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Civil War Genealogy Database
All Units - Artillery - Cavalry - Engineers - Infantry - Marines - Medical - Misc - Naval
26th Missouri Infantry      
Company Unknown
benjamin d dean - Captain   
No Comments

Contact Name:  curt williams
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/21/2007
Company E
Abraham B Firestone - Private   
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Contact Name:  kathi bartlow
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/25/2008
Company E
Abraham Lewis - Corporal   
I found this information on an on-line copy of the Rosters of 26th Missouri enlistment card. His rank is also noted on his tombstone in Smith Cemetery, Phelps Co., MO. This information was found while researching my genealogy.
Contact Name:  Sherry Lewis Miller
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  1/16/2009
Company E
Willis McMillan - Private   
Willis was born about 1845 in Patrick County Virginia. He died of the measles will serving in the war. He died 30 Dec. 1862 in Missouri. He is buried in the Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. His parents were Aaron McMillian and Jane Willis.
Contact Name:  Robert McMillan
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  8/24/2008
Company E
Frederick Zender - 1st Lieutenant   
Frederick Zender

Friederic Zeender (Frederick Zender) was born on August 6, 1826 in Bern, Switzerland. He died, April 17, 1873, in Morrison, Gasconade, Missouri. He left Port Havre, France on July 14, 1848 and arrived in New York city on August 5, 1848. According to his passport, his name was Frederic Zeender. He was 21 years old and a stone mason. On February 19, 1849, Frederick declared his intent to naturalize as a US citizen by submitting his application in Cincinnati, Ohio. He met and married Malvina Rebecca Gilkey of Ohio on July 7, 1855. He had six children with Malvina: Hattie, Caroline, Almira, William, Albert, and Ida May. All of whom were born in Missouri except Hattie as she was born in Hamilton County, Ohio. William, Malvina and Caroline are mentioned in the 1860 Osage County census. At that time, Malvina's widowed mother, Elizabeth Liggett, lived with them. In 1860, Frederick was listed as a farmer. Malvina Rebecca died on Feb. 9, 1872.

Frederick Zender enlisted in the Union army in the 26th Missouri Infantry Regiment Vols. on Oct 22, 1861 in Medora, Missouri. His company was mustered in at Chamois, Missouri on January 9, 1862. He was transferred from Company K to Company E on May 1, 1862 by order of Col. Boomer. At this time, Frederick was promoted to 1st Sergeant on June 16, 1862. Frederick was then promoted to First Lieutenant on October 10, 1863. He was mustered out of service on December 19, 1864 at Millers Station, Grady, Georgia. According to the Chicago Tribune dated June 8, 1863, 1st Sergeant Frederick Zender was wounded slightly in his left arm. This wound occurred during the battle of Champions Hill, Mississippi on May 16th, 1863. The battle of Champions Hill was part of the Vicksburg Campaign. Frederick was also part of General Sherman's infamous march to the sea.
From January 1, 1864 to February 19, 1864, Frederick was in command of Company A and received an extra $10 per month and $2 for transportation. From April 29, 1864 – August 1864, he was in command of Company E.

Frederick was wounded on May 16, 1863 at the battle of Champions Hill, MS. He was in the hospital near Memphis, TN from June 15 – 30 recovering from a wound to his arm. On November 25, 1863, Frederick was wounded in the head at the battle of Mission Ridge near Chattanooga, TN.

According to Frederick's discharge papers, he was born in Bern, Switzerland, was 5 feet 4 ¾” tall, had a florid complexion, gray eyes, brown hair and by occupation when he enrolled in the army was a stone mason.

On August 4, 1872, Frederick married Mrs. Mary Ellen (Ross) Harvey in Osage County, Missouri. Mary was a widow from William Harvey. Frederick and Mary had one child, Frederick William Zender, born on December 1, 1873 in Hermann, Gasconade, Missouri. Frederick and Mary were not married long before he died on April 17, 1873. Frederick William never knew his father, Frederick, which corresponds with my Grandfather's (Frederick Arthur) comments of him nor his father knowing Frederick (b.1826).

