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Civil War Genealogy Database
All Units - Artillery - Cavalry - Engineers - Infantry - Marines - Medical - Misc - Naval
1st Texas Infantry      
Company Unknown
John Doyal Bilbrey - Unknown   
I'm so glad I found this site (by accident), I didn't know something like this even existed!

He set sail on 9 Jun 1943 from Dallas, Texas, with the rating of S2c
Contact Name:  Gwen Bilbrey-Reynolds
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/11/2012
Company Unknown
Rufus French Emmons - 3rd Sergeant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Ron
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/26/2014
Company Unknown
William H knight - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Ike Reeves
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/3/2008
Company A
Argyle Campbell - Sergeant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Mark Jones
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  1/15/2009
Company A
Elijah Washington Cummins - Private   
A 4th great grand-uncle, Elijah W. Cummins served in Co. A, 1st Battalion Texas State Infantry. Lived in Fannin Co, Tx.
Contact Name:  Sam Comyns
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  www.scv.org
Date Added:  8/10/2010
Company A
Isaac Samuel Dowd - Private   
I am the Great Great Grandson Of Isaac S. Dowd and I am trying to trace our family roots. I can't go back any further than Great Great Grandfather Isaac who was born in South Carolina in 1831 I believe. Thanks for any help. John Dowd
Contact Name:  John Dowd
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  5/12/2009
Company A
Max Jacoby - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Alan Jacoby
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/22/2012
Company B
Newton Kirksey - 1st Corporal   
Enlisted as a Private on 16 May 1861.
Admitted to Chimborazo Hospital on 13 June 1862 for 'incised wound of the left arm.'
Returned to the regiment that same month.
Promoted to 1st Corporal in November 1863.
Contact Name:  Eric Stone
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/7/2010
Company B
Philip Pledger Meekins - 2nd Corporal   
From--The Pee Dee Advocate
Philip Meekins
--1842-1911
Died Wednesday afternoon after a long illness of about two years. He
was 69 years old the 24th day of the past September. He entered the
Confederate service with the " Texas Rangers" and fought through the
entire four years of that terrible conflict. During the war he joined
General Morgan's command, and was one of the trusted scouts, noted for
his nerve, coolness and intrepid courage, and was never better satisfied
than when in a bushwhacking engagement or hand to hand combat. Philip
Pledger Meekins did not fully understand the definition of fear, if duty
called him, he would boldly and unflinchingly face a belching cannon or
charge the breastworks of a desperate foe. After the war he returned to
his native county, engaged in farming and during those several years of
unrest, disorder and demoralization he rendered valuable and needed
service to the people and county in the restoration of order out of the
chaotic reconstruction period. He was appointed by Governor Wade
Hampton auditor of this county, and after the establishment of the state
dispensary he was appointed by Governor Tillman on the state
Constabulary, which position he held for 15 years. By those who were
associated with him he was pronounced to be the coolest and most
courageous member of that large force, stationed in Charleston, Columbia
and other places where good officers were needed. At the time of his
death he held a commission from the United States government as U.S
Deputy Marshal, which position he had held for several years, and made
faithful and appreciated official. He loved the Southern Confederacy and
always had a tender spot in his heart for old Confederate veterans. Only a
few months prior to his death he papered one of the rooms in his home in
Confederate colors, as he desired to breathe his last beneath those
historic and patriotic colors.
He was true as steel and would stand by a friend or principle of right at
