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Civil War Genealogy Database
All Units - Artillery - Cavalry - Engineers - Infantry - Marines - Medical - Misc - Naval
4th South Carolina Infantry      
Company Unknown
DAVID W THOMPSON - Private   
4TH BN SC VOLUNTEERS
LOOKING FOR FAMILY
Contact Name:  JOE THOMPSON
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  10/28/2005
Company Unknown
John Newton Wyatt - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  robert caudle
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/30/2004
Company Unknown
Samuel Thompson Wyatt - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  robert caudle
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/30/2004
Company A
JAMES C CRAIG - Captain   
Capt. Craig, age 46, resigned due to ill health, June 17, 1863

(In 4th SC Calary, not Infantry)
Contact Name:  Ginger
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  na
Date Added:  11/6/2007
Company A
HUGH CRAIG JR. - 3rd Sergeant   
HUGH CRAIG Jr. 27, from Chesterfield, SC, departed from Greensboro, N.C. after Apr 9, 1865

(Promoted 2nd LT. June 25, 1863)
Contact Name:  Ginger
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/6/2007
Company B
William Thomas Bowen - Unknown   
Served in the 4th SC Infantry, Company I, CSA. Served in Company I, 4th SC Infantry (the Pickens Guards) Company B, E, I, and J were transferred to the Palmetto Sharpshooters under General Micah Jenkins.
Contact Name:  Richard C. Baker, Jr.
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  5/25/2009
Company C
Ephriam Robinson Dickinson - Sergeant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  John O. Bronson
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/30/2004
Company C
John Clayton Hickman - Private   
Enlisted Apr 14, 1861; mustered in June 7, 1861; discharged Apr 9, 1865. Wounded at Lookout Mountain, TN.
Contact Name:  Connie Vickery
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/16/2010
Company C
James Vandiver Jones - Private   
Died of disease, October 03, 1861.
Father of Lt. William J. Jones.
Contact Name:  Keith Jones
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  www.csanewspapers.com
Date Added:  8/15/2007
Company C
William John Jones - 2nd Lieutenant   
Later in Co. I, Hampton Legion.
Contact Name:  Keith Jones
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  www.csanewspapers.com
Date Added:  8/15/2007
Company C
Jesse Walton Reid - Private   
4th Regiment,South Carolina Volunteers
Co.C (1st tour of duty) He also wrote the book----'History of the 4th Regiment,South Carolina Volunteers,of the Confederate States of America' found on my web page--- http://www.geocities.com/lindasplaying/
Contact Name:  Linda Ballington
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  http://www.geocities.com/lindasplaying/
Date Added:  3/15/2006
Company D
James Emory Bagwell - Private   
UNCLE “JIM” – JAMES EMORY BAGWELL’S
EARLY CONFEDERATE SERVICE in the 4th S. Carolina Regiment

James Emory Bagwell was born on the 18th day of August, 1841 in Near Columbia, South Carolina. He was the son of Micajor Bagwell and Harriet M. Stone. In the late 1840’s early 1850’s his family moved to Big Creek, Forsyth County, Georgia. On the 1st day of February 1861, James Emory enlisted as a private in Company D, 4th Infantry Regiment South Carolina, known as the 'Piercetown Guards.' The 4th Infantry Regiment was said to contain 1241 men at it’s formation initially. Uncle Jim was said to have walked from his home in Forsyth County, Georgia to Anderson, South Carolina to enlist. He was an apparently devoted Secessionist, and wanted to join in the defense of his former State at the initial inception of hostilities, thus his long walk. As most Southerner’s, Jim owned no slaves nor did his father. About not missing a thing, Uncle Jim got his wish as he joined just in time to see action at the outset of the Civil War being at Fort Sumter, South Carolina the 12th through the 14th of April, 1861 witnessing the first shot fired against Fort Sumter, the bombardment of the Fort, and it’s eventual surrender.