In 1886, an Officer's Certificate of Disability was submitted on Fredrick Zender. This document certified that Fredrick was injured and that he died from his injuries received during the war. This document was needed by Mary Zender to receive his pension. Mary’s first request for pension was rejected on January 17, 1889. She resubmitted the pension application on April 5, 1889. It was approved for $8 per month and $2 for each minor child commencing August 11, 1890. At this time, Mary lived at W. 20th St., Chicago, IL.



Affidavit: Charles Roos (Ross), Morrison, Missouri – September 13, 1886:
That he has been well and personally acquainted with Frederick Zender for 5 years and that the Frederick Zender died on or about the 17th day of April, 1873 from a poisonous disease of fever. Said Fredrick Zender often referred to his wound in the head which he said he received in battle and would cause him great pain notable when the weather would change. He also had been wounded in other parts of the body and leg as he would show me these wounds but claimed that one of the shots in the head near the ear had never come out. He often appeared dispirited and seemed malnourished which I took to be the result of his wound. Zender was a good citizen laborer and industrious and not addicted to drink or bad habits. During the time of my acquaintance with Zender, I met him most daily and knew nothing that troubled him accept the wounds to this he would often refer and complain of pain in the back, and claim this pain to be the result of the wound in the head.

According to the Officer's Certificate of Disability for Fredrick Zender, No. 337447, the following was a sworn statement of a John P. Crowe a 2nd Lt. of E company, 26th Missouri Infantry – Jeffreesburg, Missouri - September 20, 1886:
'I John P. Crowe late 2nd Lt. of Co. E of the 26th Regiment of Missouri Vol. certify on honor that Fredrick Zender was a Sergeant in my Company and as I am informed has died and his widow and children are applicants for an invalid Pension; that said Fredrick Zender was honorably discharged at Savannah, Georgia by expiration of term of service as the records will show. And I further certify that the said Fredrick Zender was wounded in the head near the back of his ear at the Battle of Iuka September 19, 1862. This was in line of duty and I thought Fredrick Zender was fatally hurt. I did not see much of Fredrick Zender after this battle as I was promoted to Company I of the 26th Regt MO Vol Infantry and should not sway as to the effect of this wound thereafter. And that the said Fredrick Zender at the time of enlistment to the time when he was wounded was a healthy able bodied soldier with no indication of an early death.'

Affidavit: Joseph Geiser, California, Missouri – December 29, 1886
That he was well acquainted with said Frederick Zender as Sergeant when he was wounded in the head near the back of head left ear at the Battle of Iuka in the state of Mississippi, September 19, 1862. He remembered him well as a 1st Lieutenant, Company E, 26th regiment, Missouri Vol. Infantry and lived near him immediately after their discharge from the Army. He served in the same regiment and remembers distinctively that Zender complained during the service of pain in the back and bitterly complained and suffered pain in his spinal column continually from the time of their discharge to the date of his death. He always believed that his pain had originated from his wound in the head at Iuka, Mississippi and believes that day that such was the fact as he died with the spinal meningitis or a form of spotted fever on April 17, 173 at Morrison, Missouri.

Affidavit: Mary Zender, Morrison, Missouri – December 30, 1886
That my deceased husband, Frederick Zender was wounded in the head at the battle of Iuka in the state of Mississippi September 19, 1862. This wound in his head caused a spinal weakening of which he complained during the whole time of our married life and this spinal weakening resulted in a fever called the spinal meningitis or spotted fever of which he died April 17, 1873 at Morrison, Missouri.

Physician’s Affidavit: D. M. Caughill, MD, Ashland, Kansas – October 4, 1887
I was intermittently acquainted with Frederick Zender and knew him prior to enlistment. Lived a close neighbor to him and practices in his family. I believe him to have been a sound man at enlistment and never prescribed for him that I recollect. Was called to see him on council with Dr. William McCarmant in April 1873. Found him dying with cerebral spinal meningitis from which he died.

Affidavit: Adolph Wittenbach, Fredericksburg, MO – January 21, 1888
That he has known Frederick Zender immediately after discharge and remembers that Mr. Zender complained of suffering pain from a gunshot wound in the head and spine and left side which made him lame and unfit for labor most of his time. He suffered from malarial fever a great deal. I know the above facts from personal acquaintance from 1866 until his death in April 1873.