any cost. He was so constituted that he enjoyed excitement and venturous
undertakings. When the large majority saw danger, he did not even suspect
physical harm.
On the 15th inst. he was buried under the auspices of the Knights of
Pythias, he having for a long time been a member of the Bennettsville
lodge No. 10. Revs. F.D. Veihe and K.A. Jones officiated at the funeral. He
was married twice, the first time to Miss Ada Edens. His second wife, who
was Miss Alice Crosland, survives him, and several children of both
unions also are living.
Contact Name:  T J Meekins
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  12/11/2023
Company B
William Otis Pankey - Private   
William Otis is a Pvt. in Capt. D.D. Moore's Company, [Livingston Guards] Texas Vol's. Then a Pvt. in 1st Regt. Texas Inf: [2nd] Texas Infantry. Enlisted 29 April 1861 at Livingston, Texas for 12 months. By May 1862 his unit was in the Richmond Va. area. He was wounded on the 27th and sent on wounded furlough. Remarks : Wounded at Sharpsburg Md. 17 Sept 1862. He was wounded again at Coal Harbor, Va. had a finger shot off. He was then assigned as a Teamster and paid 25 cents per day. His unit susrrendered at Citronella, Ala. 4 May 1865 and paroled at Meridian Miss.
Contact Name:  Phillip Thomas
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  1/26/2014
Company B
Joseph Wigley - Private   
Was a sharpshooter in the 1st Texas, Had four brothers in the 21st GA (Jackson, Daniel, James, Marion).
Contact Name:  William Wigley
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/23/2009
Company C
Levi Adams - Colonel   
Fought through the war. Surrendered at Appomattox. Wounded during the Wilderness.
Contact Name:  William Almond
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/20/2010
Company C
Alfred Brown Harris - Private   
my GGG Grand Uncle was born in 1824 Gibson County Tennesee, he was killed in action 19 Sep 1863 at the Battle of Chickamauga
he was the son of John and Elois Brown Harris and the brother of Spencer M. Harris, Pvt. Co B 11th TX Inf CSA
Contact Name:  David Hill
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/23/2005
Company C
Thomas Crammore Phillips - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Tammy Hill
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  10/20/2004
Company D
Elisha Bragg - Private   
1st Battalion Texas Sharpshooters,(Burnetts)
Contact Name:  Stephen Moyers Woodard
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  Givem Tha Cold Steel Boys
Date Added:  11/4/2015
Company D
Wiley D Bragg - Private   
1st Battalion Texas Sharpshooters (Burnetts)
Contact Name:  Stephen Moyers Woodard
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  Givem Tha Cold Steel Boys
Date Added:  11/4/2015
Company D
Cornelious Rowan Curtright - 2nd Lieutenant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Donovan Stewart
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  1/14/2010
Company E
George Washington Stauts - 3rd Lieutenant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  William M. Stauts
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  12/20/2004
Company F
Amos Gates Hanks - Private   
Amos was 33 years old at the beginning of the Civil War. He was a Mexican War veteran (2d Regiment of the Texas Mounted Volunteers). He married the widow (his half-brother's wife) of a Mexican War soldier. He had an eight year old son. Given how he had seen the nasty side of war and its victims, I am not sure why he felt compelled to go to war again. He was wounded, captured, and ultimately lost a leg at Antietam/Sharpsburg in the cornfield. He died mysteriously in Jefferson Co, TX about 1870 during Reconstruction. I wonder the impact of his going off to the Civil War - not only its impact on his remaining life, but on his wife and son (my great grandfather) and ultimately subsequent generations of my family.
Contact Name:  Tom Hanks
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  9/25/2012
Company F
Samuel Andrew Willson - Captain   
THE STORY OF CAPTAIN SAM WILLSON, COMPANY F, WOODVILLE RIFLES 1ST TEXAS REGIMENT, CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY By Joe Allport