He would also be witness to the first great battle of the War at the 1st Manassas or First Bull Run on July 21st, 1861. He would see action from just after breakfast through the day to dusk, be involved in the holding action that saved the Confederate Army, hear how “Stonewall” Jackson got his name, and take place in the first charge of the war, a Confederate charge that routed the Union Army at the end of the day, thus dashing the Union’s hope of a quick victory and end to the war. He served in Evan’s Brigade under Col. B.E. Sloan and was situated at the left flank of the Confederate line against the Federal Second and Third Divisions of the Union forces. He was part of the first troops in action that day. Col. Nathan G. Evans troops were the 7th Brigade of the Confederate Army of General Beauregard made up of the 1st Special Louisiana Infantry Battalion, the 4th South Carolina Infantry Regiment (Jim’s unit), the 30th Virginia Cavalry (2 companies), and the Lynchburg Artillery (2 guns) (Virginia). The line of battle that had had Evan’s Brigade situated at the Stone Bridge against the main force of the Union Army, but a flanking maneuver by the Second and Third Divisions of the Union Army caused Evans Brigade to leave their position on at the Stone Bridge to meet the danger to their flank before 10:00 a.m.. Evans, who was later reinforced by Bartow and Bee’s Brigades, gained precious time for the Confederates by halting the momentum of the Union assault. Colonel Evans who moved a mile northwest to a position at a right angle to the main Confederate body to counter McDowell’s turning march, had a flimsy line of the 4th Carolina Regiment (in which Jim was a member), and a battalion of Louisiana Tigers only initially – about 1500 men. Strung out on a low rise from Manassas-Sudley Road to the Mathews House, in the direct path of the approaching enemy – half of the Union Army, Evan’s line of the 4th South Carolina Regiment managed to hold off the attacks for a hour before being reinforced by Bee and Bartow after constant urging by Evans. The brigades of Bartow, Bee and Evans had been pretty well cut to pieces in the ravine below the Henry House and were now coming up the Henry Hill in a disorganized mass. About 11:30 a.m., the Confederate line eventually began to give way under the onslaught of two full divisions of the Union Army, and began to retreat up to the top of Henry Hill around Thomas J. Jackson’s Virginian’s on the hill’s southeastern side. It was here that Colonel Bee yelled his famous quotation, “There stands Jackson like a stonewall,” and his, Bartow, and the 4th South Carolina Regiment rallied behind the Virginians. The Union kept sending regiments up the plateau against the stiffing rebel line. For about three hours the fighting raged to and fro over this pocketed terrain. The Confederates were in the afternoon reinforced by Jubal Early’s forces as well Kirby Smith’s. Finally, by mid-afternoon, Brigadier General Pierce G.T. Beauregard ordered the entire Rebel line to charge. Jim would have taken part in this charge – bayonets fixed. This charge drove the Federals off the plateau and past the Stone House standing at the intersection of Manassas-Sudley Road with the Warrenton Turnpike, thereafter, sending the Federals in general disorder, later rout, and disorganized flight or retreat back to Washington.

He was involved in the Yorktown Siege from April through May, 1862 as part of the 4th South Carolina Regiment in Anderson’s Brigade, part of Longstreet’s Division, Magruder’s Corps. He served under Col. B.E. Sloan. He would have worked on the earthworks which spread down the peninsula from Yorktown on the York River down to the James River which were only held by men in Magruder’s Corps, about 10,000.00 against the entire Union Army. Some Confederate reinforcements were moved over to Yorktown all the while the Union was bringing up heavy siege artillery. Joseph E. Johnson - Jim and the Confederate Army’s commander-in-chief - determined that the heavy guns would not be withstood by the Yorktown defenses, and withdrew from the line abandoning it before a big gun was heard.

He was involved in the battle of Williamsburg on May 4th, 1862 as part of the 4th South Carolina Regiment in Anderson’s Brigade, part of Longstreet’s Division, Magruder’s Corps. He served under Col. B.E. Sloan. This was an action by the rear guard of the Confederate Army in covering it’s retreat from the Yorktown line of defenses. A sharp battle ensued between Union forces and the Confederate rear guard, and the Confederates accomplished their goal by holding the Federals from being able to attack the main Confederate force for which it was covering allowing the Confederates to retreat in good order. After this battle the Regiment had lost sufficient men to be reorganized into a Battalion, thus the men became part of the 4th South Carolina Battalion.

