnson, Lieut. William Bell, I; Lieut. T. W. Cobb, A.
Colonel Heath, Thirty-third Missouri (Union), reported that after the repulse of the last assault, Captain McKee's company, deployed to fill a gap in the line, 'came upon a party of the enemy's sharpshooters, whom he charged and drove frown cover,' capturing a flag 'supposed to belong to the Sixth Mississippi,' which the party was 'endeavoring to recover from the hands of their dead color bearer.'
The total casualties of the Sixth were 13 killed, 46 wounded, 14 missing. The brigade of which it was a part was about 1,000 strong before the battle. Total Confederate casualties, killed and wounded, 1,262; Federal, killed and wounded, 636.
'The battle of Harrisburg will furnish the historian a bloody record, but it will also stamp with immortality the gallant dead and the living heroes it has made. Prominent among the dead the names of Col.. Isham Harrison and Lieut.-Col. Thomas M. Nelson, of the Sixth Mississippi; Lieut.-Col. John B. Cage, commanding Fourteenth Confederate, Lieut.-Col. Sherrill, of the Seventh Kentucky, and Major Robert C. McCay, of the Thirty-eighth Mississippi, will shine in fadeless splendor. They were lion-hearted officers and courteous men. It was a sad blow that struck down these gallant spirits. In unselfish devotion to the cause and high courage they leave no superiors behind among men. Their noble natures and ardent patriotism, it is hoped, will find in the soldier's grave that peace for which their country has thus far struggled in vain, and for the achievement of which they have sacrificed their lives. Future generations will never weary in hanging garlands upon their graves.' (Report of General Forrest.)
August 1 the brigade was reported 400 present for duty. Captain Lipscomb was promoted as Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding the regiment, which was returned to Gen. Wirt Adams' district.
Colonel Lipscomb was at Macon with about 250 of Mabry's Brigade, when Grierson's raiders, from Memphis, struck the Mobile and Ohio Railroad in December, 1864. Grierson eluded most of the Confederate commands, and Lipscomb, in his pursuit, did not come up with him.
In February, 1865, with Mabry's Brigade, Wirt Adams' Cavalry, between Vicksburg and Jackson. March 3, General Forrest ordered Mabry's Brigade broken up and assigned the Sixth to Brig.-Gen. Starke's Brigade. This brigade arrived at Selma, Ala., during the battle of April 2, but was unable to render assistance. Thence they fell back to Livingston, Ala., their post, April 30. The dates of capitulation were: By General Taylor, commanding department, May 4; by General Forrest, at Gainesville, Ala., May 22, 1865. In 1865 the Sixth was consolidated with the Eighth, Colonel Duff, but the Sixth Regiment, Col. R. G. Brown, retained its identity to the last.
Contact Name:  Edith G. (Heflin) Smith
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/28/2008
Company I
Thomas Isaah Fletcher - Private   
Thomas was born in 1838 in Brandon, Rankin Co. Mississippi. He enlisted at Cato, Rankin Co [ date unknown] as his military history is missing from the archives. His wife filed claim for pension in 1931 from her home in Trinity Co. Texas. Her case drug on for over a year and was finally approved. The proof was provided my several former soldiers who served with him or knew of his service. It seems that when the unit was formed at Columbus, Miss in late 1864 he mustered with it. The regimental history provides a record of where he served. His Regiment rode with General Nathan Bedford Forrest and assigned to Marbry's Brigade. Thru consolidations he is associated with the 8th Cavalry as well.. perhaps further research will produce the CMR.
He was the father in law of my 3rd cousin 3 x removed.
Contact Name:  phillip thomas
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/4/2020
Company I
William D. Inman - Private   
Enlisted 27 Nov 1863 at 17 years of age. This unit was later transferred to the 12th Cavalry. They were surrendered at Citronelle, AL 4 May 1865 and paroled at Gainesville, AL on 14 May 1865. He survived the war and returned to Monroe Co. MS
Contact Name:  Debbie Brasfield
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/11/2009
Company L
Francis Marion Harris - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Thomas Harris
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/20/2007
Company L
charles wesley kendall - Private   
Charles Wesley Kendall 1845 -1910

Charles Wesley Kendall served as a Confederate soldier in the War Between the States. He joined at 18 years of age as rank of Private, with his first unit being the 6th Mississippi Cav. Company L -- Williams’ Company (raised in Chickasaw County, MS)..

In October, 1863, Colonel Isham Harrison was forming his regiment at Columbus, according to report of Col. Richardson, commanding district. Harrison was ordered to report to General Ruggles at Columbus, February 11, 1864, his regiment to be armed there. February 23, Colonel Harrison, commanding cavalry brigade in the Columbus district, was directed to send his regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Sykes' detachment, Colonel Morton's Battalion and Haller’s section of Rice's Artillery to Cotton Gin port for defense of the Tombigbee. February 24, General Lee asked that the regiment be sent to Artesia to await his orders..

Soon after reorganization with the 4th Miss Cav., Private Kendall was furlowed with injury and sickness. When returning to the War he was assigned to the 13th Miss. Infantry in 1864 until the end of the War. .

The winter quarters were at Russellville, Tenn., whence they moved in the last of March to Bristol. At Gordonsville, Va., May 3, they received orders to join General Lee on the Rappahannock. May 6, with the advance of Longstreet's corps, they went into battle in the Wilderness, Major Donald commanding, winning new renown on that bloody field. They were in almost constant action and frequent battles throughout the campaign of 1864, at Spottsylvania Courthouse, May 8-12; at, Hanover Junction, May 27; at Cold Harbor early in June, and at Petersburg June 19. In the latter part of July they were sent from the Petersburg lines to support Early in the Shenandoah Valley, where they were in the engagements at Berryville, Charlestown, Rockfish Gap, and Cedar Creek..

In the Wilderness battles the regiment had 18 killed, 61 wounded, 12 missing. Among the severely wounded were Lieut. William Davis (Company C), Captain Currie, Lieut. R. C. Kelly (Company I)..

The returns, in October, after this battle show Major Donald in command of the brigade..

At the battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, the brigade was conspicuous in taking the Federal position in the early part of the battle. When the return attack was delivered by Sheridan the brigade met the advance coolly and with an effective fire. It was not until their flank was exposed by the panic in other commands that they yielded..

November 20 they returned to Richmond and during the winter they were posted at Garnett's farm and on the Darbytwn and Newmarket roads. April 1-2 they marched through Richmond and began the retreat to Appomattox Courthouse..

In the final returns the remnant of the heroic Thirteenth was commanded by Lieut. W. H. Davis..



Charles Wesley Kendall 1845 - 1910



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Contact Name:  kenneth kendall
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/12/2014
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