Samuel Andrew Willson was born on January 9, 1835 in San Augustine, Texas. He was the sixth and last child of Dr. Stephen Pelham Willson and Mary (Polly) Davis. The family moved to northern Tyler County in the late 1840’s where Dr. Willson was one of the county’s five medical doctors. By 1850, young Sam was the only resident child of the Willsons.

At the age of 15, he began studying law in Woodville and was a protégé of Mijamen Priest, who later became a judge in Woodville and again in Rusk. The Texas Senate enacted a special legislation to allow Sam Willson to be admitted to the bar in 1852, at the age of seventeen. He was a junior member of the firm of Priest and Willson and he married Mr. Priest’s daughter, Susan, in 1853. In 1856, Sam became the District Attorney for the Fifteenth Judicial District. Like so many others, his future looked bright in the years leading up to the War of Southern Independence. And just like so many others, the War brought personal tragedy for the Willson family. In 1858, at the age of 23, he was re-elected to the position of District Attorney. In January of 1861, Phillip A. Work was chosen to be one of two Tyler County representatives at the Secession Convention. Several weeks later, he returned to Woodville to organize the Woodville Rifles and his friend and former law partner, Sam Willson, was selected to replace him during the Adjourned Session of March 2, 1861 to March 25, 1861.

Sam was the only native born Texan at this convention and probably the youngest. On May 28, 1861, Sam was elected 1st Lieutenant of the Woodville Rifles, serving under the first captain, P.A. Work. It was at this time that the Rifles were assimilated into the 1st Texas Regiment as Company F in Virginia. One year later, Phillip Work was promoted to Lt. Colonel, commander of the 1st Texas and Sam was elected as the new Captain. This unit served the remainder of the War with distinction as one of only three Texas regiments in the Army of Northern Virginia. They made up the core of the Texas Brigade. Captain Willson was on active duty in most major engagements of the ANV, including Sharpsburg where the 1st Texas sustained casualties of 82%, the most ever for a regiment in the entire War. Sam was badly wounded in one arm and returned to Texas for medical leave after he was released from the hospital. Therefore, he missed Fredricksburg and returned to duty in January 1863.

At the Battle of Gettysburg, Company F fought proudly and participated in the capture of two Federal cannons on July 2nd. Lt. Colonel Work gave permission to Captain Willson to select some men to move the cannons off the field of engagement. On the following day, July 3, 1863, the 1st Texas witnessed the artillery duel prior to Pickett’s Charge. During this time, they were assaulted by Yankee cavalry who made a sudden charge into their ranks and captured Sam along with Pvt. T.D. Rock.

Sometime between July 7th and July 12th, Captain Willson escaped from the POW camp, Ft. Delaware. He crossed enemy lines to return to his unit. His escape was planned from the time of his capture when he disguised himself as a private. Had the Federals learned that he was an officer, he would have been sent to Johnson’s Island, where he might have languished for the remainder of the War, or died in confinement. One of the prisoners at Ft. Delaware, (Judge) John W. Stevens, Co. K, 5th Texas Infantry, wrote a book in 1902 and said, “No one but my own company men knew him, and we always addressed him as Sam and never as captain. I fed him a stolen ration every night. I had known him from boyhood---a brave and gallant man”.

Dr. and Mrs. S.P. Willson did not survive the War and neither did one year old Frank Sexton Willson, born to Sam and Susan, while he was in military service. Three of his brothers-in-law died in the summer of 1862, one in Tyler County and two at the infamous POW killing field known as Camp Douglas in Illinois. Sam’s only brother, Hiram, served in the 27th Texas Cavalry and his first cousin, Frank Sexton, was one of two Texans to serve in the Confederate Congress for the duration of the War.

At the end of the War, the Captain returned to Woodville and he was elected District Judge again in 1866. Then came Reconstruction. In 1868, Sam had enough of the harassment, directed primarily at former officers and government officials. He refused to take the Loyalty Oath and moved to Rusk where he held brief occupations as a banker and owner of the newspaper though Reconstruction politics would continue to interfere with his life. The Radical Republicanseventually lost power and Richard Coke was elected governor in 1874. By that time, Sam had been elected district judge in Cherokee County. The new governor selected Sam to serve on the special committee that codified the law for the new (and current) Texas Constitution. In 1882, he was appointed to the State Court of Appeals by Governor O.M. Roberts and won the following election. His publication of Willson’s Criminal Forms was adapted to the Criminal Codes of Texas and was still in use as a textbook at the University of Texas Law School in 1955.

Sam Willson was active in the Baptist Church and refrained from using alcohol. He had undying devotion for his brothers-in-arms and he helped organize the Hood’s Texas Brigade Association on May 14, 1872 where he served on the original board of directors. These veterans held 62 reunions until the last in 1933. In early January 1892, Judge Willson developed pneumonia following a trip by horseback, in the snow, from his home in Rusk to the Cherokee County Courthouse where he was scheduled to hold court. He died on January 24th at the age of 57.

On January 11, 2002, members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, including the P.A. Work Camp (Woodville Rifles) participated in a military grave marker dedication for Captain Willson at the Cedar Hill Cemetery in Rusk, Texas.