Affidavit: Julius Kremmil, Fredericksburg, Missouri – June 11, 1888
I have known Frederick Zender, late a Lieutenant of Company e in the 26th Missouri Vols and state that since his discharge in December 1864, he suffered with pain and leaned to the right side and walked lame. He suffered with this deformity until he died. I know these facts from personal knowledge and positive recollection.

Affidavit: George Seifort, Morrison, Missouri – June 20, 1888
I have known Frederick Zender late a Lieut. of Company E in the 26th Regt, Mo Volunteers and state that since his discharge in December 1864, he suffered with pain and leaned to the right side and walked lame. He suffered with this deformity until he died April 17, 1873. I know these facts from personal knowledge and positive recollection.

Affidavit: Christ Plattner and George Seifort, Osage Co., Missouri – September 5, 1888
That we each of us were well acquainted with Frederick Zender and his wife Malvina Zender and know that Mrs. Malvina Zender died February 9, 1872 at Osage County, Missouri. That we have seen her in her coffin and have then said dates confirmed by the family record in their family bible and from personal knowledge and positive recollection.

Affidavit: Louise Buente and Anna Birk, Morrison, Missouri – September 5, 1888
That we were well acquainted with Frederick Zender, his wife and children that they had a daughter named Carolina Elizabeth born to them July 17, 1858. Said daughter died at Morrison, Missouri, April 3, 1873, about two weeks before Frederick Zender the father and soldier died. We know this as we have seen here in her coffin, and the record of birth as also the record of death is found in the family bible.

Affidavit: Almira (nee Zender) and Joseph Geiser, California, MO – September 17, 1888
That they were well acquainted with Frederick Zender and his wife (formerly Malvina Gilkey.) They had a daughter born to them July 11, 1856 and said daughter was named Hattie Elizabeth. She died July 21, 1856. Part of the is from the records in the family bible which we believe to be correct as our personal knowledge and positive recollection confirms that record.

Affidavit: D. M. Caughill, MD, Morrison, Missouri – November 11, 1888
I was called to see Mr. Frederick Zender on the 16th of April, 1873 in consultation with Dr. William McCament his attending physician found the patient in a depressed and comatose condition. From the evidence I gathered from Dr. McCament and the condition of the patient and owing to the fact that cerebral spinal meningitis was prevailing in an epidemic from in our midst. I have no hesitancy in claiming that he died from that disease.


Affidavit: Charles Nagel, Morrison, Missouri – April 8, 1889
That we remember Frederick Zender from about the time of his discharge to date of his death and know that he walked leaning to the right side and front. Plainly showing structural change which he claimed was on account of wound received in battle and as he was a truthful man we believed him. During our knowledge from discharge to death he was a weak broken down man both in health and limbs and we believe that any small attack of any kind of disease would have affected him and taken him off. As his health was broken down by the war we believe that his death due to his service in the war.

Affidavit: R. B. Denny, Henker, Franklin, Missouri – January 27, 1890
That he remembers Frederick Zender late a Lieutenant in Co. E, 26th Reg’t, Missouri Infantry Vols, and recollects that the said soldier was wounded several times about the head and body during his service in the above named organization.

Affidavit: Charles Gust, in Morrison, Missouri – April 1890
We remembered Fred Zender from about his discharge to his death and know that he walked leaning to the right side and front plainly showing structural damages which he claimed was on account of wounds received in battle and he was a truthful man and we believed him. During our knowledge from his discharge to his death, he was a weak, broken down man both in health and limbs and we believe that any small attack of any kind of a disease would have affected him and taken him off and as his health was broken down by the War. We believe his death due to his service in the War.

Affidavit: Jacob Hemmeberger, Morrison, Missouri - April 26, 1890
That he was well and personally acquainted with Frederick Zender on his return from the Army, in 1865 and recollects well that he was suffering with affection of the spine, which Affiant believes was the result of his service in the late War. He knows the fact of his suffering with Spinal disease, as his bending walk indicated the same. He further states that the said Frederick Zender continued to suffer with this spinal trouble, until he finally died of spinal meningitis. He knows these facts as he was intimately acquainted with the said Frederick Zender during the above stated time and knows that he suffered with spinal disease year by year from discharge to death.