He was involved in the battle of Fort Magruder on May 5th, 1862 as part of the 4th South Carolina Battalion in Anderson’s Brigade, part of Longstreet’s Division, Magruder’s Corps. He served under Major C.S. Mattison. This was an action by the rear guard of the Confederate Army in covering it’s retreat further down the tidewater.

He was involved in the battle of Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks) on May 31st, 1862 as part of the 4th South Carolina Battalion in Anderson’s Brigade, part of Longstreet’s Division, Magruder’s Corps. He served under Major C.S. Mattison and Colonel Jenkin’s and was in reserve to follow up on D.H.Hill’s attack on the right flank of the Union. This battle was held just outside the Confederate Capital Richmond, Virginia. Much confusion by Longstreet and Johnson prevented Jim from being used as a reinforcement on Hill’s attack. Later in the day the battalion made a dashing sweep (charge) through the Union lines up the Nine Mile Road on the Confederate left led by Colonel Micah Jenkins. When they moved up to Fair Oaks Station they were fired upon by men of Couch’s division of the Union Army which had nearly been cut off from the rest of the Union Army. The Confederate’s turned and attacked Couch’s division driving them toward the Chickahominy River. Couch was however reinforced by General Sumner’s Second Corps halting the Confederates impetus. Bothsides claimed victory, no gains were made by either Army as they returned to where they came from initially. This battle saw the grievous wounding to the Confederate Commander, General Johnson, and the appointment of a new Commander, General Robert E. Lee. Uncle Jim had been part of another successful charge, and his Regiment faired well again.
Contact Name:  Ben Bagwell
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/16/2011
Company D
Elbert Newton Campbell - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Carter Campbell
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/19/2006
Company D
John E Long - 1st Lieutenant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Billy Hopper
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  9/18/2010
Company G
Baylis Farr - Sergeant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Elizabeth Young
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/19/2012
Company G
Perry Shelton - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Sherri Smith
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  1/10/2012
Company H
Benjamin T. Hayes (Hays) - Private   
Died in October, 1864 of a wound at Staunton Hospital, Virginia.
Contact Name:  David Evette
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/15/2009
Company H
Robert McJunkin - Private   
Died in 1862 somewhere in Virginia.
Contact Name:  David Evette
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/15/2009
Company H
John H Williams - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Genia Hester
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/4/2015
Company J
James Addison Alewine - Private   
1861-1865, Confederate Army Service Records, National Archives, Washington, DC:
James A. Alewine (1843-1911), my great-great-grandfather, joined the Confederate Army for a one-year enlistment at the Anderson Court House on April 14, 1861, just two days after the start of the Civil War, when General Beauregard, in command of Confederate forces at Charleston, opened fire on Fort Sumter. The Union commander surrendered the following day.
James was assigned to Company J, 4th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers and after four weeks of instruction near Columbia, SC boarded a train on June 17, 1861 with his unit and traveled to Richmond arriving three days later. Then they railed to Leesburg about 25 miles west of Washington, DC and encamped at 'Camp Carolina' on 23 June.
By July 17 they marched to positions near Manassas, Virginia and were engaged by Union forces at the Battle of First Manassas. His company was positioned on the west bank of Bull Run, overlooking the Stone Bridge, a key crossing. The fight ended in a rout of the Union Army.
In December 1861, James A. Alewine was sent to Warren Springs Hospital by order of the surgeon. His records show him back with his reconstituted unit, Company E, 4th Battalion, South Carolina Volunteers in the spring of 1862. In July 1862, it is noted that he had not been paid since October.
In the summer of 1862, J. A. Alewine is now assigned to his redesignated unit, Company I, Hampton Legion. He left the unit on August 14, 1862 and was carried on their rolls as a deserter until at least January 1863. He probably went back home having heard that is father was ill or dead. Interestingly, James and Sallie Alewine say they were married during this absence in 1862. (See 1900 US Census)
But, by September 1864, he is again present for duty and served until he was paroled at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. He made his way home and he and Sally started their family 9 months later with the birth of their first child, James W. Alewine in January 1866.
Contact Name:  Bill Alewine
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/4/2010
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