Attached is a poem written for Sam by his father-in-law, Judge Mijamin Priest. It is interesting to note that Judge Priest was pro-Union during and after the War though he was a slave owner and three of his sons served in the Confederate Army. That includes the two afore-mentioned who died at Camp Douglas. Priest was a Republican and served in the Texas Senate during the Dark Years. Sam was a life long Democrat, but the two never let their political differences keep them from being close friends. Both men have portraits in the Tyler County Courthouse. There is another portrait of Judge Willson on the second floor of the Cherokee County Courthouse.


TO THE SURVIVORS OF HOOD’S BRIGADE

Brave men, the remnant of a host, Who fought through fire and blood,

Until the last, last hope was lost, Firm to the lost cause stood.

Though beaten, yet the future age, Will not forget your story,

You’ll dazzle the historic page, With deeds of martial glory.

As long as shines the Southern sun, Your deeds will be remembered,

Yes, till what has been thus begun, This government dismembered.

The government may pass away, As others have before it,

And others live to see the day, Look back, and still adore it.

But your brave deeds will never die, Will live while nations perish,

Both friends and foes alike will vie, Your gallantry to cherish.
Contact Name:  Joe Allport
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  8/12/2007
Company G
Levi Annison Adams - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Frances J. Freeman
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  12/10/2005
Company G
James Osborn Goad - 1st Corporal   
1838-1901
Contact Name:  George Hill
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/9/2013
Company G
Fredrick Julius Watts - Private   
Private F.J. Watts was from Anderson County Texas. He lost his right arm at Sharpsburg, Maryland & finished the war as County Clerk of Anderson County. He had several cousins & uncles that fought for the Confedercy Anderson & Cherokee County, Texas.
Contact Name:  Thomas Harrison
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/29/2008
Company H
Isaac G Cotney - Private   
Died a POW
Contact Name:  Dan Cotney
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/10/2004
Company H
William H. Foster - Private   
Wm Foster was my Great-Great Grandfather. He was captured at Gettysburg on July 2nd during the action at Devil's Den. He died October 13, 1863 in Fort Delaware. His youngest daughter Viola was my Great Grandmother. Rest in Peace Grandpa.
Contact Name:  Ronnie Hatfield
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/8/2011
Company H
Robert Hugh Gaston - 3rd Lieutenant   
Lieut. Robert Hugh Gaston, 3rd of five sons born to Robert K. and Letitia Gaston, enlisted with his older brother, William, in the lst Texas Volunteer Infantry Regiment Company H - Texas Guards. Robert first serving as a 4th Corporal and later promoted to 3rd Lieutenant.

This company participated in many of the great battles of the Civil War and was part of General Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. At the Battle of Antietam on September 17th 1862, Lieut. Robert Hugh Gaston was mortally wound in action and dying on the battlefield. His body was later buried in the hollowed grounds at Washington Confederate Cemetery, along side his 'brethren in arms.' At the time of Lieut. Gaston's death, he was 18 years old.
Contact Name:  G. M. Gaston
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/3/2014
Company H
William Henry Gaston - Captain   
Captain William Henry Gaston, 2nd of five sons born to Robert K. and Letitia Gaston, enlisted with his younger brother, Robert, in the lst Texas Volunteer Infantry Regiment Company H - Texas Guards. William was elected Captain shortly after his enlistment. His company became part of the First Texas Infantry regiment of Hood's Texas Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. Capt. Gaston commanded his company with distinction through the terrible battles in Virginia in 1862. After recovering from typhoid fever, he was detailed to Texas on recruiting duty for the regiment. While on leave he married a former schoolmate, Laura Furlow. He was subsequently reassigned to serve as Confederate purchasing agent in the Trans-Mississippi Department, where he spent the remainder of the war. He died on January 24, 1927, and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Dallas.
Contact Name:  G.M.Gaston
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/11/2018
Company H
Haygood G Hickman - 1st Sergeant   
First cousin twice removed
Contact Name:  Joe Hickman
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  5/5/2006
Company H
Jasper E Hickman - 4th Sergeant   
First Cousin, twice removed
Contact Name:  Joe Hickman
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  5/5/2006
Company H
Smith S. Honea - Private   
Served under John Bell Hood. Died in camp at Richmond, VA, June 1862
Contact Name:  Cheryl Campbell
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/21/2007
Company H
William Abel Honea - Private   
Served under John Bell Hood. Died at Sharpsburg, MD/Antietam, September 17, 1862
Contact Name:  Cheryl Campbell
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/21/2007
Company H
Alexis Theodore Rainey - Colonel   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Rhonda Barnes
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/24/2013
Company H
Edwin M Taylor - Private   
Texas Muster Roll Cards