Affidavit: Charles Sontag, Morrison, Missouri – April 28, 1890
That he was well and personally acquainted with the above named soldier, Frederick Zender immediately after his return from the Army, as he worked for Affiant (Charles Sonntag), and he recollects that the said Zender always complained of his back, and he knows that he suffered with the affection of the spine as he stooped a great deal, and had a bending walk. He further states that the said Frederick Zender continued to suffer with this spinal disease, from that time up to the date of his death, when he finally died of spinal meningitis. He knows the above from personal knowledge and positive recollection as he saw the said Zender very often from his discharge to death.

An affidavit from Lt. Major, Robert Crowell, 26th Missouri states:
That he remembers Frederick Zender, late a Lieutenant in Co. E, 26th Reg't Mo. Inft. Vols, and recollects that the said soldier was wounded several times about the head and body during his service in the above named organization. Affiant states that he cannot recollect the details now in regard to the said wounds, but knows this as he was present in the said company and regiment, and recollects the facts as stated, from personal knowledge and positive recollection. Affiant especially remembers said Frederick Zender being wounded in the head at the battle of Iuka, Mississippi on September 19, 1862, by a musket ball from the enemy while he was on duty with this company and regiment as orderly sergeant, and immediately under the observation and command of the undersigned then Captain of said Company E, 26th Mo, Vol Regt.

From the Surgeon General's Office, Record and Pension Division, War Dept., Washington, DC, Jan 12, 1888, No. 482448:
First Sgt. Fred Zender was admitted on board hospital city of Memphis, Tenn., May 22, 1863. He entered the hospital, Memphis, Tenn. May 27, 1863, with a flesh wound left arm and was returned to duty June 26, 1863. First Lt. Fred Zender received a gunshot wound to scalp at battle in Missouri Ridge, Tenn., Nov 25, 1863. Signed, J. L. Ainsworth, Asst. Surgeon General, US Army

According to the 'Card Records of Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans' at the National Archives, Frederick is buried in Morrison, Gasconade, Missouri. The actual cemetery is unknown. According to the 1876 Missouri census Frederick Zender, Charles Zender, Elizabeth Zender and Rose Zender are living with mother Mary in Morrison, Gasconade, Missouri. Charles, Elizabeth and Rose were from her previous marriage to William Harvey, although they are listed with the surname of Zender. This could be an error on the census taker or Frederick may have adopted them prior to his death. The 1876 census also indicated the Zender family had 2 horses and 7 hogs.

In 1886, Mary Zender filed for a Civil War pension for William S. Zender according to the National Archives, NARA Pub. Number: T289.

In 1912 (according to Mary's death certificate) Mary Zender moved to Chicago, Illinois to live with her daughter Elizabeth Harvey Rinne. It is believed she went to Chicago to her son's funeral (Frederick William) in 1912 and decided to stay and live with her daughter, Elizabeth. It is also believed Charles Harvey moved to Chicago as he was close to Frederick William. Mary stayed in Chicago until she died December 22, 1925. Mary had immigrated to the US about 1856 from Germany according to her death certificate. Further proof of the Harvey/Zender relationship is indicated in an Obit of Mary and Frederick's son, Frederick in the Chicago Tribune:

From the Chicago Daily Tribune, September 29, 1912:
Deaths.
Zender - Fred Zender, aged 38, husband of Mrs. Josephine Zender, nee Diezel, father of Raymond, Charlie, and Freddie, brother of Mrs. Rinne and Charles Harvey, Sept. 27, 1912. Funeral Monday, Sept. 30, 1912, at 9:00 o'clock, from late residence, 2259 W. Twenty-first-pl., to St. Paul's church, thence by carriages to St. Boniface cemetery.
Contact Name:  Christine Zender
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=zender&id=I569
Date Added:  2/6/2009
Company F
august ganz - Private   
killed in the battle of Vicksburg
Contact Name:  curt williams
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/21/2007
Company G
Isaac M Gough - Private   
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Contact Name:  Dave Goff
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  12/4/2014
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