E.M. Taylor
Anderson County Invincibles
1st Texas Infantry Co. H
Captain Anson T. Rainey
Enlistment May 11th 1861

My 4th Great Grand uncle
Contact Name:  Caleb Madden
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  calebsmadden@gmail.com
Date Added:  8/13/2015
Company I
Mortimer Murphy - Private   
Enlisted when formed in 1861. Died July 2, 1873, Gettysburg.
Contact Name:  AK Noorian
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/6/2008
Company I
William Robert Shehane - Private   
Born Greenville District South Carolina. Enlisted at Crockett, TX June 18th, 1861. Served in 1st TX(sometimes numbered 2nd Texas Col Currie's) until Dec 1861 when discharged for medical disability at Charlottesville, VA. Later joined 39th Alabama Inf.
Contact Name:  John Russell
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  12/29/2007
Company K
Benjamin Franklin Benton - Captain   
On June 27, 1862, Captain Benton fell at the head of his command in the Battle of Gaines' Mill, in defense of Richmond, at Cold Harbor, Virginia. He was buried on the battlefield and reinterred on January 18, 1867, with Masonic honors, in the San Augustine, TX City Cemetery near the graves of his parents and brother.
Contact Name:  Mark Anderson
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  12/27/2009
Company K
Robert T. Conner - Sergeant   
Wounded 2nd Manassas, Wounded Suffolk. Home on wounded furlough (San Augustine Co. Tx.) With Texas Ind. Militia at Battle of Mansfield and Wounded there.
Contact Name:  Robert Clifton
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/7/2010
Company K
Jesse M Hail - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Stephen Moyers Woodard
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  Givem Tha Cold Steel Boys
Date Added:  1/4/2011
Company K
Oscar F Hail - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Stephen Moyers Woodard
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  Givem Tha Cold Steel Boys
Date Added:  1/4/2011
Company K
Jonas Judd Hail Jr. - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Stephen Moyers Woodard
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  Givem Tha Cold Steel Boys
Date Added:  1/4/2011
Company K
Madison Jacobs - 3rd Sergeant   
Died July 2,1862, at Robertson's Hospital in Richmond, VA. He was from Nacogdoches County and traveled to San Augustine to enlist. He was first admitted to the hospital in April with pneumonia, released, then readmitted in June. The hospital was a private home converted to a hospital. The Third Street Cafe in present-day Richmond is marked as the location of the hospital. Madison Jacobs was my third-great uncle.
Contact Name:  David Smith
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/9/2010
Company K
William Carroll Locker - Private   
William Carroll LOCKER (W.C. LOCKER or C. LOCKER) enlisted 1862
Co. K, #1 Texas Heavy Artillery, private duration of the war.

James Monroe LOCKER, his brother, served CSA Co B 31st Texas Cavalry. Their brother, John Plowman LOCKER served CSA Co. K 15th TX Infantry.

William Carroll LOCKER is my 2nd Great granduncle.
Contact Name:  Linda Cashen Gaunt
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/23/2012
Company M
William Earl Forsyth - Private   
Enrolled at Sumptner, TX. Wounded at Wilderness.
Contact Name:  Sarah Warren
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/21/2014
Company M
Turner E. Hathorn - Unknown   
paroled at appamatox
Contact Name:  Bill Sanders
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  5/15/2004
Company M
James Allen Jones Jr. - Private   
3rd great uncle, grandson of Pvt James Jones (War 1812) and gg grandson of Pvt Christopher Harris Sr. (Revolution).
Contact Name:  David Hampton Bell, SCV322196
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  http://www.genlouishebert.com/honorroll.htm
Date Added:  10/10/2012
Company M
William (Zid) Zedekiah McClain - 1st Sergeant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Stephen Moyers Woodard
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  Givem Tha Cold Steel Boys
Date Added:  1/6/2011
Company M
William Rufus McClain - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Stephen Moyers Woodard
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  Givem Tha Cold Steel Boys
Date Added:  1/7/2011
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